Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 153, Number 11: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

March 16, 2019

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 19788

Significant New Activity Notice
(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have assessed information in their possession in respect of the substance 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 3-[1,1-bis[[dimethyl[2-[3,3,3-trimethyl-1,1bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]disiloxanyl]ethyl]silyl]oxy]-3,3-dimethyl-3-[2-[3,3,3-trimethyl-1,1-bis[(trimethylsilyl) oxy]1-disiloxanyl]ethyl]-1-disiloxanyl]propyl ester, polymer with butyl 2-propenoate and methyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 262299-63-8, under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Act,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Act, that subsection 81(4) of this Act applies with respect to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

February 21, 2019

The Honourable Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information requirements
(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. The following definition applies in this notice:

“substance” means 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 3-[1,1bis[[dimethyl[2-[3,3,3-trimethyl-1,1-bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]disiloxanyl]ethyl]silyl]oxy]-3,3-dimethyl-3-[2-[3,3,3-trimethyl-1,1-bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]-1-disiloxanyl]ethyl]1-disiloxanyl]propyl ester, polymer with butyl 2-propenoate and methyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 262299-63-8.

2. In relation to the substance, a significant new activity is

3. Despite section 2, a use of the substance is not a significant new activity if the substance is used

4. For each proposed significant new activity, the following information must be provided to the Minister of the Environment at least 90 days before the day on which the activity begins:

5. The information provided under section 4 will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister of the Environment.

Transitional provisions

6. Despite section 2, in the period between the date of publication of the present notice and March 21, 2020, a significant new activity is the use of the substance in a quantity greater than or equal to 1 000 kg in a calendar year in the manufacture or distribution for sale of the following products in which the substance is present in a concentration is greater than or equal to 0.1% by weight:

7. For greater certainty, in respect of calendar year 2020, the quantity of substance that is used before March 21 of that calendar year is not considered for the purposes of section 2.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Significant New Activity Notice.)

Description

This Significant New Activity (SNAc) Notice is a legal instrument adopted by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (the Act) to apply the SNAc provisions of that Act to 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 3-[1,1bis[[dimethyl[2-[3,3,3-trimethyl-1,1-bis[(trimethylsilyl) oxy]disiloxanyl]ethyl]silyl]oxy]-3,3-dimethyl-3-[2-[3,3,3trimethyl-1,1-bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]-1-disiloxanyl]ethyl]1-disiloxanyl]propyl ester, polymer with butyl 2-propenoate and methyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 262299-63-8. The Notice is now in force. It is therefore mandatory to meet all the requirements of the Notice should a person intend to use the substance for a significant new activity as defined in the Notice.

A SNAc Notice does not constitute an endorsement from the Department of the Environment or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

Applicability of the Significant New Activity Notice

The Notice requires that any person (individual or corporation) engaging in a SNAc in relation to 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 3-[1,1-bis[[dimethyl[2-[3,3,3-trimethyl-1,1-bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]disiloxanyl]ethyl]silyl]oxy]-3,3-dimethyl-3-[2-[3,3,3-trimethyl-1,1-bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]-1-disiloxanyl]ethyl]-1-disiloxanyl]propyl ester, polymer with butyl 2-propenoate and methyl 2-methyl-2propenoate, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 262299-63-8, submit a Significant New Activity notification (SNAN) containing all of the information prescribed in the Notice at least 90 days prior to using the substance for the SNAc.

In order to address the human toxicity concerns, the Notice requires notification in relation to the use of the substance in the manufacture of consumer products or cosmetics intended for applications that generate airborne particles of less than or equal to 10 micrometres when the concentration of the substance is greater than or equal to 0.1% by weight. The Notice also requires notification in relation to the distribution for sale of the substance in these finished products. For example, notification is required if a person plans to manufacture or distribute an aerosol cosmetic product containing the substance that generates respirable airborne particles of less than or equal to 10 micrometres, and the concentration of the substance is greater than or equal to 0.1% by weight.

