Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 153, Number 6: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

February 9, 2019

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Notice of intent to amend the Domestic Substances List under subsection 87(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to indicate that subsection 81(3) of that Act applies to the substance hexanedioic acid, diisodecyl ester, also known as DIDA

Whereas the substance DIDA (Chemical Abstracts Service [CAS] Registry No. 27178-16-1) is specified on the Domestic Substances List; footnote a

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have conducted a screening assessment of DIDA under section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 footnote b and, on February 9, 2019, published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, the final screening assessment report;

And whereas the ministers suspect that the information concerning a significant new activity in relation to this substance may contribute to determining the circumstances in which the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

Therefore, notice is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment intends to amend the Domestic Substances List pursuant to subsection 87(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to indicate that subsection 81(3) of that Act applies to any significant new activities relating to this substance, as set out in this Notice.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days of publication of this Notice, file with the Minister of the Environment comments with respect to this proposal. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this Notice and can be submitted using the online reporting system through Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window, sent by mail to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

The final screening assessment document for the substance may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this Notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Nancy Hamzawi
Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

1. Part 1 of the Domestic Substances List is proposed to be amended by deleting the following:

2. Part 2 of the Domestic Substances List is proposed to be amended by adding the following in numerical order:

Column 1

Substance

Column 2

Significant new activity for which substance is subject to subsection 81(3) of the Act

27178-16-1 S′

1. In relation to the substance in Column 1, opposite to this section

  • (a) the use of the substance in the manufacture of any of the following products containing the substance at a concentration equal to or greater than 0.6% by weight:
    • (i) a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies, other than its use in the manufacture of lubricants and automotive fluids that contain the substance at a concentration of less than 15% by weight,
    • (ii) a natural health product as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations, other than its use in the manufacture of rinse-off products that contain the substance at a concentration equal to or less than 5% by weight, or
    • (iii) a cosmetic, within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act, other than its use in the manufacture of rinse-off products that contain the substance at a concentration equal to or less than 5% by weight;
  • (b) any activity involving the use of the substance in the following products, containing the substance at a concentration equal to or greater than 0.6% by weight, if the total quantity of the substance involved in the activity, during any one calendar year, is greater than 10 kg:
    • (i) a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies, other than an activity involving lubricants and automotive fluids that contain the substance at a concentration of less than 15% by weight,
    • (ii) a natural health product as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations, other than an activity involving rinse-off products that contain the substance at a concentration equal to or less than 5% by weight, or
    • (iii) a cosmetic, within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act, other than an activity involving rinse-off products that contain the substance at a concentration equal to or less than 5% by weight.
 

2. Despite item 1, the use of the substance as a research and development substance or as a site-limited intermediate substance as these expressions are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers), or as an export-only substance, is not a significant new activity.

 

3. For each proposed significant new activity, the following information must be provided to the Minister at least 90 days before the commencement of the proposed significant new activity:

  • (a) a description of the proposed significant new activity in relation to the substance;
  • (b) the anticipated annual quantity of the substance to be used in relation to the significant new activity;
  • (c) the information specified in items 3 to 7 of Schedule 4 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);
  • (d) the information specified in paragraphs 2(d) to (f) and 8(f) and (g) of Schedule 5 of those Regulations;
  • (e) a description of how the consumer product, natural health product, or cosmetic is intended to be used or applied;
  • (f) the total quantity of the consumer product, natural health product, or cosmetic expected to be sold in Canada in a calendar year by the person undertaking the significant new activity;
  • (g) a summary of all other information and test data in respect of the substance and/or its analogues that are in the possession of the person proposing the significant new activity, or to which they may reasonably be expected to have access and that are relevant to identifying hazards of the substance to the environment and human health and the degree of environmental and public exposure to the substance;
  • (h) the identification of every other government agency, either outside or within Canada, that the person proposing the significant new activity has notified of the substance and, if known, the agency’s file number, the outcome of the assessment and, if any, the risk management actions in relation to the substance imposed by those agencies;
  • (i) the name, civic and postal addresses and telephone number and, if any, the fax number and email address of the person proposing the significant new activity and, if they are not resident in Canada, of the person resident in Canada that is authorized to act on their behalf; and
  • (j) a certification that the information is accurate and complete, dated and signed by the person proposing the significant new activity if they are resident in Canada or, if not, by the person resident in Canada authorized to act on their behalf.
 

