Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 152, Number 47: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

November 24, 2018

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Ministerial Condition No. 19663

Ministerial condition

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have assessed information pertaining to the substance 1,2-ethanediamine, N-(2-aminoethyl)-, reaction products with glycidyl p-tolyl ether, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 68411-70-1;

And whereas the ministers suspect that the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (the Act);

The Minister of the Environment, pursuant to paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Act, hereby permits the manufacture or import of the substance in accordance with the conditions of the following annex.

Nancy Hamzawi
Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Conditions

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. The following definitions apply in these ministerial conditions:

2. The notifier may manufacture or import the substance in accordance with the present ministerial conditions.

Restrictions

3. The notifier may import the substance only to use it as a curing agent in an epoxy coating system that does not meet the definition of a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies.

4. The notifier shall transfer the physical possession or control of the substance only to the person who will use it in accordance with item 3.

5. At least 120 days prior to beginning manufacturing the substance in Canada, the notifier shall inform the Minister of the Environment, in writing, and provide the following information:

Disposal of the substance

6. The notifier or the person to whom the substance has been transferred must collect any waste in their physical possession or under their control and destroy or dispose of it in the following manner:

Application

7. Items 6, 9 and 10 do not apply if the substance is imported already cured.

Environmental release

8. Where any release of the substance or waste to the environment occurs, the person who has the physical possession or control of the substance or waste shall immediately take all measures necessary to prevent any further release, and to limit the dispersion of any release. Furthermore, the person shall, as soon as possible in the circumstances, inform the Minister of the Environment by contacting an enforcement officer designated under the Act.

Record-keeping requirements

9. (1) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records, with any documentation supporting the validity of the information contained in these records, indicating

(2) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records mentioned in subsection (1) at their principal place of business in Canada, or at the principal place of business in Canada of their representative, for a period of at least five years after they are made.

Other requirements

10. The notifier shall inform any person to whom they transfer the physical possession or control of the substance or of the waste, in writing, of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. The notifier shall obtain, prior to the first transfer of the substance or waste, written confirmation from this person that they were informed of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. This written confirmation shall be maintained at the principal place of business in Canada of the notifier or of their representative in Canada for a period of at least five years from the day it was received.

Coming into force

11. The present ministerial conditions come into force on November 13, 2018.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 19584

Significant New Activity Notice

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have assessed information in their possession in respect of the substance 1-tetradecene homopolymer, hydrogenated, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1857296-89-9, under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Act,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that subsection 81(4) of that Act applies with respect to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

The Honourable Catherine McKenna

Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. The following definition applies in this notice:

2. In relation to the substance, a significant new activity is

3. Despite section 2, a use of the substance is not a significant new activity if the substance is used

4. For each proposed significant new activity described in section 2, the following information must be provided to the Minister of the Environment at least 90 days before the activity begins:

5. The above-mentioned information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister of the Environment.

Transitional provisions

6. Despite section 2, in the period between the date of publication of the present notice and November 24, 2019, a significant new activity is

7. For greater certainty, in respect of calendar year 2019, the quantity of the substance that is used before November 24 of that calendar year is not considered for the purposes of section 2.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Significant New Activity Notice.)

Description

This Significant New Activity (SNAc) Notice is a legal instrument adopted by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (the Act) to apply the SNAc provisions of that Act to 1-tetradecene homopolymer, hydrogenated, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1857296-89-9. The Notice is now in force. It is therefore mandatory to meet all the requirements of the Notice should a person intend to use the substance for a significant new activity as defined in the Notice.

A SNAc Notice does not constitute an endorsement from the Department of the Environment or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

Applicability of the Significant New Activity Notice

The Notice requires that any person (individual or corporation) engaging in a SNAc in relation to 1-tetradecene homopolymer, hydrogenated, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1857296-89-9, submit a Significant New Activity notification (SNAN) containing all of the information prescribed in the Notice at least 90 days prior to using the substance for the SNAc.

In order to address the human toxicity concerns, the Notice requires notification in relation to the use of the substance in the manufacture of consumer products or cosmetics intended to be released as vapour, mist or aerosol applications when the concentration of the substance is greater or equal to 0.1% by weight. For example, notification is required if a person plans to manufacture a product containing the substance for consumer uses in lubricant, grease or fluid products intended to be released as vapour, mist or aerosol and the concentration of the substance is greater than or equal to 0.1% by weight.

The Notice targets any use of the substance in consumer products to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) applies, or in a cosmetic as defined in the Food and Drugs Act (FDA). A SNAN is required 90 days before the use of the substance in a SNAc.

Activities not subject to the Notice

The following activities are not significant new activities.

Uses of the substance that are regulated under the Acts of Parliament listed in Schedule 2 of the Act, including the Pest Control Products Act, the Fertilizers Act and the Feeds Act are excluded from the Notice. The Notice also does not apply to transient reaction intermediates, impurities, contaminants, partially unreacted materials, or in some circumstances to items such as, but not limited to, wastes, mixtures, or manufactured items. However, it should be noted that individual components of a mixture may be subject to notification under the provisions of the Act. See subsection 81(6) and section 3 of the Act, and section 3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers for additional information.

Activities involving the use of the substance as a research and development substance or a site-limited intermediate or an export-only product are excluded from the Notice. The terms “research and development substance” and “site-limited intermediate substance” are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Information to be submitted

The Notice sets out the information that must be provided to the Minister 90 days before the day on which the substance 1-tetradecene homopolymer, hydrogenated, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1857296-89-9 is used for a SNAc. The Department of the Environment and the Department of Health will use the information submitted in the SNAN to conduct risk assessments within 90 days after the complete information is received.

The earlier assessment of the substance identified potential concerns associated with uses of the substance in consumer applications where vapour, mist or aerosol is released. This hydrogenated polyalphaolefin can potentially cause inhalation toxicity problems if inhaled. The SNAc Notice is issued to gather toxicity information in the event that the substance is used in consumer products intended to be released as vapour, mist or aerosol to ensure that the substance will undergo further assessment before SNAcs are undertaken.

The information requirements in the Notice relate to general information in respect of the substance, details surrounding its use, exposure information, and toxicity to human health. Some of the information requirements reference the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Additional guidance on preparing a SNAN can be found in section 1.3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers.

Transitional provision

A transitional provision is included in the Notice to facilitate compliance by persons who may already have imported or manufactured the substance up to 100 kg and started activities with it in concentrations that are greater than or equal to 0.1% by weight in the product matrix. The Notice comes into force immediately. However, if the substance is used to manufacture consumer products to which the CCPSA applies, or in a cosmetic as defined in the FDA, a threshold of more than or equal to 100 kg per calendar year applies and a concentration equal to or greater than 0.1% by weight applies for the period between the publication of the Notice and November 24, 2019. On November 25, 2019, the threshold for this significant new activity will be lowered to 0 kg per calendar year and the concentration will remain greater than or equal to 0.1% by weight.

