Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 153, Number 8: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

February 23, 2019

DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

Notice to interested parties — Equal remuneration for federally regulated contract workers in the air transportation sector covered by a collective agreement under Part I of the Canada Labour Code

The Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour’s mandate commitments include addressing the changing way that people work, working to increase the workforce participation of women and underrepresented groups, and setting the stage for good quality jobs by ensuring that Canadians continue to have a robust and modern set of federal labour standards.

To this end, action has been taken to strengthen the basic rights and protections of employees in the federally regulated private sector. As part of Bill C-86 (Budget Implementation Act 2018, No. 2), which received royal assent on December 13, 2018, the Government made a comprehensive suite of changes to Part III (federal labour standards) of the Canada Labour Code (Code) to ensure that employees have an up-to-date set of labour standards that reflects the realities of the 21st century workplace and provides a framework for good quality jobs. This includes a legislative amendment to ensure that employees whose employer changes due to contract re-tendering do not lose their rights and entitlements provided under Part III, as some of these entitlements are only available to an employee who has completed a certain period of continuous employment with the same employer (e.g. annual vacation and severance pay).

Building on these recent legislative changes, this notice provides interested parties with the opportunity to submit comments regarding the Labour Program’s intent to propose a regulation under Part I (Industrial Relations) of the Code that would extend the scope of the equal remuneration provision under section 47.3. This provision, which currently applies only to contracted, pre-board security screening service employees at airports, would be extended to include other federally regulated service workers in the air transportation sector. Consistent with the existing provision, the proposed regulation would apply only to federally regulated employees whose terms and conditions of employment are covered by a collective agreement.

By way of background, many employers, including those in the air transportation sector, hire contractors to perform certain services. Upon the termination of such a service contract, either through its scheduled end or because it is severed, an organization may award a new contract for the same service to the previous contractor, or may select a new contractor through a process called contract re-tendering.

When a contract is awarded to a new contractor through the re-tendering process, the employees of the previous contractor are often laid off and may be re-hired by the new contractor in order to retain their knowledge and expertise and avoid incurring costs associated with on-boarding, training and operational disruption. However, in such a scenario, the collective agreement does not transfer to the new employer with the contract, and previously unionized employees lose their union representation and the entitlements previously held under their collective agreement, including remuneration, seniority and benefits.

In this context, some stakeholders in the air transportation sector have expressed concerns regarding their remuneration levels following a contract changing hands. Specifically, the Labour Program has heard accounts of employees at some Canadian airports being re-hired to work at the same location and perform the same tasks, but at a lower wage than that provided by the previous contractors.

In light of these concerns, and building on the actions already taken to improve working conditions within the federally regulated private sector, the Labour Program is seeking stakeholder input on its proposal to extend the equal remuneration provision under section 47.3 of the Code to include other unionized service employees at airports and airlines who may be impacted by the contract re-tendering process. This proposal would ensure that employers within the air transportation sector maintain the flexibility to contract out elements of their operations while minimizing the negative impacts on workers.

Below are key questions for which Labour Program officials are particularly interested in receiving input. However, all input is welcome and should not be limited to responses to these questions.

Questions to guide input from interested parties

  1. Are you aware of particular groups of federally regulated contract service workers who have been affected by, or are vulnerable to, the lowering of remuneration levels as a result of contract re-tendering practices in the air transportation industry? (See the annex for a list of potential occupations.) Please provide evidence to support your response.
  2. Beyond the outcome of extending equal remuneration protection to a broader subset of federally regulated workers at airports and airlines, what other impacts, either positive or negative, could potentially result from the proposed regulation? Please provide evidence to support your response.
  3. How would the proposed regulation to extend the existing equal remuneration provision to other federally regulated contract service workers at airports and airlines affect your organization? Please provide evidence to support your response.
  4. Are there any alternative approaches to addressing this issue that may warrant further consideration, either in tandem with, or as an alternative to, the proposed regulatory approach? If so, please provide further details.
  5. Have you or your organization conducted, commissioned and/or consulted any studies on contract re-tendering and levels of remuneration at airports? If so, are you able to share those studies with Labour Program officials?
  6. Are there any other comments you wish to offer to inform the Government’s analysis of this issue?

The publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, initiates a 45-day comment period. Contributions may be sent by email or mail at EDSC.PRDAI.POLITIQUETRAVAIL-LABOURPOLICY.PDRIA.ESDC@labour-travail.gc.ca or 165 Hôtel-de-Ville Street, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0J9.

Barbara Moran
Director General
Strategic Policy, Analysis, and Workplace Information Directorate

Annex: Examples of occupations potentially captured by proposed regulation

Note: Occupations covered will vary for each airport and airline, depending on variables including the following:

Examples of some occupations that may be covered include

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Ministerial Condition No. 19725

Ministerial condition

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information pertaining to the substance sulfonic acids, C20-24-alkane hydroxy and C20-24-alkene, sodium salts, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 97766-43-3;

And whereas the ministers suspect that the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (the Act),

The Minister of the Environment, pursuant to paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Act, hereby permits the manufacture or import of the substance in accordance with the conditions of the following annex.

Nancy Hamzawi
Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Conditions

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. The following definitions apply in these ministerial conditions:

“engineered hazardous waste landfill facility” means a facility that is part of an overall integrated hazardous waste management system where wastes that do not require additional treatment or processing are sent and where hazardous materials are confined or controlled for the duration of their effective contaminating lifespan.

“notifier” means the person who has, on September 21, 2018, provided to the Minister of the Environment the prescribed information concerning the substance, in accordance with subsection 81(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

“substance” means sulfonic acids, C20-24-alkane hydroxy and C20-24-alkene, sodium salts, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 97766-43-3.

“waste” means the effluents that result from the formulation or transportation of the substance, disposable vessels used for the substance, spillage that contains the substance, the process effluents that contain the substance and any residual quantity of the substance in any equipment or vessel.

