Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 153, Number 18: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

May 4, 2019

DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

Notice to interested parties — Proposed amendments to certain regulations made under Part II of the Canada Labour Code to require the provision of free menstrual products in the workplace

The Labour Program of the Department of Employment and Social Development is considering amending regulations under Part II of the Canada Labour Code (the Code) relating to occupational health and safety to require employers to provide free menstrual products in the workplace for use by their employees.

Background

Most regulations under Part II of the Code require employers to provide supplies such as toilet paper, soap, warm water, and a means to dry hands. footnote 1 No requirements are currently in place to require employers to provide menstrual products. As a result, a large number of employees are required to carry a basic supply of menstrual products with them. It is estimated that 40% of the federal workforce could benefit from these measures.

There has been increasing public awareness and acknowledgement that menstrual products constitute necessary items that are essential to the health of a large proportion of Canadians. Lack of access to menstrual products can create barriers for employees to participate fully in society, including in the labour force. A 2018 survey found that one third of Canadian women under the age of 25 struggled to afford menstrual products, while 70% have missed work or school, or have withdrawn from social activities because of their period (Plan Canada International, 2018). footnote 2 Another study conducted in the United States found that 86% of women have started their period unexpectedly in public without having the supplies they need, causing feelings of anxiety or embarrassment, often resulting in the disruption of workplace activities (Free the Tampons, 2013). footnote 3

When employees find themselves without access to menstrual products, they may turn to unsuitable improvised solutions such as using toilet paper and paper towels to act in place of tampons and pads. Others may extend the use of products beyond their recommended time frame, which poses a health hazard due to the increased risk of toxic shock syndrome. Some employees may also avoid the workplace due to the shame and stigma that often surrounds menstruation.

For employees in remote locations, the negative impact to their physical and psychological health may be heightened due to greater barriers, such as higher costs of, and the lack of accessibility to, menstrual products. The cost of menstrual products varies significantly from location to location in Canada, and the financial burden is borne exclusively by menstruating employees. The provision of menstrual products by employers may help to relieve the health risks that employees may face associated with menstruation and menstrual products in the workplace.

The physical restrictions of some workplaces within the federal jurisdiction, such as trains and aircraft, may make it difficult for employers to provide menstrual products to its employees in the workplace. Employees in such workplaces are often required to share toilet facilities with members of the public. This may require employers to find other suitable locations (apart from washrooms) where they could make menstrual products available. Furthermore, employers with employees who travel to different locations as part of their work, such as truck drivers, may have a more difficult time providing menstrual products in the workplace, as the workplace is not in one single location.

Questions to guide input from interested parties

The Labour Program is seeking input on the following questions; however, all input dealing with the provision of menstrual products is welcome and should not be limited to the questions posed below.

  1. Taking into account any physical restrictions or location issues, how best could this requirement be implemented in your workplace?
  2. Taking into account issues such as financial implications, size of business, and physical restrictions, how would this requirement affect your business?
  3. There are a number of different menstrual products on the market. What types of menstrual products would best meet this requirement?
  4. Should the regulations require employers to make menstrual products available to employees at prescribed locations, e.g. washrooms or neutral locations?
  5. Are you aware of any initiatives that have been implemented in workplaces that provide menstrual products to employees?
  6. Is there anything else the Labour Program should consider regarding this proposal?

The publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, initiates a 60-day comment period. Contributions may be sent by email to EDSC.LAB.SST.POLITIQUES-LAB.OHS.POLICY.ESDC@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca or by mail to 165 De l’Hôtel-de-Ville Street, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0J9.