The Notice targets any use of the substance in consumer products to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) applies, or in a cosmetic as defined in the Food and Drugs Act (FDA). A SNAN is required 90 days before the use of the substance in a SNAc.

Activities not subject to the Notice

The following activities are not significant new activities.

Uses of the substance that are regulated under the Acts of Parliament listed in Schedule 2 of the Act, including the Pest Control Products Act, the Fertilizers Act and the Feeds Act are excluded from the Notice. The Notice also does not apply to transient reaction intermediates, impurities, contaminants, partially unreacted materials, or in some circumstances to items such as, but not limited to, wastes, mixtures, or manufactured items. However, it should be noted that individual components of a mixture may be subject to notification under the provisions of the Act. See subsection 81(6) and section 3 of the Act, and section 3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers for additional information.

Activities involving the use of the substance as a research and development substance or a site-limited intermediate or to manufacture an export-only product are excluded from the Notice. The terms “research and development substance” and “site-limited intermediate substance” are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Information to be submitted

The Notice sets out the information that must be provided to the Minister 90 days before the day on which the substance 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 3-[1,1-bis[[dimethyl[2-[3,3,3-trimethyl-1,1-bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]disiloxanyl]ethyl]silyl]oxy]-3,3-dimethyl-3-[2-[3,3,3-trimethyl-1,1-bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]-1-disiloxanyl]ethyl]-1-disiloxanyl]propyl ester, polymer with butyl 2-propenoate and methyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 262299-63-8 is used for a SNAc. The Department of the Environment and the Department of Health will use the information submitted in the SNAN to conduct risk assessments within 90 days after the complete information is received.

The earlier assessment of the substance identified potential concerns associated with uses of the substance in consumer spray applications that generate respirable airborne particles of less than or equal to 10 micrometres. This acrylate silicone copolymer with high molecular weight and water-insoluble components can potentially cause pulmonary complications if inhaled. The SNAc Notice is issued to gather toxicity information in the event that the substance is used in a consumer spray application that generates airborne particles of less than or equal to 10 micrometres to ensure that the substance will undergo further assessment before SNAcs are undertaken.

The information requirements in the Notice relate to general information in respect of the substance, details surrounding its use, exposure information, and toxicity to human health. Some of the information requirements reference the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Additional guidance on preparing a SNAN can be found in section 1.3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers.

Transitional provision

A transitional provision is included in the Notice to facilitate compliance by persons who may already have imported or manufactured the substance up to 1 000 kg and started activities with it in concentrations that are greater than or equal to 0.1% by weight in the product matrix. The Notice comes into force immediately. However, if the substance is used to manufacture or distribute for sale consumer products to which the CCPSA applies, or in a cosmetic as defined in the FDA, which releases or sprays the substance in airborne particles of less than or equal to 10 micrometres in size, a threshold of more than or equal to 1 000 kg per calendar year applies and a concentration equal to or greater than 0.1% by weight applies for the period between the publication of the Notice and March 21, 2020. On March 22, 2020, the threshold will be lowered to 0 kg per calendar year when the substance is used to manufacture consumer or cosmetic products that release or spray the substance in airborne particles of less than or equal to 10 micrometres in size, and the concentration will remain greater than or equal to 0.1% by weight. The threshold will be lowered to 10 kg per calendar year when consumer or cosmetic products, which release or spray the substance in airborne particles of less than 10 micrometres in size, are intended for distribution for sale, and the concentration will remain greater than or equal to 0.1% by weight.

Compliance

When assessing whether or not a substance is subject to SNAc provisions, a person is expected to make use of information in their possession or to which they may reasonably have access. This means information in any of the notifier’s offices worldwide or other locations where the notifier can reasonably have access to the information. For example, manufacturers are expected to have access to their formulations, while importers or users of a substance, mixture, or product are expected to have access to import records, usage information and the relevant Safety Data Sheets (SDSs).