Compliance

When assessing whether or not a substance is subject to SNAc provisions, a person is expected to make use of information in their possession or to which they may reasonably have access. This means information in any of the notifier’s offices worldwide or other locations where the notifier can reasonably have access to the information. For example, manufacturers are expected to have access to their formulations, while importers or users of a substance, mixture, or product are expected to have access to import records, usage information and the relevant safety data sheets (SDSs), formerly “material safety data sheets” (MSDSs). More details are contained in the Regulations Amending the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) and the Export of Substances on the Export Control List Regulations for reference to this amendment.

Although an SDS is an important source of information on the composition of a product, it should be noted that the goal of the SDS is to protect the health of workers in the workplace from specific hazards of chemical products. Therefore, an SDS may not list all product ingredients that may be subject to a SNAc notice due to human health or environmental concerns. Any person requiring more detailed information on product composition is encouraged to contact their supplier.

If any information becomes available that reasonably supports the conclusion that the substance 1-tetradecene homopolymer, hydrogenated, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1857296-89-9 is toxic or capable of becoming toxic, the person who is in possession of or that has knowledge of the information and is involved in activities with the substance is obligated, under section 70 of the Act, to provide that information to the Minister without delay.

A company can submit a SNAN on behalf of its clients. For example, in cases where a person takes possession or control of a substance from another person, they may not be required to submit a SNAN, under certain conditions, if their activities are covered by an original SNAN submitted by the person from whom they obtained the substance. The Substances Management Advisory Note “Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999” provides more detail on this subject.

Under section 86 of the Act, any person who transfers the physical possession or control of a substance subject to a SNAc notice must notify all persons to whom the physical possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the notice, including the obligation to notify the Minister of any SNAc and to provide all the required information outlined above.

A pre-notification consultation (PNC) is recommended for notifiers who wish to consult with the program during the planning or preparation of their SNAN to discuss any questions or concerns they have about the prescribed information and test plans.

Where a person has questions concerning their obligations to comply with a notice, believes they may be out of compliance, or would like to request a PNC, they are encouraged to discuss their particular circumstances with the program by contacting the Substances Management Information Line (eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca [email], 1-800-567-1999 [toll-free in Canada], and 819-938-3232 [outside of Canada]).

The Act is enforced in accordance with the publicly available Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. In instances of non-compliance, consideration is given to factors such as the nature of the alleged violation, potential harm, intent, and history of compliance.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 19655

Significant New Activity Notice

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information in their possession in respect of the substance benzaldehyde, reaction products with polyalkylenepolyamines, hydrogenated, Confidential Accession Number 18498-3, under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Act,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that subsection 81(4) of that Act applies with respect to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

The Honourable Catherine McKenna

Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. The following definition applies in this notice:

2. In relation to the substance, a significant new activity is

3. Despite section 2, a use of the substance is not a significant new activity if the substance is used

4. For each proposed significant new activity described in section 2, the following information must be provided to the Minister of the Environment at least 90 days before the activity begins:

5. The above-mentioned information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister of the Environment.

Transitional provisions

6. Despite section 2, in the period between the date of publication of the present notice and November 24, 2019, a significant new activity is

7. For greater certainty, in respect of calendar year 2019, the quantity of substance that is used before November 24 of that calendar year is not considered for the purposes of section 2.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Significant New Activity Notice.)

Description

This Significant New Activity (SNAc) Notice is a legal instrument adopted by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (the Act) to apply the SNAc provisions of that Act to benzaldehyde, reaction products with polyalkylenepolyamines, hydrogenated, Confidential Accession Number 18498-3. The Notice is now in force. It is therefore mandatory to meet all the requirements of the Notice should a person intend to use the substance for a significant new activity as defined in the Notice.

A SNAc Notice does not constitute an endorsement from the Department of the Environment or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

Applicability of the Significant New Activity Notice

The Notice requires that any person (individual or corporation) engaging in a SNAc in relation to benzaldehyde, reaction products with polyalkylenepolyamines, hydrogenated, Confidential Accession Number 18498-3, submit a Significant New Activity notification (SNAN) containing all of the information prescribed in the Notice at least 90 days prior to using the substance for the SNAc.

In order to address the human toxicity concerns, the Notice requires notification in relation to the use of the substance in the manufacture of consumer products or cosmetics when the concentration of the substance is greater or equal to 1% by weight in the product matrix. For example, notification is required if a person plans to use the substance to manufacture a consumer product such as coatings, adhesives, sealants and caulks and the concentration of the substance is greater or equal to 1% by weight.

The Notice targets any use of the substance in consumer products to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) applies, or in a cosmetic as defined in the Food and Drugs Act (FDA). A SNAN is required 90 days before the use of the substance in a SNAc.

Activities not subject to the Notice

The following activities are not significant new activities.

Uses of the substance that are regulated under the Acts of Parliament listed in Schedule 2 of the Act, including the Pest Control Products Act, the Fertilizers Act and the Feeds Act, are excluded from the Notice. The Notice also does not apply to transient reaction intermediates, impurities, contaminants, partially unreacted materials, or in some circumstances to items such as, but not limited to, wastes, mixtures, or manufactured items. However, it should be noted that individual components of a mixture may be subject to notification under the provisions of the Act. See subsection 81(6) and section 3 of the Act, and section 3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers for additional information.

Activities involving the use of the substance as a research and development substance or a site-limited intermediate or an export-only product are excluded from the Notice. The terms “research and development substance” and “site-limited intermediate substance” are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Information to be submitted

The Notice sets out the information that must be provided to the Minister 90 days before the day on which the substance benzaldehyde, reaction products with polyalkylenepolyamines, hydrogenated, Confidential Accession Number 18498-3, is used for a SNAc. The Department of the Environment and the Department of Health will use the information submitted in the SNAN to conduct risk assessments within 90 days after the complete information is received.

The earlier assessment of the substance identified potential concerns associated with uses of the substance in consumer products. This aliphatic amine UVCB (substance of unknown or variable composition, complex reaction product, or biological material) compound can potentially cause skin sensitization in humans. The SNAc Notice is issued to gather toxicity information in the event that the substance is used in any consumer products to ensure that the substance will undergo further assessment before SNAcs are undertaken.

The information requirements in the Notice relate to general information in respect of the substance, details surrounding its use, exposure information, and toxicity to human health. Some of the information requirements reference the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Additional guidance on preparing a SNAN can be found in section 1.3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers.

