Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 152, Number 37: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

September 15, 2018

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

FISHERIES ACT, (R.S.C. (1985), C. F-14)

Canada-Quebec Agreement on Acts and Regulations Applicable to the Municipal and Provincial Wastewater Systems in Quebec

Notice is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment has concluded with Quebec the annexed agreement entitled “Accord Canada-Québec relatif aux lois et règlements applicables aux ouvrages municipaux et provinciaux d’assainissement des eaux usées du Québec” (“Canada-Quebec Agreement on Acts and Regulations Applicable to the Municipal and Provincial Wastewater Systems in Quebec”). The Minister of the Environment is publishing this Agreement further to subsection 4.1(4) of the Fisheries Act. The French version of this Agreement is the only official version.

For further information, please contact Caroline Blais, Forest Products and Fisheries Act, Environment and Climate Change Canada, 351 Saint-Joseph Boulevard, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, ww-eu@ec.gc.ca (email).

Ottawa, September 23, 2018

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

CANADA-QUEBEC AGREEMENT ON ACTS AND REGULATIONS APPLICABLE TO MUNICIPAL AND PROVINCIAL WASTEWATER SYSTEMS IN QUEBEC

BETWEEN

THE GOVERNMENT OF QUEBEC, represented by the Minister of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change and the Minister responsible for Canadian Relations and the Canadian Francophonie, hereinafter referred to as “Quebec,” on the one hand,

AND

THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA, represented by the Minister of the Environment, hereinafter referred to as “Canada,” on the other hand,

Hereinafter individually referred to as the “Party” and collectively as the “Parties.”

WHEREAS the Parties support the environmental and human health protection objectives of the Canada-wide Strategy for the Management of Municipal Wastewater Effluent developed under the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment, even though Quebec has not adopted the strategy;

WHEREAS this Agreement applies to municipal and provincial wastewater systems in Quebec, as defined in article 2;

WHEREAS the Parties wish to avoid regulatory and administrative duplication concerning municipal and provincial wastewater systems in Quebec;

WHEREAS on June 29, 2012, Canada adopted the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations (“WSER,” as defined in article 2 of this Agreement);

WHEREAS on December 11, 2013, Quebec adopted the Regulation respecting municipal wastewater treatment works (“RRMWTW,” as defined in article 2 of this Agreement);

WHEREAS pursuant to subsection 22(3) of the Environment Quality Act, the establishment, alteration or extension of a sewer system requires prior authorization from the Minister of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change and is governed by the Regulation respecting the application of the Environment Quality Act;

WHEREAS Quebec has developed an instruction note which requires that provincial wastewater systems be governed by rules as stringent as those established under the RRMWTW;

WHEREAS upon the coming into effect of this Agreement, Quebec will include the requirements set out in the instruction note in authorizations issued by the province in response to an initial application for authorization or an application for amendment of an authorization already granted for provincial wastewater systems;

WHEREAS only three provincial wastewater systems are designed to collect an average daily volume of 100 m3 or more annually, whereas none of these systems currently collect an average daily volume of 100 m3 or more annually, and whereas these systems will be subject to the Agreement once the requirements of the instruction note are reflected in the authorizations;

WHEREAS Division III.1 of Chapter IV of Title I of the Environment Quality Act, including sections 31.32 to 31.41, stipulates that regulatory measures may be applied to municipal wastewater systems subject to the RRMWTW, notably through a depollution attestation, which sets out the conditions, restrictions and prohibitions applicable to the operation of municipal wastewater systems issued by the Minister of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change.

WHEREAS as indicated in the instruction note, discharge requirements more stringent than those of the RRMWTW may be established by Quebec for provincial wastewater systems when justified by more restrictive environmental discharge objectives which take into consideration the carrying capacity of the receiving environment;

WHEREAS none of the wastewater systems in Quebec include a chlorination system, such as a gaseous chlorine, sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide or chlorination-dechlorination system, to disinfect effluent;

WHEREAS if an operator of a wastewater system intends to install a chlorination system, it must obtain the prior authorization of the Minister of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change pursuant to section 22 of the Environment Quality Act;

