Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 152, Number 44: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

November 3, 2018

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Notice of intent to amend the Domestic Substances List under subsection 87(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to indicate that subsection 81(3) of that Act applies to the two substances set out in this Notice

Whereas the two substances set out in this Notice are specified on the Domestic Substances List; footnote 1

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have conducted a screening assessment of the two substances set out in this Notice under section 68 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 footnote 2 and on November 3, 2018, released a summary of the results of this process, for a 60-day public comment period in the Canada Gazette, Part I;

And whereas the ministers suspect that the information concerning a significant new activity in relation to any of these substances may contribute to determining the circumstances in which the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Therefore, notice is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment intends to amend the Domestic Substances List pursuant to subsection 87(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to indicate that subsection 81(3) of that Act applies to any significant new activities relating to the two substances, as set out in this Notice.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days of publication of this Notice, file with the Minister of the Environment comments with respect to this proposal. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this Notice. Comments may be sent using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada's Single Window, by mail to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

The final screening assessment document for the substance may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this Notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Kevin Cash
Acting Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

1. Part 1 of the Domestic Substances List is proposed to be amended by deleting the following:

2. Part 2 of the List is proposed to be amended by adding the following:

Column 1

Substance

Column 2

Significant New Activity for which the substance is subject to subsection 81(3) of the Act

111-96-6 S′

112-49-2 S′

  1. In relation to any substance in Column 1:
    • (a) the use of the substance in the manufacture of any of the following products containing the substance at a concentration equal to or greater than 0.1% by weight:
      • (i) a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies,
      • (ii) a natural health product as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations, or
      • (iii) a cosmetic, within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act;
    • (b) any activity involving the use of the substance in the following products, containing the substance at a concentration equal to or greater than 0.1% by weight, if the total quantity of the substance involved in the activity, during any one calendar year is greater than 10 kg:
      • (i) a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies,
      • (ii) a natural health product as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations, or
      • (iii) a cosmetic, within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.
  2. Despite items 1(a) and (b), the use of the substance as a research and development substance or as a site-limited intermediate substance as these expressions are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers), or as an export-only substance is not a significant new activity.
  3. For each proposed significant new activity, the following information must be provided to the Minister at least 90 days before the commencement of the proposed new activity:
    • (a) a description of the significant new activity in relation to the substance;
    • (b) the anticipated annual quantity of the substance to be used in relation to the significant new activity;
    • (c) the information specified in items 3 to 6 and paragraphs 7(a) and (b) of Schedule 4 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);
    • (d) the information specified in paragraphs 2(d) to (f) and 8(f) and (g) of Schedule 5 to those Regulations;
    • (e) a description of the consumer product, natural health product, or cosmetic that contains the substance, the concentration of the substance in the consumer product, natural health product, or cosmetic, the intended use of that consumer product, natural health product, or cosmetic and the function of the substance in that consumer product, natural health product, or cosmetic;
    • (f) a description of how the consumer product, natural health product, or cosmetic is intended to be used or applied;
    • (g) the total quantity of the consumer product, natural health product, or cosmetic expected to be sold in Canada in a calendar year by the person undertaking the significant new activity;
    • (h) a summary of all other information and test data in respect of the substance that are in the possession of the person proposing the significant new activity, or to which they may reasonably be expected to have access, and that permit the identification of hazards to the environment and human health and the degree of environmental and public exposure to the substance;
    • (i) the identification of every other government agency, either outside or within Canada, that the person proposing the significant new activity has notified of the substance and, if known, the agency's file number, the outcome of the assessment and the risk management actions in relation to the substance imposed by those agencies;
    • (j) the name, civic and postal addresses, telephone number and, if any, the fax number and email address of the person proposing the significant new activity and, if they are not resident in Canada, of the person resident in Canada that is authorized to act on their behalf; and
    • (k) a certification that the information is accurate and complete, dated and signed by the person proposing the significant new activity if they are resident in Canada or, if not, by the person resident in Canada that is authorized to act on their behalf.
  4. The above information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister.

Coming into Force

3. This Order would come into force on the day on which it is registered.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Notice of Intent.)

Description

The Notice of Intent (NOI) is an opportunity for the public to comment on the proposed amendments to the Domestic Substances List (DSL) to apply the significant new activity (SNAc) provisions of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 footnote 3 (CEPA) to ethane, 1,1′-oxybis[2-methoxy- (also known as diglyme, Chemical Abstract Service [CAS] Registry No. 111-96-6;), and 2,5,8,11-tetraoxadodecane (also known as triglyme, Chemical Abstract Service [CAS] Registry No. 112-49-2), pursuant to subsection 87(3) of that Act.

Within 60 days of publication of the NOI, any person may submit comments to the Minister of the Environment. These comments will be taken into consideration during the development of the Order amending the DSL to apply the SNAc provisions to these two substances.

A number of other SNAc instruments are to be published in the near future that will also target consumer products. As a result, stakeholder input provided in response to the consumer product language proposed in this NOI may not be reflected in upcoming NOIs due to publication timelines. However, the input will be taken into consideration during the development of all related notices and orders that pertain to consumer products.

