Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 153, Number 10: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

March 9, 2019

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of four carboxylic acids specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the four substances identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the final screening assessment conducted on these substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the final screening assessment of the Carboxylic Acids Group

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of four substances referred to collectively as the Carboxylic Acids Group. Substances in this group were identified as priorities for assessment as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNs) footnote 1 their Domestic Substances List (DSL) names and their common names are listed in the table below.

Substances in the Carboxylic Acids Group
CAS RN Domestic Substances List name Common name
79-09-4 Propanoic acid Propionic acid
107-92-6 Butanoic acid n-Butyric acid
112-05-0 Nonanoic acid Nonanoic acid
144-62-7 Ethanedioic acid Oxalic acid

In 2011, imported quantities of n-butyric acid and oxalic acid were reported to range from 10 000 to 100 000 kg, imported quantities of nonanoic acid were reported to be 28 925 kg and imported quantities of propionic acid were reported to range from 1 000 000 to 10 000 000 kg. None of these substances were reported to be manufactured in Canada in 2011 above the reporting threshold of 100 kg.

The substances in the Carboxylic Acids Group are reported to be used commercially in Canada in a number of applications and products such as processing aids, plastic and rubber materials, industrial intermediates, lubricants, solvents, and non-pesticidal agricultural products.

These substances are naturally occurring compounds. Propionic and n-butyric acids are endogenous to humans as they are produced through microbial fermentation in the gastrointestinal tract. Propionic acid, n-butyric acid, and nonanoic acid occur naturally in a variety of foods and may also be used as food flavouring agents. In Canada, propionic acid is also an approved food additive. Propionic acid and oxalic acid are used as components in the manufacture of a variety of food packaging materials. Nonanoic and oxalic acid are used as components in incidental additives for use in food processing establishments. Oxalic acid is also a naturally occurring substance in some foods and has been identified as an ingredient in cleaning products available to consumers in Canada.

All of the substances in the Carboxylic Acids Group are registered pesticide formulants in Canada. They are also all permitted ingredients in natural health products, and propionic, n-butyric, and oxalic acids have been identified in natural health products. Some of these substances are also present in products available to consumers, such as nonanoic acid in eye makeup and cleaning products, and oxalic acid in cleaning products.

The ecological risks of substances in the Carboxylic Acids Group in this screening assessment were characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC) approach, which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure with weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. Based on the outcome of the ERC analysis, propionic acid, n-butyric acid, nonanoic acid, and oxalic acid are considered unlikely to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from propionic acid, n-butyric acid, nonanoic acid, and oxalic acid. It is concluded that propionic acid, n-butyric acid, nonanoic acid, and oxalic acid do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

With respect to human health, propionic acid was assessed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in 2007 and by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in 2014, n-butyric acid was assessed by the OECD in 2003, and nonanoic acid was assessed by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) in 2013. Potential sources of exposure of the general population to propionic and n-butyric acid would be from their natural occurrence in the environment and in foods, and their uses as food additives or flavouring agents, as well as their uses in natural health products and/or homeopathic products. Potential sources of exposure of the general population to nonanoic acid include its natural occurrence in the environment and in foods, and its use as a food flavouring substance, and its use as an ingredient in an eye makeup product and as an ingredient in a liquid disinfectant solution. On the basis of the information from the above-noted international assessments, propionic acid, n-butyric acid, and nonanoic acid are considered to be substances of low hazard potential; therefore, the risk to human health is considered to be low.

Exposure to oxalic acid can occur from its use as an ingredient in cleaning products and its natural presence in foods. The available health effects information on oxalic acid indicates potential effects on the reproductive system. The margins of exposure between estimated exposure of oxalic acid and the critical effect level in laboratory studies are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that propionic acid, n-butyric acid, nonanoic acid, and oxalic acid do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that propionic acid, n-butyric acid, nonanoic acid, and oxalic acid do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of three substances in the Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides Group — phthalic anhydride, CAS RN footnote 2 85-44-9, maleic anhydride, CAS RN 108-31-6, and trimellitic anhydride, CAS RN 552-30-7 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas phthalic anhydride, maleic anhydride and trimellitic anhydride are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on phthalic anhydride, maleic anhydride and trimellitic anhydride pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of the Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides Group

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of three of the eight substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides Group. These three substances were identified as priorities for assessment as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. The other five substances were determined to be of low concern through other approaches, and decisions for these substances are provided in separate reports.footnote 3 Accordingly, this screening assessment addresses the three substances listed in the table below. The three substances addressed in this screening assessment will hereinafter be referred to as the Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides Group.

Substances in the Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides Group
CAS RN Domestic Substances List name Common name
85-44-9 1,3-Isobenzofurandione Phthalic anhydride
108-31-6 2,5-Furandione Maleic anhydride
552-30-7 5-Isobenzofurancarboxylicacid, 1,3-dihydro-1,3-dioxo- Trimellitic anhydride

In 2011, reported imported quantities of phthalic anhydride and trimellitic anhydride were <12 550 000 and 1 000 000–10 000 000 kg, respectively, based on information submitted pursuant to section 71 of CEPA. The two substances were not reported as being manufactured in Canada above the reporting threshold of 100 kg. Maleic anhydride was not included in surveys pursuant to section 71 of CEPA; however, information from the Canadian International Merchandise Trade Database reported average annual import volumes of maleic anhydride from 2013–2016 to be approximately 9 000 000 kg.

All of the substances in the Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides Group are primarily used as intermediates in the production of other chemicals. The substances in this group do not naturally occur in the environment, with the exception of phthalic anhydride, which may be formed through the photochemical breakdown of other organic substances in air.

Phthalic anhydride and maleic anhydride are present on the list of substances reported to the National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI). Phthalic anhydride and maleic anhydride have been reported to be released in quantities of 90 kg and 18 kg, respectively. A report from the National Research Council Canada indicates that phthalic anhydride is present in indoor air and dust in homes in Canada.