WHEREAS in reviewing such an application, the Minister of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change shall consider the impacts on the environment as well as Quebec’s department position on chlorination systems used in wastewater treatment as posted on the department’s website, which stipulates that only wastewater disinfection methods that do not have adverse effects on aquatic life and do not generate by-products that have adverse health effects are permitted and that, therefore, chlorination systems (including gaseous chlorine, sodium hypochlorite and chlorine dioxide systems) and chlorination-dechlorination systems are prohibited;

WHEREAS in addition to the wastewater treatment standards established in the RRMWTW, various powers are conferred on the Minister of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change to manage the emission, deposit, release and discharge of contaminants into the environment, namely the power set out in section 20 of the Environment Quality Act;

WHEREAS the Parties agree to enter into this Agreement recognizing that certain provisions of the Environment Quality Act, the RRMWTW, the Regulation respecting the application of the Environment Quality Act and those of the WSER are aimed at achieving equivalent effects for municipal and provincial wastewater systems;

WHEREAS Canada may enter into this Agreement with Quebec under section 4.1 of the Fisheries Act, and in this case, the Governor in Council may, by order under section 4.2, declare that certain provisions of the WSER do not apply in the province of Quebec with respect to municipal and provincial wastewater systems in Quebec to which this Agreement applies;

WHEREAS section 4.3 of the Fisheries Act stipulates that the Minister of the Environment shall, at the end of each fiscal year, prepare and submit to each house of Parliament a report on the administration of sections 4.1 and 4.2 in that fiscal year;

WHEREAS section 13 of the RRMWTW and the instruction note stipulate that the operator of municipal or provincial wastewater systems must submit to the Minister of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change an annual report that contains a summary of the results of the analyses of samples collected, pH measurements, toxicity tests and overflow measurements made under the RRMWTW. This summary must indicate any cases of non-compliance with the discharge and overflow standards. The information contained in such a report is considered public;

WHEREAS section 118.4 of the Environment Quality Act stipulates that every person or municipality has the right to obtain from the Department of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change any information on the quantity, quality or concentration of contaminants released by a source of contamination or on the presence of a contaminant in the environment;

WHEREAS section 118.5 of the Environment Quality Act stipulates that the Minister of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change shall keep a register in which information on applications for authorizations, on the authorizations themselves and on the depollution attestations is made accessible to the public;

WHEREAS section 118.5.3 of the Environment Quality Act stipulates that the information contained in the registers kept by the Minister is public and is posted on the website of the Department of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change;

NOW THEREFORE THE PARTIES AGREE AS FOLLOWS:

  1. PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES

    The purpose of this Agreement is to recognize that certain provisions of the Environment Quality Act and of the RRMWTW as well as of the WSER are aimed at achieving equivalent effects.

    Therefore, to avoid regulatory and administrative duplication concerning municipal and provincial wastewater systems in Quebec, there are reasonable grounds to remove the application of the WSER to municipal wastewater systems subject to the RRMWTW so that only the RRMWTW and the Environment Quality Act apply to such systems. There are also reasonable grounds to remove the application of the WSER to provincial wastewater systems for which the requirements of the instruction note will be included in the authorizations issued by Quebec in response to an initial application for authorization or an application for amendment of an authorization already granted, since these systems are subject to the Environment Quality Act and to the Regulation respecting the application of the Environment Quality Act.

  2. DEFINITIONS

    For the purposes of this Agreement:

    • — “Environment Quality Act” means the Environment Quality Act (CQLR, c. Q-2).
    • — “Fisheries Act” means the Fisheries Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. F-14), as amended.
    • — “municipal wastewater systems” means the wastewater systems that are covered by section 2 of the application section of the WSER and to which the RRMWTW also applies.
    • — “provincial wastewater systems” means the wastewater systems that are covered by section 2 of the application section of the WSER that are owned or operated by the Quebec government and for which an authorization containing the requirements of the instruction note has been issued by Quebec in response to an initial application for authorization or an application for amendment of an authorization already granted following the coming into effect of this Agreement.
    • — “municipal and provincial wastewater systems” means municipal wastewater systems and provincial wastewater systems.
    • — “final discharge point,” as defined in the WSER, means the point, other than an overflow point, of a wastewater system beyond which its owner or operator no longer exercises control over the quality of the wastewater before it is deposited as effluent in water or a place.
    • — “instruction note” means the instruction note applicable to provincial wastewater systems entitled “Application des exigences du Règlement sur les ouvrages municipaux d’assainissement des eaux usées (ROMAEU) aux ouvrages d’assainissement des eaux usées appartenant au gouvernement du Quebec ou exploités par ce dernier” [Application of the requirements of the Regulation respecting municipal wastewater treatment works (RRMWTW) to the wastewater systems owned or operated by the Government of Quebec], and posted on the website of the Department of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change on July 12, 2018.
    • — “Regulation respecting the application of the EQA” means the Regulation respecting the application of the Environment Quality Act (CQLR, c. Q-2, r.3), made under the Environment Quality Act (CQLR, c. Q-2) on October 28, 2015.
    • — “WSER” means the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations (SOR/2012-139), made under the Fisheries Act and published in Part II of the Canada Gazette on July 18, 2012, as well as any amendments to those Regulations.
    • — “RRMWTW” means the Regulation respecting municipal wastewater treatment works (CQLR, c. Q-2, r. 34.1) made under the Environment Quality Act (CQLR, c. Q-2) and published in Part II of the Gazette officielle du Québec on December 27, 2013.
    • — “wastewater system” means a wastewater system as defined in section 1 of the WSER.
  3. ACHIEVEMENT OF EQUIVALENT EFFECTS

    • 3.1 The Parties mutually recognize that the WSER and the RRMWTW, which govern municipal wastewater systems, are designed to achieve equivalent effects, since the following criteria have been met:
      • (a) the RRMWTW creates legally binding obligations under Quebec law;
      • (b) the RRMWTW covers municipal wastewater systems to which the WSER also apply;
      • (c) both the RRMWTW and the WSER establish equivalent baseline standards with respect to effluent quality at the final discharge point, risk-based implementation timelines, effluent control criteria, monitoring and follow-up mechanisms, and responses to violations; and
      • (d) municipal wastewater systems are likely to comply with the requirements of the RRMWTW, and enforcement and penalty mechanisms are in place for cases where the requirements are not met.
    • 3.2 The Parties recognize that in the case of provincial wastewater systems, the authorizations issued by Quebec in response to an initial application for authorization or an application for amendment of an authorization already granted for provincial wastewater systems following the coming into effect of this Agreement and the WSER are designed to achieve equivalent effects, since the following criteria have been met:
      • (a) the authorizations are governed by the Environment Quality Act and the Regulation respecting the application of the Environment Quality Act;
      • (b) the instruction note contains requirements that establish baseline standards equivalent to the WSER with respect to effluent quality at the final discharge point, effluent control criteria, and monitoring and follow-up mechanisms;
      • (c) Quebec will include the requirements of the instruction note in the authorizations that will be issued in response to an initial application for authorization or an application for amendment of an authorization already granted for provincial wastewater systems following the coming into effect of this Agreement;
      • (d) provincial wastewater systems are likely to comply with the requirements of the authorizations, and enforcement and penalty mechanisms are in place for cases where the requirements are not met.
  4. INFORMATION SHARING

    • 4.1 Quebec shall forward the following information to Canada by June 30 of each year, for the preceding year, in a format agreed to by both Parties:
      • (a) The number of operators of municipal and provincial wastewater systems that are submitting their reports by the prescribed deadlines;
      • (b) The names of any new municipal or provincial wastewater systems that have commenced operation, or in the case of provincial systems, whose authorization has been amended. A summary of any authorization being assessed and a copy of any authorization that was issued by Quebec in response to an initial application for authorization or an application for amendment of an authorization already granted during the year preceding the report submission period;
      • (c) A list of the municipal and provincial wastewater systems that are already in compliance with the effluent quality requirements of the RRMWTW, which are equivalent to the requirements of the WSER, and of wastewater systems that must meet those requirements by 2020;
      • (d) For each municipal and wastewater system, the average values of the five-day carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand, the average values of suspended solids, and the total volume of effluent that was discharged, measured as per the applicable monitoring frequency;
      • (e) The number of compliance verification activities and the number of enforcement measures, including inspections, verifications other than inspections, notices of non-compliance, ministerial orders, administrative monetary penalties, injunctions and convictions; and
      • (f) How the information collected pursuant to section 118.5 of the Environment Quality Act was made public.
    • 4.2 As part of the administration of this Agreement, the Parties also agree as follows:
      • (a) In the event that Canada applies subsection 4.2(3) of the Fisheries Act by revoking an order made under subsection 4.2(1), Canada shall make every reasonable effort to provide Quebec with six (6) months’ notice prior to the revocation.
      • (b) In the event that either Party wishes to amend or update its regulations or any other regulations applicable to municipal and provincial wastewater systems, it agrees to provide written notice to the other Party at least six (6) months before publishing the draft regulations.
      • (c) Quebec agrees to inform Canada by written notice of its intention to amend or update its legislation or the instruction note referred to in this Agreement at least six (6) months before the publication of the draft legislation or the online posting of the amended instruction note.
      • (d) The Parties agree to inform each other of the contact persons responsible for administering this Agreement and of any change in their designation. Any notice under this Agreement must be sent to the following addresses:

        For Quebec:

        Assistant Deputy Minister for Water and Air Expertise and Policies
        Department of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change
        675 René-Lévesque Boulevard East, 30th Floor
        Québec, Quebec G1R 5V7

        For Canada:

        Assistant Deputy Minister
        Environmental Stewardship Branch
        Environment Canada
        351 Saint-Joseph Boulevard
        Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3

  5. ACCESS TO INFORMATION AND PROTECTION OF PERSONAL INFORMATION
    The Parties recognize that their respective access to information and privacy legislation will apply to all information received under this Agreement.

  6. INTERPRETATION AND APPLICABLE LEGISLATION
    • 6.1 Nothing in this Agreement shall be construed as affecting the authority, rights, privileges, jurisdiction or powers conferred on the Parties by the Constitution of Canada or by any other instrument.
    • 6.2 This Agreement shall be interpreted and governed in accordance with the laws in force in Quebec.
  7. AMENDMENTS
    This Agreement may be amended by the mutual written consent of its signatories.

  8. EXECUTION, REVIEW AND EVALUATION, AND TERMINATION OF THE AGREEMENT
    • 8.1 This Agreement shall be effective on the date of the last signature.
    • 8.2 This Agreement will be reviewed and evaluated every five (5) years following the date on which it becomes effective. The Parties may conduct a joint evaluation. A report of each evaluation will be made available to each of the Parties.
    • 8.3 The Parties may terminate this Agreement at any time by providing at least six (6) months’ written notice to the other Party.
    • 8.4 The Parties have agreed to draft this Agreement in French.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF this Agreement is signed on behalf of Canada by the Minister of the Environment and on behalf of Quebec by the Minister of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change and by the Minister responsible for Canadian Relations and the Canadian Francophonie.

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Signed on this 23rd day of August 2018

GOVERNMENT OF QUEBEC

Isabelle Melançon
Minister of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change

Signed on this 6th day of August 2018

Jean-Marc Fournier
Minister responsible for Canadian Relations and the Canadian Francophonie

Signed on this 15th day of August 2018

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of two substances in the Nitro Musks Group — ethanone, 1-[4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-2,6-dimethyl-3,5-dinitrophenyl]- (musk ketone), CAS RN footnote 1 81-14-1, and benzene, 1-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3,5-dimethyl-2,4,6-trinitro- (musk xylene), CAS RN 81-15-2 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas ethanone, 1-[4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-2,6- dimethyl-3,5-dinitrophenyl]- (musk ketone) is a substance identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on benzene, 1-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3,5-dimethyl-2,4,6-trinitro- (musk xylene) pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act and on musk ketone pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action at this time under section 77 of the Act for these substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Act.

Notice is also given that options will be considered for follow-up activities to track changes in exposure to musk ketone and musk xylene.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca. Comments can also be submitted to the Minister of the Environment using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of two substances in the Nitro Musks Group

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of two substances referred to collectively as the Nitro Musks Group. Substances in this group were identified as priorities for assessment as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNs), their Domestic Substances List (DSL) names and their common names and initialisms are listed in the table below.

Substances in the Nitro Musks Group

CAS RN

Domestic Substances List name

Common name
(and initialism)

Table 1 Note
Table 1 Note a

This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA, but was included in this screening assessment as it was considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns.