4. The information above will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister.

COMING INTO FORCE

3. The Order would come into force on the day on which it is registered.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Notice of intent.)

Description

This Notice of intent (NOI) is an opportunity for the public to comment on the proposed amendment to the Domestic Substances List (DSL), pursuant to subsection 87(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA),footnote 1 to apply the significant new activity (SNAc) provisions to the substance hexanedioic acid, diisodecyl ester (also known as DIDA, Chemical Abstracts Service [CAS] Registry No. 27178-16-1) of the Act.

Within 60 days of publication of the NOI, any person may submit comments to the Minister of the Environment (the Minister). These comments will be taken into consideration during the development of the Order amending the DSL to apply the SNAc provisions to this substance.

The DSL amendment is not in force until the Order is adopted by the Minister pursuant to subsection 87(3) of CEPA. The Order must be published in the Canada Gazette, Part II.

A number of other SNAc instruments are to be published in the near future that will also target consumer products. As a result, stakeholder input provided in response to the consumer product language proposed in this NOI may not be reflected in upcoming notices due to publication timelines. However, any input received will be taken into consideration during the development of all related notices and orders that pertain to consumer products.

Information-gathering mechanisms other than the SNAc provisions were considered, including the publication of a notice under section 71 of CEPA. However, this mechanism would collect information after the substance is used in new consumer products, cosmetics or natural health products. These uses could potentially lead to exposure sources of concern.

Applicability of the proposed Order

At this time, it is proposed that the Order amending the DSL would require any person (individual or corporation) engaging in a significant new activity in relation to DIDA to submit a Significant New Activity notification (SNAN) containing all of the information prescribed in the Order at least 90 days prior to the import, manufacture, or use of the substance for the significant new activity.

In order to address potential concerns, the Order would target the use of the substance in consumer products to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) applies, in natural health products, as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations, and in cosmetics, within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act. For the manufacture of the consumer product, or natural health product, or cosmetic with the substance, notification would be required when the concentration of the substance is equal to or greater than 0.6% by weight.

For any other activity related to the substance, notification would be required when the concentration of the substance in the consumer product, or natural health product, or cosmetic is equal to or greater than 0.6% by weight, and the total quantity of the substance involved in the activity during a calendar year is greater than 10 kg.

For example, notification would be required if a company plans to import a product (for example toothpaste) to be used by consumers where the concentration of the substance in the product is 0.6% or greater and where there are more than 10 kg of the substance involved in a calendar year. Therefore, the import, manufacture, or use of the substance in such products would require notification. DIDA is not currently known to be used in cosmetics in Canada.

Activities not subject to the proposed Order

Activities involving the use of the substance in the manufacture of consumer products, natural health products, or cosmetics that contain the substance at a concentration less than 0.6% would not be subject to the Order. Similarly, any other activity involving the use of the substance in a consumer product, natural health product or cosmetic would not be subject to the Order if the total quantity of the substance involved in the activity is 10 kg or less in a calendar year. For any activity involving more than 10 kg of the substance in a calendar year, the proposed Order would not apply if the concentration of the substance is less than 0.6% by weight.

Activities involving the use of DIDA in lubricants or automotive fluids that contain the substance at a concentration of less than 15% by weight, and the use in a rinse-off natural health product or rinse-off cosmetic product that contains the substance at a concentration of 5% or less by weight are exempt from notification in the proposed Order.

The proposed Order would not apply to uses of the substance that are regulated under the acts of Parliament listed in Schedule 2 of CEPA, including the Pest Control Products Act, the Fertilizers Act and the Feeds Act. The Order would also not apply to transient reaction intermediates, impurities, contaminants, partially unreacted intermediates or, in some circumstances, to items such as wastes, mixtures or manufactured items. However, it should be noted that individual components of a mixture may be subject to notification under the Order. See subsection 81(6) and section 3 of CEPA, and section 3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers for additional information.