Although an SDS is an important source of information on the composition of a product, it should be noted that the goal of the SDS is to protect the health of workers in the workplace from specific hazards of chemical products. Therefore, an SDS may not list all product ingredients that may be subject to a SNAc notice due to human health or the environmental concerns. Any person requiring more detailed information on product composition is encouraged to contact their supplier.

If any information becomes available that reasonably supports the conclusion that the substance 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 3-[1,1-bis[[dimethyl[2-[3,3,3-trimethyl1,1-bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]disiloxanyl]ethyl]silyl]oxy]-3,3dimethyl-3-[2-[3,3,3-trimethyl-1,1-bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]1-disiloxanyl]ethyl]-1-disiloxanyl]propyl ester, polymer with butyl 2-propenoate and methyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 262299-63-8 is toxic or capable of becoming toxic, the person who is in possession of or who has knowledge of the information and is involved in activities with the substance is obligated, under section 70 of the Act, to provide that information to the Minister without delay.

A company can submit a SNAN on behalf of its clients. For example, in cases where a person takes possession or control of a substance from another person, they may not be required to submit a SNAN, under certain conditions, if their activities were covered by an original SNAN submitted by the person from whom they obtained the substance. The Substances Management Advisory Note “Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999” provides more detail on this subject.

Under section 86 of the Act, any person who transfers the physical possession or control of a substance subject to a SNAc notice must notify all persons to whom the physical possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the notice, including the obligation to notify the Minister of any SNAc and to provide all the required information outlined above.

A pre-notification consultation (PNC) is recommended for notifiers who wish to consult with the program during the planning or preparation of their SNAN to discuss any questions or concerns they have about the prescribed information and test plans.

Where a person has questions concerning their obligations to comply with a notice, believes they may be out of compliance, or would like to request a PNC, they are encouraged to discuss their particular circumstances with the program by contacting the Substances Management Information Line (eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca [email], 1-800‑567‑1999 [toll-free in Canada], and 819-938-3232 [outside of Canada]).

The Act is enforced in accordance with the publicly available Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. In instances of non-compliance, consideration is given to factors such as the nature of the alleged violation, potential harm, intent, and history of compliance.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of results of investigations and recommendations for a substance — phosphonic acid, [[(phosphonomethyl)imino]bis[2, 1-ethanediylnitrilobis(methylene)]]tetrakis- (DTPMP), CAS RN footnote 1 15827-60-8 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on phosphonic acid, [[(phosphonomethyl) imino]bis[2,1-ethanediylnitrilobis(methylene)]]tetrakis- (DTPMP) pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on this substance at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819‑938‑5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca. Comments can also be submitted to the Minister of the Environment using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of DTPMP

Pursuant to section 68 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of phosphonic acid, [[(phosphonomethyl)imino]bis[2,1-ethanediylnitrilobis(methylene)]]tetrakis-, hereinafter referred to as DTPMP. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) for DTPMP is 15827-60-8. This substance was identified as a priority for assessment on the basis of other human health concerns.

DTPMP was included in a survey issued pursuant to section 71 of CEPA. There were no reports of manufacture of DTPMP in Canada in the 2011 reporting year. DTPMP was reported as being imported into Canada with a total quantity of 333 656 kg for commercial uses only including water treatment, laundry and dishwashing, paints and coatings, oil and gas extraction, construction and building materials, paper products, ink, toner and colourants, photographic supplies, and in a variety of care products (i.e. fabric, cleaning and furnishing care, personal care, apparel and footwear care, and air care).

DTPMP is used in some permanent hair dye products and was identified as a non-medicinal ingredient in an over-the-counter drug (i.e. an ophthalmic solution).

The ecological risk of DTPMP was characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC), which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure, with weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. Based on the outcome of the ERC analysis, DTPMP is considered unlikely to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from DTPMP. It is proposed to conclude that DTPMP does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

For the general population of Canada, potential exposure to DTPMP was estimated from the use of permanent hair dyes and ophthalmic solutions.