Return to table 1 note a referrer

81-14-1

Ethanone, 1-[4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-2,6-dimethyl-3,5-dinitrophenyl]-

Musk ketone (MK)

81-15-2table 1 note a

Benzene, 1-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3,5-dimethyl-2,4,6-trinitro-

Musk xylene (MX)

Musk ketone and musk xylene do not occur naturally in the environment. They are used primarily as fragrances or fragrance ingredients. In Canada, musk ketone is found in some cosmetics, and musk xylene is found in some air fresheners, personal care products and cleaning products. On the basis of a survey conducted for 2008, musk ketone and musk xylene were both imported into Canada in quantities between 1 000 and 10 000 kg. In the same year, musk ketone and musk xylene were manufactured in quantities less than 100 kg and between 100 and 1 000 kg, respectively.

Musk ketone and musk xylene are principally released into wastewater after the use of products available to consumers and, therefore, can enter the environment through wastewater discharges to surface water. Releases to surface water via wastewater effluent could also occur as a result of the formulation of cleaning and personal care products, or when wastewater is generated from industrial operations such as cleaning. Releases to soil can also occur from the land application of biosolids derived from wastewater treatment.

Musk ketone and musk xylene have low water solubility and are very persistent chemicals in the environment, with an overall persistence in the order of years. When released to water, their primary mode of entry to the environment, they will biodegrade and hydrolyze slowly. The presence of musk ketone and musk xylene metabolites in effluents from wastewater treatment systems indicates that biodegradation during wastewater treatment could be occurring. Musk ketone and musk xylene are persistent in air, but significant releases to that medium are not expected. Musk ketone and musk xylene have, respectively, moderate and high bioaccumulation potential in aquatic organisms.

Empirical and modelled data suggest that both musk ketone and musk xylene are hazardous to aquatic organisms at relatively low concentrations. The few soil studies available indicate that musk ketone is not hazardous to soil-dwelling organisms. No soil studies were available for musk xylene, but, given the similarity of its structure and physical-chemical properties to musk ketone, it is assumed that effects on soil-dwelling organisms are similar.

Several studies that examined concentrations of musk ketone and musk xylene in Canadian wastewater treatment systems reported low but measurable concentrations in influents, effluents and biosolids. On the basis of the uses and quantities of musk ketone and musk xylene reported for 2008, as well as their expected release pathways and fate, three environmental exposure scenarios were developed: industrial releases to wastewater by formulators who use them; down-the-drain releases from products, available to consumers, that contain them; and the land application of biosolids that contain them. Risk quotients for the industrial release scenario, as well as quantitative risk analyses for the other two scenarios, indicate that levels in the environment of musk ketone and musk xylene are below levels of concern to aquatic and soil-dwelling organisms.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from musk ketone and musk xylene. It is proposed to conclude that musk ketone and musk xylene do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

In terms of potential effects on human health, decreased growth and food consumption and/or effects on the liver were observed in repeated dose laboratory studies conducted with musk ketone or musk xylene via the oral or dermal routes.

Both substances have been measured in environmental media in Canada. Estimates of exposure to Canadians were derived on the basis of levels of musk ketone and musk xylene in environmental media and in products used by consumers, such as cosmetics, air fresheners, and cleaning products. On the basis of a comparison of estimates of exposure to musk ketone and musk xylene with critical effect levels identified from laboratory studies, margins of exposure are considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in health effects and exposure data used to characterize risk.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that musk ketone and musk xylene do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that musk ketone and musk xylene do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

Consideration for follow-up

While exposure of the environment to musk ketone and musk xylene is not of concern at current levels, these substances are associated with ecological effects of concern. Therefore, there may be concern for the environment if exposure levels were to increase. Follow-up activities to track changes in exposure or commercial use patterns are under consideration.

Stakeholders are encouraged to provide, during the 60-day public comment period on the draft screening assessment, any information pertaining to the substances that may help inform the choice of follow-up activity. This could include information on new or planned import, manufacture or use of the substances, if the information has not previously been submitted to the ministers.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of 11 antimony-containing substances specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the 11 substances identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on these substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

Comments can also be submitted to the Minister of the Environment using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of 11 substances in the Antimony-containing Substances Group

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 11 substances referred to collectively as the Antimony-containing Substances Group. Substances in this group were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNs footnote 1), the Domestic Substances List (DSL) names and the common names of the substances are listed in the table below.

Substances in the Antimony-containing Substances Group

CAS RN

Domestic Substances List name

Common name

Table 2 Note
Table 2 Note a

The substance bearing this CAS RN is a UVCB (unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products, or biological materials).

