Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 155, Number 11: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

March 13, 2021

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Ministerial Condition No. 20537

Ministerial condition
(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have assessed information pertaining to the substance 1,2-propanediol, 1,2-dibenzoate, Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number 19224-26-1;

And whereas the ministers suspect that the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (the Act),

The Minister of the Environment, pursuant to paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Act, hereby permits the manufacture or import of the substance in accordance with the conditions of the following annex.

Marc D'lorio
Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Conditions

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. The following definitions apply in these ministerial conditions:

"notifier" means the person who has, on October 1, 2020, provided to the Minister of the Environment the prescribed information concerning the substance, in accordance with subsection 81(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999; and

"substance" means 1,2-propanediol, 1,2-dibenzoate, Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number 19224-26-1.

2. The notifier may manufacture or import the substance in accordance with the present ministerial conditions.

Restrictions

3. (1) The notifier may manufacture or import the substance for use in the manufacture of the following products only:

(2) The notifier may import the substance if it is contained in one of the products listed in subsection (1).

Other requirements

4. (1) The notifier shall, prior to transferring the physical possession or control of the substance to any person

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply in relation to any person to whom the substance is transferred when it is contained in any of the products listed in subsection 3(1).

5. The person who signs the written confirmation referred to in paragraph 4(1)(b) must use the substance only in the manufacture of the products referred to in subsection 3(1).

Record-keeping requirements

6. (1) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records, with any documentation supporting the validity of the information contained in these records, indicating

(2) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records mentioned in subsection (1) at their principal place of business in Canada, or at the principal place of business in Canada of their representative, for a period of at least five years after they are made.

Coming into force

7. The present ministerial conditions come into force on February 26, 2021.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of four substances in the Ethers Group specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas DEE, DPE and DPGME are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on DME pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act and on DEE, DPE and DPGME pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action at this time under section 77 of the Act for the three substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Act.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on the remaining substance at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be addressed to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca, or by using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada's Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Kwasi Nyarko
Acting Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of the Ethers Group

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of four substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Ethers Group. Substances in this group were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNsfootnote 1), the Domestic Substances List (DSL) names, the common names and the abbreviations of these substances are listed in the table below.

Substances in the Ethers Group
CAS RN DSL name Common name Abbreviation
60-29-7 Ethane, 1,1'-oxybis- Diethyl ether DEE
101-84-8 Benzene, 1,1'-oxybis- Diphenyl ether DPE
115-10-6 table a1 note a Methane, oxybis- Dimethyl ether DME
34590-94-8 Propanol,
1(or 2)-(2methoxymethylethoxy)-
Dipropylene glycol methyl ether DPGME
Table a1 note(s)
Table a1 note a

This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA but was included in this assessment, as it was considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns.

Return to table a1 note a referrer

DEE, DPE and DME naturally occur at low levels in some foods, but DPGME does not occur naturally in the environment. All four substances in the Ethers Group were included in surveys issued pursuant to section 71 of CEPA. The submitted information indicated that DEE and DPE are not manufactured in Canada above the reporting threshold of 100 kg, while 100 000 to 1 000 000 kg of DME and 10 000 to 100 000 kg of DPGME were manufactured in Canada in 2011. The four substances were also imported into Canada in quantities ranging from 487 199 to 1 287 772 kg. Reported uses are wide-ranging, with most substances being used in air care, the automotive, aircraft and transportation sectors, cleaning and furnishing care, fuels and related products, oil and natural gas extraction, and paints and coatings.

In Canada, the substances in the Ethers Group may also be used as components in food packaging materials, food processing aids, food flavouring agents, medicinal or non-medicinal ingredients in disinfectant, human or veterinary drug products and natural health products, cosmetics, and various other products available to consumers, and as formulants in pest control products.

The ecological risks of the four substances in the Ethers Group were characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC), which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure, with weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web – derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. Based on the outcome of the ERC analysis, substances in the Ethers Group are considered unlikely to be causing ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from DEE, DPE, DME and DPGME. It is proposed to conclude that DEE, DPE, DME and DPGME do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

For the general population of Canada, the predominant sources of exposure to substances in the Ethers Group are from the use of products available to consumers that contain these substances, and from environmental media and food. Scenarios that result in the highest levels of exposure were used to characterize potential exposure of Canadians to substances in the Ethers Group through the use of products available to consumers, and from environmental media and food.

According to the available information, the general population is expected to be exposed to DEE from environmental media and from the use of various products available to consumers such as body lotions, corn and callus removers, and automotive starting fluids. Based on laboratory studies, the most critical effects for DEE were body weight changes, liver toxicity and increased mortality when exposed orally, and liver toxicity when exposed via the inhalation route. A structurally similar substance, diisopropyl ether (DIPE), was also used to inform the health effects assessment of DEE.

Exposure of the general population to DPE is expected from environmental media and potential use as a food flavouring agent, and from the use of various products available to consumers such as air fresheners and hand creams. Based on laboratory studies, changes in body weight were noted as the most critical effects for oral and long-term inhalation exposure to DPE.

Exposure of the general population to DME is expected from environmental media and from the use of various products such as spray sunscreens. Based on laboratory studies, the critical effect for DME was decreased survival rates in rats exposed via long-term inhalation.

Although potential inhalation and dermal exposure to DPGME may occur from the use of products available to consumers, exposure to DPGME is characterized qualitatively, as it is considered to be of low hazard potential. DPGME was not identified as inducing any adverse effects in any of the available studies. A structurally similar substance, propylene glycol methyl ether (PGME), was also used to inform the health effects assessment of DPGME.

Comparisons of levels of exposure to DEE, DPE and DME from environmental media and from the use of products available to consumers, as well as exposure to DPE from food as a result of its potential use as a food flavouring agent, with levels at which health effects occur result in margins that are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases. As DPGME is considered to be of low hazard potential, the risk to human health is considered to be low.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that DEE, DPE, DME and DPGME do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed overall conclusion

It is therefore proposed to conclude that DEE, DPE, DME and DPGME do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of the two substances in the Thiophosphate Alkyl Esters Group — reaction products of 4-methyl-2-pentanol and diphosphorus pentasulfide, propoxylated, esterified with diphosphorous pentaoxide, and salted by amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl (TPAE-1), CAS RNfootnote 1 91745-46-9, and phosphorothioic acid, O,O-dibutyl ester, mixed (C8,C16,C18) alkylamine salt (TPAE-2), CAS RN 93964-99-9footnote 2 and CANfootnote 3 11105-8 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas TPAE-1 and TPAE-2 are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on TPAE-1 and TPAE-2 pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that TPAE-1 meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to recommend to Her Excellency the Governor in Council that TPAE-1 be added to Schedule 1 of the Act;

Notice is furthermore given that the ministers have released a risk management scope document for TPAE-1 to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of risk management options.

