Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 153, Number 26: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

June 29, 2019

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE PROTECTION ACT

Ministerial instructions regarding the processing of applications under the Caring for Children and the Caring for People with High Medical Needs classes

Notice is hereby given under subsection 87.3(6) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (the Act) that the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration has established the following ministerial instructions that, in the opinion of the Minister, will best support the attainment of the immigration goals established by the Government of Canada.

Overview

Authority for these ministerial instructions is derived from section 87.3 of the Act. The instructions are directed to officers who are responsible for handling and/or reviewing applications under the Caring for Children and Caring for People with High Medical Needs classes.

The intent of these instructions is to ensure that no new applications under these classes are accepted for processing on or after June 18, 2019.

These instructions come into effect on the same day as two other ministerial instructions, pursuant to section 14.1 of the Act, which establish two new economic permanent residence classes to replace the Caring for Children and Caring for People with High Medical Needs classes.

All ministerial instructions relating to these classes will come into force in tandem to facilitate a seamless transition to permanent residence and provide clarity for applicants with regard to dedicated permanent residence pathways for in-home caregivers.

These instructions are consistent with objectives as laid out in section 3 of the Act, specifically to pursue the maximum social, cultural and economic benefits of immigration; to enrich and strengthen the social and cultural fabric of Canadian society; to support the development of a strong and prosperous Canadian economy; to protect public health and safety and to maintain the security of Canadian society.

Instructions for the processing of applications under the Caring for Children and Caring for People with High Medical Needs classes

Effective June 18, 2019, the number of new applications that will be accepted for processing under the Caring for Children and the Caring for People with High Medical Needs classes will be set to zero.

All pending applications received prior to June 18, 2019, will continue to be processed.

These instructions will remain in place until November 29, 2019, the same date that the Caring for Children and Caring for People with High Medical Needs classes expire.

Humanitarian and compassionate requests

A request made under subsection 25(1) of the Act from outside Canada that accompanies an application that was not accepted for processing under these instructions will also not be accepted for processing.

Disposition of applications

New applications under the Caring for Children and Caring for People with High Medical Needs classes that are received by designated Department of Citizenship and Immigration offices on or after June 18, 2019, will not be processed and will be returned to applicants along with the processing fees.

Coming into effect

The instructions come into force on June 18, 2019.

Ottawa, June 14, 2019

Ahmed D. Hussen
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE PROTECTION ACT

Ministerial Instructions Respecting the Home Child Care Provider Class

The Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, pursuant to section 14.1 footnote a of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act footnote b, gives the annexed Ministerial Instructions Respecting the Home Child Care Provider Class.

Ahmed D. Hussen
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Ministerial Instructions Respecting the Home Child Care Provider Class

Definitions

1 The following definitions apply in these Instructions.

Home child care provider class

2 (1) The home child care provider class is established as part of the economic class referred to in subsection 12(2) of the Act and consists of foreign nationals who intend to reside in a province other than the province of Quebec, and who demonstrate, in accordance with these Instructions, that they meet the requirements of these Instructions.

Economic class

(2) For greater certainty, the home child care provider class is considered to be part of the class referred to in paragraph 70(2)(b) of the Regulations.

Application for permanent residence – less than 24 months experience

(3) An application for a permanent residence visa as member of the home child care provider class for a foreign national who has acquired in Canada less than 24 months of full-time work experience in an eligible occupation during the 36 months preceding the date on which the application is made consists of the following two steps:

Application for permanent residence – at least 24 months experience

(4) A foreign national who has acquired in Canada at least 24 months of full-time work experience in an eligible occupation may apply for a permanent residence visa as member of the home child care provider class if they demonstrate, on the date on which the application is made, that they meet the following conditions:

Work experience

(5) The work experience referred to in paragraph (3)(b) and subsection (4)

Processing fees

3 The fees that are payable for processing an application for a permanent resident visa under these Instructions are the fees set out in paragraphs 295(1)(c)(i), (ii) or (iii) of the Regulations, as applicable.

Period of application

4 These instructions apply from June 18, 2019 to June 17, 2024.

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE PROTECTION ACT

Ministerial Instructions Respecting the Home Support Worker Class

The Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, pursuant to section 14.1 footnote c of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act footnote d, gives the annexed Ministerial Instructions Respecting the Home Support Worker Class.

Ahmed D. Hussen
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Ministerial Instructions Respecting the Home Support Worker Class

Definitions

1 The following definitions apply in these Instructions.

Home support worker class

2 (1) The home support worker class is established as part of the economic class referred to in subsection 12(2) of the Act and consists of foreign nationals who intend to reside in a province other than the province of Quebec, and who demonstrate, in accordance with these Instructions, that they meet the requirements of these Instructions.

Economic class

(2) For greater certainty, the home support worker class is considered to be part of the class referred to in paragraph 70(2)(b) of the Regulations.

Application for permanent residence – less than 24 months experience

(3) An application for a permanent residence visa as member of the home support worker class for a foreign national who has acquired in Canada less than 24 months of full-time work experience in an eligible occupation during the 36 months preceding the date on which the application is made consists of the following two steps:

Application for permanent residence – at least 24 months experience

(4) A foreign national who has acquired in Canada at least 24 months of full-time work experience in an eligible occupation may apply for a permanent residence visa as member of the home support worker class if they demonstrate, on the date on which the application is made, that they meet the following conditions:

Work experience

(5) The work experience referred to in paragraph (3)(b) and subsection (4)

Processing fees

3 The fees that are payable for processing an application for a permanent resident visa under these Instructions are the fees set out in paragraphs 295(1)(c)(i), (ii) or (iii) of the Regulations, as applicable.

Period of application

4 These instructions apply from June 18, 2019 to June 17, 2024.

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE PROTECTION ACT

New ministerial instructions regarding the processing of certain work permit applications

Notice is hereby given under subsection 87.3(6) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (the Act) that the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration has established the following ministerial instructions regarding the processing of certain work permit applications.

Overview

Authority for ministerial instructions is derived from section 87.3 of the Act. The instructions are being issued to ensure that the processing of applications is conducted in a manner that, in the opinion of the Minister, will best support the attainment of the immigration goals established by the Government of Canada.

The instructions are consistent with objectives as laid out in section 3 of the Act. Specifically, in order to pursue the maximum social, cultural and economic benefits of immigration aligned with the goals of the new caregiver permanent residence pilots, a moratorium on new caregiver temporary foreign worker intake outside Quebec is necessary to control arrivals without a clear pathway for permanent residence.

These instructions complement and come into effect on the same day as the ministerial instructions made pursuant to section 14.1 of the Act to establish two new economic permanent residence classes.

Instructions to refuse to process certain work permit applications

Instructions are directed to designated officers who are charged with handling and/or reviewing applications for work permits.

Officers are instructed not to process applications for new work permits made by foreign nationals under subparagraph 200(1)(c)(iii) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations, if all of the below criteria apply:

Coming into effect

These instructions take effect on June 18, 2019.

Disposition of applications

Where new work permit applications are not processed pursuant to these instructions, the applicant will be notified of the refusal to process, and the associated work permit processing fee will be returned.

Expiry

These instructions will expire on June 17, 2024.

Ottawa, June 14, 2019

Ahmed D. Hussen
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2019-87-07-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Whereas, pursuant to subsection 87(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 footnote e, the Minister of the Environment has added the substances referred to in the annexed Order to the Domestic Substances List footnote f;

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 87(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 footnote e, makes the annexed Order 2019-87-07-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, June 11, 2019

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Order 2019-87-07-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Amendment

1 Part I of the Non-domestic Substances List footnote 1 is amended by deleting the following:

834899-65-9

1591783-13-9

Coming into Force

2 This Order comes into force on the day on which Order 2019-87-07-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List comes into force.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Waiver of information requirements for substances (subsection 81(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas any person who proposes to import or manufacture a substance that is not on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 81(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a person may, pursuant to subsection 81(8) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, request any of the requirements to provide information under subsection 81(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to be waived; and

Whereas a waiver may be granted by the Minister of the Environment under subsection 81(8) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 if

Therefore, notice is hereby given, pursuant to subsection 81(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that the Minister of the Environment waived some requirements to provide information pursuant to subsection 81(8) of that Act and in accordance with the following annex.

Nicole Davidson
Acting Executive Director
Program Development and Engagement Division

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Waiver of information requirements

(Subsection 81(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Person to whom a waiver was granted

Information concerning a substance in relation to which a waiver was granted

BASF Canada Inc.

Data in respect of octanol/water partition coefficient

Data in respect of hydrolysis rate as a function of pH

Data from an in vitro mutagenicity test for gene mutations

Chemsynergy, Inc.

Data in respect of vapour pressure

Data in respect of octanol/water partition coefficient

Data in respect of hydrolysis rate as a function of pH

Data from an in vivo mammalian test for chromosomal aberrations or gene mutations

Dow Chemical Canada ULC

Data in respect of octanol/water partition coefficient

H.B. Fuller Canada

Data in respect of octanol/water partition coefficient (2) table a1 note 1

Novozymes Canada Limited

Data in respect of melting point

Data in respect of boiling point

Data in respect of density

Data in respect of vapour pressure

Red Spot Canada

Data in respect of hydrolysis rate as a function of pH

Sika Corporation

Data in respect of water solubility

Stepan Canada Inc.

