Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 153, Number 22: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

June 1, 2019

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of six substances in the Siloxanes Group specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the six substances identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on these substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819‑938‑5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca. Comments can also be submitted to the Minister of the Environment, using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of the Siloxanes Group

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of six of seven substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Siloxanes Group. These six substances were identified as priorities for assessment as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. One of the seven substances was subsequently determined to be of low concern for risk to both the environment and human health, and the decision for this substance is provided in a separate report. footnote 1 Accordingly, this screening assessment addresses the six substances listed in the table below, hereinafter referred to as the Siloxanes Group.

Substances in the Siloxanes Group
CAS RN table 1 note a Domestic Substances List name Common name (abbreviation)
107-46-0 Disiloxane, hexamethyl- Hexamethyldisiloxane (L2)
141-62-8 Tetrasiloxane, decamethyl- Decamethyltetrasiloxane (L4)
141-63-9 Pentasiloxane, dodecamethyl- Dodecamethylpentasiloxane (L5)
541-05-9 Cyclotrisiloxane, hexamethyl- Cyclotrisiloxane (D3)
2627-95-4 Disiloxane, 1,3-diethenyl-1,1,3,3-tetramethyl- Divinyltetramethyldisiloxane (dvTMDS)
69430-24-6 table 1 note b Cyclosiloxanes, di-Me Cyclomethicone

Table 1 Notes

Table 1 Note a

The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.

Return to table 1 note a referrer

Table 1 Note b

This substance is a UVCB (unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products, or biological materials).

Return to table 1 note b referrer

The substances in the Siloxanes Group do not naturally occur in the environment. According to the information submitted in response to a survey under section 71 of CEPA, 1 000 to 100 000 kg for each of L2, L4, L5, D3 and dvTMDS was reported to be imported into Canada in 2008. In the same year, no Canadian manufacturing activity was reported for these five substances above the reporting threshold of 100 kg. Although cyclomethicone was not reported to be manufactured or imported above the reporting threshold of 100 kg in 2011, it is an ingredient in products available to consumers.

In Canada, L2, L4, L5 and D3 are primarily used as intermediates, solvents, skin conditioning agents, surface active agents, polymers and functional fluids in products available to consumers such as cosmetics, natural health products, electronics, medical devices, adhesives and sealants, as well as in industrial applications such as paints and coatings. L2 and dvTMDS are used as intermediates in the manufacture of polymers and other organic compounds. L5 is in sunscreens available to Canadian consumers and dvTMDS may be used in food packaging materials. Cyclomethicone is used in various products including cosmetics.

The ecological risks of the substances in the Siloxanes Group were characterized using the ecological risk classification (ERC) of organic substances, which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining the risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web-derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. Based on the outcome of the ERC analysis, the substances in the Siloxanes Group are considered unlikely to be causing ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from substances in the Siloxanes Group. It is proposed to conclude that L2, L4, L5, D3, dvTMDS and cyclomethicone in the Siloxanes Group do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

For the human health risk assessment, the linear siloxanes (L2, L4 and L5) were considered as a subgroup, D3 and dvTMDS were considered as individual substances, and cyclomethicone is a UVCB. For the general population of Canada, indoor air is the predominant source of exposure from environmental media to the linear siloxanes subgroup and D3. Oral exposure to D3 may occur from eating fish. Exposure to dvTMDS via environmental media or food packaging materials is considered to be negligible. From the use of products available to consumers, the predominant sources of exposure to the linear siloxanes subgroup and D3 are from the use of cosmetics that contain these substances (such as L2 in nail polish drying drops and bandage adhesive remover, L4 in lip balms and D3 in face cream), and from the use of sunscreens containing L5. Exposure of the general population to dvTMDS from the use of products available to consumers is not expected.

Cyclomethicone is primarily composed of three substances previously assessed under CEPA (D4, D5 and D6). For each of these three primary components (D4, D5 and D6), margins of exposure are considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases. Accordingly, human exposure and human health effects associated with cyclomethicone are not further characterized in this assessment.

In laboratory studies, L2 affects the liver, testes and lungs, whereas L4 affects the liver. L5 may have similar effects, on the basis of a read-across approach used to characterize its critical health effects. D3 resulted in effects including decreased food consumption, body weight, and liver weight. DvTMDS was not identified as posing a high hazard to human health on the basis of classifications by other national or international agencies for carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, developmental toxicity or reproductive toxicity.