The critical effect for risk characterization was determined to be potential perturbations of iron and calcium homeostasis based on a laboratory study. Margins between estimates of exposure and critical effect levels observed in laboratory studies are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

Considering all information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that DTPMP does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that DTPMP does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for this substance is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Proposed guidance for natural organic matter in drinking water

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of a proposed guidance for natural organic matter in drinking water. The proposed technical document for this guidance is available for public comment from March 16, 2019, to May 15, 2019, on the Water Quality website. Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of Health written comments on the proposed document. Comments must be sent to the Secretariat of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water, either by email at HC.water-eau.SC@canada.ca, or by regular mail to the Water and Air Quality Bureau, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, A.L. 4903D, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

March 8, 2019

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Executive summary

Natural organic matter (NOM) is an extremely complex mixture of organic compounds and is found in all groundwater and surface waters. Although NOM has no direct impact on health, it affects the efficacy of drinking water treatment processes and, consequently, the safety of drinking water. NOM may also affect consumer satisfaction because it can contribute to undesirable colour, taste and odour in drinking water.

Health Canada completed its review of NOM in drinking water and the impact that it can have on drinking water treatment processes. This guidance document reviews and assesses risks associated with the impact of NOM on drinking water treatment processes and the safety of drinking water. The intent of this document is to provide provinces, territories, other government departments and stakeholders (such as water system owners, consultants, equipment suppliers and laboratories) with guidance on the impacts of NOM on the overall quality of drinking water, including its potential effects on drinking water treatment processes and, consequently, on the safety of drinking water. It summarizes the factors that affect the concentration and character of NOM and discusses the points to consider when developing a NOM control strategy. It also provides specific guidance on treatment, monitoring, and water quality goals.

This document was developed for public consultation in collaboration with the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water.

Assessment

The health effects of NOM are due to its impact on drinking water treatment processes that are aimed to protect drinking water quality and public health. NOM can interfere with processes designed to remove or inactivate pathogens, contribute to the formation of disinfection by-products and favour the development of biofilms in the distribution system. It may also increase lead and/or copper concentrations in treated water.

The treatability and reactivity of NOM vary significantly in Canada, as each water source has unique features. Because NOM consists of numerous organic compounds, it cannot be measured directly. However, there are a number of other parameters that can be used to provide an indication of the concentration and character (i.e. chemical, physical and biodegradability properties) of NOM. It is important to understand variations in NOM concentrations and character in order to select, design and operate appropriate water treatment processes.

No practical health-based value can currently be derived for NOM in drinking water. The development of an effective NOM control strategy needs to be based on a good understanding of variations in the concentration and character of NOM in the source water, NOM’s impact on water treatment processes for the full range of water quality conditions and its potential impacts on water quality in the distribution system. Source-specific treatability studies are needed to determine the most effective treatment options to remove NOM, decrease its reactivity to form disinfection by-products, reduce its potential to contribute to corrosion, and produce biologically stable water for distribution.

International considerations

Drinking water guidelines, standards and/or guidance from other national and international organizations may vary due to the date of the assessments as well as differing policies and approaches.

International organizations have not established numerical limits for NOM in drinking water. The United States Environmental Protection Agency’s rule for disinfectants and disinfection by-products requires removal of total organic carbon (TOC) by surface water facilities using conventional or lime softening water treatment with levels of TOC above 2 mg/L in their source water. The World Health Organization suggests optimized NOM removal as a means to minimize biofilm growth in the distribution system. The European Union regulations include TOC as a general water quality indicator. In Australia, guidance has been developed for water utilities to help them understand and control the impact of NOM.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Proposed guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for cadmium

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of a proposed guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for cadmium. The proposed technical document for this guideline is available for public comment from March 16, 2019, to May 15, 2019, on the Water Quality website. Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of Health written comments on the proposed document. Comments must be sent to the Secretariat of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water, either by email at HC.water-eau.SC@canada.ca, or by regular mail to the Water and Air Quality Bureau, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, A.L. 4903D, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

March 8, 2019

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Proposed guideline

A maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 0.005 mg/L (5 µg/L) is proposed for total cadmium in drinking water.