2. The notifier may manufacture or import the substance in accordance with the present ministerial conditions.

Restrictions

3. The notifier may import the substance only to use it in onshore oil production operations.

4. The notifier shall transfer the physical possession or control of the substance only to the person who will use it in accordance with item 3.

5. At least 120 days prior to beginning manufacturing the substance in Canada, the notifier shall inform the Minister of the Environment, in writing, and provide the following information:

Disposal of the substance

6. The notifier or the person to whom the substance has been transferred must collect any waste in their physical possession or under their control and destroy or dispose of it in the following manner:

Environmental release

7. Where any release of the substance or waste to the environment occurs, other than an injection into an onshore petroleum reservoir for the purposes of oil production, the person who has the physical possession or control of the substance or waste shall immediately take all measures necessary to prevent any further release, and to limit the dispersion of any release. Furthermore, the person shall, as soon as possible in the circumstances, inform the Minister of the Environment by contacting an enforcement officer designated under the Act.

Record-keeping requirements

8. (1) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records, with any documentation supporting the validity of the information contained in these records, indicating

(2) The notifier shall maintain the electronic or paper records mentioned in subsection (1) at their principal place of business in Canada, or at the principal place of business in Canada of their representative, for a period of at least five years after they are made.

Other requirements

9. The notifier shall inform any person to whom they transfer the physical possession or control of the substance or of the waste, in writing, of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. The notifier shall obtain, prior to the first transfer of the substance or waste, written confirmation from this person that they were informed of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. This written confirmation shall be maintained at the principal place of business in Canada of the notifier or of their representative in Canada for a period of at least five years from the day it was received.

Coming into force

10. The present ministerial conditions come into force on February 5, 2019.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Notice with respect to the proposed Release Guidelines for Disperse Yellow 3 and 25 other azo disperse dyes in the textile sector

Whereas a screening assessment of Disperse Yellow 3 conducted under section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (“CEPA” or “the Act”) has concluded that the substance meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

Whereas on March 11, 2017, the Minister of the Environment published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, a statement pursuant to subsection 77(6) of the Act indicating her intention to recommend that Disperse Yellow 3 be added to the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of the Act;

Whereas Disperse Yellow 3 is a substance specified on the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of the Act;

Whereas subsection 91(1) of the Act requires that a regulation or instrument respecting preventive or control action in relation to this substance be proposed and published in the Canada Gazette;

And whereas 25 other azo disperse dyes, including 8 azo disperse dyes examined in the screening assessment and an additional 17 azo disperse dyes with molar weights below 360 g/mol and listed in Appendix 1 below, are not specified on the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of the Act, but were identified as having potential ecological effects of concern,

Notice is hereby given pursuant to subsection 54(4) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 that the Minister of the Environment proposes to issue the following Release Guidelines under subsection 54(1) of that Act:

Proposed Release Guidelines for Disperse Yellow 3 and 25 other azo disperse dyes in the textile sector

As specified under subsection 332(2) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after the date of publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments with respect to the proposed Release Guidelines or a notice of objection requesting that a board of review be established under section 333 of the Act and stating the reasons for the objection. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Director, Regulatory Innovation and Management Systems, Department of the Environment, 351 Saint-Joseph Boulevard, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-420-7386, or by email to ec.RG-DR.ec@canada.ca.

The Release Guidelines can be downloaded from the CEPA Registry website. More information can be found in the fact sheet on Environmental Release Guidelines on the CEPA Registry.

February 22, 2019

Gwen Goodier
Acting Director General
Industrial Sectors, Chemicals, and Waste Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

PROPOSED RELEASE GUIDELINES FOR DISPERSE YELLOW 3 AND 25 OTHER AZO DISPERSE DYES IN THE TEXTILE SECTOR

1. Introduction

Textile manufacturing is one of Canada’s oldest and most diverse industries. Textiles can be found in an array of applications such as clothing, transportation, medical, agriculture, civil engineering, packaging, protection (individual, environmental), and construction. Approximately 90% of textile mills in Canada are micro businesses (i.e. fewer than 5 employees) or small businesses (i.e. 5 to 99 employees) [Industry Canada, 2012]. They are part of a relatively small sector that, in 2010, constituted 0.05% of the Canadian Gross Domestic Product (Industry Canada, 2011 and Statistics Canada, 2011). The Canadian textile industry is mainly concentrated in Quebec and Ontario (Environment Canada, 2005). Azo disperse dyes represent a significant proportion of the textile dye market. These dyes are exclusively used for textile dyeing, mainly of synthetic fibres such as polyester, polyester blends, cellulose acetate and nylon.

Azo disperse dyes were assessed under CEPA, which provides for a broad range of tools to achieve environmental protection objectives. As a result of this assessment, it was determined that the most appropriate tool for managing Disperse Yellow 3 (DY3) and 25 other azo disperse dyes (listed in Appendix 1) is Release Guidelines. In the context of the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP), a Government of Canada initiative aimed at reducing the risks posed by chemicals to Canadians and their environment, azo disperse dyes were identified as having potential ecological effects when released to surface water. These releases were shown to occur during the formulation and use of the textile dyes.

The present Release Guidelines recommend standard release limits and daily use limits for 26 azo disperse dyes with molar weights below 360 g/mol, including DY3 and 25 other azo disperse dyes, used in specific textile activities (i.e. dye formulation and dyeing operations).

2. Targeted textile activities

The textile activities subject to the Guidelines are

3. Applicability

The Guidelines apply to any person who

4. Stanards

4.1 Release limit

Overall release of the 26 azo disperse dyes at a facility’s final discharge point should not be in a concentration greater than

A proposed method for determining effluent concentration is included in Appendix 2 of the Release Guidelines available on the CEPA Registry website.