Transitional provision

A transitional provision is included in the Notice to facilitate compliance by persons who may already have imported or manufactured up to 1 000 kg of the substance and started activities with it. The Notice comes into force immediately. However, if the substance is used to manufacture consumer products to which the CCPSA applies, or in a cosmetic as defined in the FDA, a threshold of more than or equal to 1 000 kg per calendar year applies and a concentration equal to or greater than 1% by weight applies for the period between the publication of the Notice and November 24, 2019. On November 25, 2019, the threshold for this significant new activity will be lowered to 0 kg per calendar year and the concentration will remain greater than or equal to 1% by weight.

Compliance

When assessing whether or not a substance is subject to SNAc provisions, a person is expected to make use of information in their possession or to which they may reasonably have access. This means information in any of the notifier’s offices worldwide or other locations where the notifier can reasonably have access to the information. For example, manufacturers are expected to have access to their formulations, while importers or users of a substance, mixture, or product are expected to have access to import records, usage information and the relevant safety data sheets (SDSs), formerly “material safety data sheets” (MSDSs). More details are contained in the Regulations Amending the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) and the Export of Substances on the Export Control List Regulations for reference to this amendment.

Although an SDS is an important source of information on the composition of a product, it should be noted that the goal of the SDS is to protect the health of workers in the workplace from specific hazards of chemical products. Therefore, an SDS may not list all product ingredients that may be subject to a SNAc notice due to human health or environmental concerns. Any person requiring more detailed information on product composition is encouraged to contact their supplier.

If any information becomes available that reasonably supports the conclusion that the substance benzaldehyde, reaction products with polyalkylenepolyamines, hydrogenated, Confidential Accession Number 18498-3, is toxic or capable of becoming toxic, the person who is in possession of or that has knowledge of the information and is involved in activities with the substance is obligated, under section 70 of the Act, to provide that information to the Minister without delay.

A company can submit a SNAN on behalf of its clients. For example, in cases where a person takes possession or control of a substance from another person, they may not be required to submit a SNAN, under certain conditions, if their activities are covered by an original SNAN submitted by the person from whom they obtained the substance. The Substances Management Advisory Note, “Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,” provides more detail on this subject.

Under section 86 of the Act, any person who transfers the physical possession or control of a substance subject to a SNAc notice must notify all persons to whom the physical possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the notice, including the obligation to notify the Minister of any SNAc and to provide all the required information outlined above.

A pre-notification consultation (PNC) is recommended for notifiers who wish to consult with the program during the planning or preparation of their SNAN to discuss any questions or concerns they have about the prescribed information and test plans.

Where a person has questions concerning their obligations to comply with a notice, believes they may be out of compliance, or would like to request a PNC, they are encouraged to discuss their particular circumstances with the program by contacting the Substances Management Information Line (eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca [email], 1-800-567-1999 [toll-free in Canada], and 819-938-3232 [outside of Canada]).

The Act is enforced in accordance with the publicly available Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. In instances of non-compliance, consideration is given to factors such as the nature of the alleged violation, potential harm, intent, and history of compliance.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 19673

Significant New Activity Notice

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have assessed information in their possession in respect of the substance 2-propenenitrile, reaction products with alkylenediamine, hydrogenated, N-benzyl derivs., Confidential Accession No. 19155-3, under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Act,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that subsection 81(4) of that Act applies with respect to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

The Honourable Catherine McKenna

Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Transitional provisions

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Significant New Activity Notice.)

Description

This Significant New Activity (SNAc) Notice is a legal instrument adopted by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (the Act) to apply the SNAc provisions of that Act to 2-propenenitrile, reaction products with alkylenediamine, hydrogenated, N-benzyl derivs., Confidential Accession Number 19155-3. The Notice is now in force. It is therefore mandatory to meet all the requirements of the Notice should a person intend to use the substance for a significant new activity as defined in the Notice.

A SNAc Notice does not constitute an endorsement from the Department of the Environment or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

Applicability of the Significant New Activity Notice

The Notice requires that any person (individual or corporation) engaging in a SNAc in relation to 2propenenitrile, reaction products with alkylenediamine, hydrogenated, N-benzyl derivs., Confidential Accession Number 19155-3, submit a Significant New Activity notification (SNAN) containing all of the information prescribed in the Notice at least 90 days prior to using the substance for the SNAc.

In order to address the human toxicity concerns, the Notice requires notification in relation to the use of the substance in the manufacture of consumer products or cosmetics when the concentration of the substance is greater than or equal to 1% by weight in the product matrix. For example, notification is required if a person plans to use the substance to manufacture a consumer product such as coatings, adhesives, sealants and caulks and the concentration of the substance is greater than or equal to 1% by weight.

The Notice targets any use of the substance in consumer products to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) applies, or in a cosmetic as defined in the Food and Drugs Act (FDA). A SNAN is required 90 days before the use of the substance in a SNAc.

Activities not subject to the Notice

The following activities are not significant new activities.

Uses of the substance that are regulated under the Acts of Parliament listed in Schedule 2 of the Act, including the Pest Control Products Act, the Fertilizers Act and the Feeds Act are excluded from the Notice. The Notice also does not apply to transient reaction intermediates, impurities, contaminants, partially unreacted materials, or in some circumstances to items such as, but not limited to, wastes, mixtures, or manufactured items. However, it should be noted that individual components of a mixture may be subject to notification under the provisions of the Act. See subsection 81(6) and section 3 of the Act, and section 3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers for additional information.

Activities involving the use of the substance as a research and development substance or a site-limited intermediate or an export-only product are excluded from the Notice. The terms “research and development substance” and “site-limited intermediate substance” are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Information to be submitted

The Notice sets out the information that must be provided to the Minister 90 days before the day on which the substance 2-propenenitrile, reaction products with alkylenediamine, hydrogenated, N-benzyl derivs., Confidential Accession Number 19155-3, is used for a SNAc. The Department of the Environment and the Department of Health will use the information submitted in the SNAN to conduct risk assessments within 90 days after the complete information is received.

The earlier assessment of the substance identified potential concerns associated with uses of the substance in consumer products. This aliphatic amine UVCB (substance of unknown or variable composition, complex reaction product, or biological material) compound can potentially cause skin sensitization in humans. The SNAc Notice is issued to gather toxicity information in the event that the substance is used in any consumer products to ensure that the substance will undergo further assessment before SNAcs are undertaken.

The information requirements in the Notice relate to general information in respect of the substance, details surrounding its use, exposure information, and toxicity to human health. Some of the information requirements reference the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Additional guidance on preparing a SNAN can be found in section 1.3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers.