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that TPAE-2 does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the ministers propose to take no further action on this substance at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Notice is further given that options are being considered for follow-up activities to track changes in exposure to TPAE-2.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be addressed to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca or by using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada's Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Kwasi Nyarko
Acting Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

Gwen Goodier
Director General
Industrial Sectors and Chemicals Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of the two substances in the Thiophosphate Alkyl Esters Group — TPAE-1 and TPAE-2

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of two substances referred to collectively as the Thiophosphate Alkyl Esters (TPAEs) Group. Substances in this group were identified as priorities for assessment as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) name, or trade name, the Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNs) as well as the Confidential Accession Numbers (CAN) of these substances are listed in the table below.

Substances in the Thiophosphate Alkyl Esters Group
Acronym Substance name CAS RN table a3 note b CAN table a3 note c
TPAE-1 table a3 note a Reaction products of 4-methyl-2-pentanol and diphosphorus pentasulfide, propoxylated, esterified with diphosphorous pentaoxide, and salted by amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl 91745-46-9 11145-3
TPAE-2 table a3 note a Phosphorothioic acid, O,O-dibutyl ester, mixed (C8,C16,C18) alkylamine salt table a3 note d Not available 11105-8

Table a3 note(s)

Table a3 note a

This substance is a UVCB (unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products, or biological materials).

Return to table a3 note a referrer

Table a3 note b

CAS RN = Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number.

Return to table a3 note b referrer

Table a3 note c

CAN = Confidential Accession Number.

Return to table a3 note c referrer

Table a3 note d

This is a trade name; the substance has IUPAC names for each of its two main constituents.

Return to table a3 note d referrer

The two substances described above and addressed in this screening assessment will hereinafter be referred to as TPAE-1 and TPAE-2. It was determined through the confidential substance identity claim review project that the identities of these substances are no longer considered to be confidential business information and are therefore disclosed in this document.

According to information submitted in response to a CEPA section 71 survey, import quantities of 100 000 to 1 000 000 kg for TPAE-1 and 500 kg for TPAE-2 were reported in Canada in 2011. These substances are used in Canada in industrial and automotive lubricants. TPAE-1 is also used in metalworking fluids.

The two substances in this group are composed primarily of alkyl dithiophosphate or thiophosphate anions with primary aliphatic amine counterions. TPAE-1 is the more complex of the two substances, with about 10 major components that include dithiophosphate, thiophosphate and phosphate alkyl ester salts, in addition to a neutral thiophosphate component. With the exception of the neutral component of TPAE-1, all components of these substances are ionized under ambient environmental conditions, and some components, notably the aliphatic amine counterions, have surfactant properties.

The whole-substance empirical ecotoxicity data, as well as ecotoxicity data for aliphatic amines, were used to derive critical toxicity values for the substances in this group. These data indicate that the alkyl (di)thiophosphate ester components and the aliphatic amine components of the TPAEs have high chronic toxicity to aquatic organisms, and the aliphatic amines components have moderate to low chronic toxicity to soil organisms. TPAE-1 was also found to biodegrade very slowly. These substances are expected to persist in the environment long enough to cause chronic toxicity; however, they were not found to be highly bioaccumulative.

Two industrial uses of TPAEs were identified as having the highest potential for releases to the environment: formulation of lubricants and use in metalworking fluids. Environmental concentrations of representative components of TPAE-1 in the aquatic environment associated with releases from these uses, following wastewater treatment, were estimated and compared to predicted no-effect concentrations for aquatic organisms. In addition, the concentration of the aliphatic amine components of TPAE-1 in soils following the application of biosolids from wastewater treatment facilities to soil were estimated and compared to a predicted no-effect concentration for soil organisms. On the basis of these comparisons, TPAE-1 may pose a risk to aquatic and soil organisms from its use in metalworking fluids. TPAE-2 is unlikely to pose a risk to aquatic or soil organisms based on current usage patterns.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a risk of harm to the environment from TPAE-1. It is proposed to conclude that TPAE-1 meets the criteria under paragraph 64(a) of CEPA, as it is entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity. However, it is proposed to conclude that TPAE-1 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(b) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from TPAE-2. It is proposed to conclude that TPAE-2 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

From a human health perspective, TPAE-2 was previously evaluated in the rapid screening of substances with limited general population exposure, which determined that the potential for direct and indirect exposure to the general population was negligible. Therefore, TPAE-2 is considered to be of low concern for human health at current levels of exposure.

No measured data regarding concentrations of TPAE-1 in environmental media were identified in Canada or elsewhere. However, releases to the environment have been estimated for use of the substance in formulation of lubricants and in metalworking fluids. Critical health effects included effects in the adrenal glands and effects on the nervous system. Comparison of estimates of oral exposure through drinking water with levels associated with critical effects in laboratory studies resulted in margins of exposure that were considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in the exposure and health effects databases.

Considering the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that the two substances in the Thiophosphate Alkyl Esters Group do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed overall conclusion

It is therefore proposed to conclude that TPAE-1 meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA and that TPAE-2 does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

It is also proposed to conclude that TPAE-1 meets the persistence criteria but not the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA.

Consideration for follow-up

While exposure of the environment to TPAE-2 is not of concern at current exposure levels, this substance is associated with effects of concern. Therefore, there may be concerns if exposure levels were to increase. Follow-up activities to track changes in exposure or commercial use patterns are under consideration.

Stakeholders are encouraged to provide, during the 60-day public comment period on the draft screening assessment, any information pertaining to TPAE-2 that may help inform the choice of follow-up activity. This could include information on new or planned import, manufacture or use of this substance, if the information has not previously been submitted to the ministers.