For L2, L4, L5, D3 and dvTMDS, estimates of exposure were derived based on levels of substances in environmental media including indoor air as the largest contributor for exposure, and products available to consumers, such as cosmetics. On the basis of these estimates of exposure compared with critical effect levels identified from studies in experimental animals, margins of exposure are considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that L2, L4, L5, D3, dvTMDS and cyclomethicone do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that the six substances in the Siloxanes Group do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for this substance is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Final guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for uranium

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of a final guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for uranium. The technical document for this guideline is available on the Water Quality website. This document underwent a public consultation period of 60 days in 2017 and was updated to take into consideration the comments received.

May 16, 2019

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Guideline

A maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 0.02 mg/L (20 µg/L) is established for total natural uranium in drinking water. The guideline is based on the chemical toxicity of naturally occurring uranium.

Executive summary

Uranium is widespread in nature and has been identified in many different minerals. It exists in several chemical oxidation states. Although natural uranium is a weakly radioactive substance, the principal health effects associated with natural uranium are due to its chemical toxicity. The maximum acceptable concentration is established based on the chemical toxicity of uranium, and the focus of this document is limited to uranium’s chemical properties. Radiological forms and/or radioactive isotopes of uranium are addressed in a separate document (Health Canada, 2009).

This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with natural uranium in drinking water. It incorporates new studies and approaches and takes into consideration the availability of appropriate treatment technology. Based on this review, the drinking water guideline for total uranium re-establishes the maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 0.02 mg/L (20 µg/L).

Health effects

With respect to chemical toxicity, international organizations agree that there is insufficient evidence to conclude that oral exposure to natural uranium will cause cancer in humans or animals. Studies in humans suggest that chronic exposure to uranium in drinking water may affect the kidneys. Consequently, the MAC of 0.02 mg/L has been developed based on studies of kidney effects in rats. Exposure through inhalation and skin contact is not considered to be significant.

Exposure

Canadians are primarily exposed to uranium through drinking water and food. Uranium may be found in water in the environment as a result of weathering and leaching from natural deposits, fallout from volcanic eruptions, its release in mill tailings, emissions from the nuclear industry, the use of phosphate fertilizers and the combustion of coal and other fuels. Levels of uranium in drinking water vary greatly across Canada, depending mainly on geological formations and to a lesser extent on human activities in the watershed.

Analysis and treatment

There are several approved analytical methods available to measure total uranium concentration in drinking water at levels well below the MAC.

The concentration of naturally occurring uranium in groundwater depends on factors such as pH, redox potential and the presence of dissolved oxygen and complexing agents. The chemical speciation of uranium in the water supply is important to ensure its successful removal during the treatment process. Most groundwaters contain soluble uranium complexes.

At the municipal level, the best available technologies for the treatment of total uranium are coagulation/filtration, lime softening, ion exchange and reverse osmosis. In addition, management strategies for uranium include practices such as switching to a new source, blending and interconnecting with another water system.

At the residential level, there are no certified residential treatment devices for the reduction of uranium from drinking water. However, drinking water treatment technologies able to effectively remove uranium include ion exchange and reverse osmosis. It is important to note that reverse osmosis systems should be installed only at the point of use, as the treated water may be corrosive to internal plumbing components.

International considerations

Drinking water quality guidelines, standards and/or guidance established by foreign governments or international agencies may vary due to the science available at the time of assessment, as well as the use of different policies and approaches, such as the choice of a key study, and the use of different consumption rates, body weights and allocation factors.

The maximum contaminant level of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the provisional guideline value of the World Health Organization are both 30 µg/L for uranium. The Australian National Health and Medical Research Council has established a guideline 17 µg/L. As of 2018, the European Union has not established a drinking water value for natural uranium.

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Devlin, Nicholas E.

2019-515

Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta

 

Justice

 

Court of Appeal of Alberta

 

Judge ex officio

 

Her Majesty’s Court of Queen’s Bench for Saskatchewan

 

Judges

 

Crooks, The Hon. Natasha

2019-512

Klatt, Beverly L.

2019-514

Robertson, D. Neil

2019-513

Immigration and Refugee Board

 

Full-time members

 

Arnott, Pamela Jean

2019-436

Colin, Michel Joseph Bernard Louis-Philippe

2019-442

Connat, Agnès Catherine

2019-440

Gauthier, Charles Joseph Raymond Eugène

2019-441

Guerrier, Guerlain

2019-438

Lopez Sanso, David Eduardo

2019-469

Pachkowski, Desiree Lucy Lynn

2019-435

Parizeau, Isabelle

2019-439

Rose, Elana Nancy

2019-467

Vermette, Derek Richard

2019-437

International Joint Commission

 

Commissioners

 

Béland, Pierre

2019-464

Lickers, Francis Henry

2019-462

Phare, Merrell-Ann S.