Transitional provision

A transitional provision is included in the Notice to facilitate compliance by persons who may already have imported or manufactured up to 1 000 kg of the substance and started activities with it. The Notice comes into force immediately. However, if the substance is used to manufacture consumer products to which the CCPSA applies, or in a cosmetic as defined in the FDA, a threshold of more than or equal to 1 000 kg per calendar year applies and a concentration equal to or greater than 1% by weight applies for the period between the publication of the Notice and November 24, 2019. On November 25, 2019, the threshold for this significant new activity will be lowered to 0 kg per calendar year and the concentration will remain greater than or equal to 1% by weight.

Compliance

When assessing whether or not a substance is subject to SNAc provisions, a person is expected to make use of information in their possession or to which they may reasonably have access. This means information in any of the notifier’s offices worldwide or other locations where the notifier can reasonably have access to the information. For example, manufacturers are expected to have access to their formulations, while importers or users of a substance, mixture, or product are expected to have access to import records, usage information and the relevant safety data sheets (SDSs), formerly “material safety data sheets” (MSDSs). More details are contained in the Regulations Amending the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) and the Export of Substances on the Export Control List Regulations for reference to this amendment.

Although an SDS is an important source of information on the composition of a product, it should be noted that the goal of the SDS is to protect the health of workers in the workplace from specific hazards of chemical products. Therefore, an SDS may not list all product ingredients that may be subject to a SNAc notice due to human health or environmental concerns. Any person requiring more detailed information on product composition is encouraged to contact their supplier.

If any information becomes available that reasonably supports the conclusion that the substance 2-propenenitrile, reaction products with alkylenediamine, hydrogenated, N-benzyl derivs., Confidential Accession Number 19155-3, is toxic or capable of becoming toxic, the person who is in possession of or that has knowledge of the information and is involved in activities with the substance is obligated, under section 70 of the Act, to provide that information to the Minister without delay.

A company can submit a SNAN on behalf of its clients. For example, in cases where a person takes possession or control of a substance from another person, they may not be required to submit a SNAN, under certain conditions, if their activities are covered by an original SNAN submitted by the person from whom they obtained the substance. The Substances Management Advisory Note, “Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,” provides more detail on this subject.

Under section 86 of the Act, any person who transfers the physical possession or control of a substance subject to a SNAc notice must notify all persons to whom the physical possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the notice, including the obligation to notify the Minister of any SNAc and to provide all the required information outlined above.

A pre-notification consultation (PNC) is recommended for notifiers who wish to consult with the program during the planning or preparation of their SNAN to discuss any questions or concerns they have about the prescribed information and test plans.

Where a person has questions concerning their obligations to comply with a notice, believes they may be out of compliance, or would like to request a PNC, they are encouraged to discuss their particular circumstances with the program by contacting the Substances Management Information Line (eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca [email], 1-800-567-1999 [toll-free in Canada], and 819-938-3232 [outside of Canada]).

The Act is enforced in accordance with the publicly available Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. In instances of non-compliance, consideration is given to factors such as the nature of the alleged violation, potential harm, intent, and history of compliance.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of five epoxides and glycidyl ether substances, specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas beta-caryophyllenoxide and alkyl (C12-C13) glycidyl ether are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on three substances pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act and on the two remaining substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that these substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time under section 77 of the Act for the two substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Act.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on the remaining three substances at this time.

Notice is also hereby given that options are being considered for follow-up activities on allyl glycidyl ether (AGE), o-cresol glycidyl ether (o-CGE) and triglycidyl isocyanurate (TGIC) to track changes in exposure to the substances.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

Comments can also be submitted to the Minister of the Environment, using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of five epoxides and glycidyl ethers

Pursuant to sections 68 and 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on 5 of 12 substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the epoxides and glycidyl ethers group. These 5 substances were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns. Seven of the 12 substances were determined to be of low concern through other approaches, and proposed decisions for these substances are provided in separate reports.footnote 1, footnote 2 Accordingly, this screening assessment addresses the 5 substances listed in the table below.

Substances in the epoxides and glycidyl ethers group

CAS RN footnote 3

Domestic Substances List name

Common name (abbreviation)

Table 1 Notes

Table 1 Note a

This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA, but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns.

Return to table 1 note a referrer

Table 1 Note b

This substance is a UVCB (unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products or biological materials).

Return to table 1 note b referrer

106-92-3 table 1 note a

Oxirane, [(2-propenyloxy)methyl]-

Allyl glycidyl ether (AGE)

1139-30-6

5-Oxatricyclo[8.2.0.04,6]dodecane, 4,12,12-trimethyl-9-methylene-, [1R-(1R,4R,6R,10S)]-

Beta-caryophyllenoxide (BCPO)

2210-79-9 table 1 note a

Oxirane, [(2-methylphenoxy)methyl]-

o-Cresol glycidyl ether (o-CGE)

2451-62-9 table 1 note a

1,3,5-Triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione, 1,3,5-tris(oxiranylmethyl)-

Triglycidyl isocyanurate (TGIC)

120547-52-6 table 1 note b

Oxirane, mono[(C12-13-alkyloxy)methyl] derivs.

Alkyl (C12-C13) glycidyl ether
(C12-C13 AGE)

With the exception of BCPO, which is naturally present in some plant species and essential oils, the substances in the epoxides and glycidyl ethers group are not known to occur naturally. All of the substances in the epoxides and glycidyl ethers group were included in surveys conducted pursuant to section 71 of CEPA. AGE, BCPO, o-CGE, and TGIC were not reported to be manufactured in Canada above the reporting threshold of 100 kg in 2011. Imported quantities of AGE, BCPO, o-CGE, and TGIC were 100 to 10 000 kg, <100 kg, 79 000 kg, and 407 000 kg, respectively, in the 2008 or 2011 reporting year. C12-C13 AGE was not reported to be manufactured or imported above the reporting threshold in 2011.

The ecological risks of the substances in the epoxides and glycidyl ethers group were characterized using the Ecological Risk Classification of organic substances (ERC). The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified the substances in the epoxides and glycidyl ethers group as having a low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from AGE, BCPO, o-CGE, TGIC and C12-C13 AGE. It is proposed to conclude that AGE, BCPO, o-CGE, TGIC and C12-C13 AGE do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

AGE is used as a reactive diluent in epoxy resin systems; however, its applications are primarily as an industrial intermediate and no products available to consumers were identified. Exposure of the general population to AGE from environmental media is expected to be minimal due to the low quantities reported in commerce and the rapid degradation of the substance in the environment. On the basis of this information, the risk to human health for the general population from exposure to AGE is low.