Data in respect of density

Table a1 note(s)

Table a1 note 1

The number in parentheses indicates the number of times that the information requirement in the second column was waived for the company.

Return to table a1 note 1 referrer

EXPLANATORY NOTE

The decision to grant a waiver is made on a case-by-case basis by Environment Canada in consultation with Health Canada. Every year, an average of 500 regulatory declarations are submitted for chemicals, polymers and living organisms under subsections 81(1), (3) and (4) and 106(1), (3) and (4) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, and around 100 waivers are granted yearly for chemicals, polymers and living organisms under subsections 81(8) and 106(8) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

For more information, please see the waivers web page on the New Substances website.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of zinc and its compounds, including those specified on the Domestic Substances List and those identified for further consideration following prioritization of the Revised In Commerce List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on zinc and its compounds pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas 64 substances identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Act, and 11 substances identified in the annex below are substances identified for further consideration following prioritization of the Revised In Commerce List;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that zinc and soluble zinc compounds meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to recommend to Her Excellency the Governor in Council that zinc and soluble zinc compounds be added to Schedule 1 of the Act.

Notice is furthermore given that the ministers have released a risk management scope document for zinc and soluble zinc compounds to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of risk management actions.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819‑938‑5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

Comments can also be submitted to the Minister of the Environment using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

Gwen Goodier
Acting Director General
Industrial Sectors, Chemicals and Waste Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX I

Summary of the draft screening assessment of zinc and its compounds

Pursuant to sections 68 and 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of zinc and its compounds. Sixty-four of these substances were identified as priorities for assessment as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. Eleven additional substances were identified for further consideration following prioritization of the Revised In Commerce List (R-ICL).

There are both natural and anthropogenic sources of zinc to the environment. Natural sources include weathering and wind and water erosion of zinc-enriched rocks, soils and sediments. Anthropogenic sources include zinc metal production (e.g. mining and processing); the manufacture, import and use of zinc compounds, products and manufactured items; industrial activities (e.g. iron and steel manufacturing, pulp and paper manufacturing, wastewater treatment systems, tire and rubber manufacturing). Results of the Domestic Substances List (DSL) Inventory Update (DSL IU) Phase 1, 2 and 3 surveys for 72 zinc compounds indicate that those zinc compounds were reported to be manufactured in Canada in quantities ranging from 0.1 t to more than 500 t and imported into Canada in quantities ranging from 0.1 t to more than 10 000 t.

Activities and uses involving zinc and its compounds reported in Canada and abroad include metal mining, galvanizing, intermediate in metallurgical processes, non-ferrous metal smelting and refining processes, fertilizers, hard material tools, paints and coatings, plastic, tire and rubber. In addition, zinc is present in thousands of products available to consumers including supplemented foods and food packaging, drugs, cosmetics, natural health products (e.g. multivitamins and mineral supplements), pesticides, paints and coatings, sealants, cleaning products, automotive products, and plant fertilizers.

Zinc species often encountered in the environment include ZnOH+, Zn2+, and ZnCO3. The species typically considered to be the source of toxicity (due to its bioavailability) is the uncomplexed, free ion (Zn2+). However, as zinc interacts with various constituents of water, soil and sediment, it can form many different complexes. Competition with other chemicals at the receptor site in organisms and formation of organic or inorganic metal species can render a significant fraction of dissolved metals non-bioavailable. The predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC) in surface water is based on the recently derived Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) Canadian Water Quality Guidelines (CWQG) for zinc for the Protection of Aquatic Life, which allows for the derivation of site-specific PNECs dependent on toxicity modifying factors (TMFs), namely hardness, pH and dissolved organic carbon.

The ecological exposure assessment focuses on releases of zinc from the main sectors of activity associated with the greatest quantities in commerce or associated with the largest reported releases to the environment, when enough data was available, namely metal mining, base metals smelting and refining (BMS), iron and steel manufacturing, and wastewater treatment systems. Predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) derived using measured concentrations of zinc in surface water samples collected at sites receiving metal mining effluent were found to exceed surface water PNECs at certain mining facilities. PECs based on measured zinc concentrations in samples collected from waterbodies near base metal smelters and refineries were generally below the PNEC except for one facility, where BMS effluents are combined with mining effluents. PECs derived for the iron and steel sector using average yearly releases of zinc calculated using loadings reported to a provincial government, did not exceed PNECs. Similarly, PECs derived for wastewater treatment systems using measured concentrations of zinc in effluents were determined to be lower than PNECs.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a risk of harm to the environment from zinc and soluble zinc compounds. It is proposed to conclude that zinc and soluble zinc compounds meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) of CEPA as they are entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity. However, it is proposed to conclude that zinc and soluble zinc compounds do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(b) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Zinc is ubiquitous in air, drinking water, food, soil and house dust. Zinc is present in thousands of products available to consumers. Food is the primary source of exposure for the general public. General population exposure was characterized using nationally representative biomonitoring data from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS), the First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative (FNBI), and the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals Early Childhood Biomonitoring and Neurodevelopment (MIREC-CD Plus) Study. Total concentrations of zinc measured in whole blood and urine provide a biologically relevant, integrated measure of exposure that may occur across multiple routes (e.g. oral ingestion, dermal contact and inhalation) and sources (e.g. natural and anthropogenic, environmental media, diet, and frequent or daily use products). Whole blood zinc concentrations increase with age and the highest zinc concentrations in whole blood are found in older adults while urinary zinc concentrations display a “U”-shaped pattern of exposure, with the highest concentrations in three- to five-year-olds and in older adults. Generally, males have higher blood and urine concentrations of zinc than females. The evidence linking changes in biomarker concentrations to changes in external exposures is stronger for urine than for whole blood. Hence, urine zinc concentration was identified as the most suitable biomarker to quantify population-level zinc exposure.

Zinc is an essential element to human health, yet elevated intake may result in adverse health effects. Several international organizations have previously established exposure guidance values (e.g. Tolerable Upper Intake Level, Reference Dose) to protect against toxicity of zinc on the basis of the alteration of copper status observed in human supplementation studies. The alteration of copper status in those studies was considered mild and within the range of natural variation. Thus, to characterize human health risk, biomonitoring equivalents were developed for the No Observed Adverse Effect Levels (NOAEL) and Low Observed Adverse Effect Level (LOAEL) associated with headaches, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite and abdominal cramps reported in the individuals. Median and 95th percentile concentrations of total zinc in urine from the CHMS survey were lower than the urine biomonitoring equivalent values derived for the NOAEL and the LOAEL. Therefore, zinc and its compounds are considered to be of low concern to the health of the general population in Canada at current levels of exposure.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that zinc and its compounds do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that zinc and soluble zinc compounds meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA. It is also proposed to conclude that zinc and soluble zinc compounds meet the persistence criteria but not the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment and the risk management scope for these substances are available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

ANNEX II

Zinc and zinc-compound substances identified as priorities for assessment under subsection 73(1) of CEPA and the Revised In Commerce List

CAS RN

DSL or R-ICL Name

Inventory /
Priority

127-82-2

Benzenesulfonic acid, 4-hydroxy-, zinc salt (2:1)

DSL

136-23-2

Zinc, bis(dibutylcarbamodithioato-S,S’)-, (T-4)-

DSL

136-53-8

Hexanoic acid, 2-ethyl-, zinc salt

DSL

155-04-4

2(3H)-Benzothiazolethione, zinc salt

DSL

546-46-3

1,2,3-Propanetricarboxylic acid, 2-hydroxy-, zinc salt (2:3)

R-ICL

556-38-7

Pentanoic acid, zinc salt (2:1)

R-ICL

557-05-1

Octadecanoic acid, zinc salt

DSL

557-07-3

9-Octadecenoic acid (Z)-, zinc salt

DSL

557-08-4

10-Undecenoic acid, zinc salt

DSL

557-34-6

Acetic acid, zinc salt

DSL

1314-13-2

Zinc oxide (ZnO)

DSL

1314-22-3

Zinc peroxide (Zn(O2))

DSL

1314-84-7

Zinc phosphide (Zn3P2)

R-ICL

1314-98-3

Zinc sulfide (ZnS)

DSL

1345-05-7

C.I. Pigment White 5

DSL

1405-89-6

Bacitracin Zinc

R-ICL

2452-01-9

Dodecanoic acid, zinc salt

DSL

3486-35-9

Carbonic acid, zinc salt (1:1)

DSL

4259-15-8

Zinc, bis[O,O-bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphorodithioato-S,S’]-, (T-4)-

DSL

4468-02-4

Zinc, bis(D-gluconato-O1,O2)-

DSL

5970-45-6

Acetic acid, zinc salt, dihydrate

DSL

7446-19-7

Sulfuric acid, zinc salt (1:1), monohydrate

DSL

7446-20-0

Sulfuric acid, zinc salt (1:1), heptahydrate

DSL

7446-26-6

Diphosphoric acid, zinc salt (1:2)