The draft screening assessment and the risk management scope document for these substances are available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of results of investigations and recommendations for a substance — piperazine, CAS RN footnote 1 110-85-0 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on piperazine pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on this substance at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be addressed to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca or by using the online reporting system available through the Environment and Climate Change Canada Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Kwasi Nyarko
Acting Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of piperazine

Pursuant to section 68 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of piperazine. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) for piperazine is 110-85-0. This substance was identified as a priority for assessment on the basis of other human health concerns.

Piperazine does not occur naturally in the environment. According to information obtained from a survey issued pursuant to section 71 of CEPA, for the 2008 reporting year, respondents indicated that no company manufactured the substance above the 100 kg reporting threshold. However, between 10 000 and 100 000 kg of piperazine was imported into Canada for commercial use in paints and coatings, and as a chemical intermediate in industrial settings, including use in carbon capture and storage systems. Information obtained from other programs within Health Canada as well as product safety data sheets identified additional uses in Canada, including as a medicinal ingredient in human and veterinary antiparasitic drugs, and as a co-monomer in epoxy adhesives. It is possibly used as a flavouring agent in foods sold in Canada.

The ecological risk of piperazine was characterized using the ecological risk classification (ERC) of organic substances, which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure, with weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web – derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. Based on the outcome of the ERC analysis, piperazine is considered unlikely to be causing ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from piperazine. It is proposed to conclude that piperazine does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Piperazine was not detected in a Canadian indoor air study and no other monitoring data of piperazine in the environment was identified. Piperazine is expected to partition to water if released to the environment and is not expected to be stable in air. Consequently, estimates of piperazine exposure to Canadians from environmental media were calculated based on potential wide-disperse releases to surface water and point source releases to air.

Neurological effects were identified by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and in the European Union risk assessment report as the critical health effect, based on clinical reports and studies of humans receiving piperazine administered as an antiparasitic drug. Piperazine is also classified by the European Chemicals Agency as a reproductive toxicant and a respiratory sensitizer.

Piperazine may be released to the environment (i.e. air and water) when used in industrial applications, including use in carbon capture and storage systems (also referred to as gas scrubbers). Based on a comparison of the estimates of exposure to piperazine from environmental media, and levels at which critical effects are observed, margins are considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases. On the basis of the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) per capita intake estimate for the population of the United States, exposure to Canadians from piperazine and its use as a food flavouring agent is considered negligible and the risk to human health is considered to be low.

Exposures to piperazine for the general population of Canada can occur from its use in epoxy adhesive products available to consumers. Based on a comparison of estimated dermal and inhalation exposures to piperazine with levels at which critical effects are observed, margins are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that piperazine does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed overall conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that piperazine does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

Consideration for follow-up

Although a risk to human health or the environment has not been identified at current levels of exposure, there may be a concern if exposure to this substance were to increase. As a result, program officials may consider this substance in future initiatives to track its commercial status and/or any new uses.

The draft screening assessment for this substance is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Final Residential Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for Acrolein

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of the final Residential Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for Acrolein. These Guidelines are available on Health Canada's air quality website. This document underwent a public consultation period of 60 days in 2020 and was updated to take into consideration the comments received.

March 12, 2021

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Guidelines

The recommended short-term (one hour) exposure limit for acrolein is 38 µg/m3 and the recommended long-term exposure limit is 0.44 µg/m3 (based on a 24-hour average).

Levels of acrolein in a typical Canadian home are likely below the short-term, but above the long-term exposure limits, and accordingly may pose a health risk, specifically related to adverse respiratory effects. It is recommended to reduce exposure to acrolein by ensuring adequate ventilation and controlling indoor sources.

Background

Acrolein is a very reactive and volatile compound, found in both indoor and outdoor air. It is ubiquitous throughout the ambient environment. In 2017, Health Canada established an Indoor Air Reference Level (IARL) for acrolein. IARLs represent concentrations that are associated with acceptable levels of risk after long-term exposure for a specific volatile organic compound (VOC), as determined by the organization or jurisdiction that performed the risk assessment. As levels of acrolein in Canadian homes frequently exceed the IARL, and in order to more fully characterize sources of acrolein in the indoor environment, acrolein was prioritized for a full risk assessment and Residential Indoor Air Quality Guidelines (RIAQG) development.

The RIAQG review the epidemiological, toxicological, and exposure research on acrolein as well as the conclusions from a number of comprehensive reviews from internationally recognized health and environmental organizations. The Guidelines are intended to provide recommended short- and long-term indoor air exposure limits for acrolein, which would minimize risks to human health, and to support the development of actions to limit acrolein emissions. The RIAQG also show that levels in Canadian homes may potentially present a health risk and recommend various risk mitigation measures to reduce exposure to acrolein.

Sources and exposure

Acrolein is ubiquitous in the environment. The primary natural source of acrolein is incomplete combustion of organic matter during forest fires. Acrolein is also generated by the combustion of fuels, for example by motor vehicles (including aircraft), and by industrial processes.

Acrolein levels in residential indoor air are generally greater than outdoor levels. Some of the sources of acrolein in indoor air are smoking, using gas stoves or wood- burning fireplaces, burning incense, cooking with oils, and secondary formation by oxidation of other VOCs from products and building materials.

Due to its reactivity with other chemicals, acrolein is one of the most difficult pollutants to measure in indoor air.

Health effects

Key health effects include eye and respiratory irritation, and tissue damage in the respiratory tract. Sensitized individuals such as asthmatics as well as individuals with chronic pulmonary disease or bronchitis may be more susceptible to the health effects of acrolein exposure. Children, especially those with asthma, may also be more likely to show adverse respiratory effects following exposure to acrolein. Pre-existing nasal allergies can also intensify the response to nasal irritants.

Risk management recommendations

Strategies for reducing indoor exposure to acrolein include

Application of the Guidelines

The RIAQG documents serve as a scientific basis for activities to evaluate and reduce the risk from indoor air pollutants including

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Proposed Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality for 4-Chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic Acid (MCPA)

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of the proposed Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality for 4-Chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic Acid (MCPA). The proposed guideline technical document is available from March 13, 2021, to May 12, 2021, on the Health Canada consultation webpage. Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of Health written comments on the proposed document. Comments must be sent by email to HC.water-eau.SC@canada.ca.

March 13, 2021

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Proposed guideline value

A maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 0.4 mg/L (400 µg/L) is proposed for 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in drinking water.

Executive summary

This guideline technical document was prepared in collaboration with the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water and is based on assessments of MCPA completed by Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency and on supporting documents.