The DSL amendments are not in force until the Order is adopted by the Minister pursuant to subsection 87(3) of CEPA. The Order must be published in the Canada Gazette, Part II.

Information gathering mechanisms other than the SNAc provisions of CEPA were considered, including the publication of a notice under section 71 of CEPA. However, these mechanisms would require the information after the substance is used, which could potentially lead to risk levels of concern for human health.

Applicability of the proposed Order

It is proposed that the Order amending the DSL would require any person (individual or corporation) engaging in a significant new activity in relation to diglyme, or triglyme to submit a Significant New Activity Notification (SNAN) containing all of the information prescribed in the Order at least 90 days prior to the import, manufacture or use of the substance for the significant new activity.

In order to address human health concerns, the Order would target the use of the substance in consumer products to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) applies, in natural health products, as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations, and in cosmetics, as these are defined in section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act (FDA). Consumer products, natural health products, and cosmetics are potential sources of direct and significant human exposure to these substances. For the manufacture of such products, notification would be required when the concentration of the substance in the product being manufactured with the substance is greater than 0.1% (w/w).

For any other activities related to consumer products, natural health products, and cosmetics, notification would be required when the substance is present in the product in a concentration equal to or greater than 0.1% by weight and the total quantity of the substance involved in the activity during a calendar year is greater than 10 kg.

Activities not subject to the proposed Order

Activities involving the use of either diglyme or triglyme in the manufacture of consumer products, natural health products, or cosmetics that contain the substance at a concentration less than 0.1% (w/w) would be excluded from the application of the proposed Order. Similarly, any other activity involving the use of the substance in a consumer product, natural health product, or a cosmetic would not be subject to the Order if the total quantity of the substance used is 10 kg or less in a calendar year. For activities involving more than 10 kg of the substance in a calendar year, the Order would not apply if the concentration of the substance in the consumer product, natural health product, or cosmetic involved in the activity is less than 0.1% (w/w). Any activity not related to consumer products, natural health products, or cosmetics would be excluded from the application of the Order.

In addition, activities involving the use of either diglyme or triglyme as a research and development substance, a site-limited intermediate substance, or an export-only substance would be excluded from the Order, as the potential for exposure of humans to the substances from these uses is expected to be low. The terms "research and development substance" and "site-limited intermediate substance" are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers). An export-only substance is a substance that is manufactured or imported in Canada and destined solely for foreign markets.

The proposed Order would not apply to uses of these substances that are regulated under the Acts of Parliament listed in Schedule 2 of CEPA, including, for example, the Pest Control Products Act, the Fertilizers Act and the Feeds Act. The Order would also not apply to transient reaction intermediates, impurities, contaminants, or partially unreacted intermediates, or in some circumstances to items such as, but not limited to, wastes, mixtures or manufactured items. However, it should be noted that individual components of a mixture may be subject to notification under the Order. See subsection 81(6) and section 3 of CEPA, and section 3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers for additional information.

Information to be submitted

The NOI sets out the proposed requirements for information that would need to be provided to the Minister 90 days before the day on which the substances are imported, manufactured or used for a significant new activity. The Department of the Environment and Department of Health will use the information submitted in the SNAN and other information to conduct human health and environmental assessments within 90 days after the complete information is received.

The information requirements in the proposed Order relate to general information in respect of the substances, details surrounding their use, and to exposure information. Some of the proposed information requirements are set out in the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Additional guidance on preparing a SNAN can be found in section 4 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers.

Compliance

When assessing whether or not a substance is subject to SNAc provisions, footnote 4 a person is expected to make use of information in their possession or to which they may reasonably be expected to have access. This means information in any of the notifier's offices worldwide or other locations where the notifier can reasonably have access to the information. For example, manufacturers are expected to have access to their formulations, while importers or users of a substance, mixture, or product are expected to have access to import records, usage information and the relevant safety data sheets (SDS). footnote 5

Although an SDS is an important source of information on the composition of a purchased product, it should be noted that the goal of the SDS is to protect the health of workers in the workplace from specific hazards of chemical products. Therefore, an SDS may not list all product ingredients that may be subject to an order due to human health or environmental concerns. Any person requiring more detailed information on product composition is encouraged to contact their supplier.

If any information becomes available that reasonably supports the conclusion that any of the substances identified in this proposed Order is toxic or capable of becoming toxic, the person who is in possession of or has knowledge of the information and is involved in activities with the substance is obligated, under section 70 of CEPA, to provide that information to the Minister without delay.

A company can submit a SNAN on behalf of its clients. For example, in cases where a person takes possession and control of a substance from another person, they may not be required to submit a SNAN, under certain conditions, if their activities were covered by the original SNAN. The Substances Management Advisory Note, "Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999," provides more detail on this subject.

Any person who transfers the physical possession or control of a substance subject to an Order should notify all persons to whom the physical possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the Order, including the obligation to notify the Minister of any significant new activity and to provide all the required information outlined above.

A pre-notification consultation (PNC) is available for notifiers who wish to consult during the planning or preparation of their SNAN to discuss any questions or concerns they have about the prescribed information and test plans.