DSL

7646-85-7

Zinc chloride (ZnCl2)

DSL

7733-02-0

Sulfuric acid, zinc salt (1:1)

DSL

7779-88-6

Nitric acid, zinc salt

DSL

7779-90-0

Phosphoric acid, zinc salt (2:3)

DSL

8011-96-9

Calamine (pharmaceutical preparation)

DSL

8048-07-5

C.I. Pigment Yellow 35

DSL

10139-47-6

Zinc iodide (ZnI2)

R-ICL

11103-86-9

Chromate(1-), hydroxyoctaoxodizincatedi-, potassium

DSL

12001-85-3

Naphthenic acids, zinc salts

DSL

12122-17-7

Hydrozincite (Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6)

DSL

12442-27-2

Cadmium zinc sulfide ((Cd,Zn)S)

DSL

13189-00-9

2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, zinc salt

DSL

13463-41-7

Zinc, bis(1-hydroxy-2(1H)-pyridinethionato-O,S)-, (T-4)-

DSL

13530-65-9

Chromic acid (H2CrO4), zinc salt (1:1)

DSL

13598-37-3

Phosphoric acid, zinc salt (2:1)

DSL

14324-55-1

Zinc, bis(diethylcarbamodithioato-S,S’)-, (T-4)-

DSL

14476-25-6

Smithsonite (Zn(CO3))

DSL

14726-36-4

Zinc, bis[bis(phenylmethyl)carbamodithioato-S,S’]-, (T-4)-

DSL

15337-18-5

Zinc, bis(dipentylcarbamodithioato-S,S’)-, (T-4)-

DSL

15454-75-8

Zinc, bis(5-oxo-L-prolinato-.kappa.N1,.kappa.O2)-, (T-4)-

R-ICL

16260-27-8

Tetradecanoic acid, zinc salt

DSL

16283-36-6

Zinc, bis(2-hydroxybenzoato-O1,O2)-, (T-4)-

DSL

16871-71-9

Silicate(2-), hexafluoro-, zinc (1:1)

DSL

17949-65-4

Zinc, bis(2-pyridinecarboxylato-.kappa.N1,.kappa.O2-, (T-4)-

R-ICL

19210-06-1

Phosphorodithioic acid, zinc salt

DSL

20427-58-1

Zinc hydroxide (Zn(OH)2)

DSL

24308-84-7

Benzenesulfinic acid, zinc salt

DSL

24887-06-7

Zinc, bis(hydroxymethanesulfinato-OS,O1)-, (T-4)-

DSL

27253-29-8

Neodecanoic acid, zinc salt

DSL

28016-00-4

Naphthalenesulfonic acid, dinonyl-, zinc salt

DSL

28629-66-5

Zinc, bis(O,O-diisooctyl phosphorodithioato-S,S’)-

DSL

36393-20-1

Zincate(2-), bis[L-aspartato(2-)-.kappa.N,.kappa.O1]-, dihydrogen, (T-4)-

R-ICL

37300-23-5

C.I. Pigment Yellow 36

DSL

38714-47-5

Zinc(2++), tetraammine-, (T-4)-, carbonate (1:1)

DSL

40861-29-8

Carbonic acid, ammonium zinc salt (2:2:1)

DSL

49663-84-5

Zinc chromate hydroxide (Zn5(CrO4)(OH)8)

DSL

50922-29-7

Chromium zinc oxide

DSL

51810-70-9

Zinc phosphide

R-ICL

61617-00-3

2H-Benzimidazole-2-thione, 1,3-dihydro-4(or 5)-methyl-, zinc salt (2:1)

DSL

68457-79-4

Phosphorodithioic acid, mixed O,O-bis(iso-Bu and pentyl) esters, zinc salts

DSL

68611-70-1

Zinc sulfide (ZnS), copper chloride-doped

DSL

68649-42-3

Phosphorodithioic acid, O,O-di-C1-14-alkyl esters, zinc salts

DSL

68784-31-6

Phosphorodithioic acid, mixed O,O-bis(sec-Bu and 1,3-dimethylbutyl) esters, zinc salts

DSL

68918-69-4

Petrolatum (petroleum), oxidized, zinc salt

DSL

68988-45-4

Phosphorodithioic acid, mixed O,O-bis(2-ethylhexyl and iso-Bu and pentyl) esters, zinc salts

DSL

73398-89-7

Xanthylium, 3,6-bis(diethylamino)-9-[2-(methoxycarbonyl)phenyl]-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1)

DSL

84605-29-8

Phosphorodithioic acid, mixed O,O-bis(1,3-dimethylbutyl and iso-Pr) esters, zinc salts

DSL

85940-28-9

Phosphorodithioic acid, mixed O,O-bis(2-ethylhexyl and iso-Bu and iso-Pr) esters, zinc salts

DSL

102868-96-2

Zinc, bis[N-(acetyl-.kappa.O)-L-methioninato-.kappa.O]-, (T-4)-

R-ICL

113706-15-3

Phosphorodithioic acid, mixed O,O-bis(sec-Bu and isooctyl) esters, zinc salts

DSL

1434719-44-4

Protein hydrolyzates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae zinc complexes

R-ICL

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of chlorhexidine and its salts, including those specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas chlorhexidine diacetate and chlorhexidine dihydrochloride are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on chlorhexidine and its salts pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to recommend to Her Excellency the Governor in Council that chlorhexidine and its salts be added to Schedule 1 of the Act.

Notice is furthermore given that the ministers have released a proposed risk management approach document for chlorhexidine and its salts on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website to continue discussions with stakeholders on the manner in which the ministers intend to develop a proposed regulation or instrument respecting preventive or control actions in relation to the substance.

Public comment period on the risk management approach

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of the proposed risk management approach document, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the proposed risk management approach document. More information regarding the proposed risk management approach may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819‑938‑5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of chlorhexidine and its salts

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of chlorhexidine and its salts, including (but not limited to) the salts listed in the table below. These substances were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other concerns. In July 2013, a draft screening assessment for chlorhexidine diacetate (then referred to as chlorhexidine acetate) was published in which it was proposed to conclude that it was not harmful to human health, but was harmful to the environment. Significant new information subsequently became available regarding other potential sources of exposure to the chlorhexidine moiety. As a result, a subsequent draft screening assessment was published on August 19, 2017, that assessed the chlorhexidine moiety to consider potential impacts on the environment and human health with respect to exposure from other potential sources of chlorhexidine.

The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNs footnote 2), the Domestic Substances List (DSL) names or chemical names, and the common names of chlorhexidine and its salts are listed in the table below.

Chlorhexidine and its salts

CAS RN

DSL name or chemical name

Common name

55-56-1 table b2 note a table b2 note b

2,4,11,13-Tetraazatetradecanediimidamide, N,N ″-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-3,12-diimino-

Chlorhexidine

56-95-1

2,4,11,13-Tetraazatetradecanediimidamide, N,N ″-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-3,12-diimino-, diacetate

Chlorhexidine diacetate

3697-42-5 table b2 note b

2,4,11,13-Tetraazatetradecanediimidamide, N,N ″-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-3,12-diimino-, dihydrochloride

Chlorhexidine dihydrochloride

18472-51-0 table b2 note a

D-Gluconic acid, compound with N,N ″-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-3,12-diimino-2,4,11,13-tetraazatetradecanediimidamide

Chlorhexidine digluconate

Table b2 note(s)

Table b2 note a

This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA but was included in this assessment, as it was considered a priority on the basis of other concerns.

Return to table b2 note a referrer

Table b2 note b

This substance is on the Revised In Commerce List of the Food and Drugs Act. Chlorhexidine dihydrochloride is not on the DSL or the Non-domestic Substances List.

Return to table b2 note b referrer

Chlorhexidine and its salts do not occur naturally. Surveys have been conducted under section 71 of CEPA for chlorhexidine (reporting year 2011), chlorhexidine diacetate (reporting years 2005, 2006 and 2011), chlorhexidine digluconate (reporting year 2011), and chlorhexidine dihydrochloride (reporting year 2015), with voluntary information being submitted for chlorhexidine dihydrochloride for 2013. None of these substances were reported to be manufactured in Canada for the years reported. Chlorhexidine diacetate and chlorhexidine dihydrochloride were reported to be imported into Canada in quantities of 1 000 to 10 000 kg, while imports of chlorhexidine digluconate were reported to be in the range of 10 000 to 100 000 kg. No data on measured concentrations in the Canadian environment have been identified for any of these substances. Chlorhexidine and its salts are used in Canada as broad-spectrum antiseptics and antimicrobial preservatives in products such as cosmetics, natural health products, prescription and non-prescription drugs for human or veterinary uses, and hard-surface disinfectants.