Phthalic anhydride is primarily used as a chemical intermediate for the synthesis of phthalate esters. It may also be used in the production of polyester resins, alkyd resins, and other chemical substances such as pigments and dyes. In Canada, phthalic anhydride is present in consumer spray paint products, floor polishes, and cosmetic products including nail polishes and eyelash adhesives. It has also been identified for use in the manufacture of food packaging materials.

Based on available information, maleic anhydride is primarily used as a chemical intermediate in the synthesis of unsaturated polyester resins, as well as other chemical substances. In Canada, maleic anhydride was identified as an ingredient in shampoos, temporary tattoos, exfoliants, bubble baths (foam and oil), bath salts, and body cleansers. Through publicly available safety data sheets (SDSs), the substance was also identified as being used in wood blending sticks designed to repair minor scratches on wood surfaces. Maleic anhydride has also been identified in Canada for use in the manufacture of food packaging materials.

Trimellitic anhydride is used in commercial applications including paint and coating applications, and plastic and rubber materials where it functions as an intermediate. The substance was identified for use as a component in resins used in the manufacture of returnable bottles used for milk, water, and juice. Trimellitic anhydride was reported to be present as an ingredient in one product available to consumers (i.e. nail polish) in Canada.

The ecological risks of the substances in the Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides Group were characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC), which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. Based on the outcome of the ERC analysis, the three substances in the Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides Group are considered unlikely to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from phthalic anhydride, maleic anhydride, and trimellitic anhydride. It is concluded that phthalic anhydride, maleic anhydride, and trimellitic anhydride do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Based on the available information, the critical effect for characterization of the risk to human health from exposure to phthalic anhydride is respiratory sensitization. A comparison of the estimated exposure levels of phthalic anhydride from its uses in products available to consumers including spray paints, floor polishes, and eyelash adhesives to critical effect levels resulted in margins of exposure that are considered adequate to account for uncertainties in the health and exposure databases. A comparison of estimated exposure to phthalic anhydride from its presence in indoor air to critical effect levels resulted in margins of exposure that are considered adequate to account for uncertainties in the health and exposure databases.

Based on the collective information, the critical effects for characterization of the risk to human health from exposure to maleic anhydride are effects on kidney and bladder. A comparison of estimated exposure levels from uses of the substance in products available to consumers to critical effect levels resulted in margins of exposure that are considered adequate to account for uncertainties in the health and exposure databases.

The estimated exposure to trimellitic anhydride from environmental media or food packaging is expected to be negligible and exposure from the use of nail polish is not expected based on the substance function in the product. The overall exposure of the Canadian general population to trimellitic anhydride is negligible; therefore, the risk to human health is considered to be low.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that phthalic anhydride, maleic anhydride, and trimellitic anhydride do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that phthalic anhydride, maleic anhydride and trimellitic anhydride do not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for this substance is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of two arenes — Benzene, (1-methylethyl) [cumene], CAS RN footnote 4 98-82-8, and Benz[a]anthracene, 7,12-dimethyl-(DMBA), CAS RN 57-97-6 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Benzene, (1-methylethyl) [cumene] and Benz[a]anthracene, 7,12-dimethyl (DMBA) are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on these two substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that these two substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on these two substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Notice is further given that the ministers intend on using information-gathering mechanisms, such as those outlined in the Act, to collect information on the substances.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of two arenes

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health conducted a screening assessment on two of nine substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Arenes Group. These two substances were identified as priorities for assessment as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. Seven of the nine substances were subsequently determined to be of low concern through other approaches, and decisions for these substances are provided in separate reports. footnote 5 footnote 6 Accordingly, this screening assessment addresses the two substances listed in the table below. The two substances addressed in this screening assessment will hereinafter be referred to as the Arenes Group.

Substances in the Arenes Group
CAS RN Domestic Substances List name Common name
98-82-8 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)- Cumene; isopropylbenzene
57-97-6 Benz[a]anthracene, 7,12-dimethyl- 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)

In 2011, between 100 000 and 1 000 000 kg of cumene (CAS RN 98-82-8) were reported to be manufactured in Canada, and the same quantity was imported into Canada. There were no reports of manufacture or import for 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA, CAS RN 57-97-6) above the reporting threshold of 100 kg for the same year. In Canada, cumene is primarily used as a chemical intermediate, but it is also used in products available to consumers, including adhesives, paints, automotive-related products, and lubricants. In Canada, DMBA is used as a research chemical in laboratories. It can also be produced unintentionally from industrial processes as a by-product.

The ecological risks of cumene and DMBA were characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC). The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established principally on the basis of metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified cumene and DMBA as having a low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from cumene and DMBA. It is concluded that cumene and DMBA do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

The risks to human health for cumene and DMBA were characterized on the basis of available health effects and exposure information.

For cumene, laboratory studies have identified carcinogenicity as a critical health effect following long-term exposure by the inhalation route. Further, following oral administration for six months or inhalation for three months, non-cancer effects were observed in laboratory studies on the kidney (six-month oral study) and liver (three-month inhalation study). Systemic adverse effects were not observed in acute and short-term laboratory studies following inhalation or dermal administration. General population exposure to cumene from environmental media and from its possible presence in food was characterized using measured levels. The predominant source of exposure was indoor air. On the basis of a comparison of exposure estimates and critical effect levels identified in health effects studies, margins of exposure were considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in the human health effects and exposure databases. Estimates of exposure to cumene from the use of various products available to consumers were derived and were not identified as a concern for human health, as available laboratory studies do not identify acute and short-term exposure to be of concern.

