Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 153, Number 27: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

July 6, 2019

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Notice respecting the Canada-Ontario Agreement on Great Lakes Water Quality and Ecosystem Health

In accordance with subsection 9(2) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (S.C. 1999, c. 33), notice is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment (“the Minister”) has negotiated a draft of the “Canada-Ontario Agreement on Great Lakes Water Quality and Ecosystem Health” (“the Agreement”).

The Agreement is composed of a series of articles that set out the purpose, principles and management of the Agreement, as well as annexes that identify commitments by each government to address Nutrients, Harmful Pollutants, Wastewater and Stormwater, Discharges from Vessels, Areas of Concern, Lakewide Management, Groundwater Quality, Climate Change Impacts and Resilience, From Awareness to Action, First Nations and the Great Lakes, and Métis and the Great Lakes.

Interested persons requiring additional information about the Agreement or Great Lakes should refer to the Environment and Climate Change Canada website or send an email to ec.grandslacs-greatlakes.ec@canada.ca.

Interested persons may, within 60 days after the publication of this notice, file with the Minister, comments or a notice of objection with respect to the Agreement. All such comments and notices must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice, and be sent to ec.grandslacs-greatlakes.ec@canada.ca.

July 6, 2019

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Notice to interested parties — Publication of a proposed regulatory approach for the Clean Fuel Standard

The Government of Canada is developing a Clean Fuel Standard to make fuels used in buildings, vehicles, and industries cleaner. This reduces air pollution, fights climate change, and drives clean growth. By setting performance standards for various types of fuels, the Clean Fuel Standard will encourage the production of clean fuels, drive innovation in the oil and gas sector, and create an incentive to use less-polluting fuels.

Environment and Climate Change Canada is designing the Clean Fuel Standard to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 30 million tonnes (Mt) a year by 2030, making an important contribution to hitting Canada’s Paris Agreement target. The Clean Fuel Standard complements other climate policies and investments in Canada’s national climate plan, including pricing pollution and rebates for the purchase of new zero-emission vehicles.

Draft Clean Fuel Standard regulations for the liquid fuels stream are expected in early 2020, and final regulations in 2021. The standard for liquid fuels will come into effect as planned in 2022, and will gradually become more stringent from 2022 to 2030.

On June 28, 2019, Environment and Climate Change Canada published a proposed regulatory approach for the treatment of liquid fuels under the Clean Fuel Standard for public comment.

This document presents the full regulatory approach for the liquid fossil fuel regulations of the Clean Fuel Standard, developed with extensive engagement and consultations with stakeholders. It builds upon the Regulatory Design Paper published in December 2018 as well as the Clean Fuel Standard Regulatory Framework published in December 2017. This document provides the full set of requirements and credit creation opportunities that will be included in the liquid class regulations.

Interested parties may submit comments by email or mail, on or before August 26, 2019, to the address below.

Clean Fuel Standard: Proposed Regulatory Approach
Carbon Pricing Bureau
Environment and Climate Change Canada
351 Saint-Joseph Boulevard
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H3
Email: ec.cfsncp.ec@canada.ca

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of 11 substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the 11 substances identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on the 11 substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 11 of 13 substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Musks (macro/poly cyclic) Group. These 11 substances were identified as priorities for assessment as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. Two of the 13 substances were determined to be of low concern through other approaches, and decisions for these substances are provided in a separate report. footnote 1 Accordingly, this screening assessment addresses the 11 substances listed in the table below. The 11 substances addressed in this screening assessment report are hereinafter referred to as the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNs footnote 2, the Domestic Substances List (DSL) names, the common names and the subgroups of these substances are listed in the table below.

Substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group

CAS RN

DSL name

Common name

Subgroup

106-02-5

Oxacyclohexadecan-2-one

Exaltolide

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

109-29-5

Oxacycloheptadecan-2-one

Hexadecanolide

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

502-72-7

Cyclopentadecanone

Exaltone

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

541-91-3

Cyclopentadecanone, 3-methyl-

Muskone/Muscone

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

542-46-1

9-Cycloheptadecen-1-one, (Z)-

Civetone

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

7779-50-2

Oxacycloheptadec-7-en-2-one

Hexadecenlactone/Ambrettolide

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

28645-51-4

Oxacycloheptadec-10-en-2-one

Isoambrettolide

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

37609-25-9

5-Cyclohexadecen-1-one

Musk amberol/Ambrettone

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

1335-94-0

Irone

Irone

Ionones

7779-30-8

1-Penten-3-one, 1-(2,6,6-trimethyl-2-cyclohexen-1-yl)-

1-Methyl-α-ionone

Ionones

108-94-1

Cyclohexanone

Cyclohexanone

Cyclohexanone

Exaltolide, isoambrettolide, 1-methyl-α-ionone, and cyclohexanone were reported to be imported into Canada in total quantities up to 166 810 kg in 2011. In the same year, exaltolide and isoambrettolide were not reported to be manufactured in Canada, whereas 1-methyl-α-ionone and cyclohexanone were manufactured in Canada at quantities up to 950 kg. No quantities were reported for the other substances in this group above the reporting threshold of 100 kg in the 2011 calendar year.

Substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group are used primarily as fragrances or fragrance ingredients. Exaltolide, muskone/muscone, civetone and cyclohexanone occur naturally in the environment. In Canada, substances in this group are used in a variety of applications including cosmetics (including body lotion and eau de toilette), sunscreen, and do-it-yourself products (including wall paint).

The ecological risks of the substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group were characterized using the Ecological Risk Classification of organic substances (ERC), which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based upon weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. Based on the outcome of the ERC analysis, these substances are considered unlikely to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from the 11 substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group. It is concluded that the 11 substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

For the human health risk assessment, the 11 substances in this group were separated into the macrocyclic lactones and ketones subgroup, the ionones subgroup and one substance (cyclohexanone). Substances in the macrocyclic lactones and ketones subgroup are considered to have a low hazard potential. On the basis of available health effects information for structurally related substances, the ionones subgroup has adverse effects, including kidney changes with repeated oral or dermal exposures. On the basis of this assessment, cyclohexanone demonstrates low potential for adverse effects via the oral and inhalation routes of exposure.

Environmental media and food were not identified as significant sources of exposure to Canadians. For all subgroups, estimates of exposure were derived based upon levels of substances in products available to consumers, such as cosmetics. On the basis of these estimates of exposure compared with critical effect levels identified from laboratory studies, margins of exposure are considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that the 11 substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that the 11 substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

GLOBAL AFFAIRS CANADA

Public release of the initial environmental assessment of the Canada-Pacific Alliance Free Trade Agreement negotiations

In accordance with the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, Global Affairs Canada (GAC) is committed to conducting environmental assessments for all trade and investment negotiations using a process that requires interdepartmental coordination and public consultation. The objectives of the environmental assessment of a trade agreement are

The Government of Canada is committed to sustainable development. Mutually supportive trade and environmental policies can contribute to this objective. To this end, the Minister of International Trade Diversification has directed Canadian trade officials to seek information and otherwise improve their understanding of the relationship between trade and environmental issues at the earliest stages of decision making, and to do this through an open and inclusive process. Environmental assessments of trade negotiations are critical to this work.

On October 22, 2017, Canada officially launched negotiations toward a free trade agreement with the Pacific Alliance. On October 26, 2017, the Government of Canada published a Notice of intent to conduct an environmental assessment of the Canada-Pacific Alliance (PA) free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations. In light of the input received from stakeholders and Canadians, the Government of Canada is releasing today the initial environmental assessment of the Canada-Pacific Alliance Free Trade Agreement negotiations. This initial environmental assessment attempts to determine whether significant environmental impacts are likely to occur as a result of a potential Canada-Pacific Alliance Free Trade Agreement.

All interested parties are invited to submit their comments on the initial environmental assessment of the Canada-Pacific Alliance Free Trade Agreement negotiations by August 5, 2019. Once negotiations conclude, and prior to ratification of the agreement, a final environmental assessment will be undertaken to assess the potential impacts of the negotiated outcome on the environment.