Releases of chlorhexidine and its salts to the Canadian environment come from consumer use and formulation of chlorhexidine-based products. Releases are expected to be diffuse (i.e. down the drain from the use of products containing chlorhexidine or its salts), as well as from point sources (e.g. from sites formulating products containing chlorhexidine or its salts). When released to the aquatic environment, chlorhexidine salts dissociate in water to release chlorhexidine. Information on the fate and behaviour in the environment of chlorhexidine indicates that this substance tends to persist in water, sediment and soil, and it has a low potential to bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms. Experimental acute and chronic toxicity data for chlorhexidine and its salts show that chlorhexidine has the potential to cause adverse effects to aquatic organisms at low concentrations. Ecological exposure scenarios were developed for down-the-drain releases from uses of products containing these substances, as well as for releases from industrial sites formulating products containing these substances, using a combination of results from monitoring and modelling. Risk quotient analyses were conducted to compare aquatic concentrations of chlorhexidine to adverse effect concentrations on aquatic and benthic organisms. The results indicate that chlorhexidine and its salts pose a risk to aquatic and benthic organisms when released as a result of industrial use, but not from the use of products containing these substances (down-the-drain releases).

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a risk of harm to the environment from chlorhexidine and its salts. It is concluded that chlorhexidine and its salts meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) of CEPA, as they are entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity. However, it is concluded that chlorhexidine and its salts do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

General population exposure to chlorhexidine and its salts from environmental media is expected to be low. Considering current use patterns, exposure is not expected from the diet. General population exposure can occur from the use of cosmetics and natural health products containing chlorhexidine or its salts.

No evidence of carcinogenicity or genotoxicity was observed in the available health effects database for chlorhexidine and its salts. The margins between estimates of exposure from environmental media and from use of products available to consumers and levels associated with effects in laboratory studies are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases. On the basis of available information for human health considerations, it is concluded that chlorhexidine and its salts do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is therefore concluded that chlorhexidine and its salts meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

It has also been determined that chlorhexidine moiety meets the persistence criteria but not the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA.

The screening assessment and the risk management approach document for chlorhexidine and its salts are available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Update to Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone

Whereas the Minister of the Environment wishes to set ambient air quality standards issued as environmental quality objectives specifying goals or purposes for pollution prevention or environmental control that lead to improved air quality, healthier communities and the protection of the environment;

Whereas the Minister of Health wishes to preserve and improve public health;

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have worked collaboratively with provinces and territories, Indigenous peoples’ representatives, and stakeholders from industry, health, and environmental organizations through a consensus-based process under the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment for the review and update of the Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone;

Whereas that process resulted in a conclusion that a more stringent ozone objective is necessary in order to drive further improvements in air quality across Canada;

Whereas the Minister of the Environment has offered to consult provincial and territorial governments and members of the National Advisory Committee of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 who are representatives of Indigenous peoples, in compliance with subsection 54(3) of the Act;

Whereas at least 60 days have elapsed following the day on which the Minister of the Environment offered to consult in accordance with subsection 54(3) of the Act;

And whereas the new objective for ozone relates to the environment, an area identified in paragraph 54(2)(a) of the Act, and to elements of the environment that may affect the life and health of Canadians, as specified in subsection 55(1) of the Act,

Now, therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 54(1) of the Act, and the Minister of Health, pursuant to subsection 55(1) of the Act, issue the new objective for ambient ozone as described in the Annex.

June 29, 2019

The Honourable Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

The Honourable Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

1. The Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) for ozone (O3) are based on three interrelated elements:

2. The new CAAQS for ozone is provided in the table below.

Averaging Time

Standard
(Numerical Value)

Statistical Form of the Standard

Year 2025

8 hour

60 ppb table b3 note *

The 3-year average of the annual 4th highest of the daily maximum 8-hour average ozone concentrations

Table b3 note(s)

Table b3 note *

ppb = parts per billion by volume

Return to table b3 note * referrer

3. The CAAQS for ozone for the year 2025 will come into effect as of 12:00 a.m. (midnight) on January 1, 2025.

4. At that time, this new CAAQS will replace the existing CAAQS for ozone published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on May 25, 2013.

5. A review of the CAAQS for ozone will be undertaken as needed to ensure it is reflective of the latest science and health information.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Notice.)

Ground-level ozone footnote 3 (ozone) is one of the major components of smog, one of the most recognizable air quality problems in Canada. There is clear scientific evidence that ozone can aggravate existing medical conditions such as asthma, heart disease and diabetes. Short-term increases in ozone levels are associated with increased lung problems, hospital admissions and medical visits and premature mortality. Ozone can also lead to damaging effects on the environment. Ozone is harmful to animals’ respiratory systems, is damaging to crops and forests, and can oxidize building materials. Ozone is also a potent greenhouse gas and a short-lived climate pollutant that contributes to near-term climate change. Ozone is considered a “secondary” pollutant, as it is not emitted directly into the atmosphere from human activities, but is formed in the atmosphere through a series of complex chemical reactions involving the precursor gases nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds in the presence of sunlight. Long-range transport of ozone and its precursors and exceptional events such as forest fires can also lead to increased local ozone levels.

All CAAQS are developed considering health and environmental impacts and are intended to drive continuous improvement of air quality in Canada. The CAAQS are developed collaboratively by Health Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada, provinces, territories, Indigenous peoples’ representatives, and stakeholders from industry, health, and environmental organizations through a consensus-based process under the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME).

The CAAQS are a key element of the Air Quality Management System (AQMS), a collaborative approach implemented by federal, provincial and territorial governments for improving air quality in Canada and for protecting the health of Canadians and the environment. In October 2012, the CCME endorsed 2015 and 2020 CAAQS for ground-level ozone. Subsequent to their endorsement, the federal government established these CAAQS as ambient air quality objectives in May 2013 under the authority of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

As part of the establishment of the ozone CAAQS, the CCME agreed to undertake a review of the 2020 CAAQS and consider recommendations for new CAAQS for 2025. The CCME initiated the review in 2017 and, in June 2019, endorsed updated CAAQS for ozone for 2025. The 2025 ozone CAAQS are more stringent than the existing CAAQS and will drive continuous improvement in air quality across the country, further protecting the health of Canadians and sensitive ecosystems.

The AQMS is comprehensive, considering all significant sources of air pollutant emissions, and providing a consistent yet flexible framework to implement air quality management actions. These actions are guided by the Air Zone Management Framework footnote 4 of the AQMS, which includes four colour-coded air quality management levels that encourage progressively more rigorous actions by jurisdictions as air quality approaches or exceeds the CAAQS, thereby ensuring that the CAAQS are not pollute-up-to levels.

The management levels for the CAAQS for ozone in 2025 are summarized in the table below. Management levels for the existing 2015 and 2020 ozone CAAQS are also shown for context.

Ozone management levels

Air Quality Management Levels footnote 5 and Goals

Ozone Concentrations Associated with Management Level table b4 note * (ppb)

2015

2020

2025

RED
Reduce ambient air pollutant concentrations below the CAAQS

>63

>62

>60

ORANGE
Prevent CAAQS exceedance

57–63

57–62

57–60

YELLOW
Prevent air quality deterioration

51–56

51–56

51–56

GREEN
Keep clean areas clean

≤ 50

≤ 50

≤ 50

Table b4 note(s)

Table b4 note *

The concentrations have the same statistical form as their corresponding CAAQS (see the Annex above).

Return to table b4 note * referrer

To assist in the management of air quality, provinces and territories have delineated their jurisdictions into local areas called air zones that have different air quality characteristics that are influenced by the number and type of air pollutant sources, meteorology and topography. Provinces and territories lead air quality management actions in the air zones, guided by a number of guidance documents developed by the CCME in consultation with stakeholders.

Under the AQMS, federal, provincial and territorial governments have agreed to report regularly on air quality and on the management actions undertaken to improve air quality.

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE

BANK ACT

SMBC Rail Services Canada ULC and Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group, Inc. and its affiliates — Order deeming entities not to be entities associated with a foreign bank

Pursuant to subsection 507(19) of the Bank Act, notice is hereby given of the issuance, pursuant to section 3 of the Entity Associated with a Foreign Bank Regulations, of an order deeming SMBC Rail Services Canada ULC not to be an entity associated with a foreign bank for the purposes of paragraphs 510(1)(a) and (b) of the Bank Act. The order also deems Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group, Inc. and its affiliates not to be entities associated with a foreign bank for the purposes of paragraph 510(1)(d) of the Bank Act, provided that with respect to Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group, Inc. and each of its affiliates, the order only applies in relation to those entities’ control of, or substantial investment in, SMBC Rail Services Canada ULC. The order was effective as of March 15, 2019.

William Morneau
Minister of Finance

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Proposed guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for aluminum

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of a proposed guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for aluminum. The proposed guideline document is available from June 28, 2019, to August 30, 2019, on the Water Quality website. Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of Health written comments on the proposed document. Comments must be sent to the Secretariat of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water, either by email at HC.water-eau.SC@canada.ca, or by regular mail to the Water and Air Quality Bureau, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, A.L. 4903D, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

June 10, 2019

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX
Proposed guideline

A maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 2.9 mg/L is proposed for total aluminum in drinking water and an operational guidance (OG) value of 0.050 mg/L for total aluminum is proposed to optimize water treatment and distribution systems.