BCPO is reported to be used in cosmetic products as a fragrance ingredient. It is not an approved food additive in Canada; however, the substance may be present in foods as a flavouring agent as it is reported to be used as such in the United States and Europe. Exposure of the general population to BCPO from environmental media is expected to be minimal due to the low quantities reported to be in commerce. Adverse effects on the liver and the mesenteric lymphatic system observed in laboratory studies were identified as the critical effects for risk characterization. Comparison of estimates of exposure from the use of cosmetic products containing BCPO with the critical effect level resulted in margins of exposure that were considered adequate to address uncertainties in the exposure and health effects databases. Estimated intakes derived by both the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives and the European Food Safety Authority for the use of BCPO as a food flavouring agent are several orders of magnitude lower than the critical effect level for this substance, and the risk to human health from exposure to BCPO from its use as a food flavour is considered low.

o-CGE is used predominantly as a reactive diluent in the formulation of epoxy resins and was identified in a limited number of do-it-yourself products including a flooring adhesive, a floor coating for garages, a two-component epoxy resin, and an arts and crafts/hobby resin. General population exposure to o-CGE from environmental media is expected to be negligible. Carcinogenicity observed in laboratory studies conducted with structurally related substances as well as non-cancer effects observed in short-term studies with o-CGE (e.g. nasal mucosa inflammation) were identified as the critical effects for risk characterization. Comparison of estimates of exposure to o-CGE from the use of certain do-it-yourself products to critical effect levels resulted in margins of exposure that were considered adequate to address uncertainties in the exposure and health effects databases.

The predominant use of TGIC is as a cross-linking agent in the formulation of polyester resins used in the manufacture of polyester powder coatings. Exposure of the general population to TGIC from environmental media is expected to be minimal as the substance is expected to be rapidly hydrolyzed if released. Exposure from contact with painted manufactured items is not expected as the substance would be fully cross-linked and cured. On the basis of this information, the risk to human health from exposure to TGIC for the general population is expected to be low.

C12-C13 AGE was identified in a limited number of do-it-yourself products including a two-component epoxy adhesive, an epoxy filler sold in tube packaging, and in a multi-purpose low-viscosity epoxy resin, used to seal and coat various surfaces. Exposure to C12-C13 AGE from environmental media is not expected. The critical effects associated with short-term dermal exposure are limited to reversible site-of-contact effects, and the risk to human health from dermal exposure to C12-C13 from the use of these products is considered low. Comparison of estimates of inhalation exposure to C12-C13 AGE with levels associated with adverse effects in laboratory animals resulted in margins of exposure that were considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in the exposure and health effects databases.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that AGE, BCPO, o-CGE, TGIC, and C12-C13 AGE do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that the five substances in the epoxides and glycidyl ethers group do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

Consideration for follow-up

While exposure of the general population or the environment to these substances is not of concern at current levels, AGE, o-CGE and TGIC are considered to have health effects of concern. Therefore, there may be concern for human health if exposure levels to the substances were to increase. Follow-up activities to track changes in human exposure are under consideration.

Stakeholders are encouraged to provide, during the 60-day public comment period on the draft screening assessment, any information pertaining to these substances that may help inform the choice of follow-up activities. This could include information on new or planned import, manufacture or use of these substances, or information not previously submitted to the ministers.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of five substances in the Poly(bios) Group specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas oxidized starch identified in the annex below is a substance identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on tannins, humic acids, SEGAC and GEGAC pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act and on oxidized starch pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action at this time under section 77 of the Act for the substance identified under subsection 73(1) of the Act.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on the remaining four substances at this time.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of the Poly(bios) Group

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of five substances referred to collectively as the Poly(bios) Group. Substances in this group were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNfootnote 4), their Domestic Substances List (DSL) names and their acronyms are listed in the table below.

Substances in the Poly(bios) Group

CAS RN

DSL name

Acronyms

Table 2 Notes

Table 2 Note c

The substance bearing this CAS RN was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA but was included in this assessment, as it was considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns.

Return to table 2 note c referrer

1401-55-4 table 2 note c

Tannins

-

1415-93-6 table 2 note c

Humic acids

-

65996-62-5

Starch, oxidized

-

56780-58-6 table 2 note c

Starch, 2-hydroxy-3-(trimethylammonio)propyl ether, chloride

SEGAC

65497-29-2 table 2 note c

Guar gum, 2-hydroxy-3-(trimethylammonio)propyl ether, chloride

GEGAC

These five substances were previously evaluated under the Second Phase of Polymer Rapid Screening, which identified tannins, humic acids and oxidized starch as having low potential to cause ecological harm, and SEGAC and GEGAC as having low potential to cause harm to human health. However, they were identified as requiring further assessment for potential human health or ecological risks on the basis of structural alerts and/or uses associated with significant consumer exposure. The present assessment further elaborates on the potential for tannins, humic acids, and oxidized starch to cause harm to human health, and for SEGAC and GEGAC to cause ecological harm, in order to reach an overall conclusion under section 64 of CEPA as to whether they pose a risk to the environment or human health.

Tannins occur naturally in the environment. In Canada, they are reported to be used in the food, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, fabric, and textile industries. It has been reported that volumes between 100–1 000 kg of tannic acid (the most commonly used tannin) were either imported or manufactured in Canada in 2014. Tannins do not contain any reactive functional groups or other structural features associated with human health concerns. The toxicological information available indicates that they have a low hazard profile for human health. Tannins are naturally occurring in a number of botanical sources and tannic acid can be used as a food additive. Therefore, direct exposure is expected; however, indirect exposure through drinking water is negligible.

Humic acids occur naturally in the environment. In Canada, they are reported to be used in cosmetics and natural health products. Import volumes of up to 100 000 kg of humic acids have been reported for the year 2014. Humic acids do not contain any reactive functional groups or other structural features associated with human health concerns. The toxicological information available indicates that it has a low hazard profile for human health. Humic substances are naturally occurring in the environment; however, both direct and indirect exposure to humic acids is expected to be negligible.

Oxidized starch does not occur naturally in the environment. In Canada, it is reported to be used in the paper and textile industries. It has been reported that greater than 10 million kilograms of oxidized starch were either imported or manufactured in Canada in 2014. The reactive aldehyde groups present in oxidized starch are found to be at very low amounts and do not present a human health hazard. No other toxicological concerns were identified therefore oxidized starch has a low hazard profile for human health. Oxidized starch is used as a food ingredient; therefore, direct exposure from the diet is expected.

SEGAC is a cationic modified starch compound that does not occur naturally in the environment. According to available information, SEGAC, is used in the pulp and paper industries and between 100 000 and 1 000 000 kilograms were imported into Canada in 2014. On the basis of the use pattern, and exposure pattern, SEGAC is not expected to pose a risk to the environment.

