Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 152, Number 43: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

October 27, 2018

DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT
EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE REGULATIONS

Resolution

Pursuant to section 66.5 of the Employment Insurance Act, notice is hereby given that the employment insurance premium rate for the year 2019 is $1.62 per $100 of insurable earnings.

Pursuant to sections 76.07 and 76.35 of the Employment Insurance Regulations, notice is hereby given that the employment insurance premium reduction rate for the year 2019 for residents of Quebec covered under the Quebec Parental Insurance Plan is $0.37. Therefore, the employment insurance premium rate for residents of Quebec is $1.25 per $100 of insurable earnings.

Canada Employment Insurance Commission

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Interim Order Amending the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations

Whereas Canada ratified the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer to phase down the consumption and production of hydrofluorocarbons;

And whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health believe that the hydrofluorocarbons listed in Schedule 1 to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 footnote a are not adequately regulated and that immediate action is required to deal with a significant danger to the environment or to human life or health;

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 94(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 footnote a, makes the annexed Interim Order Amending the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations.

Gatineau, October 9, 2018

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Interim Order Amending the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations

Amendment

1 The description of E in subsection 65.06(2) of the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations footnote 1 is replaced by the following:

E is 18 008 795 tonnes of CO2 equivalent.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This note is not part of the interim order.)

Proposal

The Interim Order Amending the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations (the interim order), made pursuant to subsection 94(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), corrects the Canadian hydrofluorocarbons (HFC) consumption baseline value to accurately reflect information obtained by Environment and Climate Change Canada (the Department) following the coming into force of the recent amendments to the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations (the Regulations).

Objective

The objective of the interim order is to deal with a significant danger to the environment by correcting the consumption baseline value that is used to determine the quantities that can enter Canada under the HFC phase-down process starting on January 1, 2019. As the corrected number is lower than the value currently set out in the Regulations, this change avoids at least 10.6 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent of HFC being released into the environment than was previously allowed by the Regulations. This change will further reduce Canadian greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, in order to help limit increases in global average temperatures. It will also contribute to Canada’s international obligations to combat climate change.

Background

HFCs are manufactured chemicals that were introduced on the global market as replacements for ozone-depleting substances, such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs). In Canada, HFCs are not manufactured, but are imported in bulk and found in imported and manufactured products, such as domestic appliances, refrigeration and air-conditioning systems, motor vehicle air-conditioning systems, foam products, and aerosols. HFCs enter the environment due to leakage during assembly, usage, and disposal of these products.

HFCs are contributing to a global warming trend that is associated with climate change. HFCs are potent GHGs with global warming potentials hundreds to thousands of times greater than those of CO2.

HFCs are toxic under CEPA because they constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. Using 19 118 651 tonnes of CO2 equivalent as the HFC consumption baseline (this is what is currently in the Regulations) would allow, over the next 18 years, the consumption of approximately 10.6 million additional tonnes of CO2 equivalent of HFC. This would not be adequately protective of the environment, considering climate change constitutes an important environmental challenge internationally, putting populations (and especially vulnerable populations) and ecosystems at risk. Changes in temperature and precipitation can impact natural habitats, agriculture and food supplies, and rising sea levels can threaten coastal communities. HFC emissions are projected to increase at a faster rate than economic growth due to increased use, as they replace ozone-depleting substances that have been phased out.

Most HFCs have relatively short lifespans in the atmosphere compared to CO2 and other longer-lived GHGs. Atmospheric levels of HFCs thus respond relatively quickly to changes in emissions, since HFCs are removed quickly from the atmosphere. As a result of the potency and short lifespan of HFCs, reducing emissions has the potential to bring significant near-term climate benefits.

The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (Montreal Protocol) is an international treaty designed to protect the ozone layer. The Montreal Protocol obligates Parties to phase out the manufacture and consumption of those substances known to be responsible for ozone depletion. The phase-out is achieved through a legally binding timetable established by the Parties with the ultimate goal of complete elimination. Given that many ozone-depleting substances are also potent GHGs, the Montreal Protocol has contributed to climate change mitigation by averting the emissions of 135 billion tonnes of CO2 equivalent.

In October 2016, Parties to the Montreal Protocol, including Canada, adopted an HFC phase-down amendment (the Kigali Amendment) wherein developed countries will begin in 2019 to gradually phase down HFCs to 15% of calculated baseline levels by 2036. In November 2017, Canada and 21 other Parties ratified the Kigali Amendment helping to bring the amendment into force on January 1, 2019. As of August 29, 2018, 43 Parties had ratified the Kigali Amendment.