Where a person has questions concerning their obligations to comply with a notice or Order, believes they may be out of compliance, or would like to request a PNC, they are encouraged to discuss their particular circumstances by contacting the Substances Management Information Line. footnote 6

CEPA is enforced in accordance with the publicly available Compliance and enforcement policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. In instances of non-compliance, consideration is given to factors such as the nature of the alleged violation, potential harm, intent, and history of compliance.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Notice of intent to amend the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations

Whereas the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 94(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, made the Interim Order Modifying the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations;

And whereas, pursuant to subsection 94(7) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the interim order will cease to have effect two years after its publication, or when a regulation having the same effect is made,

Notice is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health intend to recommend to the Governor in Council that an amendment to the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations, pursuant to subsection 94(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, be made to correct the Canadian hydrofluorocarbons (HFC) consumption baseline. The Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health intend to recommend to the Governor in Council to amend the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations and correct the Canadian HFCs consumption baseline within two years.

As part of an open and transparent process, the development of these Regulations will include consultations with representatives of industry, non-governmental organizations, the public and other stakeholders. Input received during these consultations will be considered during the development of the Regulations.

As a first step in the consultation process, interested parties may submit comments on the approach set out above by mail or email by January 2, 2019, to the contact provided below.

Director
Chemical Production Division
Environment and Climate Change Canada
Place Vincent Massey
351 Saint-Joseph Boulevard, 19th Floor
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H3
Email: ec.gestionhalocarbures-halocarbonsmanagement.ec@canada.ca

Subsequently, a consultation document will be published in 2019 to gather additional information from stakeholders. Interested parties will have another opportunity to make written comments specific to the regulatory proposal during the mandatory consultation period that will follow the publication of the proposed regulations in 2019.

Catherine McKenna

Minister of the Environment

Gatineau, October 1, 2018

Ginette Petitpas Taylor

Minister of Health

Ottawa, October 22, 2018

ANNEX I

Background

Under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), an interim order made under section 94 of the Act ceases to have effect on the day it is repealed, the day regulations having the same effect as the interim order are made, or two years after the interim order is made, whichever event happens first. The Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health intend to recommend to the Governor in Council that regulations having the same effect as the interim order be made within two years after the interim order was made.

The primary purpose of the proposed regulations that would amend the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations would be to finalize the Canadian hydrofluorocarbons (HFC) consumption baseline, which was corrected with an interim order in October 2018. Other amendments may also be included.

The Interim Order Modifying the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations (the interim order), made pursuant to subsection 94(1) of CEPA, was developed to maintain the alignment of Canada's domestic regulations with its international obligations established by the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. The interim order corrected the Canadian baseline on a temporary basis until the amendments to the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations will be finalized and enter into force. This modification to the Regulations ensures that companies can rely on their consumption allowances for business planning purposes and facilitates supply chain continuity.

The issue that was addressed by the interim order was first communicated to Environment and Climate Change Canada by industry representatives through emails, letters and telephone conversations following the distribution of the first allowance estimates on May 1, 2018. A number of companies identified errors in the data, which enabled Environment and Climate Change Canada to make the necessary corrections and determine the correct HFC consumption allowances for 2019. The interim order was made because a regular amendment to the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations was not feasible by the end of 2018.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of seven substances in the Anthraquinones Group specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Solvent Violet 13, Pigment Blue 60, Solvent Violet 59, Solvent Blue 36, Disperse Red 60 and Acid Blue 239 are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on Solvent Violet 13, Pigment Blue 60, Solvent Violet 59, Solvent Blue 36, Disperse Red 60 and Acid Blue 239 pursuant to section 74 of the Act and on the substance bearing CAS RN footnote 7 74499-36-8 pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that Solvent Violet 13 meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the remaining substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to recommend to Her Excellency the Governor in Council that Solvent Violet 13 be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on Pigment Blue 60, Solvent Violet 59, Solvent Blue 36, Disperse Red 60 and Acid Blue 239 at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Notice is also given that the ministers propose to take no further action on the substance bearing CAS RN 74499-36-8 at this time.

Notice is furthermore given that the ministers have released a risk management scope document for Solvent Violet 13 to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of risk management actions.

Notice is further given that options are being considered for follow-up activities to track changes in human exposure to five of the seven substances, Solvent Violet 59, Solvent Blue 36, Disperse Red 60, Acid Blue 239, and the substance bearing CAS RN 74499-36-8.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

Comments can also be submitted to the Minister of the Environment, using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada's Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

Marc D'Iorio
Director General
Industrial Sectors, Chemicals and Waste Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of the Anthraquinones Group

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 7 of the 15 substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Anthraquinones Group. These 7 substances were identified as priorities for assessment as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns. Out of the 15 substances, 8 were subsequently determined to be of low concern through other approaches, and proposed decisions for these substances are provided in separate reports. footnote 8, footnote 9 Accordingly, this screening assessment addresses the 7 substances listed in the table below. The 7 substances addressed in this screening assessment will hereinafter be referred to as the Anthraquinones Group.