GEGAC is manufactured by modifying guar gum with cationic functionality. It does not occur naturally in the environment. Up to 100 000 kilograms of GEGAC were imported into Canada in 2014 and reported to be used in personal care products.footnote 5 Considering the use patterns and hazard profile, GEGAC is not expected to pose a risk to the environment.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is low risk of harm to the environment from tannins, humic acids, oxidized starch, SEGAC, and GEGAC. It is concluded that tannins, humic acids, oxidized starch, SEGAC, and GEGAC do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that tannins, humic acids, oxidized starch, SEGAC, and GEGAC do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that tannins, humic acids, oxidized starch, SEGAC and GEGAC do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Proposed guidance on the use of enterococci bacteria as indicators in Canadian drinking water supplies

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of proposed guidance on the use of enterococci bacteria as indicators in Canadian drinking water supplies. The proposed guidance document is available from November 23, 2018, to January 25, 2019, on the Consulting with Canadians website. Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of Health written comments on the proposed document. Comments must be sent to the Secretariat of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water, either by email at HC.water-eau.SC@canada.ca, or by regular mail to the Water and Air Quality Bureau, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, A.L. 4903D, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

November 15, 2018

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Executive summary

Enterococci are a bacteriological indicator of faecal contamination that can be used in assessing drinking water safety. They can be included in a drinking water monitoring program to provide information on the quality of the source water, the adequacy of treatment and the delivery of safe drinking water to the consumer.

Health Canada recently completed its review of enterococci in drinking water. The guidance document describes the significance, sampling and treatment considerations for the use of enterococci as a bacteriological indicator in the context of drinking water quality and safety.

During its spring 2017 meeting, the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water reviewed the guidance document on enterococci in Canadian drinking water supplies and gave its endorsement for this document to undergo public consultation.

Assessment

Enterococci tests can be a useful tool to complement the information provided by the microbiological parameters that are traditionally used in drinking water monitoring, namely E. coli and total coliforms. Enterococci may persist longer and be carried further than E. coli in the environment. Enterococci may therefore indicate faecal contamination in water that might otherwise be missed. Adding enterococci to a monitoring program may provide enhanced information to the bacteriological monitoring programs already in place. The intent of the document is to provide stakeholders, such as provincial and territorial regulatory authorities, decision makers, water system owners and consultants, with guidance on the use of enterococci in a monitoring program with the objectives of identifying and minimizing microbiological risks in Canadian water systems.

International considerations

Drinking water quality guidelines, standards and/or guidance established by foreign governments or international agencies may vary due to the science available at the time of assessment, as well as the use of different policies and approaches. Enterococci are widely used for assessing water quality in many parts of the world, but are not used as frequently as other indicators such as E. coli. The World Health Organization states that the detection of enterococci should lead to consideration of further action, but has not established a guideline value. The Drinking Water Directive of the European Union includes enterococci as a parameter for audit monitoring, with a standard of zero enterococci per 100 mL of water, but does not require frequent monitoring. The Australian Drinking Water Guidelines do not include a guideline value for enterococci, but indicate that enterococci can be used to assess source water quality, the adequacy of treatment, post-treatment ingress into the distribution system and the delivery of safe drinking water at consumer taps. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Ground Water Rule lists enterococci as one of three state-specified bacterial indicators of faecal contamination, alongside E. coli and coliphages.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Proposed guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for barium

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of a proposed guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for barium. The proposed technical document for this guideline is available from November 23, 2018, to February 15, 2019, on the Consulting with Canadians website. Any person may, within 75 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of Health written comments on the proposed document. Comments must be sent to the Secretariat of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water, either by email at HC.water-eau.SC@canada.ca, or by regular mail to the Water and Air Quality Bureau, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, A.L. 4903D, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

November 15, 2018

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Proposed guideline

A maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 2.0 mg/L (2 000 µg/L) is proposed for total barium in drinking water.

Executive summary

Barium occurs in various compounds in the environment either naturally or from human activities. While the main use of barium is as a drilling fluid additive in oil and gas exploration, it is also used as a contrast agent in X-ray diagnostic tests and in a wide array of products, including plastics, rubbers, paint, glass, carpets, ceramics, sealants, furniture, fertilizers and pesticides.

Naturally occurring barium can be found in most types of rocks and can enter surface and groundwater by leaching and eroding from sedimentary rocks. A total of over 20 radioactive barium isotopes, with various degrees of stability and radioactivity, have been identified in the environment. However, the focus of the technical document is limited to barium’s chemical properties.

The guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with barium in drinking water. It assesses new studies and approaches and takes into consideration the availability of appropriate treatment technology. Based on this review, the proposed guideline for barium in drinking water is a maximum acceptable concentration of 2.0 mg/L.

During its fall 2017 meeting, the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water reviewed the guideline technical document for barium and gave its endorsement for this document to undergo public consultation.

Health effects

The International Agency for Research on Cancer has not classified barium as to its carcinogenicity. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency concluded that barium is not likely to be carcinogenic to humans from exposure through ingestion; other international agencies agree that there is no evidence showing that exposure to barium through ingestion could cause cancer.

Studies have found links between the ingestion of barium and unwanted effects on blood pressure in animals and humans. However, adverse effects on the kidneys have shown the strongest association with chronic oral exposure to barium. In humans, effects have been observed on the kidneys following exposure to high levels of barium in poisoning events; in animals, kidney effects are considered the most sensitive health effect associated with long-term ingestion of barium, especially in mice, the most sensitive species. Consequently, the proposed MAC of 2.0 mg/L has been established to be protective of the general population, based on studies of kidney effects in mice.

Exposure

Canadians are primarily exposed to barium through food and drinking water, with food being the main source of exposure. Concentrations of barium in food items in Canada vary widely, depending on the food item and the soil conditions. Barium levels can also vary greatly in Canadian drinking water, depending on geological formations and anthropogenic activities surrounding the source water. Intake of barium from drinking water is not expected to occur through either skin contact or inhalation.

Analysis and treatment

Several analytical methods are available for the analysis of total barium in drinking water at levels well below the proposed MAC. The total barium in a water sample includes its dissolved and particulate forms. Therefore, if the two forms are measured separately, the two concentrations must be added before comparison with the MAC.

Although conventional coagulation treatment is not effective for barium removal, there are several effective methods for its removal from municipal drinking water supplies. These technologies include lime softening and ion exchange softening, as well as high-pressure membrane separation processes such as reverse osmosis and nanofiltration. Other control strategies include switching to a new source, blending, and interconnecting with another water system.