Duncan Shaw
Senior Director
Occupational Health and Safety

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Draft federal environmental quality guidelines for certain substances

Whereas the Minister of the Environment issues the environmental quality guidelines for the purpose of carrying out the Minister’s mandate related to preserving the quality of the environment;

Whereas the guidelines relate to the environment pursuant to paragraph 54(2)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

And whereas the Minister of the Environment has offered to consult provincial and territorial governments and the members of the National Advisory Committee who are representatives of Indigenous governments in accordance with subsection 54(3) of the Act,

Notice is hereby given that draft federal environmental quality guidelines for certain substances listed in the Annex hereby are available for comment on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment, written comments on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the guidelines are made. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819‑938‑5212 or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Draft federal environmental quality guidelines (FEQGs) are available for the following substances:

  1. Iron
  2. Lead
  3. Quinoline
  4. Strontium

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of four substances in the Epoxy Resins Group specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the four substances identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on the substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of the Epoxy Resins Group

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of four substances referred to under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Epoxy Resins Group. Substances in this group (namely three diglycidyl ethers of bisphenol A [DGEBA] and one Novolac epoxy resin) were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNs footnote 4 ), the Domestic Substances List (DSL) names and the abbreviations of these substances are listed in the table below.

Substances in the Epoxy Resins Group
CAS RN DSL name Acronyms
25036-25-3 Phenol, 4,4′-(1-methylethylidene)bis-, polymer with 2,2′-[(1-methylethylidene)bis(4,1-phenyleneoxymethylene)]bis[oxirane] DGEBA epoxy resin
25068-38-6 Phenol, 4,4′-(1-methylethylidene)bis-, polymer with 2-(chloromethyl)oxirane DGEBA epoxy resin
25085-99-8 Oxirane, 2,2′-[(1-methylethylidene)bis(4,1-phenyleneoxymethylene)]bis-, homopolymer DGEBA epoxy resin
28064-14-4 Phenol, polymer with formaldehyde, glycidyl ether Novolac epoxy resin

These four substances were previously evaluated under the Second Phase of Polymer Rapid Screening, which identified the substances bearing CAS RN 25036-25-3 (one of the DGEBA epoxy resins) and CAS RN 28064-14-4 (Novolac epoxy resin) as having a low potential to cause ecological harm. However, further evaluation of human health risks was warranted. The three DGEBA epoxy resins and Novolac epoxy resin were identified as requiring further assessment for potential human health and/or ecological risks on the basis of structural alerts and/or uses associated with significant consumer exposure. The present assessment further elaborates on the potential for these substances to cause harm to human health and ecological harm, in order to reach an overall conclusion under section 64 of CEPA as to whether they pose a risk to human health or the environment.

The four epoxy resins do not occur naturally in the environment. In Canada, they are reported to be used as crosslinkers and binders in paints/coatings and plating agents; as intermediates; in adhesives and sealants in grout, flooring, plastics and concrete; in lubricants and lubricant additives; as corrosion inhibitors and anti-scaling agents; and as processing aids specific to petroleum production. In addition, epoxy resins have been identified as components used in the manufacture of some food packaging materials.

DGEBA epoxy resins contain epoxy reactive functional groups, which, in general, may be associated with adverse effects on fish, invertebrates, and algae. However, the assessment revealed that DGEBA epoxy resins are expected to show moderate to low toxicity to aquatic organisms and low toxicity to sediment dwelling species in natural environments. Considering the use of the DGEBA epoxy resins, they may be released to the environment through formulation facilities and during end-use applications; however, conservative estimates of exposure were calculated and found to be below the exposure expected to cause harm to sensitive organisms in the environment.

DGEBA and Novolac epoxy resins contain epoxy reactive functional groups that are associated with potential adverse human health effects. These substances show effects on the spleen in chronic studies at doses greater than 15 mg/kg bw/day (primarily associated with the lower molecular weight resins) and are dermal sensitizers; however, they have low acute toxicity and are not developmental or reproductive toxicants, nor are they teratogenic or carcinogenic in animal studies. Canadians may be exposed to DGEBA epoxy resins from the potential transfer of an insignificant amount of the resin from food packaging materials into food, including canned liquid infant formula products. Quantities are very low because these substances are used up in the chemical reaction when the packaging is made. Dietary exposure to Novolac epoxy resin from food packaging material is also expected to be negligible for adults and children. Exposure to epoxy resins by inhalation is not expected due to their low vapour pressures. Dermal exposure to epoxy resins is considered minimal due to their usage in cured form. Indirect exposure of the general public to epoxy resins through media such as drinking water is not expected due to their low water solubility.