The use of the substance as a research and development substance, a site-limited intermediate substance, or an export-only substance would not require the submission of a SNAN, as these activities are not expected to result in exposure to the general population in Canada. The terms “research and development substance” and “site-limited intermediate substance” are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substance Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers). An export-only substance is a substance that is manufactured or imported in Canada and destined solely for foreign markets.

Information to be submitted

The NOI sets out the proposed requirements for information that would have to be provided to the Minister 90 days before the day on which the substance is imported, manufactured or used for a significant new activity. The Department of the Environment and the Department of Health will use the information submitted in the SNAN to conduct human health and environmental assessments within 90 days after the complete information is received.

The information requirements in the proposed Order relate to general information in respect of the substance, details surrounding its use, and to exposure information. Some of the proposed information requirements are set out in the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Additional guidance on preparing a SNAN can be found in section 4 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers.

Compliance

When assessing whether or not a substance is subject to SNAc provisions, footnote 2 a person is expected to make use of information in their possession or to which they may reasonably be expected to have access. This means information in any of the notifier’s offices worldwide or other locations where the notifier can reasonably have access to the information. For example, manufacturers are expected to have access to their formulations, while importers or users of a substance, mixture, or product are expected to have access to import records, usage information and the relevant safety data sheets (SDS).

Although an SDS is an important source of information on the composition of a purchased product, it should be noted that the goal of the SDS is to protect the health of workers in the workplace from specific hazards of chemical products. Therefore, an SDS may not list all product ingredients that may be subject to an order due to human health or environmental concerns. Any person requiring more detailed information on product composition is encouraged to contact their supplier.

If any information becomes available that reasonably supports the conclusion that the substance DIDA is toxic or capable of becoming toxic, the person who is in possession of the information and is involved in activities with the substance is obligated, under section 70 of CEPA, to provide that information to the Minister without delay.

A company can submit a SNAN on behalf of its clients. For example, in cases where a person takes possession and control of a substance from another person, they may not be required to submit a SNAN, under certain conditions, if their activities were covered by an original SNAN. The Substances Management Advisory Note, “Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,” provides more detail on this subject.

Any person who transfers the physical possession or control of a substance subject to an order should notify all persons to whom the physical possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the order, including the obligation to notify the Minister of any significant new activity and to provide all the required information outlined above.

A pre-notification consultation (PNC) is recommended for notifiers who wish to consult during the planning or preparation of their SNAN to discuss any questions or concerns they have about the prescribed information and test plans.

Where a person has questions concerning their obligations to comply with a notice or order, believes they may be out of compliance, or would like to request a PNC, they are encouraged to discuss their particular circumstances by contacting the Substances Management Information Line.footnote 3

CEPA is enforced in accordance with the publicly available Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. In instances of non-compliance, consideration is given to the following factors when deciding which enforcement measure to take: nature of the alleged violation, effectiveness in achieving compliance with CEPA and its regulations, and consistency in enforcement.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2019-87-02-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Whereas, pursuant to subsection 87(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 footnote c, the Minister of the Environment has added the substance referred to in the annexed Order to the Domestic Substances List footnote d;

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 87(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 footnote c, makes the annexed Order 2019-87-02-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, January 28, 2019

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Order 2019-87-02-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Amendment

1 Part I of the Non-domestic Substances List footnote 4 is amended by deleting the following:

Coming into Force

2 This Order comes into force on the day on which the Order 2019-87-02-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List comes into force.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of a substance — hexanedioic acid, diisodecyl ester (DIDA), CAS RN footnote 5 27178-16-1 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas DIDA is a substance identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on DIDA pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on this substance at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Notice is further given that the Minister of the Environment intends to amend the Domestic Substances List pursuant to subsection 87(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to indicate that subsection 81(3) of that Act applies with respect to DIDA.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of DIDA

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of one of two substances originally referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Aliphatic Diesters Group. The substance in question, hexanedioic acid, diisodecyl ester (Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number [CAS RN] 27178-16-1), hereinafter referred to as DIDA, was identified as a priority for assessment as it met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. The other substance was subsequently determined to be of low concern through another approach, and the decision for this substance is provided in a separate report.footnote 6 Accordingly, this screening assessment addresses DIDA.