Return to table 2 note a referrer

1314-60-9

Antimony oxide (Sb2O5)

Antimony pentoxide

1327-33-9 table 2 note a

Antimony oxide

Antimony oxide

1345-04-6

Antimony sulfide (Sb2S3)

Antimony sulfide

10025-91-9

Stibine, trichloro-

Antimony trichloride

15432-85-6

Antimonate (SbO31-), sodium

Sodium antimonate

15874-48-3

Phosphorodithioic acid, O,O-dipropyl ester, antimony(3+) salt

NA

15890-25-2

Antimony, tris(dipentylcarbamodithioato-S,S’)-, (OC-6-11)-

Antimony
diamyldithiocarbamate

15991-76-1

Antimony, tris[bis(2-ethylhexyl)carbamodithioato-S,S’]-, (OC-6-11)-

NA

28300-74-5

Antimonate(2-),
bis[µ-[2,3-di(hydroxyκO)butanedioato(4-)κO1O4]]di-, dipotassium, trihydrate, stereoisomer

Antimony potassium tartrate (APT)

29638-69-5

Antimonate (Sb2O74-), tetrapotassium

Potassium
antimonate

33908-66-6

Antimonate (Sb(OH)61-), sodium, (OC-6-11)-

Sodium
hexahydroxoantimonate

Abbreviations: NA, Not Available

Antimony (Sb) is a naturally occurring semi-metal. Results from surveys under section 71 of CEPA indicate that the 11 antimony-containing substances in this group were manufactured or imported above reporting thresholds in either 2008 or 2011. Uses and functions of these 11 substances include automobile manufacturing, corrosion inhibitor and anti-scaling agents, electronics and electrical manufactured items, flame retardants, intermediates, lubricants and greases, mordant in textile industry, non-ferrous smelting industry, paint and coatings, plating and surface treating agents, process regulators, rubber additive, solid separation agent and as an intermediate to produce other antimony compounds.

The ecological risks of the 11 substances in the Antimony-containing Substances Group were characterized using the Ecological Risk Classification of Inorganic Substances (ERC-I) approach. The ERC-I is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics considering both hazard and exposure in a weight of evidence. Hazard characterization in ERC-I included a survey of existing predicted no-effect concentrations (PNEC) and water quality guidelines, and the derivation of new PNEC values when required. Exposure profiling considered two approaches: predictive modelling using a generic near-field exposure model for each substance, and an analysis of measured concentrations collected by federal and provincial water quality monitoring programs using antimony concentrations as a conservative indicator of exposure for the 11 substances. Modelled and measured predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) were compared to PNECs, and multiple statistical metrics were computed and compared to decision criteria to classify the potential for causing harm to the environment. The ERC-I identified 11 antimony-containing substances as being of low ecological concern.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from the 11 antimony-containing substances. It is proposed to conclude that the 11 antimony-containing substances do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Canadians may be exposed to the 11 antimony-containing substances, which include both trivalent and pentavalent forms of antimony, as they contribute to levels of antimony in environmental media, food, drinking water and/or products available to consumers. To characterize exposure, intake estimates from environmental media, food, drinking water and uses of certain product types were derived. Food (including breast milk and beverages), and to a lesser extent, drinking water are the primary sources of daily intake for the general population. Breast-fed infants had the highest daily intakes. In addition, exposures of the general population to antimony were derived from contact with textiles, and use of toys and lubricants and greases. Dermal exposure to infants from contact with textiles resulted in the highest exposure estimates from products available to consumers.

The human health risk characterization for the 11 antimony-containing substances, which include both trivalent and pentavalent forms of antimony, was based upon the no-observed-adverse-effect level reported in an oral developmental toxicity study in laboratory animals. In addition, for the inhalation route, a route-specific risk characterization was conducted on the basis of lung inflammation in female rats. The resulting margins of exposure are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that the 11 antimony-containing substances do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that the 11 substances in the Antimony-containing Substances Group do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

FOOD AND DRUGS ACT

Interim Order Respecting Epinephrine Auto-injectors

Whereas the Minister of Health believes that immediate action is required to deal with a significant risk, direct or indirect, to health, safety or the environment;

Therefore, the Minister of Health, pursuant to subsection 30.1(1) footnote a of the Food and Drugs Act footnote b, makes the annexed Interim Order Respecting Epinephrine Auto-injectors.