Executive summary

This guideline technical document was prepared in collaboration with the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water and assesses all available information on aluminum.

Exposure

Aluminum is a metal widely distributed in nature. It may be present in water from natural sources or as a result of human activities. This metal is used for many purposes: in the production of construction materials, vehicles, aircraft, electronics, pharmaceuticals and personal care products; as a food additive; and as a component of food packaging materials. Aluminum salts are commonly added as coagulants during water treatment to remove turbidity, organic matter and microorganisms. Aluminum is also an impurity found in other water treatment chemicals and can leach into drinking water from cement mortar pipes or linings.

The Canadian population is exposed to aluminum from its presence in the environment and in a variety of products and processes. The main source for Canadians’ exposure is through food, followed sequentially by exposure through soil, drinking water and air. Aluminum concentrations in water vary across Canada, with surface water generally presenting higher concentrations than groundwater. Intake of aluminum from drinking water is not expected to occur through either skin contact or inhalation.

Health effects

Aluminum is not an essential element. Studies in humans have found possible associations between aluminum ingestion and diseases of the nervous system. However, these studies have a number of design limitations and do not provide strong evidence that aluminum can cause these diseases. Studies in animals have consistently observed adverse effects on the nervous system following ingestion of high levels of aluminum, which supports effects seen in human studies. The proposed MAC of 2.9 mg/L is based on neurological effects observed in rats.

Operational and aesthetic considerations

Aluminum can act as an accumulation sink for such other contaminants as arsenic, chromium, manganese and nickel and can influence the concentrations of lead and copper. An OG of 0.050 mg/L is proposed for both the entry point and distribution system to minimize the potential accumulation and release of aluminum and co-occurring contaminants.

Aluminum can coat water mains, service lines and water meters, resulting in pressure losses, meter malfunctions or turbid/discoloured water. An OG of 0.050 mg/L is proposed for both the entry point and the distribution system to avoid these issues as well.

Analysis and treatment

Several methods are available for analyzing total aluminum in drinking water at concentrations well below the proposed MAC and OG. Online or portable colorimetric analyzers are important tools for obtaining a rapid indication of changes to aluminum concentrations. These measurements can be used to make quick treatment adjustments, which are critical for effective plant operation. Water utilities should confirm with the responsible drinking water authority in the affected jurisdiction whether results from these units can be used for compliance reporting.

Water treatment strategies should minimize the aluminum concentration that enters the distribution system from the treatment plant. For water treatment plants using aluminum-based coagulants, the aluminum residual is an important process parameter (like pH, temperature, turbidity and other measurements) to achieve optimum coagulation. Strict pH control and adequate coagulant dosing are necessary to optimize coagulation and minimize aluminum residual concentrations. It is important to note that coagulant under-dosing can result in substantial deterioration of pathogen removal capability. Strategies to minimize residual aluminum concentrations should not compromise the removal effectiveness of pathogens or natural organic matter (NOM) [i.e. disinfection by-product precursors].

Measures should also be in place to minimize the contribution of aluminum from other water treatment chemicals.

For naturally occurring aluminum in source water, the only known effective treatment technology is coagulation, which is not typically undertaken in small systems or private water supplies. In cases where aluminum removal is required and coagulation is not feasible, the responsible drinking water authority in the affected jurisdiction should be contacted to discuss possible options.

Distribution system

It is recommended that water utilities develop a distribution system management plan to minimize the accumulation and release of aluminum and co-occurring contaminants in the system. This typically involves minimizing the aluminum concentration entering the distribution system and implementing best practices to maintain stable chemical and biological water quality conditions throughout the system, as well as to minimize physical and hydraulic disturbances.

Application of the guideline

Note: Specific guidance related to the implementation of drinking water guidelines should be obtained from the appropriate drinking water authority in the appropriate jurisdiction.

Due to the effect of pH, temperature and NOM on aluminum concentrations, seasonal trends can be highly relevant, even for systems that do not add coagulants. Treatment modifications or other operational practices can also impact aluminum concentrations. Water utilities should therefore carefully monitor total aluminum concentrations, from the source through to the distribution system, as concentrations can change. Site-specific monitoring plans should be developed to capture all seasonal water quality conditions for comparison with the proposed OG of 0.050 mg/L.

Total aluminum in drinking water, based on a locational running annual average of a minimum of quarterly samples taken in the distribution system, should be calculated for comparison with the proposed MAC of 2.9 mg/L.

International considerations

Other national and international organizations have drinking water guidelines, standards and/or guidance values. Variations in these values can be attributed to the age of the assessments or to differing policies and approaches, including the choice of key study and the use of different consumption rates, body weights and source allocation factors.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), the European Union and Australia’s National Health and Medical Research Council have not established health-based regulatory limits for aluminum in drinking water. Rather, these agencies and other international agencies have set OG values ranging from 0.050 mg/L to 0.20 mg/L, based on aesthetic or operational considerations.

In its 2010 assessment of aluminum in drinking water, the World Health Organization (WHO) calculated a non-regulatory health-based value of 0.9 mg/L, but highlighted the importance of not exceeding the practicable levels of 0.1–0.2 mg/L. The proposed Canadian guideline differs from the WHO’s health-based value because Canada takes into consideration advancements in science since 2010. The WHO assessment is based on the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives’s (JECFA) previous Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI) for aluminum of 1 mg/kg body weight per day (JECFA, 2007). JECFA has since revised its PTWI to 2 mg/kg body weight per day (JECFA, 2012) based on the key study, Poirier et al., 2011, that is used in the Canadian guideline.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Filing of claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 12(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of the filing of the claims for exemption listed below.

In accordance with subsection 12(2) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, affected parties, as defined, may make written representations to the screening officer with respect to the claim for exemption and the safety data sheet (SDS) or label to which it relates. Written representations must cite the appropriate registry number, state the reasons and evidence upon which the representations are based and be delivered within 30 days of the date of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to the screening officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau, 269 Laurier Avenue West, 8th Floor (4908-B), Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

Véronique Lalonde
Chief Screening Officer

On February 11, 2015, the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) was amended, and the Controlled Products Regulations (CPR) and the Ingredient Disclosure List were repealed and replaced with the new Hazardous Products Regulations (HPR). The revised legislation (HPA/HPR) is referred to as WHMIS 2015.

The claims listed below seek an exemption from the disclosure of supplier confidential business information in respect of a hazardous product; such disclosure would otherwise be required under the provisions of the relevant legislation.

Claimant

Product Identifier

Subject of the Claim for Exemption

Registry Number

Fluid Energy Group Ltd.

Enviro-Syn® HCR-3000CEF

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03319234

3M Canada Company

3M™ Polyurethane Adhesive Sealant 550 Fast Cure

C. of three ingredients

03329295

3M Canada Company

3M™ Fire Barrier Rated Foam, FIP 1-Step Part A

C.i. of one ingredient

03329297

Win Manuco Ltd.

iQLF

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

03329320

Henkel Canada Corporation

TECHNOMELT PUR 513C

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03329335

Allnex Canada Inc., c/o Goodmans, LLP

MODAFLOW® Resin

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03329449

Allnex Canada Inc., c/o Goodmans, LLP

MODAFLOW® 2100 Additives

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03329450

Allnex Canada Inc., c/o Goodmans, LLP

MULTIFLOW® Resin

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03329452

Jacam Manufacturing, 2013, LLC

SuperCorr® X Part A

C.i. of one ingredient

03329581

ROHM AND HAAS CANADA LP

MONOMER QM-516

C.i. of one ingredient

03329615

Atotech Canada Ltd.

Stannatech SF 8 VK

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03329713

Chevron Oronite Company LLC

CS 4400

C.i. of four ingredients

03329714

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

Vitec 1400

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

03329892

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

Vitec 3000

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

03329893

Akzo Nobel Surface Chemistry LLC

REDICOTE E-4819

C.i. of three ingredients

03329908

Baker Hughes Canada Company

BPC 68156 CORROSION INHIBITOR

C.i. and C. of one ingredient
C.i. of one ingredient

03329909

Nalco Canada ULC

FCC4000WC

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03330168

Cambrian Solutions Inc.

Camsolv S0

C.i. of one ingredient

03330169

Baker Hughes Canada Company

RE32553

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

03330434

Nalco Canada ULC

PROE27105A

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

03330645

ECO-TEC Inc

ECO BRINE-XLH

C.i. of two ingredients

03330749

Quantum Chemical Ltd.

SafeCoat Clear II Part A

C.i. of one ingredient

03330779

Ingevity Corporation

INDULIN MQ3

C.i. of one ingredient

03331166

Henkel Canada Corporation

Loctite Eccobond NCP 5209

C.i. of six ingredients

03331167

Allnex Canada Inc., c/o Goodmans, LLP

PC-1644® Defoamer

C.i. of one ingredient

03331232

Albemarle Corporation

KF-772

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

03331233

3M Canada Company

3M™ Fire Retardant Protective Coating - EC-8027 CLR Clear Base Coat

C.i. of five ingredients

03331329

Ingevity Corporation

QPR-SQe

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

03331336

Toyota Tsusho Canada Inc.