Substances in the Anthraquinones Group
CAS RN Domestic Substances List name Common name
81-48-1 9,10-Anthracenedione, 1-hydroxy-4-[(4-methylphenyl)amino]- Solvent Violet 13
81-77-6 5,9,14,18-Anthrazinetetrone, 6,15-dihydro- Pigment Blue 60
6408-72-6 9,10-Anthracenedione, 1,4-diamino-2,3-diphenoxy- Solvent Violet 59
14233-37-5 9,10-Anthracenedione, 1,4-bis[(1-methylethyl)amino]- Solvent Blue 36
17418-58-5 9,10-Anthracenedione, 1-amino-4-hydroxy-2-phenoxy- Disperse Red 60
72391-24-3 Benzenesulfonic acid, [[(chloroacetyl)amino]methyl][4-[[4-(cyclohexylamino)-9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-1-anthracenyl]amino]phenoxy]methyl-, monosodium salt Acid Blue 239
74499-36-8 table note a, table note b 9,10-Anthracenedione, 1,4-diamino-, N,N′-mixed 2-ethylhexyl and Me and pentyl derivs. N/A
Abbreviations: N/A = not available

Table Notes

Table Note a

This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns.

Return to table note a referrer

Table Note b

The substance bearing this CAS RN is a UVCB (substances of unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products, or biological materials).

Return to table note b referrer

The substances in the Anthraquinones Group are used as colourants in products available to consumers, including cosmetics (e.g. body creams, lipsticks/lip balms, makeup, hair products and face paint), food packaging materials, children's arts and crafts materials (i.e. stampers), toys, do-it-yourself products (e.g. specialty lubricants, epoxy coatings), and textiles. According to information submitted in response to a survey under section 71 of CEPA, the following quantities were imported in the 2011 calendar year: between 1 000 and 10 000 kg for Solvent Violet 13, between 10 000 and 100 000 kg for Pigment Blue 60, between 1 000 and 10 000 kg for Solvent Violet 59, less than 100 kg for Solvent Blue 36, between 100 and 1 000 kg for each of Disperse Red 60 and Acid Blue 239, and between 1 000 and 10 000 kg for the substance bearing CAS RN 74499-36-8. No manufacturing quantities were reported for any of the substances in this group above the reporting threshold of 100 kg in the 2011 calendar year.

The ecological risks of the substances in the Anthraquinones Group were characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC), which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure, with weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified the substances in the Anthraquinones Group as having a low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from Solvent Violet 13, Pigment Blue 60, Solvent Violet 59, Solvent Blue 36, Disperse Red 60, Acid Blue 239 and the substance bearing CAS RN 74499-36-8. It is proposed to conclude that Solvent Violet 13, Pigment Blue 60, Solvent Violet 59, Solvent Blue 36, Disperse Red 60, Acid Blue 239 and the substance bearing CAS RN 74499-36-8 do not meet the criteria under paragraphs 64(a) and (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

For the general population of Canada, the predominant source of exposure to substances in the Anthraquinones Group is the use of products available to consumers that contain these substances. For each substance, estimates of exposure were derived for uses with the greatest potential for exposure. The predominant route of exposure is dermal, with some uses also resulting in oral or inhalation exposure. Estimates of potential exposures to Solvent Violet 13 were derived based on the use of cosmetics. Estimates of potential exposure to Pigment Blue 60 were derived based on the use of children's craft products (i.e. stampers). Estimates of potential exposure to Solvent Violet 59 were derived based on data on mouthing plastic toys and on the use of permanent hair dye. Estimates of potential exposure to Solvent Blue 36 were derived based on the use of hair conditioner and the use of specialty lubricants. Estimates of potential exposures to Disperse Red 60 and Acid Blue 239 were derived based on contact with textiles. Estimates of potential exposure to the substance bearing CAS RN 74499-36-8 were derived based on the application of epoxy coating products.

Pigment Blue 60 has been reviewed internationally through the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations / World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). In laboratory studies, Pigment Blue 60 was a reproductive toxicant, but not genotoxic or carcinogenic. Solvent Blue 36 was considered to be a developmental toxicant. Health effects information for Pigment Blue 60 and Solvent Blue 36 informed the health effects characterization of some of the substances in the Anthraquinones Group. Disperse Red 60 showed no adverse effects in laboratory studies. Given limited health effects information for some substances in the Anthraquinones Group, a read-across approach, based upon health effects information for the substance anthraquinone, also informed the health effects characterization. The genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of anthraquinone were evaluated by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA). Critical health effects of anthraquinone include kidney tumours, as well as spleen, bone marrow and liver toxicity. All substances, except Pigment Blue 60, are considered to be carcinogenic based on their common structural backbone anthraquinone. The margins of exposure between levels of exposure of the general population from the use of Solvent Violet 13 in cosmetics and levels associated with health effects were considered potentially inadequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases. The margins of exposure were considered adequate for uses of other substances in the Anthraquinones Group.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that Solvent Violet 13 meets the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that Pigment Blue 60, Solvent Violet 59, Solvent Blue 36, Disperse Red 60, Acid Blue 239, and the substance bearing CAS RN 74499-36-8 do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

It is proposed to conclude that Solvent Violet 13 meets the persistence criteria but not the bioaccumulation criteria, as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that Solvent Violet 13 meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA. It is proposed to conclude that Pigment Blue 60, Solvent Violet 59, Solvent Blue 36, Disperse Red 60, Acid Blue 239 and CAS RN 74499-36-8 do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

Consideration for follow-up

While exposure of the general population to Solvent Violet 59, Solvent Blue 36, Disperse Red 60, Acid Blue 239, and CAS RN 74499-36-8 is not of concern at current levels, these substances are considered to have health effects of concern. Therefore, there may be concern for human health if exposure levels were to increase. Follow-up activities to track changes in exposure or commercial use patterns are under consideration.