Executive summary

Cadmium is a metal that can be found in the environment either in its elemental form or in a number of different salts. It is often associated with lead, copper, and zinc ores. Cadmium may enter drinking water sources naturally (leaching from soil), as a result of human activities (as a by-product of refining or from its use in technological applications), or through leaching from some pipes and well components.

This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with cadmium in drinking water. It incorporates new studies, assessments and approaches and takes into consideration the availability of appropriate treatment technology. Based on this review, the document proposes to reaffirm an MAC of 0.005 mg/L (5 µg/L) for cadmium in drinking water.

During its spring 2018 meeting, the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water reviewed the guideline technical document on cadmium and its endorsement for this document to undergo public consultation.

Health effects

Although exposure to cadmium through inhalation is considered to be associated with cancer effects in humans, this concern has not been linked to exposure through drinking water. Oral exposure to high levels of cadmium over a long period of time may result in adverse effects on the kidneys or on bones. The proposed guideline is based on adverse effects in the kidney, as they occur at low exposure levels and are well characterized.

Exposure

Canadians can be exposed to cadmium through its presence in food, water, consumer products, soil and air. Food is the main source of Canadian exposure to cadmium, with the exception of smokers or individuals who are exposed to it in the workplace. Exposure to cadmium in drinking water is primarily due to its leaching from galvanized steel used for service lines, pipes and well components and, to a lesser extent, from brass fittings and cement mortar linings. Historically, galvanized pipes were generally installed in homes and buildings prior to the 1960s but were permitted by the National Plumbing Code until 1980. In addition, galvanized iron has been used in the production of well components such as casings and drop pipes. Cadmium levels in source water are typically very low, and exposure to cadmium from drinking water is also generally expected to be low. Intake of cadmium from drinking water is not expected through either skin contact or inhalation.

Analysis and treatment

The establishment of a drinking water guideline must take into consideration the ability to measure the contaminant. There are several methods available that can reliably measure total cadmium in drinking water below the proposed MAC.

Cadmium levels in source water are typically very low. Although there are treatment technologies that can remove cadmium efficiently at the treatment plant, municipal treatment is not generally an effective strategy. The strategy for reducing exposure to cadmium from drinking water is generally focused on controlling corrosion using adjustments to the water quality or corrosion inhibitors.

As the primary source of cadmium in drinking water is the leaching from galvanized steel used to make service lines, pipes and well components, drinking water treatment devices offer an effective option at the residential level, although their use should not be considered to be a permanent solution. There are a number of certified residential treatment devices available that can remove cadmium from drinking water to below the proposed MAC.

International considerations

Drinking water guidelines, standards and/or guidance from other national and international organizations may vary due to the age of the assessments as well as differing policies and approaches, including the choice of key study and the use of different consumption rates, body weights and allocation factors.

Various organizations have established values for cadmium in drinking water. The United States Environmental Protection Agency established a maximum contaminant level of 0.005 mg/L, the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council has established a guideline value of 0.002 mg/L, the World Health Organization has published a drinking-water quality guideline of 0.003 mg/L, and the European Union directive includes a parametric value of 0.005 mg/L for cadmium in drinking water.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Proposed review of total coliforms in drinking water

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of a proposed review of total coliforms in drinking water. The proposed review is available for public comment from March 16, 2019, to May 15, 2019, on the Water Quality website. Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of Health written comments on the proposed document. Comments must be sent to the Secretariat of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water, either by email at HC.water-eau.SC@canada.ca, or by regular mail to the Water and Air Quality Bureau, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, A.L. 4903D, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

March 8, 2019

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Conclusions of the review

The current Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality: Guideline Technical Document — Total Coliforms were published in 2012. They establish that the maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of total coliforms in water leaving a treatment plant and in non-disinfected groundwater leaving the well is none detectable per 100 mL. The Guidelines also state that total coliforms should be monitored in the distribution system because they are used to indicate changes in water quality. Detection of total coliforms from consecutive samples from the same site or from more than 10% of the samples collected in a given sampling period should be investigated (Health Canada, 2012).