4.2 Daily use limit

Total daily use of the 26 azo disperse dyes should not be in a quantity greater than

5. Alternatives

Facilities are encouraged, when appropriate, to use alternatives that reduce or minimize human health or environmental risks. It is important that the chosen alternatives are not azo disperse dyes with a molar weight below 360g/mol. Information on the chosen alternatives should be reported through the Declaration of the operator included in Appendix 3 of the Release Guidelines available on the CEPA Registry website.

6. Declaration of the operator

The entities listed in section 3 should inform in writing the Minister of the Environment of their intention to implement these Guidelines by completing the Declaration of the operator no later than six months after the final publication of the Guidelines or six months before the initial use of any of the 26 azo disperse dyes.

7. Monitoring and analysis

Any person/entity subject to these Guidelines should monitor their activities on an ongoing basis to ensure conformity with the Guidelines by

Any analysis performed for the purposes of the Guidelines must be conducted by a laboratory that is accredited under ISO and standard ISO/IEC 17025:2005, entitled “General Requirements for the Competence of Testing and Calibration Laboratories,” as amended from time to time.

8. Reporting

Any person/entity subject to these Guidelines should

Conformity evaluation reports should include the following :

If the approach used to calculate the concentration at a facility’s final discharge point differs from the method proposed in Appendix 2 of the Release Guidelines, a facility should submit a copy of the method used and the results obtained (e.g. chemical analysis) with the report.

9. Record keeping

Any person/entity subject to these Guidelines should retain all records pertaining to these Guidelines for at least five years beginning on the date of their creation and make them available to the Minister of the Environment upon request. It is important that the company keep all such records, as well as reported instances of spills, leak detection and repairs, annual estimates of releases, stock supply, quantity used, concentration estimated, laboratory analysis data, use dates, batch number, etc.

10. Verification

Verification activities will be carried out six months after the facilities’ annual reports have been received. Site visits of selected facilities by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) representatives will help confirm the accuracy of the reported data. ECCC will verify the current use/processes involving the 26 azo disperse dyes and determine the end of use, if applicable. This includes verifying the equipment and the machinery used inside the facility, as well as the implementation of the recommended best practices and record-keeping activities in the facility, as outlined in these Guidelines. In addition, verifiers may ask to review records and auxiliary data, obtain information through interviews or ask for supplemental documentation.

11. Confidentiality

In accordance with section 313 of the Act, any person who submits information under these Guidelines could request that the information be treated as confidential.

12. Best practices

The proposed best practices to mitigate releases of Disperse Yellow 3 and the 25 other azo disperse dyes included in these Guidelines can be found in the Release Guidelines on the CEPA Registry website. These best practices should be implemented across the facility where chemicals are handled.

13. Resources

The proposed method for estimating effluent concentrations, the Declaration of the operator, the Conformity evaluation report and the method to calculate a facility-specific predicted environmental concentration (PEC) in surface water can be found in the Release Guidelines on the CEPA Registry website.

14. Contact information

For technical questions or comments about these proposed Release Guidelines, please contact

Products Division
Environment and Climate Change Canada
351 Saint-Joseph Boulevard, 9th Floor
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H3
Telephone: 819-938-4483 / 1-888-391-3426 (information)
Fax: 819-938-4480 / 1-888-391-3695
Email: ec.produits-products.ec@canada.ca
Subject: “Release Guidelines for Disperse Yellow 3 and 25 other azo disperse dyes

For more information about the Release Guidelines, please contact

Innovative Measures Section
Regulatory Innovation and Management Systems Division
Environment and Climate Change Canada
351 Saint-Joseph Boulevard, 20th Floor
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H3
Telephone: 1-844-580-3637 (information)
Fax: 819-420-7386 / 1-844-580-3638
Email: ec.RG-DR.ec@canada.ca
Subject: “Release Guidelines for Disperse Yellow 3 and 25 other azo disperse dyes”

APPENDIX 1

Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) and Domestic Substances List (DSL) name of azo disperse dyes with molar weights below 360 g/mol

CAS RN

C.I. Name

Molar weight
(g/mol)

Assessed under Subgrouping/ Initiative

Table 1 Notes

Abbreviation: C.I. = Colour Index

Table 1 Note a

Meets one or more criteria under section 64 of CEPA.

Return to table 1 note a referrer

Table 1 Note b

Substance with both ecological and human health effects of concern.

Return to table 1 note b referrer

2832-40-8

Disperse Yellow 3table 1 note a, table 1 note b

269

Azo Disperse Dyes/ Azo Solvent Dyes

6250-23-3

Disperse Yellow 23table 1 note b

302

Azo Disperse Dyes

65122-05-6

n/atable 1 note b

306

Azo Disperse Dyes

6300-37-4

Disperse Yellow 7table 1 note b

316

Azo Disperse Dyes

21811-64-3

Disperse Yellow 68

318

Azo Disperse Dyes

27184-69-6

n/a

346

Azo Disperse Dyes

6657-00-7

n/a

346

Azo Disperse Dyes

69472-19-1

Disperse Orange 33

351

Azo Disperse Dyes

6253-10-7

Disperse Orange 13

352

Azo Disperse Dyes

842-07-9

Solvent Yellow 14/ Disperse Yellow 97table 1 note b

248

Azo Solvent Dyes

730-40-5

Disperse Orange 3

242

Not Assessed

6054-48-4

Disperse Black 1

262

Not Assessed

4314-14-1

Disperse Yellow 16

278

Not Assessed

12222-69-4/ 20721-50-0

Disperse Black 9

300

Not Assessed

31464-38-7

Disperse Orange 25:1

309

Not Assessed

2872-52-8

Disperse Red 1

314

Not Assessed

2581-69-3

Disperse Orange 1

318

Not Assessed

43047-20-7

Disperse Orange 138

321

Not Assessed

31482-56-1

Disperse Orange 25/Disperse Orange 36

323

Not Assessed

6439-53-8

Disperse Yellow 5

324

Not Assessed

2734-52-3

Disperse Red 19

330

Not Assessed

83249-52-9

Disperse Yellow 241

337

Not Assessed

3179-89-3

Disperse Red 17

345

Not Assessed

16889-10-4

Disperse Red 73

348

Not Assessed

3180-81-2

Disperse Red 13

349

Not Assessed

40880-51-1

Disperse Red 50

358

Not Assessed

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Decisions, undertakings and orders on claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 18(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of the decisions of the screening officer respecting each claim for exemption and the relevant safety data sheet (SDS) and (where applicable) the label listed below.