PELECTRON PVL

C.i. of one ingredient

03331486

Toyota Tsusho Canada Inc.

PELECTRON PVH

C.i. of two ingredients

03331495

Toyota Tsusho Canada Inc.

PELECTRON AS

C.i. of one ingredient

03331510

Toyota Tsusho Canada Inc.

PELESTAT 230

C.i. of one ingredient

03331511

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

RoClean L211

C.i. and C. of five ingredients
C. of one ingredient

03331675

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

RoClean P111

C.i. and C. of three ingredients
C. of two ingredients

03331682

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

RoClean P303

C.i. and C. of three ingredients
C. of one ingredient

03331683

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

RoClean P611

C.i. and C. of three ingredients
C. of two ingredients

03331685

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

RoClean P703

C.i. and C. of three ingredients
C. of one ingredient

03331689

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

RoQuest 3000

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

03331696

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

AntiChlor 427

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03331703

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

SafeGuard 100

C.i. and C. of three ingredients

03331704

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

RoCide IS2

C.i. and C. of two ingredients
C. of one ingredient

03331705

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

RoClean L403

C.i. and C. of one ingredient
C. of two ingredients

03331706

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

Vitec 5100

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

03331707

Nalco Canada ULC

CORE SHELL® 71306

C.i. of one ingredient

03331788

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

Vitec 7000

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

03331808

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

RoClean P112

C.i. and C. of two ingredients
C. of two ingredients

03331809

Baker Hughes Canada Company

RE34114TAN TAN Reduction Aid

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03331811

AVISTA TECHNOLOGIES Inc.

Vitec 4000

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

03331812

Note: C.i. = chemical identity and C. = concentration

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Bourassa Forcier, Mélanie

2019-773

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

 

Member and Vice-chairperson

 

Bourque, Christa, Q.C.

2019-630

Court of Queen’s Bench of New Brunswick, Family Division

 

Judge

 

Court of Appeal of New Brunswick

 

Judge ex officio

 

Court of Queen’s Bench of New Brunswick, Trial Division

 

Judges

 

Court of Appeal of New Brunswick

 

Judges ex officio

 

Doyle, Arthur T.

2019-631

Dysart, Robert, Q.C.

2019-632

DeWare, The Hon. Tracey K.

2019-625

Court of Queen’s Bench of New Brunswick

 

Chief Justice

 

Court of Appeal of New Brunswick

 

Judge ex officio

 

Faullem, The Hon. Jean

2019-626

Superior Court of Quebec for the district of Gatineau, Labelle and Pontiac

 

Puisne Judge

 

Immigration and Refugee Board

 

Full-time members

 

Bousfield, Joel Armstrong

2019-670

Braden, Cheryl Marie

2019-708

Harrison, Christopher Gerald

2019-671

Lamani, Mokhtar

2019-772

Lourenco, Jessica Ramires

2019-673

Maxwell, Caitlin Maureen

2019-707

McGovern, Karen Lorraine

2019-672

Schwarz, Madeleine Jane

2019-706

Thibault, Marie-Lyne

2019-709

McDonald, Elizabeth

2019-633

Supreme Court of British Columbia

 

Judge

 

National Farm Products Council

 

Member

 

Faulkner, Joelle Abra

2019-702

Member and Vice-Chairperson

 

Bonnett, Ronald

2019-701

National Research Council of Canada

 

Members

 

Bakker, Karen J.

2019-649

Beauchamp, Norma

2019-651

Blum, Susan

2019-648

Hoemsen, Raymond Peter

2019-652

Murphy, Steven A.

2019-650

Rivard, Pierre

2019-653

Superior Court of Quebec for the district of Montréal

 

Puisnes Judges

 

Edwards, The Hon. Jeffrey

2019-627

Gagnon, Anne-France

2019-628

Harvie, Judith

2019-629

June 20, 2019

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

AERONAUTICS ACT

Interim Order No. 2 Respecting Battery-powered Hand-held Lasers

Whereas the annexed Interim Order No. 2 Respecting Battery-powered Hand-held Lasers is required to deal with a significant risk, direct or indirect, to aviation safety or the safety of the public;

Whereas the provisions of the annexed Order may be contained in a regulation made pursuant to section 4.9 footnote g, paragraphs 7.6(1)(a) footnote h and (b) footnote i and section 7.7 footnote j of the Aeronautics Act footnote k;

And whereas, pursuant to subsection 6.41(1.2) footnote l of that Act, the Minister of Transport has consulted with the persons and organizations that the Minister considers appropriate in the circumstances before making the annexed Order,

Therefore, the Minister of Transport, pursuant to subsection 6.41(1) footnote l of the Aeronautics Act footnote k, makes the annexed Interim Order No. 2 Respecting Battery-powered Hand-held Lasers.

Ottawa, June 10, 2019

Marc Garneau
Minister of Transport

Interim Order No. 2 Respecting Battery-powered Hand-held Lasers

Interpretation

Definition of Regulations

1 (1) In this Interim Order, Regulations means the Canadian Aviation Regulations.

Interpretation

(2) Unless the context requires otherwise, all other words and expressions used in this Interim Order have the same meaning as in the Regulations.

Conflict

(3) In the event of a conflict between this Interim Order and the Regulations, the Interim Order prevails.

Designated Provision

Designation

2 (1) The provision set out in column I of the schedule is designated as a provision the contravention of which may be dealt with under and in accordance with the procedure set out in sections 7.7 to 8.2 of the Act.

Maximum amounts

(2) The amounts set out in column II of the schedule are the maximum amounts of the penalty payable in respect of a contravention of the designated provision set out in column I.

Notice

(3) A notice referred to in subsection 7.7(1) of the Act must be in writing and must specify

Application

Battery-powered hand-held lasers

3 This Interim Order applies in respect of battery-powered hand-held lasers with a power output rating greater than 1 milliwatt.

Prohibited Zones

Prohibition

4 (1) No person shall have in their possession a battery-powered hand-held laser

TABLE

Montréal region

Toronto region

Vancouver region

Boucherville

Brampton

Burnaby

Côte-Saint-Luc

Halton Hills

Coquitlam

Dollard-des-Ormeaux

Markham

Delta

Dorval

Mississauga

New Westminster

Hampstead

Toronto

North Vancouver (City)

Laval

Vaughan

Port Coquitlam

Longueuil

 

Richmond

Montréal

 

Vancouver

Montréal-Est

   

Montréal-Ouest

   

Pointe-Claire

   

Rosemère

   

Saint-Lambert

   

Westmount

   

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply if

Repeal

5 The Interim Order Respecting Batterypowered Hand-held Lasers, made on June 28, 2018, is repealed if this Interim Order is made before the Interim Order Battery-powered Hand-held Lasers ceases to have effect.

SCHEDULE

(Subsections 2(1) and (2))

Designated Provision

Column I

Designated Provision

Column II

Maximum Amount of Penalty ($)

 

Individual

Corporation

Subsection 4(1)

5,000

25,000

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This note is not part of the Order.)

Proposal

This Order approves Interim Order No. 2 Respecting Battery-powered Hand-held Lasers (“the Interim Order”) made under subsection 6.41(1) of the Aeronautics Act (the Act) by the Minister of Transport on June 10, 2019.

Content of the Interim Order

The Interim Order applies to all battery-operated hand-held lasers with an output of greater than 1 milliwatt (mW). Hand-held lasers with varying strengths may be used for professional, business, or recreational purposes. For example, in the construction industry, a hand-held laser may be used to measure distances. For astronomy societies, hand-held lasers are an important tool used during demonstrations to explore the night sky.

The Interim Order prohibits possession of all battery-operated hand-held lasers with an output of greater than 1 mW within a 10 km radius of the geometric centre of an airport or heliport in Canada and within the prescribed municipalities in the Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver regions. If an individual is in possession of a battery-operated hand-held laser within a private dwelling, the Interim Order does not apply. The 10 km radius was developed by Transport Canada subject matter experts (SMEs) calculating the visual effects a laser attack can have upon a pilot operating an aircraft during a critical phase of flight (such as take-off or upon final approach to landing). The closer the laser attack takes place to an airport and the stronger the output of the laser, the more severe the potential consequences are of such an attack.

There are presently 316 certified aerodromes in Canada and 223 certified heliports. In the cases of Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver, the 10 km radiuses of the certified aerodromes and heliports cover the vast majority of the city boundaries and surrounding municipalities. As a result, Transport Canada has decided to clearly define these boundaries in the Interim Order as follows:

Prescribed municipalities from Interim Order

Montréal
Region

Toronto Region

Vancouver
Region

Boucherville

Côte-Saint-Luc

Dollard-des-Ormeaux

Dorval

Hampstead

Laval

Longueuil

Montréal

Montréal-Est

Montréal-Ouest

Pointe-Claire

Rosemère

Saint-Lambert

Westmount

Brampton

Halton Hills

Markham

Mississauga

Toronto

Vaughan

Burnaby

Coquitlam

Delta

New Westminster

North Vancouver (City)

Port Coquitlam

Richmond

Vancouver

The Interim Order is identical to the Interim Order Respecting Battery-powered Hand-held Lasers made on June 28, 2018, with the exception of some clarifications with respect to the prescribed municipalities of Toronto. The municipalities of East York, Etobicoke, North York and York were removed because they have been amalgamated into the greater City of Toronto.