A comparison of estimated levels of exposure to DGEBA epoxy resins and Novolac epoxy resins to the critical effect levels results in margins of exposure that are considered adequate to account for uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from DGEBA epoxy resins and Novolac epoxy resin. It is concluded that DGEBA epoxy resins and Novolac epoxy resin do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitutes or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that the three DGEBA epoxy resins and the Novolac epoxy resin do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that the four substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments
Name and position Order in Council

Court of Queen’s Bench of New Brunswick, Family Division

 

Judges

 

Blais, The Hon. Marie-Claude

2019-373

Noble, The Hon. Bruce Alexander

2019-372

Robichaud, The Hon. Michel A.

2019-370

Ellies, The Hon. Gregory

2019-368

Superior Court of Justice of Ontario for the Northeast Region

 

Regional Senior Judge

 

Court of Appeal for Ontario

 

Judge ex officio

 

Hamilton Morris, David Alexander

2019-358

Immigration and Refugee Board

 

Full-time member

 

Hupman, Murray Calvin

2019-365

Marine Atlantic Inc.

 
President and Chief Executive Officer  

Lametti, The Hon. David, P.C.

2019-375

Her Majesty’s Counsel learned in the law

 

Morgan, Marta

2019-379

Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs

 

Muzyka, Douglas W.

2019-345

National Research Council of Canada

 
Chairperson  

Ouellette, The Hon. Jean-Paul

2019-371

Court of Queen’s Bench of New Brunswick, Trial Division

 

Judge

 

Parole Board of Canada

 

Full-time members

 

Kirkpatrick, Douglas Allen

2019-303

O’Brien, Matthew Daniel

2019-354

Richardson, The Hon. Susan E.

2019-374

Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta

 

Justice

 

Court of Appeal of Alberta

 

Judge ex officio

 

Spiro, David E.

2019-367

Tax Court of Canada

 

Judge

 

Superior Court of Justice of Ontario

 

Judges

 

Court of Appeal for Ontario

 

Judges ex officio

 

Gordon, The Hon. Robbie D.

2019-369

Schabas, Paul B.

2019-311

Superior Court of Justice of Ontario, a member of the Family Court branch

 

Judges

 

Court of Appeal for Ontario

 

Judges ex officio

 

Bale, Lauren

2019-320

Fraser, Mary A.

2019-317

Gregson, The Hon. Nathalie

2019-314

MacLeod, Robert

2019-318

Maddalena, The Hon. Theresa

2019-312

Malcolm, The Hon. Wendy B.

2019-313

Price, Timothy G.

2019-315

Tellier, Nicole J.

2019-316

Walters, Jacalyn D.

2019-319

Supreme Court of Canada

2019-293

Commissioners to administer oaths

 

Alain, Marc-André

 

Laverty, Julie Johanne

 

Waito, Mark Bryan

 

Wood, The Hon. Michael J.

2019-366

Chief Justice of the Court of Appeal of Nova Scotia, with the style and title of Chief Justice of Nova Scotia

April 25, 2019

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

BOARDS OF TRADE ACT

Chambre de commerce de Manicouagan

Notice is hereby given that Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, by Order in Council dated April 5, 2019, has been pleased to change the name of the Chambre de commerce de Manicouagan to the Chambre de commerce et d’industrie de Manicouagan upon petition made therefor under section 39 of the Boards of Trade Act.

April 17, 2019

Ray Edwards
Director
For the Minister of Industry

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation by class of “analysts” qualified to analyze samples of bodily substances

The Attorney General of Canada, pursuant to subparagraph 320.4(b)(ii) of the Criminal Code, with respect to Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, designates the forensic specialists and forensic technologists employed by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Toxicology Services as a class of persons that is qualified, for the purposes of Part VIII.1 of the Criminal Code, to analyze samples of bodily substances.