DMBA is genotoxic and laboratory studies have identified carcinogenicity to multiple organs as a critical health effect following administration by the oral and dermal routes. It is considered that the substance could be carcinogenic via the inhalation route, and estimates of potency were derived on the basis of route-specific potencies of a well-studied polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. General population exposure to DMBA was characterized using measured levels in ambient air in Canada. On the basis of a comparison of exposure estimates and the derived critical effect level in health effects studies, the margin of exposure was considered adequate to address uncertainties in the human health effects and exposure databases.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that cumene and DMBA do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that cumene and DMBA do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

Consideration for follow up

While exposure of the general population to cumene and DMBA is not of concern at current levels, cumene and DMBA are associated with human health effects of concern. Therefore, there may be a concern for human health if exposure were to increase. Follow-up activities will track changes in exposure and/or commercial use patterns, and will include indoor air monitoring via indoor air studies, continued monitoring via the National Pollutants Release Inventory (NPRI), and/or the use of information-gathering mechanisms, such as those outlined in the Act.

The Government will use the data gathered through these follow-up activities to prioritize further information gathering or risk assessment of these substances, if required.

The screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Final guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for lead

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of a final guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for lead. The technical document for this guideline is available on the Water Quality website. This document underwent a public consultation period of 60 days in 2017 and was updated to take into consideration the comments received.

March 8, 2019

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Guideline

The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for total lead in drinking water is 0.005 mg/L (5 µg/L), based on a sample of water taken at the tap and using the appropriate protocol for the type of building being sampled. Every effort should be made to maintain lead levels in drinking water as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

Executive summary

Lead is usually found in drinking water as a result of leaching from distribution and plumbing system components, particularly in aggressive (corrosive) waters. Historically, lead has been used extensively in service lines, solders and fittings, making its presence in drinking water more likely in older homes and neighbourhoods.

This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with lead in drinking water. It assesses new studies and approaches and takes into consideration the availability and limitations of appropriate treatment and analytical technologies. The information contained in this document is complementary to that found in Guidance on Controlling Corrosion in Drinking Water Distribution Systems.

Health effects

Inorganic lead compounds have been classified as probably carcinogenic to humans, based on findings in laboratory animals. However, the cancer effects are not the main health effects of concern in humans.

The toxicity of lead has been extensively documented in humans, based on blood lead levels (BLLs). Effects that have been studied include increased blood pressure and renal dysfunction in adults, as well as adverse cognitive and behavioural effects in children. The strongest association observed to date is between increased BLLs in children and reductions in intelligence quotient (IQ) scores, which is the key health endpoint of concern. The threshold below which lead is no longer associated with adverse neurodevelopmental effects has not been identified. As the MAC exceeds the drinking water concentration associated with neurodevelopmental effects in children, every effort should be made to maintain lead levels in drinking water as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

Exposure

Lead is commonly found in the environment, both naturally and as a result of human activities. Canadians are exposed to small amounts of lead in water, food, air, soil and consumer products. Lead has historically been used in drinking water distribution and plumbing systems, as well as in paints and as an additive in gasoline. Significant reductions of lead in products such as gasoline and paints mean that food and drinking water have become more important sources of lead exposure for average adult populations.

Analysis and treatment

The establishment of a drinking water guideline must take into consideration the ability to measure the contaminant. There are several methods available for the analysis of total lead in drinking water. Based on the capacity of commercial laboratories in Canada, analytical methods are available to reliably measure total lead in drinking water below the MAC. These methods require sample preparation steps to ensure that they are able to detect both dissolved and particulate lead.

The guideline development process also considers the ability to remove the contaminant from drinking water supplies to meet the MAC. Although there are treatment technologies that can remove lead efficiently at the treatment plant, municipal treatment alone may not be an effective strategy to reduce lead to concentrations at the tap below the MAC. This is because materials used in the distribution and plumbing systems, such as service lines, solder and fittings, may contain lead, which may leach into the water and be found at the tap as a result of corrosion in these systems. Consequently, the best approach to minimize exposure to lead from drinking water at the municipal level is to remove the full service line and to control corrosion in the distribution and treatment systems.

As the primary source of lead in drinking water is the leaching from distribution and plumbing system components, drinking water treatment devices offer an effective option to lower exposure to lead from drinking water at the residential level. However, their use should not be considered to be a permanent solution because filters must be replaced regularly and the systems require ongoing maintenance. There are a number of certified residential treatment devices available that can remove lead from drinking water.

International considerations

Drinking water guidelines, standards and/or guidance from other national and international organizations may vary due to the age of the assessments as well as differing policies and approaches, including the choice of key study and the use of different consumption rates, body weights and allocation factors.

Various organizations have established values for lead in drinking water. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has not established a maximum contaminant level for lead in drinking water, but has a maximum contaminant level goal of zero, and has established an action level of 0.015 mg/L (15 µg/L) in its treatment-based Lead and Copper Rule, though a revision of this rule is currently underway. The World Health Organization has established a provisional drinking water quality guideline of 0.01 mg/L (10 µg/L), the European Union directive includes a parametric value of 0.01 mg/L (10 µg/L), and the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council has established a guideline value of 0.01 mg/L (10 µg/L) for lead in drinking water.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CONTROLLED DRUGS AND SUBSTANCES ACT

Notice to interested parties — Proposed regulations amending the Narcotic Control Regulations, the Benzodiazepines and Other Targeted Substances Regulations and the Food and Drug Regulations — Part G to modernize regulations with respect to pharmacists

This notice provides interested stakeholders with the opportunity to provide comments on Health Canada’s intent to amend the Narcotic Control Regulations (NCR), the Benzodiazepines and Other Targeted Substances Regulations (BOTSR) and the Food and Drug Regulations — Part G (FDR — Part G) so that they better support modern pharmacy practices and to address gaps and inconsistencies.

The Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) is the means by which Canada fulfills its obligations under the United Nations (UN) Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, 1961, the UN Convention on Psychotropic Substances, 1971, and the United Nations Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, 1988, which together form the basis for the current global drug control system. The objective of the regulations under the CDSA is to allow legitimate activities with controlled substances and precursors while minimizing the risk of their diversion to illegal markets or uses.