Exposure

MCPA is a phenoxyacetic acid herbicide, registered in Canada for use on agricultural sites, fine turf and lawns, in forestry and at industrial sites. It is among the top 10 pesticides sold in Canada, with more than 1 000 000 kg of MCPA active ingredient sold in 2018, and is used across the country, most extensively in the Prairie Provinces. Herbicide formulations can use various forms of MCPA, including the free acid, salts and esters, but all release the acid as the active ingredient. Canadians may be exposed to MCPA through its presence in drinking water, air and food. Certain segments of the population may be exposed in occupational settings related to pesticide use and application.

Data provided by provinces and territories that monitor for MCPA indicate that levels of MCPA in drinking water are mostly below detection limits.

Health effects

Some studies have been conducted about the impacts of chlorophenoxy herbicides, including MCPA, on human health. However, because the subjects were exposed to several pesticides, as well as to other organic compounds, these studies cannot be used to assess the toxicity of MCPA in humans. The MAC of 0.4 mg/L (400 µg/L) was derived based on kidney effects observed in rats.

MCPA is considered by international agencies as either unclassifiable with respect to carcinogenicity, or not likely to be carcinogenic in humans, based on a lack of evidence of carcinogenicity in animal studies.

Analytical and treatment considerations

The development of drinking water guidelines takes into consideration the ability to both measure the contaminant and remove it from drinking water supplies. Several analytical methods are available for measuring MCPA in water at concentrations well below the proposed MAC. At the municipal level, activated carbon, membrane filtration, oxidation, advanced oxidation processes and biological filtration achieved a wide range of removal efficiencies. Although MCPA may be removed using oxidation, water utilities should be aware of the potential for formation of degradation by-products. Pilot- and/or bench-scale testing are recommended prior to full-scale implementation.

For MCPA removal at a small system or household level, in the case of drinking water from a private well, for example, a residential drinking water treatment unit may be an option. Although there are no treatment units currently certified for the removal of MCPA from drinking water, technologies that are expected to be effective include adsorption (activated carbon) and reverse osmosis. When using such a treatment unit, it is important to send samples of water entering and leaving the treatment unit to an accredited laboratory for analysis to ensure that adequate MCPA removal is occurring.

Routine operation and maintenance of treatment units, including replacement of the filter components, should be conducted according to manufacturer specifications.

Application of the guidelines

Note: Specific guidance related to the implementation of drinking water guidelines should be obtained from the appropriate drinking water authority.

The proposed guidelines are protective against health effects from exposure to MCPA in drinking water over a lifetime. Any exceedance of the proposed MAC should be investigated and followed by the appropriate corrective actions, if required. For exceedances in source water where there is no treatment in place, additional monitoring to confirm the exceedance should be conducted. If it is confirmed that source water MCPA concentrations are above the proposed MAC, then an investigation to determine the most appropriate way to reduce exposure to MCPA should be conducted. This may include use of an alternate water supply or installation of a treatment device. Where a treatment device is already in place and an exceedance occurs, an investigation should be conducted to verify the treatment method and determine if adjustments are needed to lower the treated water concentration below the proposed MAC.

International considerations

Other national and international organizations have their own drinking water guidelines, standards and/or guidance values for MCPA in drinking water. Variations in these values among jurisdictions can be attributed to the age of the assessments or to differing policies and approaches, including the choice of key study and the use of different consumption rates, body weights, and source allocation factors.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) does not have a maximum contaminant level (MCL) for MCPA in drinking water (the MCL is the equivalent of the MAC). The U.S. EPA has established a non-enforceable lifetime health advisory of 0.03 mg/L (30 µg/L) for the substance. Health advisories serve as the informal technical guidance about unregulated drinking water contaminants in the United States. The World Health Organization has developed a health-based value of 0.7 mg/L (700 µg/L) for MCPA, but has indicated that a guideline is unnecessary, since the substance usually occurs in drinking water sources or drinking water at concentrations well below those of health concern.

The European Union does not have a specific parametric value for individual pesticides. Instead, the EU uses a value of 0.1 µg/L for any individual (single) pesticide, and a value of 0.5 µg/L for total pesticides found in drinking water. In establishing these values, the EU did not consider the science related to each pesticide, including health effects. Instead, the values are based on a policy decision to keep pesticides out of drinking water.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANNABIS ACT

Cannabis Fees Order: Increase to fees set out in sections 3, 4 and 5

The Cannabis Fees Order (SOR/2018-198) was published in the Canada Gazette, Part II, on October 17, 2018, and came into force on the same date.

Section 2 of the Order provides that "the fees set out in sections 3 to 5 are to be adjusted in each fiscal year on April 1 by the percentage change over 12 months in the April All-items Consumer Price Index for Canada, as published by Statistics Canada under the Statistics Act, for the previous fiscal year and rounded to the next highest dollar."

Notice is hereby given that the following fees will be adjusted effective April 1, 2021, by the 2020 Consumer Price Index of -0.2%.

Fee Description Current fee Adjusted fee effective
April 1, 2021
Screening of a licence application
  • Licence for micro-cultivation
$1,709 $1,706
  • Licence for standard cultivation
$3,417 $3,411
  • Licence for a nursery
$1,709 $1,706
  • Licence for micro-processing
$1,709 $1,706
  • Licence for standard processing
$3,417 $3,411
  • Licence for sale for medical purposes
$3,417 $3,411
Application for security clearance $1,725 $1,722
Application for import or export permit $637 $636

John Clare
Director General
Strategic Policy Directorate
Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Decisions and orders on claims for exemption

A supplier can file a claim for exemption with Health Canada under the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act (HMIRA) from having to disclose information, under the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) and Hazardous Products Regulations (HPR), that they consider to be confidential business information (CBI) on a safety data sheet (SDS) or label associated with a hazardous product.

An employer can also file a claim for exemption under the HMIRA with Health Canada from having to disclose information, under the Canada Labour Code or the provisions of the Accord Act, that they consider to be CBI on an SDS or label associated with a hazardous product.

Notice is hereby given of the decisions and orders on the validity of each claim for exemption, as well as the compliance of the relevant SDS and label (where applicable) with the HPA and the HPR. The details related to decisions that were found to be valid and the corrective measures that have been implemented voluntarily will not be published. Should a claimant, the general public, or anyone involved in the use or supply of hazardous products in the workplace wish to review or have concerns about a specific product, the corrective measures for the claim will be made available (in the official language of preference) upon request by contacting the Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau by email at hc.whmis.claim-demande.simdut.sc@canada.ca.