Ratification of the Kigali Amendment obliges Canada to phase down HFCs in accordance with a specific reduction schedule. The HFC phase-down starts on January 1, 2019, and will follow the steps below (Table 1). Other obligations include the establishment of a licensing system and reporting requirements.

Table 1. HFC phase-down steps under the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol

Year

Reduction from Baseline (%)

2019

10

2024

40

2030

70

2034

80

2036

85

Under the Kigali Amendment, the Canadian HFC consumption baseline will be calculated using data that will be provided by Canada in March 2019. In order for Canada to meet its international obligations, the baseline established under the Kigali Amendment must match the baseline included in the domestic regulations that implement the HFC phase-down.

On October 18, 2017, the Government of Canada published the Regulations Amending the Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations (the Amendments) to implement Canada’s obligation to phase down HFCs in accordance with the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol. The Amendments came into force on April 16, 2018, and established the HFC phase-down system and set the Canadian HFC consumption baseline at 19 118 651 tonnes of CO2 equivalent.

The Canadian HFC consumption baseline was calculated based on data received from companies who responded to mandatory surveys issued under section 71 of CEPA. footnote 2, footnote 3, footnote 4 The surveys gathered import, manufacture and export information, which was used to calculate the total amounts of HFCs, in CO2 equivalent, consumed in Canada between 2011 and 2015.

Rationale

On May 1, 2018, following the coming into force of the Amendments, consumption allowance estimates were sent to companies who were entitled to a 2019 consumption allowance according to the data received by the Department. Consumption is defined as the sum of quantities manufactured and imported minus quantities exported. The allowance estimates were determined in accordance with the Regulations. First, the base consumption for each company was calculated in accordance with subsection 65.06(2), as follows:

Base consumption = C/D x E

where

C =
the company’s average HFC consumption for 2014 and 2015 (expressed as tonnes of CO2 equivalent)
D =
the average total Canadian HFC consumption for 2014 and 2015 (expressed as tonnes of CO2 equivalent)
E =
the Canadian HFC baseline value, which is 19 118 651 tonnes of CO2 equivalent

Subsequently, each base consumption value was reduced by 10% to reflect the first step in the HFC phase-down that commences on January 1, 2019. The allowance estimates correspond to the amount of new bulk HFCs a company would be allowed to consume (import + manufacture −export) during a calendar year starting on January 1, 2019.

Following the distribution of these estimates, some companies confirmed that they failed to respond, or submitted incorrect data in response to the three mandatory notices on HFCs. The incorrect data has therefore resulted in the Regulations containing the incorrect Canadian HFC consumption baseline value.

After corrections were made to the data, it is clear that Canada’s baseline is significantly lower than the numerical baseline value set out in the Regulations, and, as a result, HFCs are not adequately regulated. There is a significant danger to the environment if the Canadian HFC consumption baseline value is not corrected.

With the use of the correct lower baseline value, significant HFC consumption and subsequent emissions would be avoided when compared to the use of the existing number in the Regulations, thereby reducing the potential negative effects of the additional emissions that can contribute to climate change.

Implications

It is anticipated that the interim order would have a positive impact on the environmental outcomes of the Regulations by correcting the Canadian HFC consumption baseline to 18 008 795 instead of 19 118 651 tonnes of CO2 equivalent currently in the Regulations. Using the 19 118 651 tonnes of CO2 equivalent baseline included in the Regulations would allocate an excess of approximately 10.6 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent to Canadian allowance holders and would not be adequately protective of the environment, as this may impact climate more than what the correct baseline would allow. By publishing an interim order, Canada would be taking an immediate action to deal with a significant danger to the environment in protecting the environment by implementing the first step of the HFC phase-down starting January 1, 2019.

The interim order temporarily modifies the operation of the Regulations, with respect to granting HFC consumption allowances for 2019 and the following years, by establishing a correct Canadian HFC consumption baseline, and allows Canada to maintain its international commitment to phase down HFCs starting January 1, 2019, with a 10% reduction from the calculated baseline.

Action is required to correct the Canadian HFC consumption baseline value so that consumption allowances can be issued to qualifying companies. The 2019 allowances are needed well in advance to facilitate business certainty and supply chain continuity. Companies also need regulatory certainty to make informed decisions as soon as possible for the next year. The development of an amendment to regulations made under section 93 of CEPA can take at least two years, and it would not be possible for the final amendment to be in force before the end of 2018. Therefore, an interim order was deemed the most appropriate instrument to take immediate action.

Consultations

The issue being addressed by this interim order was first communicated to the Department by industry representatives through emails, letters and phone conversations following the distribution of the allowance estimates on May 1, 2018. A number of companies identified errors in their data, which enabled the Department to make necessary corrections and determine the correct HFC consumption allowances for 2019.