This framework has evolved since the early 1960s, with successive pieces of legislation and regulations coming into force at different times to address emerging issues or to meet international commitments. This piecemeal approach has led to the development of a regulatory framework that, at times, does not take into account some newer operational realities of pharmacies. Consequently, this situation has created barriers to the adoption of new and emerging service delivery models, such as third-party prescription filling in a central fill pharmacy. In addition, this framework does not reflect the expanding roles of other registered and qualified pharmacy professionals, such as pharmacy technicians, which may be limiting pharmacies’ ability to optimize their current service delivery.

Health Canada intends to propose amendments to the NCR, the BOTSR and the FDR — Part G to address these barriers and update the regulations so that they better enable pharmacy innovation in Canada, while bringing greater clarity and consistency across the regulations. The Department is seeking the feedback of interested parties in these areas to ensure that the proposed amendments are informed by and responsive to the pharmacy sector and its stakeholders.

The publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, initiates a 60-day comment period. Anyone interested in this process or who has comments on this notice should contact Legislative and Regulatory Affairs, Controlled Substances Directorate, Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch, Health Canada, by mail at Address Locator: 0302A, 150 Tunney’s Pasture Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9, or by email at hc.csd.regulatory.policy-politique.reglementaire.dsc.sc@canada.ca.

Michelle Boudreau
Director General
Controlled Substances Directorate

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Lethbridge Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Sonia Stock

Ottawa, February 26, 2019

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

Notice amending the comment period for the certificate of intent to amalgamate port authorities

In light of the public’s ongoing interest in providing comments on the Government’s intent to amalgamate the Oshawa and Hamilton port authorities, which notice was published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on February 9, 2019, Transport Canada is extending the public consultation period by 15 days, to 45 days. This 15-day extension will move the closing date of the public consultation period from March 11, 2019, to March 26, 2019. This extension allows those who wish to provide comments on the proposed amalgamation the time to consider more fully their views and opinions on the proposed amalgamation.

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position Organization Closing date
Chief Administrator Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada  
Chairperson Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada  
Director Canada Council for the Arts  
Chairperson Canada Development Investment Corporation  
Chairperson Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology  
Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson Canada Industrial Relations Board  
Chairperson Canada Lands Company Limited  
President and Chief Executive Officer Canada Lands Company Limited  
Chairperson (joint federal Governor in Council and provincial Lieutenant Governor appointment) Canada–Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board  
President and Chief Executive Officer Canada Post Corporation  
Chairperson Canada Science and Technology Museum  
Vice-Chairperson Canada Science and Technology Museum  
President and Chief Executive Officer Canadian Commercial Corporation  
Chairperson Canadian Dairy Commission  
Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson and Director Canadian Energy Regulator  
Lead Commissioner, Deputy Lead Commissioner and Commissioner Canadian Energy Regulator  
Chairperson Canadian Institutes of Health Research  
Vice-Chairperson Canadian Museum of Nature  
Permanent Member Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission  
Regional Member (Quebec) Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission  
Chairperson and Member Canadian Statistics Advisory Council  
President (Chief Executive Officer) Canadian Tourism Commission  
President and Chief Executive Officer Defense Construction (1951) Limited  
Chairperson Farm Credit Canada  
President and Chief Executive Officer Farm Credit Canada  
Vice-Chairperson Farm Products Council of Canada  
Chairperson The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited  
Commissioner Financial Consumer Agency of Canada  
Chairperson First Nations Financial Management Board  
Chief Commissioner First Nations Tax Commission  
Deputy Chief Commissioner First Nations Tax Commission  
Director Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation  
Director (Federal) Hamilton Port Authority  
Member International Authority  
Commissioner and Chairperson International Joint Commission  
Member (appointment to roster) International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies  
Vice-Chairperson Invest in Canada Hub  
Chief Executive Officer The Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated  
Librarian and Archivist of Canada Library and Archives of Canada  
President and Chief Executive Officer Marine Atlantic Inc.  
Vice-Chairperson National Arts Centre Corporation  
Member National Capital Commission  
Government Film Commissioner National Film Board  
Chairperson National Research Council of Canada  
President Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada  
Canadian Ombudsperson Office of the Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise  
Commissioner of Competition Office of the Commissioner of Competition  
Ombudsperson Office of the Ombudsperson for National Defence and Canadian Forces  
Director (Federal) Oshawa Port Authority  
Chairperson Pacific Pilotage Authority  
Chief Executive Officer Parks Canada  
Vice-Chairperson and Member Patented Medicine Prices Review Board  
Member Payment in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel  
Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee  
Principal Royal Military College of Canada  
Vice-Chairperson (all streams) Social Security Tribunal of Canada  
Chairperson Telefilm Canada  
Member (Marine and Medical) Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada  
President and Chief Executive Officer VIA Rail Canada Inc.  

TREASURY BOARD

FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT

Occupational group definitions

Pursuant to paragraph 11.1(1)(b) of the Financial Administration Act, the Treasury Board of Canada hereby provides notice of the following occupational group changes:

The following definitions will apply to the Program and Administrative Services Group and its sub-groups, to the Comptrollership Group and its sub-groups and to the Negotiation, Mediation and Conciliation Officer Group, effective March 9, 2019.

The group definitions of

are revised as follows effective March 9, 2019.

Program and Administrative Services (PA) Occupational Group Definition

The Program and Administrative Services Group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the planning, development, delivery or management of administrative and federal government policies, programs, services or other activities directed to the public or to the public service.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one of the following activities:

  1. supporting or administering programs or services where the latitude for discretion is defined by a framework of established precedents and guidelines;
  2. planning, developing, delivering or managing policies, programs or services;
  3. providing direct administrative assistance to an individual or individuals performing an executive role;
  4. delivering societal reintegration or social, physical or psychological rehabilitation through the application of intervention planning, risk assessment, and relapse prevention strategies and practices; and
  5. applying a comprehensive knowledge of communications theories and principles to departmental communication policies, products or plans.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Program and Administrative Services Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other group and those positions at the Canada Border Services Agency that are primarily involved in the planning, development, delivery, or management of the inspection and control of people and goods entering Canada.