However, information on orders issued and the associated non-compliances are provided in the tables contained in this notice (where applicable).

Lynn Berndt-Weis
Director
Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau
Consumer and Hazardous Products Safety Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch

On March 18, 2020, the HMIRA was amended. Certain requirements were changed and provisions were updated to reflect the new HMIRA. The appeals process under the HMIRA has been removed and the related Hazardous Materials Information Review Act Appeal Board Procedures Regulations were repealed. Note that the provisions referenced in this publication refer to the previous HMIRA, as all decisions were issued prior to the coming into force of the new provisions.

The claimant name on which a decision was issued for the following claim is different from the claimant name that was published in the Notice of Filing.

Registry number Notice of Filing publication date Original claimant name New claimant name
10838 2017-01-28 Nalco Canada ULC ChampionX Canada ULC

The subject of the claim on which a decision was issued for the following claims is different from the subject of the claim that was published in the Notice of Filing.

Registry number Notice of Filing publication date Original subject of the claim Revised subject of the claim
9651 2015-11-07 C.i. of two ingredients
C. of seven ingredients
C.i. of two ingredients
C. of six ingredients
10609 2016-12-31 C.i. and C. of one ingredient
C. of one ingredient
C.i. of one ingredient
10838 2017-01-28 C.i. and C. of two ingredients
C. of one ingredient
C.i. of two ingredients

Note: C.i. = chemical identity and C. = concentration

Claims for exemption that are found to be valid and for which all corrective measures were implemented voluntarily

Each of the claims for exemption listed in the table below was found to be valid. This decision was based on the review of the information in support of the claim, having regard exclusively to the criteria found in section 3 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Regulations. Furthermore, based on the information elements reviewed by Health Canada, non-compliances with the provisions of the HPA and the HPR were identified for the SDS or label associated with the claim for exemption. The claimant was given an opportunity to address these non-compliances and all the corrective measures were implemented voluntarily.

Registry number Claimant Product identifier Date of decision Date of compliance
9651 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Sludge and Emulsion Preventer W60 2019-10-21 2021-01-28
11587 Q2 Technologies, LLC EnviroSolve ProM 2020-01-06 2021-01-07
11590 Q2 Technologies, LLC EnviroSolve Pro3 2020-01-08 2021-01-07
10609 Nalco Canada ULC EC3081A PROCESS ANTIFOULANT 2020-01-29 2021-01-05
9993 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Scale Inhibitor L074 2019-12-09 2021-01-28
12121 SUEZ Water Technologies & Solutions Canada THERMOFLO 7051 2020-01-06 2021-01-05
10838 ChampionX Canada ULC CFS100 2020-01-08 2021-01-06

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA SHIPPING ACT, 2001

Interim Order No. 3 Restricting Pleasure Craft Navigation Due to COVID-19

Whereas the Minister of Transport believes that the annexed Interim Order No. 3 Restricting Pleasure Craft Navigation Due to COVID-19 is required to deal with a direct or indirect risk to marine safety or to the marine environment;

And whereas the provisions of the annexed Interim Order may be contained in a regulation made pursuant to subsection 120(1)footnote a and paragraphs 136(1)(f)footnote b and (h)footnote b and 244(f)footnote c of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001footnote d;

Therefore, the Minister of Transport, pursuant to section 10.1footnote e of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 footnote d, makes the annexed Interim Order No. 3 Restricting Pleasure Craft Navigation Due to COVID-19.

Ottawa, March 1, 2021

Omar Alghabra
Minister of Transport

Interim Order No. 3 Restricting Pleasure Craft Navigation Due to COVID-19

Definitions

Definitions

1 The following definitions apply in this Interim Order.

arctic waters
means
  • (a) the Canadian waters located north of the 60th parallel of north latitude; and
  • (b) the territorial sea of Canada in the vicinity of Nunatsiavut, Nunavik and the Labrador coast. (eaux arctiques)
COVID-19
means the coronavirus disease 2019. (COVID-19)
foreign pleasure craft
means a pleasure craft in respect of which a registration number, licence or other document has been issued, under the laws of a foreign state, granting it the right to fly the flag of that state, or that otherwise has the right to fly the flag of a foreign state. (embarcation de plaisance étrangère)
Minister
means the Minister of Transport. (ministre)

Overview

Purpose

2 This Interim Order temporarily restricts the operation of pleasure craft in certain arctic waters to promote the safe navigation of vessels by ensuring that limited marine assets and personnel are available for critical marine resupply operations in the Arctic during the COVID-19 pandemic. It also protects the public interest by protecting health care infrastructure in the Arctic.

Prohibition

Prohibition — general

3 (1) A person must not operate a pleasure craft in arctic waters other than lakes and rivers.

Prohibition — owner

(2) The owner of a pleasure craft must not allow another person to operate the pleasure craft in arctic waters other than lakes and rivers.

Exceptions — general

(3) Subsection (1) does not apply to a person that is

Exceptions — owner

(4) Subsection (2) does not apply to an owner who allows another person to operate a pleasure craft in any of the situations set out in subsection (3).

Non-Application

Use by local communities

4 This Interim Order does not apply in respect of pleasure craft used by local communities.

Foreign Pleasure Craft

Obligation to give notice

5 (1) At least 60 days before the expected date of arrival in arctic waters, other than lakes and rivers, of a foreign pleasure craft described in paragraph 3(3)(c), the operator must give written notice to the Minister of the arrival of the pleasure craft in those waters.

Conditions

(2) The Minister may impose any conditions that the Minister considers appropriate in respect of a foreign pleasure craft for which notice has been given.

Responsibility of operator

(3) The operator must ensure that all persons on board the foreign pleasure craft comply with any conditions that the Minister imposes.

Ministerial Exemptions

Canada's international obligations and external affairs

6 (1) The Minister may, in writing, exempt a person from any of the prohibitions set out in this Interim Order if

Recreational boaters

(2) The Minister may, in writing, exempt a person from any of the prohibitions set out in this Interim Order if

Application for exemption

(3) A person may apply to the Minister for an exemption under subsection (1) or (2).

Conditions of exemption

(4) An exemption is subject to any conditions that the Minister considers appropriate.