Stakeholders are encouraged to provide, during the 60-day public comment period on the draft screening assessment, any information pertaining to the substance that may help inform the choice of follow-up activities. This could include information on new or planned import, manufacture or use of the substance, or information not previously submitted to the ministers.

The draft screening assessment for the Anthraquinones Group and the risk management scope document for Solvent Violet 13 are available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of 72 substances specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) or subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas 52 of the 72 substances annexed hereby are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on 20 substances pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) and on 52 substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is concluded that these substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action at this time under section 77 of the Act for the 52 substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Act.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on the remaining 20 substances at this time.

Notice is further given that the Minister of the Environment intends to amend the Domestic Substances List pursuant to subsection 87(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to indicate that subsection 81(3) of the Act applies with respect to ethane, 1,1′-oxybis[2-methoxy- and 2,5,8,11-tetraoxadodecane.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX I

Summary of the screening assessment of substances identified as being of low concern based on the ecological risk classification of organic substances and the threshold of toxicological concern-based approach for certain substances

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 72 substances. These substances were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other human health or ecological concerns.

The ecological risks of the substances in this assessment were characterized using the ecological risk classification (ERC) of organic substances, which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for assessing both hazard and exposure to create a weight of evidence to determine risk classification. Hazard profiles based primarily on metrics associated with mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity are established. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances according to their hazard and exposure profiles. Of the 640 substances examined using this approach, 548 were identified as being of moderate or low ecological concern and do not require further assessment work at this time.

The human health risk of substances in this assessment was characterized using a threshold of toxicological concern (TTC)-based approach. The TTC-based approach establishes a human exposure threshold value for a chemical, below which there is a low probability of risk to human health. The TTC-based approach examined 237 substances for which exposure to the general population was expected to be limited. As a result of this approach, 89 substances were determined to have exposure estimates below TTC values and are considered to be of low concern to human health on the basis of current levels of exposure.

When the results of ERC and TTC-based approaches are considered together, and after further adjustments were made for three substances, footnote 10, footnote 11 a subset of 72 substances were identified as being of low concern to both human health and the environment. Conclusions on the remaining substances (i.e. those identified as being either of low concern to the environment through the ERC or of low concern to human health through the TTC-based approach, but not both) will be made in other assessments.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from the 72 substances identified in Annex II. It is concluded that these 72 substances do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that these 72 substances do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that the 72 substances listed in Annex II do not meet any of the criteria under section 64 of CEPA.

The final screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

Consideration for follow-up

Because ethane, 1,1′-oxybis[2-methoxy- (diglyme) and 2,5,8,11-tetraoxadodecane (triglyme) are listed on the Domestic Substances List, their import and manufacture in Canada are not subject to notification under the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemical and Polymers). However, since diglyme and triglyme are considered to have human health effects of concern, there is suspicion that new activities that have not been identified or assessed could lead to diglyme and/or triglyme meeting the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA. Therefore, the Government of Canada intends to amend the Domestic Substances List, under subsection 87(3) of the Act, to indicate that the significant new activity (SNAc) provisions under subsection 81(3) of the Act apply with respect to these substances.

A significant new activity can include an activity that has not been conducted with the substance in the past, or an existing one with a different quantity or in different circumstances that could affect the exposure pattern of the substance. The SNAc provisions trigger an obligation for a person (individual or corporation) to provide, and for the Government to assess, specific information about a substance when a person proposes to use the substance in a significant new activity. The ministers will assess the information provided by the notifier and other information available to them to determine whether the substance, if used in the proposed new activity, could pose a risk to the environment or human health, and, if so, whether risk management is required.