2019-463

Invest in Canada Hub

 

Director of the board of directors

 

Cohon, Mark, O.Ont.

2019-508

Vice-Chairperson of the board of directors

 

Rafati, Shahrzad

2019-507

Kalmakoff, The Hon. Jeffery

2019-511

Court of Appeal for Saskatchewan

 

Judge of Appeal

 

Her Majesty’s Court of Queen’s Bench for Saskatchewan

 

Judge ex officio

 

Moore, Valerie A., Q.C.

2019-470

Veterans Review and Appeal Board

 

Permanent member

 

Parole Board of Canada

 

Full-time members

 

Boudreau, Geneviève

2019-433

Skye, Ronalds S.

2019-434

May 24, 2019

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Québec Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport for the Québec Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the immovables, other than federal immovables, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority wishes to acquire an immovable formed by parts of lots 2 356 620 and 4 775 237, as known and described in the Land register of Québec;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister of Transport issue supplementary letters patent to set out the said immovable in Schedule C of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following at the end of that Schedule:

Lot

Description

Part of lot 2 356 620

An immovable known and described in the Land register of Québec as part of lot 2 356 620, as described in the technical description prepared May 24, 2018, and shown on the accompanying plan, under number 2910 of the minutes of Alexis Cartier-Ouellet, land surveyor, containing an area of 5.42 hectares.

Part of lot 4 775 237

An immovable known and described in the Land register of Québec as part of lot 4 775 237, as described in the technical description prepared May 24, 2018, and shown on the accompanying plan, under number 2910 of the minutes of Alexis Cartier-Ouellet, land surveyor, containing an area of 15.62 hectares.

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the Land register of Québec of the deed of sale evidencing the transfer of the immovable to the Authority.

ISSUED this 6th day of May, 2019.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Trois-Rivières Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Trois-Rivières Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the immovables, other than federal immovables, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS, pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority wishes to acquire the immovable known and designated in the Land register of Québec as being lot 1 019 105;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to set out the said immovable in Schedule C of the letters patent;

WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following at the end of that Schedule:

Lot

Description

1 019 105

An immovable known and designated in the Land register of Québec as being lot 1 019 105, containing an area of 149.6 m2.

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the Land register of Québec of the deed of sale evidencing the transfer of the immovable to the Authority.

ISSUED this 7th day of May, 2019.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA SHIPPING ACT, 2001

Interim Order No. 3 Respecting Flooded Areas

Whereas the Minister of Transport is of the opinion that the annexed Interim Order No. 3 Respecting Flooded Areas is required to deal with a direct or indirect risk to marine safety or to the marine environment;

And whereas the provisions of the annexed Order may be contained in a regulation made pursuant to subsection 35.1(1) footnote a and paragraphs 136(1)(f) footnote b and (h) footnote b, 207(f) and 244(f) footnote c, (g) and (h) footnote d of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 footnote e;

Therefore, the Minister of Transport, pursuant to subsection 10.1(1) footnote f of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 footnote g, makes the annexed Interim Order No. 3 Respecting Flooded Areas.

Ottawa, May 14, 2019

Marc Garneau
Minister of Transport

Interim Order No. 3 Respecting Flooded Areas

Interpretation

Definitions

1 (1) The following definitions apply in this Interim Order.

Act means the Canada Shipping Act, 2001. (Loi)

Regulations means the Vessel Operation Restriction Regulations. (règlement)

Interpretation

(2) Unless the context requires otherwise, all other words and expressions used in this Interim Order have the same meaning as in the Regulations.

Prohibition

Operation of vessels

2 No person shall operate a vessel in any of the following waters:

Exception

Persons

3 Section 2 does not apply to vessels operated by the following persons:

Enforcement

Enforcement officers

4 For the purpose of ensuring compliance with section 2, the persons or classes of persons set out in the table to this section are appointed or specified as enforcement officers.

TABLE
Item Column 1

Persons or classes of persons
Column 2

Geographic location
1 A member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Ontario and Quebec
2 A member of any harbour or river police force Ontario and Quebec
3 A member of any provincial, county or municipal police force Ontario and Quebec
4 A marine safety inspector Ontario and Quebec
5 A pleasure craft safety inspector Ontario and Quebec
6 A person employed as park warden by Parks Canada and appointed under the Canada National Parks Act Ontario and Quebec
7 A person employed as marine conservation area warden by Parks Canada and appointed under the Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act Ontario and Quebec
8 A person employed as conservation officer by the National Capital Commission National Capital Region
9 A First Nations Constable appointed under the Ontario Police Services Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. P.15 Ontario

Powers

5 An enforcement officer may

Designated Provision

Designation

6 (1) The provision set out in column 1 of the schedule is designated as a provision the contravention of which may be dealt with under and in accordance with the procedure set out in sections 229 to 242 of the Act.