Amending conditions

(5) The Minister may add, amend or remove conditions if the Minister determines that it is necessary to do so for public health or safety or the protection of the marine environment.

Exemption on board

(6) A person to whom an exemption has been granted must keep that exemption on board a pleasure craft while they are using it.

Suspension or revocation

(7) The Minister may suspend or revoke an exemption if

Notice

(8) If the Minister suspends or revokes an exemption, the Minister must give notice in writing to the person to whom the exemption had been granted.

Publication — Canada Gazette

(9) Notice of every exemption granted under subsection (1) or (2) must be published in the Canada Gazette.

Enforcement

Persons ensuring compliance

7 (1) The following persons are authorized to ensure compliance with this Interim Order:

Powers and duties

(2) An authorized person may

Obligation to comply

8 A person must comply with any prohibition, direction or requirement referred to in subsection 7(2).

Violations

Violations

9 (1) A person that contravenes this Interim Order commits a violation and is liable to a penalty in the amount of

Continued violation

(2) A violation referred to in subsection (1) constitutes a separate violation for each day on which it is continued.

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA SHIPPING ACT, 2001

Interim Order No. 5 Respecting Passenger Vessel Restrictions Due to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Whereas the Minister of Transport believes that the annexed Interim Order No. 5 Respecting Passenger Vessel Restrictions Due to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is required to deal with a direct or indirect risk to marine safety or to the marine environment;

And whereas the provisions of the annexed Interim Order may be contained in a regulation made pursuant to subsection 120(1)footnote a and paragraphs 136(1)(f)footnote b and (h)footnote b and 244(f)footnote c of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001footnote d;

Therefore, the Minister of Transport, pursuant to subsection 10.1(1)footnote e of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 footnote d, makes the annexed Interim Order No. 5 Respecting Passenger Vessel Restrictions Due to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Ottawa, March 1, 2021

Omar Alghabra
Minister of Transport

Interim Order No. 5 Respecting Passenger Vessel Restrictions Due to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Definitions

Definitions

1 The following definitions apply in this Interim Order.

arctic waters
means
  • (a) the Canadian waters located north of the 60th parallel of north latitude; and
  • (b) the territorial sea of Canada in the vicinity of Nunatsiavut, Nunavik and the Labrador coast. (eaux arctiques)
COVID-19
means the coronavirus disease 2019. (COVID-19)
ferry vessel
means any vessel, having provision for deck passengers and for vehicles, that is operated on a short run on a schedule between two points over the most direct water route and offers a public service of a type normally attributed to a bridge or tunnel. (transbordeur)
Minister
means the Minister of Transport. (ministre)
passenger vessel
means a vessel, other than a ferry vessel, that is certified to carry more than 12 passengers as indicated on its inspection certificate or Passenger Ship Safety Certificate issued under the Vessel Certificates Regulations or on an equivalent certificate issued by a foreign government. (bâtiment à passagers)
passenger vessel that provides essential services
means a passenger vessel that is set out in the schedule. (bâtiment à passagers exploité pour fournir des services essentiels)

Application

Application

2 This Interim Order applies to passenger vessels and ferry vessels.

Prohibition

Prohibition — Canadian waters other than arctic waters

3 It is prohibited to navigate, moor, anchor or berth in Canadian waters, other than arctic waters, if

Prohibition — arctic waters

4 It is prohibited for a passenger vessel to enter arctic waters from any other waters.

Exceptions

5 (1) Sections 3 and 4 do not apply to

Foreign vessels in certain waters

(2) Despite section 3, a foreign vessel may, in the Great Lakes, the Inside Passage, the St. Lawrence River, the Gulf of St. Lawrence or the St. Lawrence Seaway

Incidental activities

(3) For the purposes of paragraph (2)(b), mooring, anchoring or berthing is not an activity that is incidental to the passage if it is a technical stop. A technical stop includes embarkation, disembarkation, refuelling, resupplying, and restocking.

Passenger Vessels that Provide Essential Services and Ferry Vessels

Permission

6 (1) Sections 3 and 4 do not apply to a passenger vessel that provides essential services if

Notice to the Minister

(2) The authorized representative of a vessel that implements measures in accordance with paragraph (1)(b) must notify the Minister, in writing, of the measures before implementing them and must keep a copy of the notice on board.

Guidelines

7 The authorized representative and master of a passenger vessel that provides essential services must make reasonable efforts to implement and put in place the measures contained in the guidelines that are set out in the document entitled COVID-19: Guidance Material for Passenger Vessel and Ferry Operators published on April 17, 2020 by the Marine Safety Directorate of Transport Canada, as amended from time to time.

Ferry vessels

8 The authorized representative and master of a ferry vessel must ensure that at least one of the requirements set out in section 6 is met and comply with the requirement set out in section 7.

Arctic Waters

Foreign vessels in arctic waters

9 (1) At least 60 days before the expected date of arrival in arctic waters of a vessel referred to in paragraph 5(1)(e), the master of the vessel must give written notice to the Minister of the arrival of the vessel in those waters.

Conditions

(2) The Minister may impose, in respect of a vessel for which notice has been given, any conditions that the Minister considers appropriate.

Responsibility of master

(3) The master must ensure that the vessel and its crew comply with any conditions that the Minister imposes.

Prohibition — Authorized Representative and Master

Prohibition

10 The authorized representative and master of a passenger vessel must not permit the vessel to contravene any of the restrictions or prohibitions set out in this Interim Order.

Ministerial Exemptions

Canada's international obligations and external affairs

11 The Minister may, in writing, exempt a passenger vessel from any of the restrictions or prohibitions set out in this Interim Order if

Repair

12 (1) The Minister may, in writing, exempt a passenger vessel from any of the restrictions or prohibitions set out in this Interim Order if

60 days' notice

(2) At least 60 days before the expected date of arrival of the vessel in Canadian waters, the master must give written notice to the Minister of the arrival of the vessel in those waters.

Passenger vessels

13 (1) The Minister may, in writing, exempt a passenger vessel from any of the restrictions or prohibitions set out in this Interim Order if

60 days' notice

(2) At least 60 days before the expected date of arrival of the vessel in Canadian waters, the master must give written notice to the Minister of the arrival of the vessel in those waters.

Application for exemption

14 (1) An authorized representative of a passenger vessel may apply to the Minister for an exemption under any of sections 11 to 13.