In accordance with section 20 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, a claimant or any affected party, as defined, may appeal a decision or order of a screening officer. An affected party may also appeal an undertaking in respect of which a notice has been published in the Canada Gazette. To initiate the appeal process, a Statement of Appeal (Form 1) as prescribed by the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act Appeal Board Procedures Regulations must be completed and delivered, along with the fee prescribed by section 12 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Regulations, within 45 days of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to the Chief Appeals Officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau, 269 Laurier Avenue West, 8th Floor, 4908B, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

Véronique Lalonde
Chief Screening Officer

On February 11, 2015, the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) was amended, and the Controlled Products Regulations (CPR) and the Ingredient Disclosure List were repealed and replaced with the new Hazardous Products Regulations (HPR). The revised legislation (HPA/HPR) is referred to as WHMIS 2015.

All claims for exemption in this publication were filed and evaluated in accordance with the provisions of WHMIS 2015.

A Notice of Filing was published in Part I of the Canada Gazette and there were no written representations from affected parties with respect to any of the claims for exemption and related SDSs or labels mentioned below.

Each of the claims for exemption listed in the table below was found to be valid except for those for registry numbers (RNs) 9139 and 9167, which were found to be partially valid. The screening officer reached this decision after reviewing the information in support of the claim, having regard exclusively to the criteria found in section 3 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Regulations.

RN

Claimant

Product Identifier

Date of Decision

9139

MacDermid Enthone, Inc.

CHROME STRIPPER SI

2018-11-09

9145

MacDermid Enthone, Inc.

ENPREP® R2R

2018-03-05

9163

MacDermid Enthone, Inc.

UDIQUE® 879W

2018-10-24

9167

MacDermid Enthone, Inc.

ZINCROLYTE® KCL-Ni Extender MV

2018-08-27

9168

MacDermid Enthone, Inc.

ZINCROLYTE® KCL-NI L

2018-02-08

9452

NH Resources LLC

HydraScav

2018-12-17

9456

Huntsman Corp.

POLYFROTH® H23

2018-06-26

9457

Huntsman Corp.

POLYFROTH® W22C

2018-06-26

9610

TBF Environmental Technology Inc.

EkaSol 1

2018-08-30

9643

Alpha Assembly Solutions

SC-30 STENCIL CLEANER

2018-01-24

12058

Baker Hughes Canada Company

RE33805WAO

2019-10-25

12068

Suez Water Technologies & Solutions Canada

LOSALT 53D

2018-10-26

In all cases where the SDS or the label was determined not to be in compliance with the relevant legislation, pursuant to subsection 16.1(1) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the claimant was given 30 days to provide the screening officer with a signed undertaking accompanied by the SDS or the label amended as necessary.

Non-compliances that fall outside the scope of what is required to be published in the Canada Gazette are referred to as “administrative non-compliances.”

A description of “administrative non-compliances” and their associated corrective measures are presented with Health Canada’s List of active claims for exemption.

CLAIMS FOR WHICH THE SCREENING OFFICER WAS SATISFIED THAT THE CLAIMANT HAD TAKEN THE MEASURES SET OUT IN THE UNDERTAKING

Pursuant to paragraph 18(1)(b) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of information that has been disclosed on the relevant SDS or label in compliance with an undertaking and the date on which the notice referred to in subsection 16.1(3) of the Act was issued.

RN: 9456

Date of compliance undertaking: 2018-11-15

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose a more specific recommended use.
  2. Disclose the Canadian initial supplier identifier.
  3. Disclose the additional hazard classification of “Acute Toxicity (Inhalation) – Category 4”.
  4. Disclose the additional information elements concerning hazard and precautionary statements.
  5. Disclose the additional ingredient “Methyl isobutyl carbinol” and its actual concentration or concentration range.
  6. Disclose the applicable common name(s) and synonym(s) for the ingredient “Methyl isobutyl carbinol”.
  7. Resolve the misleading information regarding potential inhalation acute health effects.
  8. Disclose an ACGIH TLV–TWA value of 25 ppm (skin) and an ACGIH–STEL value of 40 ppm (skin) for the ingredient “Methyl isobutyl carbinol”.
  9. Disclose the product’s boiling range.
  10. Resolve the disclosure of misleading information regarding “Flammability (solid, gas)”.
  11. Disclose the calculated product inhalation ATE of 16 mg/L (40% unknown).
  12. Disclose the LD50/LC50 values for the ingredient “Methyl isobutyl carbinol”.
  13. Disclose that the ingredient “Methyl isobutyl carbinol” has been shown to be an irritant to the eyes.
  14. Disclose all likely routes of exposure.

RN: 9457

Date of compliance undertaking: 2018-11-15

The claimant had been advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the additional hazard classification of “Acute Toxicity (Inhalation) – Category 4”.
  2. Disclose the additional information elements concerning hazard and precautionary statements.
  3. Disclose the percent of unknown acute inhalation toxicity.
  4. Disclose the applicable common name(s) and synonym(s) for the ingredients “4-methylpentan-2-ol” and “Propylene carbonate”.
  5. Resolve the misleading information regarding potential inhalation acute health effects.
  6. Disclose the calculated product inhalation ATE of 16 mg/L (93% unknown).