The Interim Order does not apply to individuals and/or groups with a legitimate reason to be in possession of a hand-held laser within the defined area. The legitimate-use category is intended to have a broad application to ensure that those individuals with a legitimate purpose in possession of a hand-held laser will not be subject to penalty. This has been communicated to delegated authorities as part of a comprehensive training package to ensure the Interim Order does not unnecessarily burden law-abiding citizens. Legitimate uses include possession of a hand-held laser for occupational or business purposes, educational purposes, transporting the laser in the course of professional duties or activities related to an astronomical society.

A legitimate reason may also include transporting a hand-held laser for use outside of the prohibited zone. If asked by a Transport Canada official or delegated authority, the individual must explain why they have a legitimate reason to be in possession of the hand-held laser. These types of exceptions are being clearly communicated in Transport Canada’s proactive national communications approach.

Enforcement authorities will exercise their discretion when deciding how to proceed based on the circumstances of each case. The Interim Order provides additional enforcement tools, but criminal offences always remain an option. This is also addressed as part of the training package disseminated to delegated authorities.

The Interim Order, in accordance with subsection 6.41(2) of the Act, ceases to have effect 14 days after it is made unless it is approved by the Governor in Council (GIC) within that period of time. Should GIC approval be granted, the Interim Order, in accordance with subsection 6.41(3) of the Act, will remain in effect for one year from the day it was made or until regulations having the same effect come into force.

Objective

The objective of this Interim Order is to address the continued risk to aviation safety caused by laser attacks on aircraft. This is accomplished by prohibiting possession of hand-held lasers with an output greater than 1 mW within the immediate vicinity of certified aerodromes and heliports where the majority of laser attacks occur. The intended result is to sustain the encouraging reduction in the number of reported laser attacks on aircraft and maintain enhanced enforcement for offences through immediate issuance of administrative monetary penalties (AMPs). Concomitant benefits are increased deterrence and improved education and awareness.

Background

Laser attacks pose a real danger to flight crew and aviation safety. In Canada, these attacks are reported hundreds of times per year. Hand-held lasers are easily accessible. At present, it is legally permissible in Canada to sell and use hand-held lasers with an output of 5 mW or less. Online retailers may allow consumers to skirt Health Canada regulations under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA), which limits the power output of hand-held lasers. When misused, hand-held lasers can become a danger to aviation safety. Laser attacks can distract the pilot, create glare that affects the pilot’s vision, or temporarily blind the pilot, resulting in hazardous situations, particularly during the critical phases of flight, such as take-off and landing.

In response to laser attacks on aircraft, Transport Canada implemented a public awareness and education campaign called “Not a Bright Idea” through social media, and information available on its website. Deterrence, education and awareness campaigns alone cannot reduce the number of laser attacks. Laser attacks continue to be reported hundreds of times per year. Improved enforcement tools are therefore essential. Historically, there is a spike in laser attacks over the summer months, highlighting the urgency for the Minister to take immediate action by making this Interim Order with the approach of the summer season.

To address this prevalent and immediate risk to aviation safety, Transport Canada amended the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) to designate section 601.20 (Projection of a Bright Light Source at an Aircraft) and subsection 601.21(1) [Requirement for Notification] as provisions the contravention of which may be dealt with under and in accordance with the procedure set out in sections 7.7 to 8.2 of the Act, which allows Transport Canada to delegate authority to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and select police forces. This allows them to immediately enforce the designated provisions through the issuance of AMPs.

The Interim Order provides a bridge between Transport Canada’s current and future legislative or regulatory framework. The Interim Order also responds directly to concerns raised by the aviation industry and its request for the Minister of Transport (the Minister) to take action.

Implications

The Act authorizes the Minister to make an interim order where it is necessary to deal with a significant risk, direct or indirect, to aviation safety or the safety of the public. The Interim Order seeks to address the danger to aviation safety caused by the hundreds of annually reported laser attacks against aircraft.

Through the Interim Order, the prohibition for possession is designated. An individual may be issued an AMP with a maximum penalty of $5,000. For a corporation, the maximum penalty is $25,000.

The Minister’s authority to issue AMPs for offences will continue to be delegated to the RCMP and local law enforcement agencies including those responsible for jurisdictions that correspond to the highest number of reported laser attacks (Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver). These delegated law enforcement agencies will be acting as Transport Canada officials. Based on the circumstances, they may be able to take immediate enforcement action for a contravention by issuing an AMP.

An individual or corporation that has been issued an AMP under this Interim Order must pay the amount of the AMP or file a written request with the Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada (TATC) for review. If the individual fails to pay the AMP and does not file a request for review with the TATC within the prescribed time limit, that individual will be deemed to have contravened the designated provision.

The Interim Order Respecting Battery-powered Hand-held Lasers made in June 2018 was supported by an outreach and communications campaign that was proactive and national in scope. Transport Canada has engaged with the public through announcements, its website and social media in order to spread awareness about the Interim Order Respecting Battery-powered Hand-held Lasers, the hand-held laser prohibitions and enforcement activities related to the designated provisions. This campaign will continue. Canadians will be informed they can be in possession of a hand-held laser in a prohibited zone for a legitimate reason, or within private dwellings. The messaging will continue to highlight the safety benefits of these measures and that they do not apply outside of the prohibited zones.

Consultation

Consultations on the Interim Order have included key groups of stakeholders: the aviation industry, law enforcement agencies, hand-held laser users and vendors. The aviation industry had called for action against laser attacks and is therefore generally supportive of the measures to enhance aviation safety. Law enforcement agencies welcomed additional enforcement tools, but raised concerns about the scope and application of the Interim Order. The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada and Fédération des astronomes amateurs du Québec expressed concern given that their members routinely use hand-held lasers for their demonstrations. The Retail Council of Canada reported no concerns about the Interim Order, particularly because its members are bound by the CCPSA.

Transport Canada and Health Canada remain in continuous contact regarding the Interim Order and will ensure future outreach and communications campaigns are clearly aligned to ensure whole-of-government messaging.

In June 2018, Transport Canada launched an online discussion forum called “Let’s Talk Lasers” via its social media channels, including Facebook and Twitter. This allowed Transport Canada to seek out public input on hand-held laser use and safety issues. Participant comments helped Transport Canada better understand laser users, identified knowledge gaps, and effectively targeted its awareness campaign messaging. The results of the Transport Canada social media campaign have been positive. There were 2.6 million impressions (total number of times content was displayed to people) and a reach of 1 million (the number of people who may have seen content). The results of these efforts have informed the making of the Interim Order.

In the spring of 2019, Transport Canada intends to engage with the members of the Canadian Aviation Regulation Advisory Council (CARAC) by releasing a Notice of Proposed Amendment (NPA) to the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) that will introduce Transport Canada’s proposal for regulations to replace the Interim Order. CARAC members and other impacted stakeholders will have 45 days to provide their input to Transport Canada.

Summary

Since the Interim Order Respecting Battery-powered Hand-held Lasers was made in June 2018, Transport Canada consulted with a variety of stakeholders on hand-held lasers, including the Canadian public. Consultations will continue as a permanent solution to the prohibition of hand-held lasers is sought. Laser attack statistics have been encouraging, but this is not a guarantee that the number of reported attacks may not increase once again. Given the broad applicability of the legitimate-use exception provided for in the Interim Order, the majority of Canadians and industries fall into the “legitimate-use” category. This will allow for enforcement efforts to be focused on individuals who are in possession of a hand-held laser they are misusing to pose a danger to aviation safety.

Transport Canada will continue to be proactive in consulting with stakeholders concerning the Interim Order. Transport Canada will review its communications strategy and related tools for proactive engagement with the public, including legitimate and non-legitimate uses of hand-held lasers. This strategy will include public announcements and advertisements, social media campaigns, Transport Canada website page highlights with a focus on deterrence and immediate enforcement.

Contact

Chief
Regulatory Affairs
Policy and Regulatory Services (AARBH)
Civil Aviation, Safety and Security Group
Transport Canada
Place de Ville, Tower C
330 Sparks Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0N5
Telephone (general inquiries): 613‑993‑7284 or 1‑800‑305‑2059
Fax: 613‑990‑1198
Email: carrac@tc.gc.ca
Internet address: http://www.tc.gc.ca

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Port Alberni Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Port Alberni Port Authority (“Authority”) under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective July 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule B of the letters patent sets out the federal real property managed by the Authority, and sets out a leasehold interest dated November 13, 1985, between the Province of British Columbia and Port Alberni Harbour Commission (“Lease”);

WHEREAS the Authority wishes to modify Schedule B of its letters patent to reflect changes to the Lease, effective May 15, 2019;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent reflecting these changes in Schedule B of its letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act,

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule B of the letters patent is amended by replacing the text in the chart of paragraph 3 under the heading “INTEREST” that begins with “Leasehold interest pursuant to a General Lease dated for reference November 13, 1985” and the corresponding description of the lands under the heading “LANDS TO WHICH INTEREST RELATES” with the following:

INTEREST

LANDS TO WHICH INTEREST RELATES

Leasehold interest, pursuant to a head lease, dated for reference November 13, 1985, between the Province of British Columbia and the Port Alberni Harbour Commission, effective May 15, 2019, per an Agreement concluded between the Province of British Columbia and the Port Alberni Port Authority

The ungranted and unreserved land, including foreshore and land covered by water (waterlot), defined as "Crown Land" in the Land Act, R.S.B.C. 1979, as amended, comprising the waters of Alberni Inlet and Trevor Channel, excluding those parts of Tzartus Island and Congreve Island which lie above the high water mark, shown outlined in red on the plan attached to the lease as Annex 2, subject to any alienations heretofore made by the Province of any of the said lands

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of issuance.