Ottawa, April 18, 2019

David Lametti
Attorney General of Canada

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation by class of “analysts” qualified to certify that a standard solution is suitable for use with an approved instrument

The Attorney General of Canada, pursuant to paragraph 320.4(c) of the Criminal Code, with respect to Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, designates the forensic specialists and forensic technologists employed by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Toxicology Services as a class of persons that is qualified, for the purposes of Part VIII.1 of the Criminal Code, to certify that an alcohol standard is suitable for use with an approved instrument.

Ottawa, April 18, 2019

David Lametti
Attorney General of Canada

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position Organization Closing date

Chief Administrator

Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada

 

Chairperson

Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada

 

Chairperson and Director

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

 

Chairperson

Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology

 

Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson

Canada Industrial Relations Board

 

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

Chairperson (joint federal Governor in Council and provincial Lieutenant Governor appointment)

Canada–Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board

 

Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

Board Member (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chairperson (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chief Executive Officer (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Vice-Chairperson (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Commercial Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canadian Dairy Commission

 

Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson and Director

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Lead Commissioner, Deputy Lead Commissioner and Commissioner

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Pay Equity Commissioner

Canadian Human Rights Commission

 

Chairperson

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

 

Permanent Member

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

 

Regional Member (Quebec)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

 

Chairperson and Member

Canadian Statistics Advisory Council

 

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Canadian Tourism Commission

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Defense Construction (1951) Limited

 

Chairperson

Farm Credit Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Farm Credit Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson

Farm Products Council of Canada

 

Chairperson

The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited

 

Commissioner

Financial Consumer Agency of Canada

 

Chairperson

First Nations Financial Management Board

 

Chief Commissioner

First Nations Tax Commission

 

Deputy Chief Commissioner

First Nations Tax Commission

 

Director

Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation

 

Director (Federal)

Hamilton Port Authority

 

Sergeant-at-Arms and Corporate Security Officer

House of Commons

 

Member

International Authority

 

Commissioner and Chairperson

International Joint Commission

 

Member (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Vice-Chairperson

Invest in Canada Hub

 

Chief Executive Officer

The Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated

 

Librarian and Archivist of Canada

Library and Archives of Canada

 

Member

National Capital Commission

 

Government Film Commissioner

National Film Board

 

President

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

 

Auditor General of Canada

Office of the Auditor General

 

Chief Accessibility Officer (Anticipatory)

Office of the Chief Accessibility Officer

 

Ombudsperson

Office of the Ombudsperson for National Defence and Canadian Forces

 

Director (Federal)

Oshawa Port Authority

 

Chairperson

Pacific Pilotage Authority

 

Chief Executive Officer

Parks Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson and Member

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

 

Member

Payment in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel

 

Commissioner

Public Service Commission

 

Member and Alternate Member

Renewable Resources Board (Gwich’in)

 

Member and Alternate Member

Renewable Resources Board (Sahtu)

 

Principal

Royal Military College of Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson (all streams)

Social Security Tribunal of Canada

 

Chairperson

Telefilm Canada

 

BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at March 31, 2019

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Amount

Total

Cash and foreign deposits

 

17.9

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

10,009.1

 

Advances

 

Other receivables

4.1

 
   

10,013.2

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

24,131.1

 
Canada Mortgage Bonds

515.7

 

Government of Canada bonds

78,444.8

 

Other investments

435.1

 
   

103,526.7

Capital assets

Property and equipment

599.0

 

Intangible assets

46.8

 

Right-of-use leased assets

54.3

 

   

700.1

     

Other assets

 

115.3

 

114,373.2


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Amount

Total

Bank notes in circulation

 

86,535.4

Deposits

Government of Canada

23,526.4

 

Members of Payments Canada

250.0

 

Other deposits

2,936.9

 
   

26,713.3

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

 

597.4

   

113,846.1

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Investment revaluation reserve

397.1

 
   

527.1

Total Liabilities and Equity

114,373.2

I declare that the foregoing statement is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, April 15, 2019

Carmen Vierula
Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accountant

I declare that the foregoing statement is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, April 15, 2019

Stephen S. Poloz
Governor