According to information submitted pursuant to a CEPA section 71 notice, there were no reports of manufacture of DIDA above the reporting threshold of 100 kg in Canada in 2011. DIDA was reported to be imported into Canada in 2011 in the range of 1 000 000 to 10 000 000 kg for use as a plasticizer in electrical cables, as processing aids and as an ingredient in lubricants and greases. Lubricant-type products available to consumers in Canada containing DIDA were identified as motor oils, power steering fluids, aerosol lubricants and lubricant products designed to stop oil leaks. In addition, DIDA is present as a non-medicinal ingredient in natural health products.

The ecological risks of DIDA were characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC). The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. Based on the outcome of the ERC analysis, DIDA is considered unlikely to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from DIDA. It is concluded that DIDA does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

With respect to human health, a read-across approach was used to characterize the potential health effects of DIDA. Specifically, developmental toxicity was identified as the critical effect for risk characterization purposes using data available from the analogue di-(2-ethylhexl) adipate (DEHA, CAS RN 103-23-1). On the basis of a comparison of exposure estimates and critical effect levels identified in health effects studies, the margins of exposure were considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in the exposure and human health effects databases.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that DIDA does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Overall conclusion

It is concluded that DIDA does not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

Consideration for follow-up

Because DIDA is listed on the Domestic Substances List (DSL), its import and manufacture in Canada are not subject to notification under the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) under subsection 81(1) of CEPA. Given the hazardous properties of this substance, there is concern that new activities that have not been identified or assessed could lead to this substance meeting the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act. Therefore, the Government of Canada intends to amend the DSL, under subsection 87(3) of the Act, to indicate that the significant new activity (SNAc) provisions under subsection 81(3) of the Act apply with respect to this substance.

A significant new activity can include an activity that is not currently occurring or an existing activity involving a different quantity or concentration, or occurring in different circumstances, that could affect the exposure pattern of the substance. The SNAc provisions trigger an obligation for a person (individual or corporation) to provide, and for the Government to assess, specific information about a substance when a person proposes to use the substance in a significant new activity. The ministers will assess the information provided by the notifier and other information available to them to determine whether the substance, if used in the proposed new activity, could pose a risk to the environment or human health, and if so, whether risk management is required.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of nine substances in the Benzoates Group specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the seven substances identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on two substances pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act and on seven of the remaining substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action at this time under section 77 of the Act for the seven substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Act.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on the remaining two substances at this time.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of the Benzoates Group

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 9 of 10 substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Benzoates Group. These 9 substances were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns. The tenth substance was subsequently determined to be of low concern for risk to ecological or human health, and the decision for this substance is provided in a separate report.footnote 7 Accordingly, this screening assessment addresses the 9 substances listed in the table below, which will hereinafter be referred to as the Benzoates Group.

Substances in the Benzoates Group

CAS RN footnote 8

Domestic Substances List name

Common name

Table 1 Notes

Table 1 Note a

This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA, but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns.

Return to table 1 note a referrer

Table 1 Note b

This substance is a UVCB (substances of unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products, or biological material).

Return to table 1 note b referrer

93-58-3

Benzoic acid, methyl ester

Methyl benzoate

93-89-0 table 1 note a

Benzoic acid, ethyl ester

Ethyl benzoate

120-50-3 table 1 note a

Benzoic acid, 2-methylpropyl ester

Isobutyl benzoate

120-55-8

Ethanol, 2,2′-oxybis-, dibenzoate

Diethylene glycol dibenzoate

136-60-7

Benzoic acid, butyl ester

Butyl benzoate

614-33-5

1,2,3-Propanetriol, tribenzoate

Tribenzoin

8024-05-3 table 1 note b

Oils, tuberose

Tuberose oil

27138-31-4

Propanol, oxybis-, dibenzoate

Dipropylene glycol dibenzoate

68052-23-3

1,3-Pentanediol, 2,2,4-trimethyl-, dibenzoate

Trimethylpentanediyl dibenzoate

All nine substances in this assessment were included in a survey conducted under a CEPA section 71 notice. Reported imported quantities ranged from 1 000 to 10 000 000 kg for five of the substances. Manufacturing and import activities were not reported for the four remaining substances.