ISSUED this 12th day of June, 2019.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Chief Administrator

Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada

 

Chairperson

Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada

 

Chairperson and Director

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

 

Chairperson

Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology

 

Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson

Canada Industrial Relations Board

 

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

Chairperson (joint federal Governor in Council and provincial Lieutenant Governor appointment)

Canada–Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board

 

Board Member (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chairperson (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chief Executive Officer (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Vice-Chairperson (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chairperson

Canadian Dairy Commission

 

Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson and Director

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Lead Commissioner, Deputy Lead Commissioner and Commissioner

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Pay Equity Commissioner

Canadian Human Rights Commission

 

Permanent Member

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

 

Regional Member (British Columbia/Yukon)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

 

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Canadian Tourism Commission

 

Chairperson

Farm Credit Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Farm Credit Canada

 

Commissioner

Financial Consumer Agency of Canada

 

Director

Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation

 

Director (Federal)

Hamilton Port Authority

 

Sergeant-at-Arms and Corporate Security Officer

House of Commons

 

Member (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Member

National Capital Commission

 

Government Film Commissioner

National Film Board

 

President

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

 

Auditor General of Canada

Office of the Auditor General

 

Chief Accessibility Officer (Anticipatory)

Office of the Chief Accessibility Officer

 

Ombudsperson

Office of the Ombudsperson for National Defence and Canadian Forces

 

Director (Federal)

Oshawa Port Authority

 

Chief Executive Officer

Parks Canada

 

Commissioner

Public Service Commission

 

Member and Alternate Member

Renewable Resources Board (Gwich’in)

 

Member and Alternate Member

Renewable Resources Board (Sahtu)

 

Principal

Royal Military College of Canada

 

Chairperson

Telefilm Canada

 

TREASURY BOARD SECRETARIAT

Regulatory modernization — Request for stakeholder comments

Effective regulations promote social and economic well-being, protect health and safety, and foster innovation and a competitive business environment. In recent years, the Government of Canada has undertaken a number of initiatives to modernize the Canadian regulatory system and improve its performance for Canadians and businesses. The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) is inviting input from all interested stakeholders on four of these regulatory modernization initiatives through this notice:

A summary of each initiative, optional guiding questions, and instructions for submissions are detailed below.

1. Targeted Regulatory Reviews (Round 2)

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat is coordinating the three-year targeted Regulatory Review process with federal departments and agencies. Targeted Reviews explore ways to enable regulations to be more agile, transparent and responsive, while continuing to protect the health and safety of Canadians and the environment. This will enable businesses to grow, benefitting all Canadians.

The first round of Regulatory Reviews focused on three high growth sectors: agri-food and aquaculture, health and bio-sciences, and transportation and infrastructure. Findings from the first round of Reviews were published in a “What we heard” report, and have been used to develop Regulatory Roadmaps. The Roadmaps lay out plans for regulatory modernization in each of the targeted sectors. In particular, they respond to irritants raised by stakeholders during the Regulatory Reviews consultation period. The Roadmaps also contain proposals for legislative and regulatory changes, outline plans to update policies and practices, and propose novel approaches (such as pilot projects and regulatory co-development) designed to address the regulation of emerging technologies and better align the regulatory system with industry realities. Responses received from the second round of Reviews will be used to develop a similar set of Roadmaps, and to guide future regulatory modernization initiatives.

If you have previously submitted input to the Canada Gazette consultations concerning regulatory modernization — such as the first round of Regulatory Reviews or regulatory cooperation — and would like elements of your previous submission to be considered again, please indicate this in your response.

The second round of Reviews will focus on the following three areas:

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat has prepared the following three questions to guide stakeholder submissions relating to clean technology, digitalization and technology-neutral regulations, and international standards:

2. The Red Tape Reduction Act

The Red Tape Reduction Act (RTRA), brought into effect in 2015, sets out requirements for federal departments and agencies to control the growth of administrative burden on business when developing regulations (i.e. the “One-for-One” Rule). When a new or amended regulation increases the administrative burden on business, the Rule requires that the cost be offset by other regulatory changes. The Rule also requires that an existing regulation be repealed each time a new regulation imposes new administrative burden on business. Since 2015, annual reports have been published detailing the results of the “One-for-One” Rule and the application of its exemptions.

The Government of Canada has launched the legislated review of the Red Tape Reduction Act, and is seeking stakeholder input on the Act, its design and implementation, and recommendations for improvement.

The following questions are intended to guide stakeholder submissions:

3. Exploring options to legislate changes to regulator mandates

In the Fall Economic Statement 2018, the Government of Canada announced that it would review legislation to assess whether opportunities for legislative changes exist to integrate the assessment of regulatory efficiency and economic growth as an integral part of regulators’ mandates, while ensuring that Canada’s regulatory system continues to prioritize the health, safety, security, and social and economic well-being of Canadians, and a sustainable environment.

In response, TBS is considering the development of key principles related to efficiency and economic growth that would become part of the required analysis that regulators must perform as part of the regulatory development process. Through the regulatory impact analysis statements that are published with all regulatory proposals, stakeholders would have the opportunity to assess and provide input. Departments and agencies would receive guidance on the expectations for this analysis through policy documents and the central regulatory oversight function performed by the Treasury Board.

The following questions are intended to guide stakeholder submissions:

4. Suggestions for the next annual Regulatory Modernization Bill

Announced in the Government’s Fall Economic Statement 2018, the Regulatory Modernization Bill is a new annual mechanism designed to remove outdated and redundant requirements embedded in legislation that impede federal regulators from making changes to keep pace with innovation and technology, and to modernize requirements and practices. The Bill will allow for the subsequent modernization of associated regulations. This annual exercise aims to help keep regulations current, to better reflect the realities of today’s fast-paced environment.

TBS is seeking input from Canadians to identify specific areas of legislation that currently prevent regulations from being agile and responsive.

The following questions are intended to guide stakeholder submissions:

TBS will keep track of all suggestions. They will also be provided to the responsible regulatory department or agency for their consideration in the 2020 or future Annual Regulatory Modernization Bill. Timing for the 2020 Bill is yet to be determined.

Submissions

The Government of Canada is inviting all Canadians and stakeholder groups to comment on the regulatory modernization initiatives included in this notice. Please indicate the initiative and provide your input by September 5, 2019. Submissions can be sent to RCD-DCMR@tbs-sct.gc.ca.

In the interest of transparency of the consultation process, the Government of Canada is planning to make public the responses received or will provide summaries in its public documents. To meet the usability requirements for Government of Canada websites, please provide your response in any of the following formats: .doc, .docx, .odf, .txt, or .rtf or HTML.

In addition, please clearly indicate the name of the individual or the organization that should be identified as having made the submission and advise

Information received throughout this submission process is subject to the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act. Should you express an intention that your submission, or any portions thereof, be considered confidential, the Government of Canada will make all reasonable efforts to protect this information.

The handling of any personal information collected in this submission process is described in the standard personal information bank Outreach Activities PSU 938.

Contact

Brennen Young
Director
Policy and Strategic Planning
Regulatory Affairs Sector
Email: RCD-DCMR@tbs-sct.gc.ca

BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at May 31, 2019

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Amount

Total

Cash and foreign deposits

 

17.9

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

10,314.1

 

Advances

 

Other receivables

4.5

 
   

10,318.6

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

25,638.2

 

Canada Mortgage Bonds

517.6

 

Government of Canada bonds

79,197.1

 

Other investments

438.1

 
   

105,791.0

Capital assets

Property and equipment

598.0

 

Intangible assets

47.5

 

Right-of-use leased assets

53.5

 
   

699.0

Other assets

 

110.9

Total assets

 

116,937.4


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Amount

Total

Bank notes in circulation

 

88,728.2

Deposits

Government of Canada

24,177.7

 

Members of Payments Canada

250.9

 

Other deposits

2,605.6

 
   

27,034.2

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

 

644.9

   

116,407.3

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Available-for-sale reserve

400.1

 
   

530.1

Total Liabilities and Equity

116,937.4

I declare that the foregoing statement is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, June 17, 2019

Carmen Vierula
Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accountant

I declare that the foregoing statement is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, June 17, 2019

Timothy Lane
Deputy Governor