RN: 12058

Date of compliance undertaking: 2019-01-14

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the additional hazard classification of “Acute Toxicity (Inhalation) – Category 4”.
  2. Disclose the additional information elements concerning hazard and precautionary statements.
  3. Disclose the applicable common name(s) and synonym(s) for the ingredient “N-methylmorpholine”.
  4. Disclose the product’s odour threshold, melting point and freezing point, boiling range, partition coefficient, auto-ignition temperature and decomposition temperature.
  5. Disclose the calculated product inhalation ATE of 13 mg/kg (0% unknown).
  6. Resolve the disclosure of misleading information regarding the LD50 (rat, oral) value for the ingredient “Amino ether”, and LD50 (rabbit, dermal) value for the ingredient “N-methylmorpholine”.

CLAIMS FOR WHICH THE SCREENING OFFICER ORDERED THE CLAIMANT TO COMPLY WITH THE APPLICABLE DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS

In the case of the following claims, either the claimant did not supply the screening officer with a signed undertaking or the screening officer was not satisfied that the claimant had taken the measures set out in the undertaking in the manner and within the period specified in it. Pursuant to subsection 17(1) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the screening officer ordered the claimant to comply with the requirements of the relevant legislation within 30 days from the expiry of the appeal period, except that the information in respect of which the claim for exemption was made does not have to be disclosed, and to provide a copy of the amended SDS to the screening officer within 30 days of expiry of the appeal period.

Pursuant to paragraph 18(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of information that the screening officer ordered to be disclosed on the SDS reviewed by the screening officer and the date of the order.

RN: 9145

Date of order: 2018-11-05

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the recommended use.
  2. Disclose the Canadian initial supplier identifier.
  3. Disclose the percent of unknown toxicity for the calculated product ATE values.
  4. Disclose the actual concentration of the ingredient “Sodium hydroxide”.
  5. Disclose the available or applicable conditions to avoid.
  6. Disclose the calculated product dermal ATE of 4 000 mg/kg (96.8% unknown).
  7. Resolve the disclosure of misleading information regarding the LD50 (rat, oral) value for the confidential ingredient “Proprietary silicates”, and the LD50 (rat, oral) and the LD50 (rabbit, dermal) values for the confidential ingredient “Sodium salt”.
  8. Disclose that the confidential ingredients “Proprietary silicates” and “Sodium hydroxide” are corrosive to the eyes.
  9. Disclose that the confidential ingredients “Proprietary silicates” and “Sodium hydroxide” have been shown to be corrosive to the skin.

RN: 9163

Date of order: 2018-12-14

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the Canadian initial supplier identifier.
  2. Disclose the additional hazard classifications of “Acute Toxicity (inhalation – mist) – Category 4” and “Skin Sensitizer – Category 1B”.
  3. Disclose the additional information elements concerning hazard and precautionary statements.
  4. Disclose the percent of unknown toxicity of “0%” for the calculated product oral ATE value, “38.3%” for the calculated product inhalation – vapour ATE value, and “34.7%” for the calculated product inhalation – dust/mist ATE value.
  5. Disclose the actual concentration/concentration range of the ingredient “Hydrochloric acid”.
  6. Disclose the additional applicable common name(s) and synonym(s) for “Hydrochloric acid”.
  7. Disclose accurate information on the product’s potential inhalation acute health effects.
  8. Disclose the product’s boiling range.
  9. Disclose the conditions to avoid.
  10. Disclose the calculated product oral ATE of 1 560 mg/kg (0% unknown), the calculated product dermal ATE of 44 480 mg/kg (45.5% unknown), the calculated product inhalation (vapour) ATE of 4.9 mg/L (38.3% unknown) and the calculated product inhalation (dust/mist) ATE of 2.6 mg/L (34.7% unknown).
  11. Disclose the LC50 values for the confidential ingredient “Inorganic salt” and the ingredient “Hydrochloric Acid”, LD50 values for the ingredient “Hydrochloric acid” and the confidential ingredient “Aromatic hydroxide”.
  12. Disclose that the confidential ingredient “Aromatic hydroxide” and the ingredient “Hydrochloric acid” have been shown to cause serious eye damage, under the subheading “Irritant/Corrosion”.
  13. Disclose that the confidential ingredient “Aromatic hydroxide” has been shown to cause skin sensitization, under the subheading “Sensitization”.
  14. Disclose accurate information on the product’s acute inhalation toxicity.

RN: 9168

Date of order: 2018-04-12

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the Canadian initial supplier identifier.
  2. Disclose the additional hazard classifications of “Reproductive Toxicity – Category 1B” and “Eye Irritation – Category 2B” based on the confidential ingredient “Aromatic acid salt”.
  3. Disclose the symbol and/or name of the symbol for “Health Hazard”.
  4. Disclose the signal word “Danger”.
  5. Disclose the additional information elements concerning hazard and precautionary statements.
  6. Disclose conditions to avoid.
  7. Disclose that the confidential ingredient “aromatic acid salt” has been shown to be corrosive to the eyes/an eye irritant.