Ottawa, August 27, 2018

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

Interim Order Respecting Epinephrine Auto-injectors

Interpretation

Definitions

1 The following definitions apply in this Interim Order.

epinephrine auto-injector means the epinephrine auto-injector, 0.15 mg or 0.3 mg dose, that is approved for sale in the United States and identified in that country by the brand name AUVI-Q® (epinephrine injection, USP). (auto-injecteur d’épinéphrine )

import has the same meaning as in subsection C.01A.001(1) of the Regulations. (importer)

Regulations means the Food and Drug Regulations. (Règlement)

Words and expressions

2 Unless the context requires otherwise, words and expressions used in this Interim Order have the same meaning as in the Regulations.

Purpose

Importation and sale

3 The purpose of this Interim Order is to permit the immediate importation and sale of epinephrine auto-injectors for use in the emergency treatment of life-threatening reactions in people who are at risk of or have a history of anaphylaxis.

Non-application

Importation

4 The provisions in the Regulations respecting importation do not apply to the importation of epinephrine auto-injectors if

Sale

5 The provisions in the Regulations respecting sale do not apply to the sale of an epinephrine auto-injector if the package of the epinephrine auto-injector that is sold is identified by a label that bears the NDC 60842-022-01 or 60842-023-01.

Part C of Regulations

6 Subject to sections 8 to 10, the provisions of Part C of the Regulations do not apply in respect of the epinephrine auto-injectors that are referred to in sections 4 and 5.

Requirement — Information Handout

Sale to consumer

7 A person must not sell an epinephrine auto-injector to a consumer unless the epinephrine auto-injector is accompanied by the information handout entitled Patient Information — Auvi-Q® (epinephrine injection) Auto-Injector For Allergic Emergencies (Anaphylaxis), published in 2018 by the Government of Canada on its website.

Application of Certain Provisions of the Regulations

Prohibition — sale

8 (1) Subject to subsection (2), the prohibition set out in section C.01.016 of the Regulations applies to the sale of the epinephrine auto-injectors that are referred to in sections 4 and 5.

Serious adverse drug reaction reporting

(2) The manufacturer of the epinephrine auto-injectors is required to comply only with the requirement set out in section C.01.017 of the Regulations.

Recalls

9 Section C.01.051 of the Regulations applies in respect of the epinephrine auto-injectors that are referred to in sections 4 and 5.

Activities ordered under section 21.32 of Act

10 Section C.01.053 of the Regulations applies in respect of the epinephrine auto-injectors that are referred to in sections 4 and 5.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This note is not part of the Interim Order.)

Proposal

The Interim Order Respecting Epinephrine Auto-injectors (the Interim Order) made by the Minister of Health on August 27, 2018 permits the immediate importation and sale of epinephrine auto-injectors, sold under the brand name AUVI-Q® (0.15 mg and 0.3 mg doses) and authorized by the United States Food and Drug Administration for use in the emergency treatment of life-threatening allergic reactions.

Objective

The objective of the Interim Order is to address the significant risk to the health of Canadians as a result of a shortage of epinephrine auto-injectors. This Interim Order represents one of a number of actions to help address a critical shortage of a life-saving drug.

Background

Epinephrine auto-injectors are life-saving drug delivery products used in the treatment of life-threatening allergic reactions in adults and children. The Canadian market for epinephrine auto-injectors is currently supplied by Pfizer Canada’s products EpiPen (0.3 mg dose) and EpiPen Jr (0.15 mg dose for children weighing between 33 and 66 pounds), manufactured by Meridian in the United States.

Supplies of EpiPens have been in shortage globally for several months due to manufacturing issues and it is unclear when the situation will be resolved. These issues have resulted in limited importation of supplies into Canada. Health Canada communicated publicly advising Canadians of the shortage in January and April 2018. On July 30, 2018, Health Canada further advised Canadians of the limited supply and likely depletion of the supply of EpiPens in the 0.3 mg format at pharmacies across Canada. Supplies of EpiPen Jr are also limited. The beginning of the school year has historically been a time of peak demand for the 0.15 mg dose. Moreover, the monthly demand for both doses is anticipated to increase significantly once product becomes available as people have been coping with limited supply for several months.