Health Canada reviewed the scientific literature related to total coliforms in 2017. Based on this review, a full update of this guideline technical document is not required at this time, as science continues to support the MAC established in 2012.

This review was undertaken in collaboration with the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water.

Methodology

This review was conducted to identify any new scientific information on total coliforms and to determine whether a full update of the guideline technical document on total coliforms was warranted. The review primarily focused on peer-reviewed scientific studies and reports published between 2010 and 2017, and including those published on the websites of the World Health Organization, the United States Environmental Protection Agency, the European Union and the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council. Other reports, such as those from the Water Research Foundation, were also reviewed. While a preliminary scoping of the literature highlighted some issues that had not been discussed in the existing guideline technical document, such as the availability of new detection methods and approaches, none would have an impact on the guideline value or its implementation.

Summary of findings

The recent literature continues to support the use of total coliforms, in conjunction with other indicators, as part of a multi-barrier approach to produce drinking water of an acceptable quality. It also highlights a number of considerations related to the detection of total coliforms, including the wide range of variability among culture-based methods used for detection, the impact of sampling location and storage conditions on total coliform recovery, and the complexity of assessing the microbial quality of the distribution system.

Future considerations

Given the limitations associated with using any single indicator, including total coliforms, there is a need to look at additional indicators of microbial water quality. Not every indicator will be useful in every situation; thus, site-specific assessments should consider a variety of appropriate methods and indicators.

The wide ranges of variability reported among culture-based methods used for detection of total coliforms indicate that there is a need for further optimization. Rapid and reliable methods for bacterial indicators are needed to ensure the best possible assessment of water quality and, thus, public health protection.

Maintaining water quality in the distribution system can be very challenging, and testing for conventional indicators of water quality, such as total coliforms, does not provide rapid results allowing for immediate action. Alternative approaches that can be used to detect early changes in microbial water quality need to be further explored.

Opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) are responsible for a significant number of drinking water-related outbreaks, and their presence in distribution system and plumbing system biofilms does not correlate with that of other microbial indicators, including total coliforms. A better understanding of water quality parameters that facilitate OPPP colonization and growth is needed and will be considered during the next review of the guidance document on waterborne bacterial pathogens.

How to use this review

The review document, available upon request, provides a summary of the findings of the scientific literature review. It formally reaffirms the scientific and technical basis of the guidance provided in the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality: Guideline Technical Document — Total Coliforms (Health Canada, 2012). It does not change either the guideline statement or its application and does not replace the existing guideline technical document. The review document follows the format of the existing guideline technical document to provide additional scientific information and highlights considerations that are likely to have an impact on future microbiological documents in this series.

Reference

Health Canada (2012). Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality: Guideline Technical Document — Total Coliforms. Water, Air and Climate Change Bureau, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. (Catalogue No. H144-8/2013E-PDF).

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Instrument of Advice dated March 1, 2019

Bibeau, The Hon. Marie-Claude, P.C.

Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

MacAulay, The Hon. Lawrence, P.C.

Minister of Veterans Affairs; Associate Minister of National Defence, to be styled Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence

Monsef, The Hon. Maryam, P.C.

Minister of International Development; Minister of Women and Gender Equality, to be styled Minister of International Development and Minister for Women and Gender Equality

March 4, 2019

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Boswell, Matthew F. J.