Penalties

(2) The range of penalties set out in column 2 of the schedule is the range of penalties payable in respect of a contravention of the designated provision set out in column 1.

Repeal

7 Interim Order No. 2 Respecting Flooded Areas, made on April 30, 2019, is repealed.

SCHEDULE

(Subsections 6(1) and (2))

Designated Provision
Column 1

Designated Provision
Column 2

Range of Penalties ($)
  Individual
Section 2 250 to 5,000

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position Organization Closing date
Chief Administrator Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada  
Chairperson Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada  
Chairperson and Director Atomic Energy of Canada Limited  
Chairperson Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology  
Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson Canada Industrial Relations Board  
Chairperson Canada Lands Company Limited  
President and Chief Executive Officer Canada Lands Company Limited  
Chairperson (joint federal Governor in Council and provincial Lieutenant Governor appointment) Canada–Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board  
Board Member (Anticipatory) Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization  
Chairperson (Anticipatory) Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization  
Chief Executive Officer (Anticipatory) Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization  
Vice-Chairperson (Anticipatory) Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization  
Chairperson Canadian Dairy Commission  
Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson and Director Canadian Energy Regulator  
Chief Executive Officer Canadian Energy Regulator  
Lead Commissioner, Deputy Lead Commissioner and Commissioner Canadian Energy Regulator  
Pay Equity Commissioner Canadian Human Rights Commission  
Chairperson Canadian Institutes of Health Research  
Permanent Member Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission  
Regional Member (British Columbia/Yukon) Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission  
Regional Member (Quebec) Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission  
Chairperson and Member Canadian Statistics Advisory Council  
President (Chief Executive Officer) Canadian Tourism Commission  
President and Chief Executive Officer Defense Construction (1951) Limited  
Chairperson Farm Credit Canada  
President and Chief Executive Officer Farm Credit Canada  
Vice-Chairperson Farm Products Council of Canada  
Commissioner Financial Consumer Agency of Canada  
Chairperson First Nations Financial Management Board  
Director Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation  
Director (Federal) Hamilton Port Authority  
Sergeant-at-Arms and Corporate Security Officer House of Commons  
Member International Authority  
Member (appointment to roster) International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies  
Librarian and Archivist of Canada Library and Archives of Canada  
Member National Capital Commission  
Government Film Commissioner National Film Board  
President Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada  
Auditor General of Canada Office of the Auditor General  
Chief Accessibility Officer (Anticipatory) Office of the Chief Accessibility Officer  
Ombudsperson Office of the Ombudsperson for National Defence and Canadian Forces  
Director (Federal) Oshawa Port Authority  
Chairperson Pacific Pilotage Authority  
Chief Executive Officer Parks Canada  
Vice-Chairperson and Member Patented Medicine Prices Review Board  
Commissioner Public Service Commission  
Member and Alternate Member Renewable Resources Board (Gwich’in)  
Member and Alternate Member Renewable Resources Board (Sahtu)  
Principal Royal Military College of Canada  
Vice-Chairperson (all streams) Social Security Tribunal of Canada  
Chairperson Telefilm Canada  

BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at April 30, 2019

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Amount

Total

Cash and foreign deposits

 

17.8

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

10,013.1

 

Advances

 

Other receivables

4.1

 
   

10,017.2

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

24,187.3

 

Canada Mortgage Bonds

516.7

 

Government of Canada bonds

80,120.4

 

Other investments

437.7

 
   

105,262.1

Property and equipment

598.9

 

Intangible assets

47.1

 

Right-of-use leased assets

53.9

 

 

 

699.9

Other assets

 

113.8

Total assets

 

116,110.8


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Amount

Total

Bank notes in circulation

 

87,795.4

Deposits

Government of Canada

24,133.5

 

Members of Payments Canada

250.3

 

Other deposits

2,825.7

 
   

27,209.5

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

 

576.2

   

115,581.1

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Investment revaluation reserve

399.7

 
   

529.7

Total Liabilities and Equity

116,110.8

I declare that the foregoing statement is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, May 15, 2019

Carmen Vierula
Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accountant

I declare that the foregoing statement is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, May 15, 2019

Stephen S. Poloz
Governor