At the residential level, there are certified residential treatment devices for removing barium from drinking water. Drinking water treatment technologies able to effectively remove barium include ion exchange and reverse osmosis. It is important to note that reverse osmosis systems should be installed only at the point of use, as the treated water may be corrosive to internal plumbing components.

International considerations

Drinking water quality guidelines, standards and/or guidance established by foreign governments or international agencies may vary due to the science available at the time of assessment, as well as the use of different policies and approaches, such as the choice of key study, and the use of different consumption rates, body weights and allocation factors.

Other organizations have set guidelines or regulations pertaining to the concentration of barium in drinking water. The World Health Organization established a guideline for drinking-water quality of 1.3 mg/L for barium. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standard and the guideline established by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council are both set at 2.0 mg/L. The European Union has not established a limit for barium in drinking water.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Proposed guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for chloramines

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of a proposed guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for chloramines. The proposed technical document for this guideline is available from November 23, 2018, to January 25, 2019, on the Consulting with Canadians website. Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of Health written comments on the proposed document. Comments must be sent to the Secretariat of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water, either by email at HC.water-eau.SC@canada.ca, or by regular mail to the Water and Air Quality Bureau, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, A.L. 4903D, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

November 15, 2018

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Proposed guideline

It is not considered necessary to establish a guideline for chloramines in drinking water, based on the low toxicity of monochloramine at concentrations found in drinking water. Any measures taken to limit the concentration of chloramines or their by-products in drinking water supplies must not compromise the effectiveness of disinfection.

Executive summary

The term “chloramines” refers to inorganic and organic chloramines. The technical document focuses on inorganic chloramines, which consist of monochloramine, dichloramine and trichloramine. Unless specified otherwise, the term “chloramines” will refer to inorganic chloramines throughout the notice.

Chloramines are found in drinking water mainly as a result of treatment, either intentionally as a disinfectant in the distribution system, or unintentionally as a by-product of the chlorination of drinking water in the presence of natural ammonia. As monochloramine is more stable and provides longer-lasting disinfection, it is commonly used in the distribution system, whereas chlorine is more effective at disinfecting water in the treatment plant. Chloramines have also been used in the distribution system to help reduce the formation of common disinfection by-products such as trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. However, chloramines also react with natural organic matter to form other disinfection by-products.

All drinking water supplies should be disinfected, unless specifically exempted by the responsible authority. Disinfection is an essential component of public drinking water treatment; the health risks associated with disinfection by-products are much less than the risks from consuming water that has not been adequately disinfected. Most Canadian drinking water supplies maintain a chloramine residual below 4 mg/L in the distribution system.

The guideline technical document focuses on the health effects related to exposure to chloramines in drinking water supplies, and takes into consideration taste and odour concerns. It does not review the benefits or the processes of chloramination, nor does it assess the health risks related to exposure to by-products formed as a result of the chloramination process. The Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water has determined that an aesthetic objective is not necessary, since levels commonly found in drinking water are within an acceptable range for taste and odour, and since protection of consumers from microbial health risks is paramount.

During its fall 2017 meeting, the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water reviewed the guideline technical document for chloramines and gave its endorsement for this document to undergo public consultation.

Health effects

The International Agency for Research on Cancer and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have classified monochloramine as “not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans” based on inadequate evidence in animals and in humans. The information on dichloramine and trichloramine is insufficient to establish any link with unwanted health effects in animals or in humans. These forms are also less frequently detected in drinking water. Studies have found minimal effects in humans and animals following ingestion of monochloramine in drinking water, with the most significant effect being decreased body weight gain in animals. However, this effect is due to reduced water consumption caused by taste aversion.

Exposure

Human exposure to chloramines primarily results from their presence in treated drinking water; monochloramine is usually the predominant chloramine. Intake of monochloramine and dichloramine from drinking water is not expected through either skin contact or inhalation. Intake of trichloramine from drinking water might be expected from inhalation; however, it is relatively unstable in water and is only formed in specific conditions (at very high chlorine to ammonia ratios or under low pH), which are unlikely to occur in treated drinking water. Consequently, exposure to chloramines by inhalation and skin contact during showering or bathing is expected to be negligible.

Analysis and treatment

Although there are no methods approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for the direct measurement of chloramines, there are several such methods for the measurement of total and free chlorine. The results from these methods can be used to calculate the levels of combined chlorine (or chloramines). However, it is also important to determine the levels of organic chloramines to avoid overestimating the disinfectant residual.

For municipal plants, a change in disinfectant (such as changing the disinfectant residual to chloramine) can impact water quality. When considering conversion to chloramine, utilities should assess the impacts on their water quality and system materials, including the potential for corrosion, nitrification and the formation of disinfection by-products.

Chloramines may be found in drinking water at the treatment plant, in the distribution system and in premises plumbing. For consumers who find the taste of chloramines objectionable, there are residential drinking water treatment devices that can decrease concentrations of chloramines in drinking water. However, removal of the disinfectant residual is not recommended.

International considerations

Drinking water quality guidelines, standards and/or guidance established by foreign governments or international agencies may vary due to the science available at the time of assessment, as well as the use of different policies and approaches, such as the choice of key study, and the use of different consumption rates, body weights and allocation factors.

Several organizations have set guidelines or regulations for chloramines in drinking water, all based on the same study, which found no health effects at the highest dose administered.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has established a maximum residual disinfectant level of 4 mg/L for chloramine, recognizing the benefits of adding a disinfectant to water on a continuous basis and of maintaining a residual to control for pathogens in the distribution system. The World Health Organization and the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council both established a drinking water guideline of 3 mg/L.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Filing of claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 12(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of the filing of the claims for exemption listed below.

In accordance with subsection 12(2) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, affected parties, as defined, may make written representations to the screening officer with respect to the claim for exemption and the safety data sheet (SDS) or label to which it relates. Written representations must cite the appropriate registry number, state the reasons and evidence upon which the representations are based and be delivered within 30 days of the date of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to the screening officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau, 269 Laurier Avenue West, 8th Floor (4908-B), Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

Véronique Lalonde
Chief Screening Officer

On February 11, 2015, the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) was amended, and the Controlled Products Regulations (CPR) and the Ingredient Disclosure List were repealed and replaced with the new Hazardous Products Regulations (HPR). The revised legislation (HPA/HPR) is referred to as WHMIS 2015 and the former legislation (HPA/CPR) is referred to as WHMIS 1988. Transitional provisions allow compliance with either the WHMIS 1988 or WHMIS 2015 for a specified period of time.

The claims listed below seek an exemption from the disclosure of supplier confidential business information in respect of a hazardous product; such disclosure would otherwise be required under the provisions of the relevant legislation.