Conditions of exemption

(2) An exemption is subject to any conditions that the Minister considers appropriate.

Amending conditions

(3) The Minister may add, amend or remove conditions if the Minister determines that it is necessary to do so for the purposes of navigation safety, public health and safety or protection of the marine environment.

Exemption on board

(4) The exemption must be kept on board the vessel.

Suspension or revocation

(5) The Minister may suspend or revoke an exemption if

Notice

(6) The Minister must give notice, in writing, of the suspension or revocation to the authorized representative of the vessel.

Publication — Canada Gazette

(7) Notice of every exemption issued under this Interim Order must be published in the Canada Gazette.

Enforcement

Persons ensuring compliance

15 (1) The following persons are authorized to ensure compliance with this Interim Order:

Powers and duties

(2) A person who is authorized to ensure compliance with this Interim Order may

Obligation to comply

16 A person or vessel must comply with any direction given to them or a requirement or prohibition imposed on them under subsection 15(2).

SCHEDULE

(Section 1)

Passenger Vessels That Provide Essential Services
Item Vessels
1 A vessel operating to protect public health or safety or the marine environment including a vessel that is involved in
  • (a) search and rescue operations; or
  • (b) emergency or environmental response.
2 A vessel that supports the activities of any of the following at their request:
  • (a) the Minister;
  • (b) the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans;
  • (c) a member of the Canadian Coast Guard; or
  • (d) a peace officer in the performance of their duties.
3 A vessel that operates when it is the most practical means to
  • (a) give passengers access to their domicile or residence or their place of employment;
  • (b) give passengers access to essential goods and services, including
    • (i) goods or services directly related to the response to COVID-19, including medical equipment, testing and laboratory services,
    • (ii) essential health services, including primary health care services and pharmacies, and
    • (iii) food, potable water, pharmaceuticals and fuel;
  • (c) transport cargo to resupply communities, businesses or industry; or
  • (d) give passengers access to services that are declared to be essential services by the Government of Canada, a provincial government, a local authority or a government, council or other entity authorized to act on behalf of an Indigenous group.

GLOBAL AFFAIRS CANADA

Consulting Canadians on future trade negotiations with the United Kingdom

The Government of Canada is committed to diversifying its trade and investment ties with key markets, strengthening the rules-based international trading system, and pursuing inclusive trade. The Government of Canada is soliciting the views of Canadians on possible bilateral trade agreement negotiations with the United Kingdom (U.K.), as well as on the United Kingdom's request to join the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP).

As steps are taken to ensure that more Canadians have access to the benefits and opportunities that flow from international trade and investment, traditionally under-represented groups, such as women, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), Indigenous peoples and racialized communities, are encouraged to give their input.

Background

Canada's commercial relationship with the United Kingdom

Canada and the United Kingdom have historically enjoyed mutually advantageous commercial relations. In 2019, the United Kingdom was Canada's third-largest destination for merchandise exports worldwide. Two-way merchandise trade amounted to $29 billion, making it Canada's fifth-largest trading partner. Bilateral trade in services totalled $14.5 billion, making the United Kingdom Canada's second-largest services trading partner. The United Kingdom is also Canada's fourth most important source of foreign direct investment (FDI) [FDI stock valued at $62.3 billion] and second-largest destination for Canadian direct investment abroad ($107.0 billion). Approximately 600 Canadian companies own over 1 100 subsidiaries in the United Kingdom.

Bilateral free trade agreement negotiations with the United Kingdom

On December 9, 2020, Canada and the United Kingdom concluded a Trade Continuity Agreement (the Canada-U.K. TCA). The TCA substantively replicates the provisions of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement to support near-term continuity in the Canada-U.K. trade relationship now that the United Kingdom has left the European Union (Brexit). The agreement provides stability and predictability for businesses and workers in both countries. As the TCA is meant to be an interim measure, Canada and the United Kingdom have also committed to enter into subsequent negotiations within one year of its entry into force, and to work on a new, ambitious, inclusive and comprehensive free trade agreement — one that would include a focus on SMEs, women, the environment and digital trade, and, most importantly, would focus on serving the interests of Canadians.

CPTPP

On February 1, 2021, the United Kingdom submitted a formal Notification of Intent to accede to the CPTPP. The United Kingdom is the first economy to submit a formal accession application since the CPTPP's entry into force. Should CPTPP Parties decide by consensus to proceed with the accession process, the United Kingdom will be expected to meet the Agreement's high-standard rules and ambitious market access commitments. Combined, the eleven CPTPP members form a trading bloc representing 509 million consumers and 12.9% of global gross domestic product (GDP). The CPTPP is currently in force for Canada, Australia, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore and Vietnam. It will enter into force for the remaining signatories (Brunei, Chile, Malaysia and Peru) 60 days after completion of their respective domestic ratification procedures.

Submissions

More information on the Government's consultations on possible future trade negotiations with the United Kingdom can be found on the Join the discussion: Free Trade Agreement negotiations with the United Kingdom and its possible accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership web page.

Interested parties are invited to submit their views on both initiatives with the United Kingdom by April 27, 2021. Please be advised that any information received as part of this consultation will be considered as public information, unless explicitly requested otherwise.

Submissions should include the following information:

  1. the contributor's name and address and, if applicable, the name of the contributor's organization, institution or business;
  2. the specific issues being addressed; and
  3. where possible, precise information on the rationale for the positions taken, including any significant impact it may have on Canada's domestic or international interests.

Contributions can be sent to

Canada-U.K. Trade Consultations
Global Affairs Canada
Trade Negotiations Division (TCA)
125 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0G2
Email: consultations@international.gc.ca

Submissions by interested parties

The following are examples of areas where the Government would appreciate receiving views from Canadians.

Trade and investment interests

Other topics of interest for Canadians

GLOBAL AFFAIRS CANADA

Notice of intent to conduct impact assessments, including an initial environmental assessment and gender-based analysis plus, on possible future bilateral trade negotiations with the United Kingdom

On March 13, 2021, the Government of Canada launched public consultations to seek the views of Canadians on possible bilateral trade agreement negotiations between Canada and the United Kingdom.

In parallel, the Government is seeking the views of Canadians on the potential impacts and opportunities that a Canada – United Kingdom bilateral trade agreement may have with respect to the environment — including greenhouse gas emissions — through an initial environmental assessment (EA). The Government will also examine gender and other diversity considerations through a gender-based analysis plus (GBA+). For more information on GBA+ of trade policy and trade agreements, please review the overview.