RN: 9452

Date of order: 2019-01-18

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the additional hazard classifications of “Reproductive Toxicity – Category 2”, “Specific Target Organ Toxicity-Single Exposure (STOT-SE) – Category 1 (oral, CNS and kidney due to acidosis)” and “Acute Toxicity (Oral) – Category 4”.
  2. Disclose the additional symbols and/or names of symbols for “Reproductive Toxicity – Category 2”, “STOT-SE – Category 1” and “Acute Toxicity (Oral) – Category 4”.
  3. Disclose the additional information elements concerning hazard and precautionary statements.
  4. Disclose the percent of unknown toxicity of 0% for the calculated product oral ATE value.
  5. Disclose the other hazards known to the supplier, including a clear definition of the acronyms “PBT” and “vPvB”.
  6. Disclose a statement conveying that the antidote to poisoning by the product must be administered only under the supervision of a physician.
  7. Disclose unsuitable extinguishing media for the product.
  8. Disclose an acceptable ACGIH (TWA, STEL, C) value for each of the confidential ingredients “Inorganic base” and “Polyhydric alcohol”.
  9. Disclose a more specific description of the product’s physical state.
  10. Disclose the initial boiling point and boiling range.
  11. Disclose the reactivity.
  12. Disclose the calculated product oral ATE of 550 mg/kg (0% unknown) and dermal ATE of 3 400 mg/kg (0% unknown).
  13. Disclose the LD50 (rat, oral) value of 205 mg/kg and the LD50 (rabbit, dermal) value >1 260 mg/kg and <2 000 mg/kg for the confidential ingredient “Inorganic base”. Disclose the LD50 (rat, oral) value of 1 700 mg/kg for the confidential ingredient “Polyhydric alcohol”.
  14. Disclose eye contact as a likely route of exposure.
  15. Disclose that the product may cause reproductive toxicity effects.

RN: 9610

Date of order: 2018-11-09

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the calculated product inhalation ATE of 26.8 mg/L (8% unknown) and oral ATE of 19 600 mg/kg (0% unknown).

RN: 9643

Date of order: 2018-10-29

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the Canadian initial supplier identifier.
  2. Disclose the hazard classification of “Reproductive Toxicity – Category 1B”.
  3. Disclose the calculated product dermal ATE of 3 770 mg/kg (75% unknown).
  4. Resolve the disclosure of misleading information regarding the LD50 (rat, oral), LC50 (rat, inhalation, vapour, 4 hours) values for the confidential ingredient “Glycol Ether” and LC50 (rat, inhalation, vapour, 4 hours) value for the confidential ingredient “Alcohol”.

CLAIMS FOR WHICH THE SCREENING OFFICER ISSUED THE DECISION THAT THE CLAIM FOR EXEMPTION WAS EITHER PARTIALLY VALID OR INVALID

In the case of the following claims, the screening officer issued the decision that the claims for exemption were partially valid.

Pursuant to section 18 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of information that the screening officer ordered to be disclosed on an SDS or a label pursuant to subsection 16(1) and information that has been disclosed on the relevant SDS or label in compliance with an undertaking, and the dates on which the orders and notices referred to in subsection 16.1(3) of the Act were issued.

RN: 9139

Date of order: 2019-01-16

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the Canadian initial supplier identifier.
  2. Disclose the additional information elements concerning hazard and precautionary statements.
  3. Disclose the product’s boiling range.
  4. Disclose conditions to avoid.
  5. Disclose that the confidential ingredient “Heterocyclic Organic Compound” has been shown to be a skin sensitizer.
  6. Disclose the calculated product oral ATE of 10 000 mg/kg (0% unknown).

RN: 9167

Date of compliance undertaking: 2018-12-04

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the Canadian initial supplier identifier.
  2. Disclose the additional hazard classifications of “Serious Eye Damage – Category 1” and “Acute Toxicity (Inhalation) – Category 4” based on the confidential ingredients “Amine” and “Inorganic salt”.
  3. Disclose the symbol of “Corrosion”.
  4. Disclose the signal word “Danger”.
  5. Disclose the additional information elements concerning hazard and precautionary statements.
  6. Resolve the misleading information regarding potential inhalation and eye contact acute health effects.
  7. Disclose the product boiling range.
  8. Disclose conditions to avoid.
  9. Disclose the calculated inhalation ATE of 1.03 mg/L.
  10. Remove the false or misleading information regarding sensitization.
  11. Remove the false or misleading information regarding potential acute health effects of eye contact and inhalation.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Filing of claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 12(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of the filing of the claims for exemption listed below.

In accordance with subsection 12(2) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, affected parties, as defined, may make written representations to the screening officer with respect to the claim for exemption and the safety data sheet (SDS) or label to which it relates. Written representations must cite the appropriate registry number, state the reasons and evidence upon which the representations are based and be delivered within 30 days of the date of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to the screening officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau, 269 Laurier Avenue West, 8th Floor (4908-B), Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

Véronique Lalonde
Chief Screening Officer

On February 11, 2015, the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) was amended, and the Controlled Products Regulations (CPR) and the Ingredient Disclosure List were repealed and replaced with the new Hazardous Products Regulations (HPR). The revised legislation (HPA/HPR) is referred to as WHMIS 2015.

The claims listed below seek an exemption from the disclosure of supplier confidential business information in respect of a hazardous product; such disclosure would otherwise be required under the provisions of the relevant legislation.

Claimant

Product Identifier

Subject of the Claim for Exemption

Registry Number

Win Manuco Ltd.

eQi

C.i. and C. of four ingredients

12351

Diversity Technologies Corp.

CHEM CLEAN GREEN

C.i. and C. of three ingredients

12352

Baker Hughes Canada Company

ARFLOW 6001 ASPHALTENE INHIBITOR

C.i. and C. of one ingredient
C. of two ingredients

12353

Allnex Canada Inc. (c/o Goodmans, LLP)

CRYLCOAT® E 04681 powder resins

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12354

Allnex Canada Inc. (c/o Goodmans, LLP)

CRYLCOAT® E 04613 powder resins

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12355

Allnex Canada Inc. (c/o Goodmans, LLP)

BECKOPOX™ E 04649 powder resins

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12356

Allnex Canada Inc. (c/o Goodmans, LLP)

BECKOPOX™ E 04643 powder resins

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12357

The Lubrizol Corporation

ANGLAMOL® 6055

C.i. and C. of three ingredients

12358

Calfrac Well Services Ltd.