ANNEX II

Substances not meeting the criteria under section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999
CAS RNtable 1 note a Chemical name Effects of concern
60-24-2 Ethanol, 2-mercapto- No
77-47-4 1,3-Cyclopentadiene, 1,2,3,4,5,5-hexachloro- No
78-67-1table 1 note b Propanenitrile, 2,2′-azobis[2-methyl- No
79-74-3 1,4-Benzenediol, 2,5-bis(1,1-dimethylpropyl)- No
85-42-7table 1 note b 1,3-Isobenzofurandione, hexahydro- No
87-66-1table 1 note b 1,2,3-Benzenetriol No
92-70-6table 1 note b 3-Hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid No
101-37-1table 1 note b 1,3,5-Triazine, 2,4,6-tris(2-propenyloxy)- No
103-24-2 Nonanedioic acid, bis(2-ethylhexyl) ester No
111-55-7table 1 note b 1,2-Ethanediol, diacetate No
111-96-6table 1 note b Ethane, 1,1′-oxybis[2-methoxy- Yes (Health)
112-49-2table 1 note b 2,5,8,11-Tetraoxadodecane Yes (Health)
120-11-6 Benzene, 2-methoxy-1-(phenylmethoxy)-4-(1-propenyl)- No
120-24-1 Benzeneacetic acid, 2-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)phenyl ester No
121-91-5 1,3-Benzenedicarboxylic acid No
122-68-9 2-Propenoic acid, 3-phenyl-, 3-phenylpropyl ester No
122-79-2table 1 note b Acetic acid, phenyl ester No
126-33-0table 1 note b Thiophene, tetrahydro-, 1,1-dioxide No
132-65-0 Dibenzothiophene No
133-14-2 Peroxide, bis(2,4-dichlorobenzoyl) No
288-88-0table 1 note b 1H-1,2,4-Triazole No
614-45-9table 1 note b Benzenecarboperoxoic acid, 1,1-dimethylethyl ester No
632-51-9 Benzene, 1,1′,1″,1′′′(1,2-ethenediylidene)tetrakis- No
793-24-8 1,4-Benzenediamine, N-(1,3-dimethylbutyl)-N′-phenyl- No
2379-79-5 Anthra[2,3-d]oxazole-5,10-dione, 2-(1-amino-9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-2-anthracenyl)- No
3006-86-8 Peroxide, cyclohexylidenebis[(1,1-dimethylethyl) No
3081-14-9 1,4-Benzenediamine, N,N′-bis(1,4-dimethylpentyl)- No
3327-22-8table 1 note b 1-Propanaminium, 3-chloro-2-hydroxy-N,N,N-trimethyl-, chloride No
3851-87-4 Peroxide, bis(3,5,5-trimethyl-1-oxohexyl) No
5285-60-9 Benzenamine, 4,4′-methylenebis[N-(1-methylpropyl)- No
6858-49-7 Propanedinitrile, [[4-[ethyl[2-[[(phenylamino)carbonyl]oxy]ethyl]amino]-2-methylphenyl]methylene]- No
8001-04-5table 1 note b Musks No
13082-47-8 Xanthylium, 9-(2-carboxyphenyl)-3,6-bis(diethylamino)-, hydroxide No
13472-08-7table 1 note b Butanenitrile, 2,2′-azobis[2-methyl- No
15791-78-3 9,10-Anthracenedione, 1,8-dihydroxy-4-[[4-(2-hydroxyethyl)phenyl]amino]5-nitro- No
19720-45-7 9,10-Anthracenedione, 1,4-bis[(2-methylpropyl)amino]- No
21652-27-7 1H-Imidazole-1-ethanol, 2-(8-heptadecenyl)-4,5-dihydro-, (Z)- No
26266-77-3 1-Phenanthrenemethanol, dodecahydro-1,4a-dimethyl-7-(1-methylethyl)- No
26544-38-7 2,5-Furandione, dihydro-3-(tetrapropenyl)- No
27193-86-8 Phenol, dodecyl- No
28173-59-3 Carbonic acid, 2-[(1-amino-9,10-dihydro-4-hydroxy-9,10-dioxo-2-anthracenyl)oxy]ethyl phenyl ester No
28777-98-2table 1 note b 2,5-Furandione, dihydro-3-(octadecenyl)- No
28984-69-2 4,4(5H)-Oxazoledimethanol, 2-(heptadecenyl)- No
29036-02-0 Quaterphenyl No
29350-73-0 Naphthalene, decahydro-1,6-dimethyl-4-(1-methylethyl)-, [1S-(1α,4α,4aα,6α,8aβ)]-, didehydro deriv. No
32072-96-1table 1 note b 2,5-Furandione, 3-(hexadecenyl)dihydro- No
38640-62-9table 1 note b Naphthalene, bis(1-methylethyl)- No
53894-23-8 1,2,4-Benzenetricarboxylic acid, triisononyl ester No
61788-72-5table 1 note b Fatty acids, tall-oil, epoxidized, octyl esters No
61789-01-3table 1 note b Fatty acids, tall-oil, epoxidized, 2-ethylhexyl esters No
61790-28-1 Nitriles, tallow No
61790-29-2 Nitriles, tallow, hydrogenated No
64754-95-6 Castor oil, hydrogenated, lithium salt No
64800-83-5 Benzene, ethyl(phenylethyl)- No
68082-35-9 Fatty acids, soya, epoxidized, Me esters No
68139-89-9 Fatty acids, tall-oil, maleated No
68140-48-7 Ethanone, 1-[2,3-dihydro-1,1,2,6-tetramethyl-3-(1-methylethyl)-1H-inden-5-yl]- No
68398-19-6 Benzene, ethyl(phenylethyl)-, mono-ar-ethyl deriv. No
68442-69-3 Benzene, mono-C10-14-alkyl derivs. No
68515-60-6 1,2,4-Benzenetricarboxylic acid, tri-C7-9-branched and linear alkyl esters No
68603-15-6 Alcohols, C6-12 No
68783-36-8 Fatty acids, C16-22, lithium salts No
68784-12-3 2,5-Furandione, dihydro-, mono-C15-20-alkenyl derivs. No
68784-26-9 Phenol, dodecyl-, sulfurized, carbonates, calcium salts, overbased No
68909-18-2 Pyridinium, 1-(phenylmethyl)-, Et Me derivs., chlorides No
68916-97-2 Horehound oil No
68955-53-3 Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl No
71486-79-8table 1 note b Benzenesulfonic acid, mono-C15-30-branched alkyl and di-C11-13-branched and linear alkyl derivs., calcium salts, overbased No
73984-93-7 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2(3H)-thione, 5-(tert-dodecyldithio)- No
80584-90-3 1H-Benzotriazole-1-methanamine, N,N-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-4-methyl- No
125328-64-5 Nitriles, rape-oil, hydrogenated No
174333-80-3 Benzaldehyde, 2-hydroxy-5-nonyl-, oxime, branched No

Table 1 Notes

Table 1 Note a

The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.