Program and Service Operations (PA-PVO) Sub-Group Definition

The Program and Service Operations Sub-Group comprises positions that are primarily engaged in one or more of the following activities in order to support or administer programs or services where the latitude for discretion is defined by a framework of established precedents and guidelines:

  1. operating electronic business support equipment and performing related troubleshooting; collecting, verifying or entering information into systems; generating or adapting reports using software; providing user support; or informing clients on how to use office equipment or software;
  2. applying procedures, directives, or regulations; searching for required information; obtaining information from clients; or providing information, clarification or options to clients;
  3. prioritizing or problem-solving organizational demands; managing the flow of information; modifying or establishing office administrative procedures; proofreading, editing, or validating written materials such as forms, documents, memoranda, presentations, spreadsheets; or coordinating or providing logistical support for projects, meetings, events or hearings;
  4. identifying, processing or applying program eligibility, options, or entitlements;
  5. researching, analyzing, and providing advice on employee compensation or benefits issues to managers, employees and their families or representatives;
  6. delivering or coordinating administrative services in one or more fields such as human resources, finance, records management, materiel management, health and safety;
  7. verifying that the quality and accuracy of programs or services delivered meet service standards; or
  8. training or supervision of any of the above activities.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Program and Service Operations Sub-Group are those whose primary purpose is included in any other occupational group or another Program and Administrative Services Sub-Group definition, namely those

  1. providing program or service delivery in situations which require the interpretation and application of the theories and principles underlying the program or service; or
  2. providing direct administrative assistance to an individual performing an executive role.
Program Development and Administration (PA-PDM) Sub-Group Definition

The Program Development and Administration Sub-Group comprises positions that are primarily engaged in one or more of the following activities in order to plan, develop, deliver or manage policies, programs or services:

  1. researching, analyzing, designing, evaluating or modifying policies, programs or services;
  2. interpreting policies, acts or regulations to ensure compliance, provide recommendations, make decisions, or deliver a program or service by applying related theories and principles;
  3. analyzing business requirements through the assessment of objectives, trends, risks, and impacts;
  4. assessing, integrating, coordinating or developing corporate business or strategic plans, including performance measurement activities;
  5. providing strategic advice to senior management on program or service priorities, issues and risks; or
  6. leadership of any of the above activities.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Program Development and Administration Sub-Group are those whose primary purpose is included in any other occupational group or another Program and Administrative Services Sub-Group definition, namely those

  1. supporting or administering programs or services where the latitude for discretion is defined by a framework of established precedents and guidelines.
Executive Administrative Assistant (PA-EAA) Sub-Group Definition

The Executive Administrative Assistant Sub-Group comprises positions that are primarily engaged in providing direct administrative assistance to an individual(s) performing an executive role.

Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Executive Administrative Assistant Sub-Group are those whose primary purpose is included in any other occupational group or another Program and Administrative Services Sub-Group definition, namely those

  1. providing administrative support to an organizational unit or a functional area; or
  2. providing strategic advice to senior management on program or service priorities, issues and risks.
Communications (PA-CMN) Sub-Group Definition

The Communications Sub-Group comprises positions that are primarily engaged in one or more of the following activities through the application of communications theories and principles:

  1. researching, analyzing, developing, recommending formal communications plans;
  2. planning, developing and delivering communications products or services;
  3. promoting or publishing federal government policies, programs or services; or
  4. leadership of any of the above activities.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Communications Sub-Group are those whose primary purpose is included in any other occupational group or another Program and Administrative Services Sub-Group definition, namely those

  1. providing technical input on graphic design, website architecture and monitoring, or coding and user interface; or
  2. providing program or service subject matter content for communication products.
Rehabilitation and Reintegration (PA-RHB) Sub-Group Definition

The Rehabilitation and Reintegration Sub-Group comprises positions that are primarily engaged in the delivery of societal reintegration or social, physical or psychological rehabilitation through the application of intervention planning, risk assessment, and relapse prevention strategies and practices through one or more of the following activities:

  1. assessing, planning for, and managing individual client needs and risks through a case management approach;
  2. delivering and facilitating individual or group seminars on topics related to social, psychological or criminogenic rehabilitation and reintegration; or
  3. supervising or leading any of the above activities.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Rehabilitation and Reintegration Sub-Group are those whose primary purpose is included in any other occupational group or another Program and Administrative Services Sub-Group definition, namely those

  1. applying a comprehensive knowledge of professional specialties in the fields of dentistry, medicine, nursing, nutrition and dietetics, occupational or physical therapy, pharmacy, psychology, social work or veterinary medicine;
  2. performing administrative functions related to benefit programs and services, including identifying, processing or applying program eligibility, options, or entitlements; or
  3. researching, analyzing, designing, evaluating or modifying policies, programs or services.
Comptrollership (CT) Occupational Group Definition

The Comptrollership Group comprises positions that are primarily engaged in internal audits, financial management and external audits.

Inclusions

The Comptrollership Group includes only those positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one of the following activities:

  1. planning, developing, conducting or managing internal audit work, in accordance with the internal audit policy of the Government of Canada, to assess the effectiveness of risk management, control or governance processes;
  2. planning, development, analysis, delivery or management of internal Public Service financial policies, programs, services or other related activities;
  3. the application of a comprehensive knowledge of generally accepted accounting principles and auditing standards to the planning, delivery and management of external audit programs.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Comptrollership Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other occupational group, and for more certainty, those in which one of the following activities is of primary importance:

  1. the evaluation of actuarial liabilities and the determination of premiums and contributions in respect of insurance, annuity and pension plans;
  2. the application of a comprehensive knowledge of economics, sociology or statistics to the conduct of economic, socio-economic and sociological research, studies, forecasts and surveys; the research, analysis and evaluation of the economic or sociological effects of departmental or interdepartmental projects, programs and policies; the development, application, analysis and evaluation of statistical and survey methods and systems; and the development, analysis and interpretation of qualitative and quantitative information and socio-economic policies and recommendations;
  3. the planning, development, delivery or management of administrative and federal government policies, programs, services or other activities directed to the Public Service;
  4. the provision of strategic advice on or the planning, analysis, development, delivery or management of human resources policies, programs, services and other activities;
  5. the development, application or enforcement of standards and procedures, and quality assurance pertaining to information technology processing systems and activities.
Internal Audit (CT-IAU) Sub-Group Definition

The Internal Audit Sub-group comprises positions that are primarily engaged in planning, developing, conducting or managing internal audit work, in accordance with the internal audit policy of the Government of Canada, to assess the effectiveness of risk management, control or governance processes.