In accordance with the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, Global Affairs Canada conducts EAs for all trade and investment negotiations using a process that requires interdepartmental coordination and public consultation. The objectives of the EA of a trade agreement are

The Government will also conduct an economic impact assessment (EIA) of a possible Canada – United Kingdom bilateral trade agreement. Findings from the EIA, which includes assessing the expected impact of a possible bilateral trade agreement on the Canadian labour market, are used to inform both the EA and GBA+.

Public consultations are an important part of this process, and they help to inform the initial impact assessments of a possible Canada – United Kingdom bilateral trade agreement negotiation. Once negotiations conclude, and prior to the ratification of an agreement, a final economic impact assessment, final EA and final GBA+ will be undertaken to assess the potential impacts of the negotiated outcome on the environment, labour, gender and inclusivity.

The Government of Canada is seeking the views of industry stakeholders, non-governmental organizations, Indigenous peoples, and all interested Canadian citizens. Interested parties are invited to submit their views by April 27, 2021. Please be advised that any information received as a result of this consultation will be considered as public information, unless explicitly specified otherwise.

Submissions should include the following information:

  1. the contributor's name and address and, if applicable, the name of the contributor's organization, institution or business;
  2. the specific issues being addressed; and
  3. where possible, precise information on the rationale for the positions taken, including any significant impact it may have on Canada's domestic or international interests.

Contributions can be sent to

Canada – U.K. Trade Consultations
Global Affairs Canada
Trade Negotiations Division (TCE)
Lester B. Pearson Building
125 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0G2
Email: consultations@international.gc.ca

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada's diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one's dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one's full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council appointments website.

Governor in Council appointment opportunities
Position Organization Closing date
Member Atlantic Pilotage Authority Canada  
Commissioner British Columbia Treaty Commission  
Member Buffalo and Fort Erie Public Bridge Authority  
Director Business Development Bank of Canada  
President and Chief Executive Officer Business Development Bank of Canada  
President and Chief Executive Officer Canada Development Investment Corporation  
Commissioner for Employers Canada Employment Insurance Commission  
Director Canada Infrastructure Bank  
President and Chief Executive Officer Canada Lands Company Limited  
Director Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation  
President Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation  
Member of the Board of Directors Canada Post  
Member Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board  
Director Canadian Energy Regulator  
Federal Housing Advocate Canadian Human Rights Commission  
Member Canadian Human Rights Tribunal  
Member Canadian Institutes of Health Research  
Chairperson Canadian Museum of History  
Director Canadian Museum of History  
Chairperson Canadian Transportation Agency  
Temporary Member Canadian Transportation Agency  
Director Farm Credit Canada  
Chairperson Federal Public Sector Labour Relations and Employment Board  
Vice-Chairperson Federal Public Sector Labour Relations and Employment Board  
Director Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation  
Member Great Lakes Pilotage Authority Canada  
Director
(Federal)
Hamilton-Oshawa Port Authority  
Member, Yukon Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada  
Assistant Deputy Chairperson Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada  
Member
(appointment to roster)
International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies  
Chairperson Laurentian Pilotage Authority Canada  
Director Marine Atlantic Inc.  
Chairperson Military Police Complaints Commission of Canada  
Member Military Police Complaints Commission of Canada  
Member National Arts Centre Corporation  
Member National Seniors Council  
Member Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada  
Commissioner and Director Office of the Commissioner of Indigenous Languages  
Superintendent Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions Canada  
Member Payments in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel  
Director Public Sector Pension Investment Board  
Commissioner Roosevelt Campobello International Park Commission  
Member Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada  
Chairperson Standards Council of Canada  
Registrar Supreme Court of Canada  
Member Telefilm Canada  
Director
(Federal)
Toronto Port Authority  
Chairperson and Member Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada  
Member Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada  
Vice-Chairperson Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada  
Director
(Federal)
Trois-Rivières Port Authority  

TREASURY BOARD SECRETARIAT

PUBLIC SERVICE SUPERANNUATION REGULATIONS
CANADIAN FORCES SUPERANNUATION REGULATIONS
ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE SUPERANNUATION REGULATIONS

Quarterly rates

In accordance with subsection 46(3) of the Public Service Superannuation Regulations, subsection 36(3) of the Canadian Forces Superannuation Regulations and subsection 30(3) of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Regulations, the quarterly rates used for calculating interest for the purpose of subsection (1) of each of the corresponding sections are as follows:

As of:

Jean-Yves Duclos
President

BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at January 31, 2021

(Millions of dollars)

Unaudited

ASSETS Amount Total
Cash and foreign deposits   7.1
Loans and receivables
Securities purchased under resale agreements 153,453.1  
Advances to members of Payments Canada 0.0  
Other receivables 10.5  
    153,463.6
Investments
Government of Canada treasury bills 48,350.7  
Government of Canada bonds — carried at amortized cost 108,349.6  
Government of Canada bonds — carried at fair value through profit and loss 214,235.9  
Canada Mortgage Bonds 9,668.6  
Other bonds 15,987.4  
Securities lent or sold under repurchase agreements 7,252.0  
Other securities 2,755.0  
Shares in the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) 496.3  
    407,095.5
Derivatives — Indemnity agreements with the Government of Canada   1,543.1
Capital assets
Property and equipment 564.7  
Intangible assets 84.3  
Right-of-use leased assets 45.0
    694.0
Other assets   47.0
Total assets   562,850.2
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY Amount Total
Bank notes in circulation   104,585.6
Deposits
Government of Canada 70,752.4  
Members of Payments Canada 370,151.1  
Other deposits 8,816.1  
    449,719.6
Securities sold under repurchase agreements   6,563.4
Derivatives — Indemnity agreements with the Government of Canada   0.0
Other liabilities   1,393.3
    562,261.9
Equity
Share capital 5.0  
Statutory and special reserves 125.0  
Investment revaluation reserve 458.2  
    588.2
Total Liabilities and Equity 562,850.2

I declare that the foregoing statement is correct according to the books f the Bank.

Ottawa, February 17, 2021

Coralia Bulhoes
Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accountant

I declare that the foregoing statement is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, February 17, 2021

Tiff Macklem
Governor