DynaRate 6514

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12359

BWA Water Additives US LLC

Belcor 585

C.i. and C. of two ingredients
C. of two ingredients

12360

BWA Water Additives US LLC

Belclene 810

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

12361

BWA Water Additives US LLC

Flocon 260

C.i. and C. of three ingredients

12362

Northern Technologies International Corporation

Zerion FVS

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12363

Buckeye International Inc.

BUCKEYE BLUE

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

12364

BASF Canada Inc.

Plurafac SLF 180

C.i. of one ingredient

12365

Washing Systems, LLC

MOTION

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03316611

ROHM AND HAAS CANADA LP

MONOMER QM-1565

C.i. of one ingredient

03317508

Integrity Biochem

IronFix As Plus

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03317647

SUEZ Water Technologies & Solutions Canada

E.C.O.FILM EF2481

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03317795

SUEZ Water Technologies & Solutions Canada

E.C.O.FILM EF2482

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03317797

Dow Chemical Canada ULC

DIAMONDLOCK™ RFA 300

C.i. of one ingredient

03317801

Halliburton Group Canada

DUAL SPACER SURFACTANT A

C.i. of one ingredient

03317806

Nalco Canada ULC

EC5689A Pour Point Depressant

C.i. of one ingredient

03318154

Allnex Canada Inc. c/o Goodmans, LLP

EBECRYL® 4100 radiation curing resins

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03318321

Canadian Energy Services LP

PC-485

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03318404

Note: C.i. = chemical identity and C. = concentration

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

 

Permanent member

 
  • Beaubien, Susan D.

2019-83

Vice-chairperson

 
  • Ritcey, Rose Ann

2019-82

Champagne, The Hon. Ken

2018-393

Her Majesty’s Court of Queen’s Bench for Manitoba

 
  • Puisne Judge
 

Ho, L. Bernette

2018-392

Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta

 
  • Justice
 

Court of Appeal of Alberta

 
  • Judge ex officio
 

Hori, Dennis K., Q.C.

2019-85

Supreme Court of British Columbia

 
  • Judge
 

Immigration and Refugee Board

 

Full-time members

 
  • Cox, Robert Thomas Joseph

2019-55

  • Mohan, Dilani

2019-80

  • Sergong, Tsering Lhamo

2019-54

Khurana, Jennifer

2019-81

Canadian Human Rights Tribunal

 
  • Vice-chairperson
 

footnote * Nakonechny, E. Llana

2018-1561

Superior Court of Justice of Ontario

 
  • Judge
 

Court of Appeal for Ontario

 
  • Judge ex officio
 

Superior Court for the district of Montréal in and for the Province of Quebec

 

Puisne Judges

 
  • Frappier, Jérôme

2018-395

  • Platts, David E.

2018-394

February 15, 2019

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BANK ACT

Schedules I, II and III

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to subsections 14(3) and 14.1(3) of the Bank Act that Schedules I, II and III, as amended, were as shown below as at December 31, 2018.

SCHEDULE I

(Section 14)

As at December 31, 2018

Name of Bank

Head Office

ADS Canadian Bank

Ontario

B2B Bank

Ontario

Bank of Montreal

Quebec

Bank of Nova Scotia (The)

Nova Scotia

Bridgewater Bank

Alberta

Caisse populaire acadienne ltée

New Brunswick

Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce

Ontario

Canadian Tire Bank

Ontario

Canadian Western Bank

Alberta

Coast Capital Savings Federal Credit Union

British Columbia

Concentra Bank

Saskatchewan

Continental Bank of Canada

Ontario

CS Alterna Bank

Ontario

DirectCash Bank

Alberta

Equitable Bank

Ontario

Exchange Bank of Canada

Ontario

First Nations Bank of Canada

Saskatchewan

General Bank of Canada

Alberta

Haventree Bank

Ontario

Home Bank

Ontario

HomeEquity Bank

Ontario

Laurentian Bank of Canada

Quebec

Manulife Bank of Canada

Ontario

Motus Bank

Ontario

National Bank of Canada

Quebec

President’s Choice Bank

Ontario

Rogers Bank

Ontario

Royal Bank of Canada

Quebec

Street Capital Bank of Canada

Ontario

Tangerine Bank

Ontario

Toronto-Dominion Bank (The)

Ontario

Vancity Community Investment Bank

British Columbia

VersaBank

Ontario

Wealth One Bank of Canada

Ontario

Zag Bank

Alberta

SCHEDULE II

(Section 14)

As at December 31, 2018

Name of Bank

Head Office

Amex Bank of Canada

Ontario

Bank of China (Canada)

Ontario

Bank One Canada

Ontario

BofA Canada Bank

Ontario

Cidel Bank Canada

Ontario

Citco Bank Canada

Ontario

Citibank Canada

Ontario

CTBC Bank Corp. (Canada)

British Columbia

Habib Canadian Bank

Ontario

HSBC Bank Canada

British Columbia

ICICI Bank Canada

Ontario

Industrial and Commercial
Bank of China (Canada)

Ontario

J.P. Morgan Bank Canada

Ontario

J.P. Morgan Canada

Ontario

KEB Hana Bank Canada

Ontario

Mega International Commercial Bank (Canada)

Ontario

SBI Canada Bank

Ontario

Shinhan Bank Canada

Ontario

Société Générale (Canada)

Quebec

UBS Bank (Canada)

Ontario

Walmart Canada Bank

Ontario

SCHEDULE III

(Section 14.1)

As at December 31, 2018

Name of Authorized Foreign Bank (FB)

Name under which FB is permitted to
carry on business in Canada

Type of Foreign
Bank Branch (FBB) footnote *

Principal Office

Bank of America, National Association

Bank of America, National Association

Full-service

Ontario

Bank of China Limited

Bank of China, Toronto Branch

Full-service

Ontario

Bank of New York Mellon (The)

Bank of New York Mellon (The)

Full-service

Ontario

Barclays Bank PLC

Barclays Bank PLC, Canada Branch

Full-service

Ontario

BNP Paribas

BNP Paribas

Full-service

Quebec

Capital One Bank (USA), N.A.