Inclusions

The Internal Audit Sub-group includes only those positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. conducting internal audits;
  2. developing, interpreting, assessing, recommending or revising internal audit practices, guidelines, directives, or policies; and
  3. supervising or managing any of the above activities.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Internal Audit Sub-group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other occupational group, and for more certainty, those in which one or more of the following activities is of primary importance:

  1. the development of evaluation frameworks; or the planning or conduct of program evaluations;
  2. the conduct of administrative, support, coordination or liaison functions related to audit committees or external assurance providers;
  3. the development and implementation of initiatives for the benefit of the internal audit community.
Financial Management (CT-FIN) Sub-Group Definition

The Financial Management Sub-group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the planning, development, analysis, delivery or management of internal Public Service financial policies, programs, services or other related activities.

Inclusions

The Financial Management Sub-group includes only those positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. the development, delivery, interpretation, recommendation or revision of financial management policies, practices, principles, systems or techniques;
  2. the provision of advice on the financial implications of policy and program proposals and actions, including risk management and performance information and management, and the approval of the adequacy of financial safeguards in programs and activities;
  3. the design, planning, implementation, assessment or continuous monitoring of financial internal controls;
  4. the development and delivery of cost accounting models;
  5. the financial planning, analysis and reporting;
  6. the financial operations and services, such as the management of the accounting process and reporting of expenditures, revenues, assets or liabilities;
  7. the provision of services in two or more administrative fields, one of which is financial, when the financial work is, in the opinion of the employer, of primary importance. In allocating a position to the appropriate group, the purpose of the position must be assessed according to all of the following criteria:
    • (a) the impact of the financial aspects of the advice and recommendations made on the overall achievement of the organization’s programs and objectives;
    • (b) the degree of responsibility and complexity of the financial work of the position, including the availability of, and the need to provide, financial functional direction; and
    • (c) the degree of specialized knowledge, skill and experience required in the work; and
  8. the leadership of any of the above activities.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Financial Management Sub-group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other occupational group, and for more certainty, those for which the following activity is of primary importance:

  1. the provision of administrative services in support of Public Service policies, programs, services or other activities dealing with financial management.
External Audit (CT-EAV) Sub-Group Definition

The External Audit Sub-group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the application of a comprehensive knowledge of generally accepted accounting principles and auditing standards to the planning, delivery and management of external audit programs.

Inclusions

The External Audit Sub-group includes only those positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. the application of a comprehensive knowledge of generally accepted accounting principles and auditing standards to the auditing of the accounts and financial records of individuals, businesses, non-profit organizations, or provincial or municipal governments to determine their accuracy and reasonableness, to establish or verify costs, or to confirm the compliance of transactions with the provisions of statutes, regulations, agreements or contracts;
  2. the provision of advice in the above fields; and
  3. the leadership of any of the above activities.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the External Audit Sub-group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other occupational group.

Negotiation, Mediation and Conciliation Officer (MN) Occupational Group Definition

The Negotiation, Mediation and Conciliation Officer Group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the planning, development, delivery or management of administrative and federal government policies, programs, services or other activities directed to the public.

Inclusions

Positions included in this group are those in which the incumbents:

  1. provide conciliation and mediation services with regard to collective bargaining and industrial relations disputes pursuant to the Canada Labour Code; or
  2. negotiate collective agreements with bargaining agents in the core public administration on behalf of the Treasury Board, as the employer, pursuant to the Federal Public Sector Labour Relations Act.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from this group are those in which any of the following are of primary importance:

  1. the provision of industrial relations or labour relations services other than negotiation, mediation or conciliation;
  2. the provision of arbitration services; or
  3. the provision of technical or other support services in support of negotiation, mediation or conciliation functions.
Commerce and Purchasing Occupational Group Definition

The Commerce and Purchasing Group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the planning, development, delivery and management of economic development policies, programs, services and other activities; and the planning, development, delivery and management of policies, programs, systems or other activities dealing with purchasing and supply in the Public Service.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. the planning, development, delivery and management of economic development policies, programs, services and other activities designed to promote the establishment, growth and improvement of industry, commerce and export trade; and the regulation of trade and commerce including:
    • the promotion of the more efficient use of resources in particular geographic areas through the conduct of studies and investigations and the implementation of programs and projects for this purpose;
    • the promotion of the development and use of modern industrial technologies;
    • the promotion of economic development directed towards groups, regions, industries or the Canadian economy as a whole;
    • the promotion of the export of Canadian goods and services, including the tourist industry; the expansion of Canada’s share of global trade by providing advice to Canadian companies, trade associations or other agencies of government, by safeguarding and promoting Canadian trading relationships, or by bringing the export aspects to bear in Canada’s aid and financing programs;
    • the study and assessment of developments in international trade and trading arrangements, and their implications for the Canadian economy;
    • the administration and enforcement of competition legislation and legislation relating to restraints of trade; and
    • the examination of records and reports of registered insurance, trust and loan companies, money lenders and small loan companies, fraternal benefit societies and co-operative credit associations to ensure their solvency and compliance with legislation and regulations controlling their operations;
  2. the planning, development, delivery and management of purchasing and supply policies, programs, services and other activities to meet the needs of Public Service departments and agencies including one or more subsidiary activities, such as in the areas of asset management and disposal, contracting, procurement of goods or services, inventory management, cataloguing, warehousing or traffic management;
  3. the provision of advice in the above fields; and
  4. the leadership of any of the above activities.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Commerce and Purchasing Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other group or those in which one or more of the following activities is of primary importance:

  1. the application of a comprehensive knowledge of agriculture to the promotion, development and regulation of the agricultural industry and trade;
  2. the application of a comprehensive knowledge of economics, sociology or statistics to the conduct of economic, socio-economic and sociological research, studies, forecasts and surveys;
  3. the planning, development, delivery and promotion of Canada’s diplomatic, commercial, human rights, cultural, promotional and international development policies and interests in other countries and in international organizations through the career rotational foreign service;
  4. applying a comprehensive knowledge of communications theories and principles to departmental communication policies, products or plans;
  5. the writing of specifications and technical descriptions that require the continuing application of technical knowledge; and
  6. the receipt, storage, handling and issue of items held in stores.
Economics and Social Science Services (EC) Occupational Group Definition

The Economics and Social Science Services Group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the conduct of surveys, studies and projects in the social sciences; the identification, description and organization of archival, library, museum and gallery materials; the editing of legislation or the provision of advice on legal problems in specific fields; and the application of a comprehensive knowledge of economics, sociology or statistics to the conduct of economic, socio-economic and sociological research, studies, forecasts and surveys; the research, analysis and evaluation of the economic or sociological effects of departmental or interdepartmental projects, programs and policies; the development, application, analysis and evaluation of statistical and survey methods and systems; and the development, analysis and interpretation of qualitative and quantitative information and socio-economic policies and recommendations.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. the conduct of surveys, studies, projects and tests requiring a practical knowledge of a specialized field such as economics, history, law or psychology and requiring the development of specialized techniques and procedures, or the development and use of related processing applications, or the interpretation of findings;
  2. the identification, description, classification, organization and location of archival, gallery, library or museum materials; or the creation, manipulation, verification, analysis and transmission of descriptive records pertaining to such materials, both of which require a practical knowledge of the subject matter;
  3. the editing of legislation or the conduct of studies in matters such as land conveyancing, expropriation, litigation and labour relations requiring a practical knowledge of the specific legal area to interpret findings or prepare submissions;
  4. the application of a practical knowledge of a specialized field such as economics, history, law or psychology to the use and modification or adaptation of computer systems, utilities or software;
  5. the application of a comprehensive knowledge of economics, sociology or statistics to economic, socio- economic or sociological studies, forecasts and surveys in a variety of subject areas in domestic and/or international settings;
  6. the application of a comprehensive knowledge of economics, sociology or statistics to the development, application and evaluation of statistical and survey methods and indicators for use in natural or social science research projects, or in the planning of surveys and censuses or in the determination of statistical measures and techniques for data analysis and reporting;
  7. the provision of advice in the fields of economics, sociology and statistics; and
  8. the leadership of any of the above activities.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Economics and Social Science Services Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other group or those in which one or more of the following activities is of primary importance:

  1. supporting or administering programs or services where the latitude for discretion is defined by a framework of established precedents and guidelines;
  2. planning, developing, delivering or managing policies, programs or services;
  3. applying a comprehensive knowledge of communications theories and principles to departmental communication policies, products or plans;
  4. the application of a comprehensive knowledge of mathematics to the development or application of mathematical and analytical methods, including those of mathematical statistics; and
  5. the planning, development, delivery and management of economic development policies, programs, services and other activities designed to promote the establishment, growth and improvement of industry, commerce and export trade and the regulation of trade and commerce.
Border Services (FB) Occupational Group Definition

The Border Services Group comprises positions in the Canada Border Services Agency that are primarily involved in the planning, development, delivery, or management of the inspection and control of people and goods entering Canada.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. determining the admissibility of people or goods entering Canada;
  2. post-entry verification of people or goods that have entered Canada;
  3. arresting, detaining or removing those people who may be in violation of Canada’s laws;
  4. investigating the illegal entry of people or goods;
  5. conducting intelligence activities related to the monitoring, inspection or control of people or goods entering Canada;
  6. developing Canada Border Services Agency operational directives to be followed in carrying out the above activities; and
  7. the leadership of any of the above activities.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Border Services Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other group or those in which one or more of the following activities is of primary importance:

  1. supporting or administering programs or services where the latitude for discretion is defined by a framework of established precedents and guidelines; and
  2. the planning, development, delivery or management of government policies, programs, services or other activities directed to the public other than those involving the inspection and control of people and goods entering Canada.
Human Resources Management (HM) Occupation Group Definition

The Human Resources Management Group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the provision of strategic advice on human resources management or organizational management and the planning, development, delivery or management of human resources or organizational services to the Public Service.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. the provision of strategic advice on or the planning, analysis, development, delivery or management of human resources policies, programs, services and other activities;
  2. the provision of strategic advice and assistance in improved structures and use of resources through the analysis and study of the organization and operations of the Public Service;
  3. the provision of specialized services such as investigations, appeals and dispute resolution processes involving the application of human resources policies and programs; and
  4. the leadership of any of the above activities.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Human Resources Management Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other group or those in which one or more of the following activities is of primary importance:

  1. supporting or administering programs or services where the latitude for discretion is defined by a framework of established precedents and guidelines; and
  2. planning, developing, delivering or managing policies, programs or services.
Police Operations Support (PO) Occupational Group Definition

The Police Operations Support Group comprises positions that are primarily engaged in planning, developing, conducting or managing telecommunications in support of police operations.