Return to table 1 note a referrer

Table 1 Note b

This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA, but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns or ecological concerns.

Return to table 1 note b referrer

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Final notice — Termination of the Revised In Commerce Substances List nomination process

The purpose of this final notice is to announce the formal end of acceptance of substance nominations to the Revised In Commerce List (R-ICL) on November 3, 2019.

Background of the In Commerce Substances List

On September 13, 2001, substances in products regulated under the Food and Drugs Act (FDA) became subject to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA) and the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) [NSNR (Chemicals and Polymers)] and the New Substances Notification Regulations (Organisms) [NSNR (Organisms)]. Substances in commerce between January 1, 1984, and December 31, 1986, were eligible for addition to the Domestic Substances List (DSL), and substances on the DSL are not subject to notification under the NSNR. Substances in products regulated under the FDA that were in commerce between January 1, 1987, and September 13, 2001, were placed on an administrative list called the In Commerce List. These substances are subject to a policy that notification under the NSNR (Chemicals and Polymers) and NSNR (Organisms) is not required for FDA-related applications at this time.

Subsequent to the development of the In Commerce List, Health Canada verified the List, correcting inaccuracies and duplications, and also accepted industry nominations. This resulted in the Revised In Commerce List (R-ICL), which currently includes approximately 2 600 substances. The R-ICL was first published on May 3, 2013, and has been periodically updated to reflect new information, including nominations that continue to be received by Health Canada. Substances on the R-ICL that have been added to the DSL have been removed to reduce redundancy.

As part of the Government of Canada's Chemicals Management Plan, substances on the R-ICL underwent a risk-based prioritization process to identify those that require further consideration to determine whether they warrant further risk assessment. The results of this prioritization process have been made public and are available online.

Nominations to the R-ICL will continue to be accepted until one year following publication of a final notice. However, in order to create a static list that will allow the prioritization of substances on the R-ICL to be finalized, the nomination process will be terminated at that time, and no further nominations will be accepted. A Notice of intent – Termination of the Revised In Commerce Substances List nomination process was published on April 7, 2018, announcing the formal end of acceptance of substance nominations to the R-ICL. This initiated a 60-day comment period, which ended on June 6, 2018. Questions of clarification from one stakeholder were addressed, and no comments were received. This final notice indicates that the acceptance of substance nominations to the R-ICL will be terminated one year after publication in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on November 3, 2019, and no further nominations will be accepted thereafter.

Scope

This final notice indicates that the end of acceptance of substance nominations to the R-ICL will occur on November 3, 2019, providing stakeholders with one year to conclude the nomination of any outstanding eligible substances to the R-ICL. From November 3, 2019 onward, manufacturers and importers who wish to market a new substance for use in FDA-regulated products in Canada that is not already listed on the R-ICL must submit a notification under the NSNR (Chemicals and Polymers) and NSNR (Organisms).

Planned actions

A. The proposed eligibility criteria for addition to the R-ICL and guidance material

Guidelines for the nomination of substances to the R-ICL are available to assist nominators in determining the eligibility criteria for nominating their substances, and acceptable substance identity information. Please contact Health Canada at the address below to request a copy of the guidelines.

B. Nomination forms

Nominators will be requested to provide substance nomination information to Health Canada, by completing and submitting the appropriate nomination form and providing proof of in commerce in Food and Drugs Act products marketed in Canada between January 1, 1987, and September 13, 2001. There are two forms: one form is intended for the nomination of chemicals and polymers, the second form is intended for the nomination of living organisms. Please contact the Program at the coordinates below to obtain the nomination forms and mailing address.

Comment period

The publication of this final notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, follows the initial 60-day comment period and provides a period of one year for anyone interested in nominating substances to the R-ICL to do so before November 3, 2019.

Contact information

Environmental Assessment Unit 2
Health Canada
269 Laurier Avenue West, 5th Floor, PL 4905B
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0K9
613-960-7366 (telephone [local])
1-866-996-9913 (telephone [toll-free])
1-613-946-6474 (fax)
hc.ricl-lrsc.sc@canada.ca (email)

Please include your full contact information: name, address, telephone number and email address.