Claimant

Product Identifier

Subject of the Claim for Exemption

Registry Number

Clean Harbours

Paratene S627

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

12254

Baker Hughes Canada Company

FORSA™ SCW600 SCALE INHIBITOR

C.i. and C. of one ingredient C. of one ingredient

12255

Arkema Canada Inc.

LUPEROX® RTM

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

12256

Afton Chemical Corporation

HiTEC® 3250 Performance Additive

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12257

Clean Harbours

Paratene D731

C.i. and C. of four ingredients

12258

Halliburton Group Canada

CL-28M CROSSLINKER

C.i. of one ingredient

12259

Schlumberger Canada Limited

Winterized Microemulsion B524W

C.i. and C. of three ingredients C. of three ingredients

12260

Afton Chemical Corporation

HiTEC 65016 Fuel Additive

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12261

Baker Hughes Canada Company

SULFIX™ 9658G ADDITIVE

C.i. and C. of one ingredient C. of three ingredients

12262

Momentive Performance Materials

ECC3051S

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12263

Galata Chemicals (Canada) Inc.

MARK® 7005

C.i. and C. of one ingredient C.i. of three ingredients

12264

Baker Hughes Canada Company

PETROSWEET™ HSW2017 SCAVENGER

C.i. and C. of two ingredients C. of two ingredients

12265

Calfrac Well Services Ltd.

DWP-421

C.i. and C. of three ingredients

12266

Baker Hughes Canada Company

JETTISON™ 3005 SOLIDS RELEASE AGENT

C.i. and C. of three ingredients

12267

Rockwater Energy Solutions, Inc.

FRAQ SLIQ PFR-9400

C.i. of five ingredients

12268

Galata Chemicals (Canada) Inc.

MARK® 7130

C.i. of four ingredients

12269

3M Canada Company

3M™ Rigid Parts Repair Adhesive Part A (Accelerator) PN 55885

C.i. and C. of one ingredient C.i. of four ingredients

12270

Ingevity Corporation, North Charleston, South Carolina

QPR®-H2C

C.i. and C. of ten ingredients

12271

LiquidPower Speciality Products Inc.

EP(TM) 2000 Flow Improver

C.i. of four ingredients

12272

Exaltexx Inc.

F-AMA 3203

C.i. and C. of five ingredients

12273

Integrity Bio-Chem

CM3500

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

12274

Integrity Bio-Chem

CM3550

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

12275

The Chemours Canada Company

Ti-Pure™ R-796+ Titanium Dioxide Pigment

C.i. and C. of one ingredient C. of two ingredients

12276

Multi-Chem Production Chemicals Co.

MC MXI 5-4689

C.i. of two ingredients

12277

Akzo Nobel Surface Chemistry LLC

Tetrameen 2HT

C.i. of one ingredient

12278

Baker Hughes Canada Company

FORSA™ SCW4483 SCALE INHIBITOR

C.i. and C. of one ingredient C. of two ingredients

12279

Afton Chemical Corporation

HiTEC® 2607 Performance Additive

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

12280

King Lee Technologies

Pretreat Plus 0100 Concentrate

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

12281

Note: C.i. = chemical identity and C. = concentration

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Barrington-Foote, The Hon. Brian A.

2018-1342

Court of Appeal for Saskatchewan

 

Judge of Appeal

 

Her Majesty’s Court of Queen’s Bench for Saskatchewan

 

Judge ex officio

 

Bélanger-Richard, Marie-Claude

2018-1376

Court of Queen’s Bench of New Brunswick, Family Division

 

Judge

 

Court of Appeal of New Brunswick

 

Judge ex officio

 

Boone, Daniel, Q.C.

2018-1348

Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador

 

Judge

 

Court of Appeal of Newfoundland and Labrador

 

Judge ex officio

 

Court of Appeal of Alberta

 

Justices of Appeal

 

Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta

 

Judges ex officio

 

Court of Appeal for the Northwest Territories

 

Judges

 

Court of Appeal of Nunavut

 

Judges

 

Hughes, The Hon. Elizabeth A.

2018-1349

Pentelechuk, The Hon. Dawn

2018-1350

Her Majesty’s Court of Queen’s Bench for Saskatchewan

 

Judges

 

Hildebrandt, Brenda R., Q.C.

2018-1343

Richmond, Charlene M.

2018-1344

Revil, Anne Marlene Jeanne

2018-1336

Immigration and Refugee Board

 

Full-time member

 

Superior Court of Justice in and for the Province of Ontario

 

Judges

 

Court of Appeal for Ontario

 

Judges ex officio

 

Boucher, Susanne

2018-1347

Chozik, Erika

2018-1346

Doi, Michael T.

2018-1351

Stribopoulos, The Hon. James

2018-1345

Vaillancourt, The Hon. Jean-Sébastien

2018-1375

Superior Court of Quebec for the district of Montréal

 

Puisne Judge

 

Zarnett, Benjamin

2018-1374

Court of Appeal for Ontario

 

Justice of Appeal

 

Superior Court of Justice of Ontario

 

Judge ex officio

 

November 15, 2018

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Director

Canada Council for the Arts

 

Chairperson

Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology

 

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Post Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Commercial Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Nature

 

Chairperson

Canadian Race Relations Foundation

 

Regional Member (Quebec)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

 

Chairperson and Member

Canadian Statistics Advisory Council

 

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Defense Construction (1951) Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Destination Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Export Development Canada

 

Chief Executive Officer

The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited

 

Commissioner

Financial Consumer Agency of Canada

 

Director

Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation

November 30, 2018

Director (Federal)

Hamilton Port Authority

 

Commissioners and Chairperson

International Joint Commission

 

Members (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Librarian and Archivist of Canada

Library and Archives of Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Marine Atlantic Inc.

 

Chairperson

National Arts Centre Corporation

 

Vice-Chairperson

National Arts Centre Corporation

 

Chief Executive Officer

National Capital Commission

 

Director

National Gallery of Canada

 

Chairperson

National Research Council of Canada

 

President

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

 

Commissioner of Competition

Office of the Commissioner of Competition

 

Ombudsperson

Office of the Ombudsperson for National Defence and Canadian Forces

 

Veterans’ Ombudsman

Office of the Veterans’ Ombudsman

 

Director (Federal)

Oshawa Port Authority

 

Chairperson

Pacific Pilotage Authority

 

Panel Member

Payment in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel

 

Master of the Mint

Royal Canadian Mint

 

Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson

Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee

 

Director (Federal)

Saguenay Port Authority

 

Chairperson

Telefilm Canada

 

Member (Marine and Medical)

Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

VIA Rail Canada Inc.