On July 5, 2018, companies received a letter notifying them that their final allowance will be available by November 1, 2018, and that it is expected to be lower by 3.0% to 3.5% than the original estimate provided on May 1, 2018. The companies did not express concerns about this reduction, even if they may have to slightly increase efforts to either reduce HFC consumption or move towards other types of HFCs that have a lower global warming potential. They also received a new estimate on September 10, 2018, after the corrections to the numbers were made. Communication with the approximately 20 impacted companies from the chemicals, foams, refrigeration and air conditioning, and aerosols sectors continues on an as-needed basis.

Contact

Nicole Folliet
Director
Chemicals Production Division
Environment and Climate Change Canada
351 Saint-Joseph Boulevard, 19th Floor
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H3
Telephone: 819-938-4228
Email: ec.gestionhalocarbures-halocarbonsmanagement.ec@canada.ca

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Ministerial Condition No. 19602

Ministerial condition

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information pertaining to the substance 1,2-ethanediol, 1,2-dibenzoate, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 94-49-5;

And whereas the ministers suspect that the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (the Act),

The Minister of the Environment, pursuant to paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Act, hereby permits the manufacture or import of the substance in accordance with the conditions of the following annex.

Nancy Hamzawi
Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Conditions

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. The following definitions apply in these ministerial conditions:

“notifier” means the person who has, on May 24, 2018, provided to the Minister of the Environment the prescribed information concerning the substance, in accordance with subsection 81(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

“substance” means 1,2-ethanediol, 1,2-dibenzoate, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 94-49-5.

2. The notifier may import the substance in accordance with the present ministerial conditions.

Restrictions

3. The notifier may import the substance for use only as a component in organic peroxide formulations intended for industrial use as

4. The notifier shall transfer the physical possession or control of the substance only to the person who will use it in accordance with item 3.

Record-keeping requirements

5. (1) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records, with any documentation supporting the validity of the information contained in these records, indicating

(2) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records mentioned in subsection (1) at their principal place of business in Canada, or at the principal place of business in Canada of their representative, for a period of at least five years after they are made.

Other requirements

6. The notifier shall inform any person to whom they transfer the physical possession or control of the substance, in writing, of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. The notifier shall obtain, prior to the first transfer of the substance or waste, written confirmation from this person that they were informed of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. This written confirmation shall be maintained at the principal place of business in Canada of the notifier or of their representative in Canada for a period of at least five years from the day it was received.

Coming into force

7. The present ministerial conditions come into force on October 12, 2018.

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Ardito-Toffolo, Caterina

2018-1243

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

 

Temporary member

 

Connolley, Amanda Leanne

2018-1242

Immigration and Refugee Board

 

Full-time member

 

Harris, Jeffrey F.

2018-1269

Her Majesty’s Court of Queen’s Bench for Manitoba

 

Puisne Judge

 

Her Majesty’s Court of Queen’s Bench for Manitoba (Family Division)

 

Puisne Judges

 

Horst, Annette J. R.

2018-1271

Petersen, Connie F.

2018-1270

Jackson, Veronica

2018-1268

Supreme Court of British Columbia

 

Judge

 

Lang, Elisabeth

2018-1233

Superintendent of Bankruptcy

 

October 19, 2018

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Senators called

Her Excellency the Governor General has been pleased to summon to the Senate of Canada, by letters patent under the Great Seal of Canada bearing the date of October 11, 2018:

October 19, 2018

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as a fingerprint examiner:

Martin McKenna

Ottawa, October 15, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following persons of the Saint John Police Force as fingerprint examiners:

Connor Bodechon
James Smith

Ottawa, October 15, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Thunder Bay Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Jesse Lepere

Ottawa, October 15, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following persons of the Thunder Bay Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

James Bryson
Michael Sweitzer
Nancy Tillberg

Ottawa, October 15, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Québec Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

By the Minister of Transport

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport for the Québec Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule B of the letters patent sets out the federal immovables managed by the Authority;

WHEREAS on January 22, 2018, the Court of Appeal of Quebec (2018 QCCA 72) declared that Mr. Sylvio Thibeault is the owner of certain immovables (shoreline and submerged water lots) situated in a sector of the basin of the River Chaudière, pursuant to a deed of sale executed before a notary, on April 30, 2013, and registered with the Québec land registry, registration division of Lévis, under number 19 912 229;

WHEREAS Mr. Thibeault acquired another immovable (shoreline and submerged water lot), pursuant to a deed of sale executed before a notary, on January 14, 2016, and registered with the Québec land registry, registration division of Lévis, under number 22 081 376;