Contributions can be sent to

Consultations on the environmental assessment of the Canada-Pacific Alliance Free Trade Agreement negotiations
Trade Negotiations – Trade Policy and Negotiations Division (TCW)
Global Affairs Canada
125, Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 1J1
Email: EAconsultationsEE@international.gc.ca

Related links

Initial environmental assessment: https://www.international.gc.ca/trade-commerce/trade-agreements-accords-commerciaux/agr-acc/pacific-alliance-pacifique/initial_ea-ee_initiale.aspx?lang=eng

Consulting Canadians on a possible Canada-Pacific Alliance Free Trade Agreement: http://www.international.gc.ca/trade-commerce/consultations/pacific-alliance-pacifique/index.aspx?lang=eng

INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CANADA

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SLPB-003-19 — Decision on Releasing Millimetre Wave Spectrum to Support 5G and Interim Guideline for Licensing of Earth Stations in the Fixed-Satellite, Earth Exploration–Satellite and Space Research Services in the Frequency Bands 26.5-28.35 GHz and 37.5-40.0 GHz

The intent of this notice is to announce the release of the document entitled Decision on Releasing Millimetre Wave Spectrum to Support 5G, which sets out Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada’s (ISED) decisions regarding revisions to the 26.5-27.5 GHz band (also known as the 26 GHz band), the 27.5-28.35 GHz band (also known as the 28 GHz band), the 37-40 GHz band and the 64-71 GHz band to support the deployment of advanced communications systems, such as 5th generation (5G) wireless networks and systems.

This notice also announces the release of GL-10, Interim Guideline for Licensing of Earth Stations in the Fixed-Satellite, Earth Exploration-Satellite and Space Research Services in the Frequency Bands 26.5-28.35 GHz and 37.5-40 GHz.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on ISED’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website.

Official versions of notices can be viewed on the Canada Gazette website.

June 5, 2019

Aline Chevrier
Senior Director
Spectrum Licensing and Auction Operations

Spectrum Licensing Policy Branch

INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CANADA

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SLPB-004-19 — Extension to the comment period: Consultation on a Policy and Licensing Framework for Spectrum in the 3500 MHz Band

Notice No. SLPB-002-19, Consultation on a Policy and Licensing Framework for Spectrum in the 3500 MHz Band, was published on Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada’s (ISED) Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website on June 5, 2019. The deadline for submitting comments was July 19, 2019, and the deadline for submitting reply comments was August 19, 2019.

The purpose of the present notice is to advise all interested parties that, based on several requests for additional time to respond, the deadline for submitting comments has been extended to August 2, 2019, and the deadline for submitting reply comments has been extended to September 13, 2019. All comments received will be posted on the ISED Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on the ISED Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website.

Official versions of notices can be viewed on the Canada Gazette website.

June 24, 2019

Aline Chevrier
Senior Director
Spectrum Licensing Policy Branch

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Chief Administrator

Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada

 

Chairperson

Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada

 

Chairperson and Director

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

 

Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson

Canada Industrial Relations Board

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

Chairperson (joint federal Governor in Council and provincial Lieutenant Governor appointment)

Canada–Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board

 

Board Member (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chairperson (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chief Executive Officer (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Vice-Chairperson (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chairperson

Canadian Dairy Commission

 

Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson and Director

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Lead Commissioner, Deputy Lead Commissioner and Commissioner

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Pay Equity Commissioner

Canadian Human Rights Commission

 

Regional Member (British Columbia/Yukon)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

 

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Canadian Tourism Commission

 

Chairperson

Farm Credit Canada

 

Sergeant-at-Arms and Corporate Security Officer

House of Commons

 

Member (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Auditor General of Canada

Office of the Auditor General

 

Chief Accessibility Officer (Anticipatory)

Office of the Chief Accessibility Officer

 

Director (Federal)

Oshawa Port Authority

 

Chief Executive Officer

Parks Canada

 

Commissioner

Public Service Commission

 

Member and Alternate Member

Renewable Resources Board (Gwich’in)

 

Member and Alternate Member

Renewable Resources Board (Sahtu)

 

Principal

Royal Military College of Canada

 

Chairperson

Telefilm Canada