2019-107

Commissioner of Competition

 

Ettinger, Doug

2019-125

Canada Post Corporation

 

President

 

Immigration and Refugee Board

 

Full-time members

 

Aubin, Pascale

2019-113

Foreman, Kimberley Brooke Ann

2019-115

Geer, Dreeni Lucy

2019-114

Plouffe-Malette, Kristine

2019-117

Saint-Fleur, Love Bernadette

2019-116

Mithani, Siddika

2019-104

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

 

President

 

Thorpe-Dorward, Doug

2019-112

Parole Board of Canada

 

Full-time member

 

March 8, 2019

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

GLOBAL AFFAIRS CANADA

OFFICIAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE ACCOUNTABILITY ACT

Notice of intent to define the expression “official development assistance” for the purposes of the Official Development Assistance Accountability Act

Notice is hereby given that Global Affairs Canada is initiating a process to seek views on the development of a regulation to define the expression “official development assistance” (ODA) for the purposes of the Official Development Assistance Accountability Act (ODAAA), as provided for in the Budget Implementation Act, 2018, No. 2 (Bill C-86), Part 4, Division 17. The definition contained in the regulation will replace the definition of ODA contained in the ODAAA that is repealed in accordance with the Budget Implementation Act, 2018, No. 2, Part 4, Division 17.

The new definition of ODA will be based on the definition originally included in the ODAAA; however, it will be updated to align with the latest internationally agreed definition. The Budget Implementation Act, 2018, No. 2 specifically indicates that the new definition “must take into account, among other things, the most recent definition of ‘official development assistance’ formulated by the Development Assistance Committee of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development” (OECD-DAC).

Background

The internationally agreed OECD-DAC definition of ODA has recently been revised (a copy of the bilingual definition can also be obtained from Global Affairs Canada through the email address provided below) to reflect the evolving landscape of development and development finance. Canada’s definition of ODA in the ODAAA, which was based on the OECD-DAC definition from 2008, is therefore no longer aligned with the latest international standards as agreed by the OECD-DAC.

Overview

The proposed regulation will define the expression “official development assistance” for the purposes of the Official Development Assistance Accountability Act (ODAAA).

In particular, the regulation will aim to ensure that the expression “official development assistance” will

AND EITHER

OR

Public comment period

Interested persons may submit comments concerning the proposed regulation within 15 days after the date of publication of this notice. All such submissions must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice, and be addressed to Mhairi Petersen, Director, International Assistance Envelope Management, Global Affairs Canada, 125 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0G2 (email: mhairi.petersen@international.gc.ca).

INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CANADA

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY ACT
RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. DGSO-001-19 — Consultation on Periodic Adjustments for Radio and Spectrum Licence Fees and Fees Related to Equipment Certification Services

The intent of this notice is to announce a public consultation through the Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) document DGSO-001-19 entitled Consultation on Periodic Adjustments for Radio and Spectrum Licence Fees and Fees Related to Equipment Certification Services.

Through the release of this consultation, ISED seeks comments on the application of the annual fee adjustment required by the Service Fees Act (SFA), and invites proposals for an alternative periodic adjustment that would be applicable to the fees within the scope of the consultation. Any alternative proposal would need to take into account ISED’s policy objectives and the requirements of the SFA.

Submitting comments

Interested parties are requested to submit their comments no later than April 15, 2019, to ensure consideration. All submissions should cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, the publication date, the title and the notice reference number (DGSO-001-19). Respondents are asked to provide supporting rationale for their comments. Due to the anticipated interest in this consultation, respondents are requested to limit their responses to 500 words.

Contact information is required for each submission for validation and in the event that further clarification is necessary. Respondents are asked not to provide confidential or private information in their submissions.

There are three ways to submit comments:

Soon after the close of the comment period, comments received will be posted on ISED’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website. ISED will also provide interested parties with the opportunity to reply to comments from other parties. Reply comments will be accepted no later than 15 days after initial comments are posted, and will be published shortly thereafter.

Obtaining copies

All spectrum-related documents referred to herein are available on ISED’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website.

Official versions of notices can be viewed on the Canada Gazette website.