WHEREAS, given the above, the said immovables are no longer held by Her Majesty in right of Canada, Schedule B of the Authority’s letters patent must be modified accordingly;

WHEREAS, pursuant to section 9(1) of the Act, the Minister wishes to issue, on his own initiative, supplementary letters patent to the Authority modifying Schedule B of its letters patent, and pursuant to section 9(2) of the Act, notice of the proposed changes to the letters patent was given in writing to the board of directors of the Authority;

AND WHEREAS the Minister of Transport is satisfied that the amendments to the letters patent are consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

DESCRIPTION

Immovables (shoreline and submerged water lots) of irregular shapes situated in the basin of the River Chaudière, in territory without a cadastral survey, acquired by Mr. Sylvio Thibeault, pursuant to deeds of sale executed before a notary and registered in the Québec land registry, registration division of Lévis, under numbers 19 912 229 and 22 081 376.

ISSUED this 16th day of October, 2018.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

GLOBAL AFFAIRS CANADA

Final environmental assessment of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership

The Government of Canada has concluded negotiations for a Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). The CPTPP is a free trade agreement among Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam. Further to the notice of intent to conduct an environmental assessment and the publication of the initial environmental assessment report, Global Affairs Canada has completed a final environmental assessment based on negotiated outcomes.

The Government of Canada is committed to sustainable development. Mutually supportive trade, investment and environmental policies can contribute to this objective. To this end, trade negotiators endeavour to consider potential environmental effects of trade negotiations. Strategic environmental assessments of trade negotiations are critical to this work. The purpose of this final environmental assessment report is to document the projected outcomes of CPTPP negotiations as they relate to the environment.

Strategic environmental assessments of trade negotiations are prepared pursuant to the 2010 Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals.

For more information, please consult the following:

All interested parties are invited to submit comments on the final environmental assessment of the CPTPP by November 25, 2018.

Comments can be sent by email or mail to

Email: EAconsultationsEE@international.gc.ca

Environmental Assessment Secretariat
Trade Agreements and NAFTA Secretariat (TCT)
Global Affairs Canada
125 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0G2

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Director

Canada Council for the Arts

 

Chairperson

Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology

 

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Post Corporation

 

Director

Canada Revenue Agency

October 31, 2018

Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

Chairperson

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

 

Vice-President

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Nature

 

Chairperson

Canadian Race Relations Foundation

 

Regional Member (Quebec)

Canadian
Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

 

Chairperson and Member

Canadian Statistics Advisory Council

 

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Defense Construction (1951) Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Export Development Canada

 

Chief Executive Officer

The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited

 

Commissioner

Financial Consumer Agency of Canada

 

Director (Federal)

Hamilton Port Authority

 

Deputy Chairperson and Member, Immigration Appeal Division (1) and Refugee Appeal Division (1)

Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada

October 30, 2018

Commissioners and Chairperson

International Joint Commission

 

Members
(appointment
to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Marine Atlantic Inc.

 

Chairperson

National Arts Centre Corporation

 

Vice-Chairperson

National Arts Centre Corporation

 

Chief Executive Officer

National Capital Commission

 

Director

National Gallery
of Canada

 

Chairperson

National Research Council of Canada

 

Commissioner of Competition

Office of the Commissioner of Competition

 

Ombudsperson

Office of the Ombudsperson for National Defence and Canadian Forces

 

Veterans’
Ombudsman

Office of the
Veterans’ Ombudsman

 

Director (Federal)

Oshawa Port Authority

 

Panel Member

Payment in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel

 

Master of the Mint

Royal Canadian Mint

 

Director (Federal)

Saguenay Port Authority

 

Member

Social Security Tribunal of Canada

October 29, 2018

Chairperson

Telefilm Canada

 

Member (Marine and Medical)

Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

VIA Rail Canada Inc.

 

BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at September 30, 2018

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

17.3

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

8,605.5

 

Advances

 

Other receivables

3.9

 
   

8,609.4

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

26,222.8

 

Government of Canada bonds

78,787.1

 

Other investments

409.9

 
   

105,419.8

Property and equipment

 

581.3

Intangible assets

 

41.3

Other assets

 

242.1

 

114,911.2


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

88,065.4

Deposits

Government of Canada

22,371.1

 

Members of Payments Canada

250.2

 

Other deposits

3,119.1

 
   

25,740.4

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

 

603.5

   

114,409.3

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Investment revaluation reservefootnote *

371.9

 
   

501.9

114,911.2

I declare that the foregoing statement is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, October 15, 2018

Carmen Vierula
Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accountant

I declare that the foregoing statement is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, October 15, 2018

Stephen S. Poloz
Governor