Capital One Bank (Canada Branch)

Full-service

Ontario

China Construction Bank

China Construction Bank Toronto Branch

Full-service

Ontario

Citibank, N.A.

Citibank, N.A.

Full-service

Ontario

Comerica Bank

Comerica Bank

Full-service

Ontario

Coöperatieve Rabobank U.A.

Rabobank Canada

Full-service

Ontario

Crédit Agricole Corporate and Investment Bank

Crédit Agricole Corporate and Investment Bank (Canada Branch)

Lending

Quebec

Credit Suisse AG

Credit Suisse AG, Toronto Branch

Lending

Ontario

Deutsche Bank AG

Deutsche Bank AG

Full-service

Ontario

Fifth Third Bank

Fifth Third Bank

Full-service

Ontario

First Commercial Bank

First Commercial Bank

Full-service

British Columbia

JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association

JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association

Full-service

Ontario

M&T Bank

M&T Bank

Full-service

Ontario

Maple Bank GmbH

Maple Bank

Full-service

Ontario

Mega International Commercial Bank Co., Ltd.

Mega International Commercial Bank Co., Ltd.

Full-service

Ontario

Mizuho Bank, Ltd.

Mizuho Bank, Ltd., Canada Branch

Full-service

Ontario

MUFG Bank, Ltd.

MUFG Bank, Ltd., Canada Branch

Full-service

Ontario

Natixis

Natixis Canada Branch

Lending

Quebec

Northern Trust Company (The)

Northern Trust Company, Canada Branch (The)

Full-service

Ontario

PNC Bank, National Association

PNC Bank Canada Branch

Full-service

Ontario

Silicon Valley Bank

Silicon Valley Bank

Lending

Ontario

Société Générale

Société Générale (Canada Branch)

Full-service

Quebec

State Street Bank and Trust Company

State Street

Full-service

Ontario

Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation

Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation, Canada Branch

Full-service

Ontario

U.S. Bank National Association

U.S. Bank National Association

Full-service

Ontario

UBS AG

UBS AG Canada Branch

Full-service

Ontario

United Overseas Bank Limited

United Overseas Bank Limited

Full-service

British Columbia

Wells Fargo Bank, National Association

Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, Canadian Branch

Full-service

Ontario

February 14, 2019

Jeremy Rudin
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Chief Administrator

Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada

 

Chairperson

Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada

 

Director

Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada

March 1, 2019

Director

Canada Council for the Arts

 

Chairperson

Canada Development Investment Corporation

 

Director

Canada Development Investment Corporation

March 4, 2019

Chairperson

Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology

 

Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson

Canada Industrial Relations Board

 

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

Chairperson (joint federal Governor in Council and provincial Lieutenant Governor appointment)

Canada–Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Post Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Commercial Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canadian Dairy Commission

March 1, 2019

Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson and Director

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Lead Commissioner, Deputy Lead Commissioner and Commissioner

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Chairperson

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Nature

 

Regional Member (Quebec)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

 

Chairperson and Member

Canadian Statistics Advisory Council

 

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Canadian Tourism Commission

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Defense Construction (1951) Limited

 

Chairperson

Farm Credit Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Farm Credit Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson

Farm Products Council of Canada

 

Chairperson

The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited

February 27, 2019

Commissioner

Financial Consumer Agency of Canada

 

Chairperson

First Nations Financial Management Board

 

Chief Commissioner

First Nations Tax Commission

 

Deputy Chief Commissioner

First Nations Tax Commission

 

Director

Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation

 

Director (Federal)

Hamilton Port Authority

 

Member

International Authority

 

Commissioner and Chairperson

International Joint Commission

 

Member (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Vice-Chairperson

Invest in Canada Hub

 

Chief Executive Officer

The Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated

 

Librarian and Archivist of Canada

Library and Archives of Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Marine Atlantic Inc.

 

Vice-Chairperson

National Arts Centre Corporation

 

Member

National Capital Commission

 

Government Film Commissioner

National Film Board

 

Chairperson

National Research Council of Canada

 

President

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

 

Canadian Ombudsperson

Office of the Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise

 

Commissioner of Competition

Office of the Commissioner of Competition

 

Ombudsperson

Office of the Ombudsperson for National Defence and Canadian Forces

 

Director (Federal)

Oshawa Port Authority

 

Chairperson

Pacific Pilotage Authority

 

Chief Executive Officer

Parks Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson and Member

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

 

Member

Payment in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel

 

Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson

Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee

 

Principal

Royal Military College of Canada

 

Chairperson

Telefilm Canada

 

Member (Marine and Medical)

Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

VIA Rail Canada Inc.

 

BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at December 31, 2018
(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

17.0

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

10,673.0

 

Advances

 

Other receivables

3.1

 
   

10,676.1

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

24,217.8

 

Canada Mortgage Bonds

251.3

 

Government of Canada bonds

79,625.4

 

Other investments

433.3

 
   

104,527.8

Property and equipment

 

600.3

Intangible assets

 

44.0

Other assets

 

189.7

 

116,054.9


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

90,193.1

Deposits

Government of Canada

21,725.6

 

Members of Payments Canada

250.5

 

Other deposits

2,830.1

 
   

24,806.2

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

 

530.3

   

115,529.6

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Investment revaluation reservefootnote *

395.3

 
   

525.3

116,054.9

I declare that the foregoing statement is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, February 11, 2019

Carmen Vierula
Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accountant

I declare that the foregoing statement is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, February 11, 2019

Stephen S. Poloz
Governor