Tribenzoin, tuberose oils, and methyl, ethyl, butyl, and isobutyl benzoates are used as food flavouring agents globally and are present in products available to consumers in Canada. These substances are also used as fragrance ingredients in household cleaning products and cosmetics. In addition to being anthropogenic sources, methyl, ethyl, butyl, and isobutyl benzoates are naturally present in foods such as apples, bananas, sweet cherries, papayas, beer, cider, and cocoa.

Diethylene glycol dibenzoate, dipropylene glycol dibenzoate, and trimethylpentanediyl dibenzoate were identified in products including caulking, paint, and adhesives, as well as cosmetics and natural health products. Diethylene glycol dibenzoate and dipropylene glycol dibenzoate have also been identified as components in the manufacture of food packaging materials.

The ecological risks of the nine benzoates in this screening assessment were characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC). The CRE is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified the nine benzoates in this screening assessment as having low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from the nine benzoates addressed in this screening assessment. It is concluded that substances in the Benzoates Group do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

The characterization of the health effects in this assessment takes into consideration empirical evidence that benzoates readily hydrolyze into benzoic acid, which is then further metabolized into hippuric acid and subsequently excreted. Accordingly, the evaluation of the benzoate esters in this assessment focuses on health effects data for benzoic acid and benzyl derivatives considered to metabolize to benzoic acid. Taking into consideration the assessments of other jurisdictions, which have concluded that these substances and other similar substances show low toxicity, and given that the substances in this assessment metabolize to benzoic acid, the potential risk to human health is considered to be low.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that the substances in the Benzoates Group do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Overall conclusion

It is concluded that the substances in the Benzoates Group do not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Feehan, The Hon. Kevin P.

2019-43

Court of Appeal of Alberta

 

Justice of Appeal

 

Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta

 

Judge ex officio

 

Court of Appeal for the Northwest Territories

 

Judge

 

Court of Appeal of Nunavut

 

Judge

 

Friesen, Tamara

2019-44

Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta

 

Justice

 

Court of Appeal of Alberta

 

Judge ex officio

 

Immigration and Refugee Board

 

Full-time members

 

Brennan, Jody

2019-23

Helis, John

2019-22

Jedid, Toni

2019-25

Tétreault, Anne-Thierrie

2019-24

Kinloch, Natalie

2019-50

The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited

 

Chief Executive Officer

 

Lavery, Mairead

2019-34

Export Development Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

 

Lemay, Marie

2019-8

Master of the Mint

 

Parole Board of Canada

 

Part-time members

 

Johnstone-Clarke, Lori K.

2019-21

LePage, Brenda

2019-20

Sansfaçon, The Hon. Stéphane

2019-48

Court of Appeal of Quebec

 

Puisne Judge

 

Superior Court of Justice of Ontario

 

Judges

 

Court of Appeal for Ontario

 

Judges ex officio

 

Chalmers, William S.

2019-46

O’Brien, Shaun

2019-47

Tholl, The Hon. Jerome A.

2019-45

Court of Appeal for Saskatchewan

 

Judge of Appeal

 

Her Majesty’s Court of Queen’s Bench for Saskatchewan

 

Judge ex officio

 

February 1, 2019

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Belleville Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Grant Boulay

Ottawa, January 30, 2019

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Two-year review of list of entities established pursuant to section 83.05 of the Criminal Code

Whereas subsection 83.05(9)footnote e of the Criminal Code footnote f requires the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness to review the list established under subsection 83.05(1)footnote g of that Act two years after its establishment, and every two years after that, to determine whether there are still reasonable grounds for an entity to remain a listed entity as set out in subsection 83.05(1) footnote g of that Act;

Whereas, on July 23, 2018, 16 years had elapsed since the establishment of the list by the Regulations Establishing a List of Entities footnote h pursuant to subsection 83.05(1) footnote g of the Criminal Code footnote f;

And whereas, pursuant to subsection 83.05(9) footnote e of the Criminal Code footnote f, the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness has carried out the review of the list, as it existed on July 23, 2018;

Therefore, notice is given, pursuant to subsection 83.05(10) footnote e of the Criminal Code footnote f, that the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness completed the review on November 21, 2018.