November 3, 2018

David Morin
Director General
On behalf of the Minister of Health

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Edmonton Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Greg LeCerf

Ottawa, October 17, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as a fingerprint examiner:

Francis Coutu

Ottawa, October 17, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following persons of the Edmonton Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

Ottawa, October 17, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the York Regional Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Gregory McGuire

Ottawa, October 17, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Montreal Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

By the Minister of Transport

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport ("Minister") for the Montreal Port Authority ("Authority"), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act ("Act"), effective March 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule B of the letters patent sets out the federal immovables managed by the Authority;

WHEREAS by ministerial order dated July 11, 2018, the Government of Quebec, represented by the Minister of the Environment and the Fight against Climate Change, transferred to Her Majesty the Queen in right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Transport, the administration and control of immovables, shoreline and submerged water lots, known and designated as lots 5 024 710 and 6 152 784 in the cadastre of Quebec;

WHEREAS pursuant to the Federal Real Property and Federal Immovables Act and the Federal Real Property Regulations, the Minister accepted, on behalf of Her Majesty the Queen in right of Canada, the transfer of administration and control, from the Government of Quebec, of lots 5 024 710 and 6 152 784;

WHEREAS in accordance with the applicable provisions of the Act, the Authority wants the management of the immovables for the purpose of operating the port, and that its board of directors requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to set out the immovables in Schedule B of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendments to the letters patent of the Authority are consistent with the Act,

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

3.2 REGISTRATION DIVISION OF VERCHÈRES
Lot Description
5 024 710 A shoreline and submerged water lot part of the bed of the St. Lawrence River, known and designated as being lot 5 024 710 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Verchères, city of Contrecoeur, as shown on the surveying plan prepared by Berthier Beaulieu, land surveyor, October 4, 2017, under number 2062 of its minutes, containing an area of 5.65 hectares.
6 152 784 A shoreline and submerged water lot part of the bed of the St. Lawrence River, known and designated as being lot 6 152 784 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Verchères, city of Contrecoeur, as shown on the surveying plan prepared by Berthier Beaulieu, land surveyor, October 4, 2017, under number 2062 of its minutes, containing an area of 49.32 hectares.

ISSUED this 15th day of October, 2018.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Montreal Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

By the Minister of Transport

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport ("Minister") for the Montreal Port Authority ("Authority"), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act ("Act"), effective March 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule B of the letters patent sets out the federal real property and immovables managed by the Authority;

WHEREAS, pursuant to subsection 45.1(1) of the Act, the Authority has requested that the Minister acquire the federal immovable known and designated as lot 5 336 892 of the cadastre of Quebec, and the port authority may pay the price of the properties in question;

WHEREAS the immovable, also known as Montée Lapierre, is the property of the city of Contrecœur and that it is authorized to close the sale with the Government of Canada, represented by the Minister of Transport, pursuant to the applicable provisions of an Act respecting the Ministère du Conseil exécutif of Québec, the whole as it appears from the Decree No. 1108-2018, executed August 15, 2018, by the Government of Quebec;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to set out the said immovable in Schedule B of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act,

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule B of the letters patent is amended by adding the following at the end of section 2.3.1, after the description of lot 5 024 923:
Lot Description
5 336 892 An immovable known and designated as being lot 5 336 892 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Verchères, as described in the certificate of location and shown on the accompanying plans prepared July 20, 2016, under number 4369 of the minutes of
Jean-Luc Fortin, land surveyor, containing an area of 3.39 hectares.

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the Land Registry of Quebec of the deed of sale evidencing the transfer of the immovable to Her Majesty the Queen in right of Canada.

ISSUED this 23rd day of October, 2018.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada's diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one's dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one's full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position Organization Closing date
Director Canada Council for the Arts  
Chairperson Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology  
Chairperson Canada Lands Company Limited  
President and Chief Executive Officer Canada Lands Company Limited  
President and Chief Executive Officer Canada Post Corporation  
Chairperson Canada Science and Technology Museum  
Vice-Chairperson Canada Science and Technology Museum  
Chairperson Canadian Institutes of Health Research  
Vice-Chairperson Canadian Museum for Human Rights  
Vice-Chairperson Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21  
Vice-Chairperson Canadian Museum of Nature  
Chairperson Canadian Race Relations Foundation  
Regional Member (Quebec) Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission  
Chairperson and Member Canadian Statistics Advisory Council  
Chairperson Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police  
President and Chief Executive Officer Defense Construction (1951) Limited  
President and Chief Executive Officer Export Development Canada  
Chief Executive Officer The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited  
Commissioner Financial Consumer Agency of Canada  
Director (Federal) Hamilton Port Authority  
Commissioners and Chairperson International Joint Commission  
Members (appointment to roster) International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies  
President and Chief Executive Officer Marine Atlantic Inc.  
Chairperson National Arts Centre Corporation  
Vice-Chairperson National Arts Centre Corporation  
Chief Executive Officer National Capital Commission  
Director National Gallery of Canada  
Chairperson National Research Council of Canada  
Commissioner of Competition Office of the Commissioner of Competition  
Ombudsperson Office of the Ombudsperson for National Defence and Canadian Forces  
Veterans' Ombudsman Office of the Veterans' Ombudsman  
Director (Federal) Oshawa Port Authority  
Panel Member Payment in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel  
Master of the Mint Royal Canadian Mint  
Director (Federal) Saguenay Port Authority  
Chairperson Telefilm Canada  
Member (Marine and Medical) Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada  
President and Chief Executive Officer VIA Rail Canada Inc.