Inclusions

The Police Operations Support Group includes only those positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. planning, developing, conducting or managing telecommunications operations in support of police operations;
  2. planning, developing, conducting or managing lawfully authorized telecommunications interceptions in support of police operations.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Police Operations Support Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other occupational group, and for more certainty, those in which one or more of the following activities is of primary importance:

  1. supporting or administering programs or services where the latitude for discretion is defined by a framework of established precedents and guidelines;
  2. operation of electronic equipment to communicate information for the safety of life at sea, the protection of the environment and the efficient movement of marine vessels, and to monitor radio aids to marine navigation, and the provision of associated advisory services; and
  3. maintenance and repair of electronic and associated electro-mechanical or electrical equipment.
Non-Supervisory Printing Services (PR(Non-S)) Group Definition

The Non-Supervisory Printing Services Group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the production and binding of text material and illustrations by the various techniques used in the printing industry and directly related printing environments.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. advising customers on technical issues;
  2. planning and estimating jobs, developing technical specifications, scheduling production and auditing printing jobs;
  3. preparing specifications for all printing operations and materials;
  4. preparing and proof-reading text and illustrations to ensure total readiness for printing;
  5. preparing and operating printing equipment;
  6. performing bindery and finishing operations by hand or mechanical and electronic means;
  7. repairing press, bindery, composition and other equipment used in printing operations and inspecting and repairing circuits in electronic machines; and
  8. a limited degree of leadership in addition to any of the above activities.

To be allocated to the Non-Supervisory Printing Services Group, a position must, in addition to meeting the requirements for inclusion, be a part of a printing or duplicating or photocopying environment that meets the criteria listed below:

  1. The “printing or reproduction shop” is a distinct organizational entity in itself, such as a unit or section, or a part of a larger printing organization.
  2. The shop activities are under the direction and control of a leader who has responsibilities for more than one of the following graphic arts processes: text preparation, plate-making, printing/duplicating, high-speed photocopying, electronic pre-press preparation, printing and bindery operations. Also included are a small number of shops specializing in one of the processes, such as text preparation, typesetting or composition, that rely on other printing organizations to perform the other graphic processes.

Positions that require the application of skill and knowledge acquired through formal printing apprenticeship in performing bookbinding, paper cutting, composition, pre-press preparation, lithographic press operation, maintenance and printing control duties are to be allocated to the Non-Supervisory Printing Services Group, regardless of the environment in which they work.

Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Non-Supervisory Printing Services Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other group or those in which the following activity is of primary importance:

  1. supporting or administering programs or services where the latitude for discretion is defined by a framework of established precedents and guidelines.

Also excluded are positions whose primary purpose is the leadership of printing services.

Health Services (SH) Occupational Group Definition

The Health Services Group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the application of a comprehensive knowledge of professional specialties in the fields of dentistry, medicine, nursing, nutrition and dietetics, occupational and physical therapy, pharmacy, psychology and social work to the safety and physical and mental well-being of people; and, in the field of veterinary medicine, to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of animal diseases and the determination of the human safety of veterinary drugs.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of dental disease and abnormal dental conditions, and the management of dental health programs;
  2. the conduct and management of programs to promote public and individual health and the reduction of disease;
  3. the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability and abnormal physical and mental conditions;
  4. the assessment of the incidence and prevalence of diseases; the assessment of the fitness for work of Public Service employees; the medical assessment of applicants for immigration into Canada; and the assessment of the medical fitness of aviation personnel;
  5. the assessment of medical fitness for the determination of disability and other federal government benefits, special equipment and services to eligible applicants;
  6. the appraisal of drugs and medical devices for safety and efficacy under the conditions of their intended use;
  7. the assessment of medical information for the purposes of determining eligibility of applicants for a government program requiring knowledge associated with a registered nurse;
  8. the care of patients and the treatment and management of illness in co-operation with medical doctors, and the provision of specialized nursing services;
  9. the evaluation of nursing policies, procedures, standards and practices and the conduct of related research and education;
  10. the development of standards and guides in the field of nutrition and dietetics; the assessment of nutritional requirements and provision of nutrition and dietetic services; the provision of nutritional education and information; the management of nutritional programs; and the management of food services;
  11. the assessment and treatment of clients for whom occupational or physical therapy services are required for the improvement or maintenance of their well-being;
  12. the planning and management of client treatment or health education programs delivered by other health care providers;
  13. the compounding and dispensing of drugs; and the maintenance and control or the audit of drug stocks;
  14. the conduct of research in human behaviour, the assessment of human motives, abilities, skills, decisions and acts, and the treatment of human behaviour;
  15. the promotion of individual, group and community well-being through the identification and assessment of social needs; and the planning, development and delivery and management of social programs and social work services with the objective of lessening, removing or preventing the physical, emotional and material problems of individuals, families or groups;
  16. the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of animal diseases; the examination of animals, organs and tissues to determine whether they are diseased or potentially harmful to people or animals; and the evaluation of veterinary drugs to determine their human safety;
  17. the provision of advice in the above fields; and
  18. the leadership of any of the above activities.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Health Services Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other group or those in which one or more of the following activities is of primary importance:

  1. the inspection of techniques and technical processes and products to ascertain conformity with prescribed standards;
  2. the inspection and regulation of the manufacture, processing, labelling and advertising of drugs for compliance with drug control legislation; and
  3. delivering societal reintegration or social, physical or psychological rehabilitation through the application of intervention planning, risk assessment, and relapse prevention strategies and practices.

Also excluded are positions that:

  1. do not require the application of a comprehensive knowledge of dentistry, medicine, nursing, nutrition and dietetics, occupational and physical therapy, pharmacy, psychology, social work or veterinary medicine such as registered nursing assistants, community health representatives, dental hygienists or dental therapists;
  2. as primary activities, engage in research in microbiology, pharmacology, toxicology, physiology, virology or related biological sciences; and
  3. perform research and investigative work in various scientific disciplines pertaining to the materials and processes of basic nutrition.
Translation (TR) Occupational Group Definition

The Translation Group comprises positions that are primarily involved in translation, simultaneous or consecutive interpretation and terminology, and the provision of language advisory services.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. the provision of translation, simultaneous or consecutive interpretation and terminology services;
  2. the revision of translated material, including text editing and the verification of the intent of the text;
  3. the conduct of terminological and linguistic research;
  4. the training or provision of consultative services to translators, interpreters, terminologists and others working in language-related fields;
  5. the provision of expert language advisory services; and
  6. the leadership of any of the above activities.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Translation Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other group or those in which the following activity is of primary importance:

  1. applying a comprehensive knowledge of communications theories and principles to departmental communication policies, products or plans.