Ottawa, January 11, 2019

Ralph Goodale
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Vancouver Fraser Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

WHEREAS the Governor in Council, pursuant to Part 5.1 of the Port Authorities Management Regulations, issued a Certificate of Amalgamation containing letters patent to amalgamate the Vancouver Port Authority, the Fraser River Port Authority and the North Fraser Port Authority to continue as the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (“Authority”), effective January 1, 2008;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the real property, other than federal real property, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS, pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), the Authority wishes to acquire the real properties bearing parcel identifiers (PID) 004-033-221, 009-237-747 and 009-237-780;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister of Transport issue supplementary letters patent to set out the real properties in Schedule C of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister of Transport is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act,

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following after PID 030-061-431:

PID NUMBER

DESCRIPTION

004-033-221

Lot 1, Section 16, Block 5 North, Range 5 West, New Westminster District, Plan 71665

009-237-747

Lot 4, Section 18, Block 6 North, Range 1 East, New Westminster District, Plan 10150

009-237-780

Lot 5 except: Part Plan LMP49684; Sections 7 and 18, Block 6 North, Range 1 East, New Westminster District, Plan 10150

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration of the title, in the New Westminster Land Title Office, of each parcel of land subject to the transaction.

ISSUED this 22nd day of January, 2019.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BANK ACT

Motus Bank — Order to commence and carry on business

Notice is hereby given of the issuance, pursuant to subsection 49(1) of the Bank Act, of an order authorizing Motus Bank, and, in French, Banque Motus, to commence and carry on business, effective January 10, 2019.

January 14, 2019

Jeremy Rudin
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Chief Administrator

Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada

 

Chairperson

Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada

 

Director

Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada

February 11, 2019

Director

Canada Council for the Arts

 

Chairperson

Canada Development Investment Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology

 

Director

Canada Infrastructure Bank

February 18, 2019

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

Chairperson (joint federal Governor in Council and provincial Lieutenant Governor appointment)

Canada–Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Post Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Commercial Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canadian Dairy Commission

 

Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson and Director

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Lead Commissioner, Deputy Lead Commissioner and Commissioner

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Chairperson

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Nature

 

Regional Member (Quebec)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

 

Chairperson and Member

Canadian Statistics Advisory Council

 

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Canadian Tourism Commission

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Defense Construction (1951) Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Export Development Canada

 

Chairperson

Farm Credit Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Farm Credit Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson

Farm Products Council of Canada

 

Chairperson

The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited

 

Chief Executive Officer

The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited

 

Commissioner

Financial Consumer Agency of Canada

 

Chairperson

First Nations Financial Management Board

 

Chief Commissioner

First Nations Tax Commission

 

Deputy Chief Commissioner

First Nations Tax Commission

 

Director

Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation

 

Director (Federal)

Hamilton Port Authority

 

Commissioner and Chairperson

International Joint Commission

 

Member (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 
Director Invest in Canada Hub February 9, 2019

Vice-Chairperson

Invest in Canada Hub

 

Chief Executive Officer

The Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated

 
Director The Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated February 12, 2019

Librarian and Archivist of Canada

Library and Archives of Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Marine Atlantic Inc.

 

Vice-Chairperson

National Arts Centre Corporation

 

Member

National Capital Commission

 

Government Film Commissioner

National Film Board

 

Director

National Gallery of Canada

 

Chairperson

National Research Council of Canada

 

President

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

 

Canadian Ombudsperson

Office of the Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise

 

Commissioner of Competition

Office of the Commissioner of Competition

 

Ombudsperson

Office of the Ombudsperson for National Defence and Canadian Forces

 

Director (Federal)

Oshawa Port Authority

 

Chairperson

Pacific Pilotage Authority

 

Chief Executive Officer

Parks Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson and Member

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

 

Member

Payment in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel

 

Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson

Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee

 

Principal

Royal Military College of Canada

 

Director (Federal)

Saguenay Port Authority

 

Chairperson

Telefilm Canada

 

Member (Marine and Medical)

Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

VIA Rail Canada Inc.