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC PROSECUTIONS

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC PROSECUTIONS ACT

Assignment

1. Under paragraph 3(3)(g) of the Director of Public Prosecutions Act, I assign to the Director of Public Prosecutions the powers, duties and functions of the Attorney General of Canada — as set out on December 18, 2018 — in the following Acts:

2. The Assignment under paragraph 3(3)(g) of the Director of Public Prosecutions Act published in the Canada Gazette on August 1, 2015, is repealed on the day that this Assignment is made.

Ottawa, February 28, 2019

David Lametti
Attorney General of Canada

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Chief Administrator

Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada

 

Chairperson

Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada

 

Chairperson

Canada Development Investment Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology

 

Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson

Canada Industrial Relations Board

 

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

Chairperson (joint federal Governor in Council and provincial Lieutenant Governor appointment)

Canada–Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board

 

Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Commercial Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canadian Dairy Commission

 

Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson and Director

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Chief Executive Officer (Anticipatory)

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Lead Commissioner, Deputy Lead Commissioner and Commissioner

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Pay Equity Commissioner

Canadian Human Rights Commission

 

Chairperson

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Nature

 

Permanent Member

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

 

Regional Member (Quebec)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

 

Chairperson and Member

Canadian Statistics Advisory Council

 

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Canadian Tourism Commission

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Defense Construction (1951) Limited

 

Chairperson

Farm Credit Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Farm Credit Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson

Farm Products Council of Canada

 

Chairperson

The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited

 

Commissioner

Financial Consumer Agency of Canada

 

Chairperson

First Nations Financial Management Board

 

Chief Commissioner

First Nations Tax Commission

 

Deputy Chief Commissioner

First Nations Tax Commission

 

Director

Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation

 

Director (Federal)

Hamilton Port Authority

 

Sergeant-at-Arms and Corporate Security Office

House of Commons

 

Member

International Authority

 

Commissioner and Chairperson

International Joint Commission

 

Member (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Vice-Chairperson

Invest in Canada Hub

 

Chief Executive Officer

The Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated

 

Librarian and Archivist of Canada

Library and Archives of Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Marine Atlantic Inc.

 

Vice-Chairperson

National Arts Centre Corporation

 

Member

National Capital Commission

 

Government Film Commissioner

National Film Board

 

Chairperson

National Research Council of Canada

 

President

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

 

Canadian Ombudsperson

Office of the Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise

 

Ombudsperson

Office of the Ombudsperson for National Defence and Canadian Forces

 

Director (Federal)

Oshawa Port Authority

 

Chairperson

Pacific Pilotage Authority

 

Chief Executive Officer

Parks Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson and Member

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

 

Member

Payment in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel

 

Member and Alternate Member

Renewable Resources Board (Gwich’in)

 

Member and Alternate Member

Renewable Resources Board (Sahtu)

 

Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson

Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee

 

Principal

Royal Military College of Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson (all streams)

Social Security Tribunal of Canada

 

Chairperson

Telefilm Canada

 

Member (Marine and Medical)

Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

VIA Rail Canada Inc.

 

BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at January 31, 2019

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

16.2

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

9,390.4

 

Advances

143.2

 

Other receivables

5.1

 
   

9,538.7

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

23,750.3

 

Canada Mortgage bonds

251.8

 

Government of Canada bonds

80,955.2

 

Other investments

426.2

 
   

105,383.5

Capital assets

   

Property and equipment

600.6

 

Intangible assets

46.3

 

Right-of-use leased assets

53.8

 
   

700.7

Other assets

 

186.9

 

115,826.0


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

86,424.8

Deposits

Government of Canada

24,892.0

 

Members of Payments Canada

393.3

 

Other deposits

2,924.5

 
   

28,209.8

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

 

673.3

   

115,307.9

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Investment revaluation reserve footnote *

388.1

 
   

518.1

115,826.0

I declare that the foregoing statement is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, February 20, 2019

Carmen Vierula
Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accountant

I declare that the foregoing statement is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, February 20, 2019

Stephen S. Poloz
Governor