Health Canada has identified an alternative supplier, Kaléo Inc., whose epinephrine auto-injector product, AUVI-Q®, is authorized for sale in the United States. This product is comparable to another product by the same company that has been authorized by Health Canada previously, but that is not currently marketed in Canada. The most significant difference is that the U.S. product does not include French labelling and instructions. Health Canada will address this difference by requiring that instructions in English and French be provided to all consumers.

Implications

The Interim Order permits shipments of AUVI-Q® (0.15 mg and 0.3 mg doses) to be imported from the United States and sold in Canada.

In order to be sold to consumers in Canada, AUVI-Q® will need to be accompanied by the U.S. approved patient information, available in French and English on Health Canada’s website.

Most provisions in Part C of the Food and Drug Regulations will not apply to the importation or sale of AUVI-Q®. However, requirements relating to the reporting of serious adverse drug reactions, recall by the manufacturer, and the ministerial power to order a test or study will continue to apply. In addition, AUVI-Q® will be required to be imported by an importer holding an establishment licence issued by Health Canada.

Consultation

Representatives of provinces and territories and pharmacist associations have been made aware of the Minister’s intent to take action to address the shortage of epinephrine auto-injectors. They have indicated their support for the Interim Order as a mechanism to facilitate an improved supply of life-saving products for Canadians.

Contact

Kim Dayman-Rutkus
Director
Policy and Regulatory Strategies Directorate
Regulatory Operations and Regions Branch
Health Canada
Address Locator: 1907A
200 Eglantine Driveway
Jeanne Mance Building
7th Floor, Room 705A
Tunney’s Pasture
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0K9
Telephone: 613-954-6785
Email: kim.dayman-rutkus@canada.ca

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Filing of claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 12(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of the filing of the claims for exemption listed below.

In accordance with subsection 12(2) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, affected parties, as defined, may make written representations to the screening officer with respect to the claim for exemption and the safety data sheet (SDS) or label to which it relates. Written representations must cite the appropriate registry number, state the reasons and evidence upon which the representations are based and be delivered within 30 days of the date of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to the screening officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau, 269 Laurier Avenue West, 8th Floor (4908-B), Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

Véronique Lalonde
Chief Screening Officer

On February 11, 2015, the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) was amended, and the Controlled Products Regulations (CPR) and the Ingredient Disclosure List were repealed and replaced with the new Hazardous Products Regulations (HPR). The revised legislation (HPA/HPR) is referred to as WHMIS 2015 and the former legislation (HPA/CPR) is referred to as WHMIS 1988. Transitional provisions allow compliance with either WHMIS 1988 or WHMIS 2015 for a specified period of time.

The claims listed below seek an exemption from the disclosure of supplier confidential business information in respect of a hazardous product; such disclosure would otherwise be required under the provisions of the relevant legislation.

Claimant

Product Identifier

Subject of the Claim
for Exemption

Registry Number

Hexion Inc.

Structurfast(TM)
PHO-1036SA

C.i. and C. of
three ingredients

12208

PMC Organometallix

THERMOLITE 176

C.i. and C. of
two ingredients

12209

PMC Organometallix

THERMOLITE 140

C.i. and C. of
two ingredients

12210

3M Canada Company

All Weather Thermoplastic White Granular
with Elements

C. of one ingredient

12211

Multi-Chem Production Chemicals Co.

Legend™ LD-7350

C.i. of two ingredients

12212

Refined Technologies, Inc.

PetroBlast

C.i. and C. of
two ingredients

12213

Evonik Canada Inc.

Dynasylan® SIVO 408

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient

12214

Ingevity Corporation

INDULIN® FX

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient

12215

Baker Hughes Canada
Company

RE33937RBW WATER CLARIFIER

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient

12216

IPAC Chemicals Ltd.

IPAC 1888C

C.i. and C. of
three ingredients

12217

Nalco Canada ULC

NALCO® 64606

C.i. of one ingredient

12218

Baker Hughes Canada
Company

CRW323C CORROSION INHIBITOR

C.i. and C. of
two ingredients

12219

Nalco Canada ULC

PROE27040A

C.i. and C. of
two ingredients

12220

The Lubrizol Corporation

POWERZOL ™ ZG1130

C.i. of one ingredient
C. of two ingredients

12221

HP Inc.

CP834Series

C.i. of three ingredients

12222

HP Inc.

CP829Series

C.i. of three ingredients

12223

HP Inc.

CP833Series

C.i. of three ingredients

12224

The Lubrizol Corporation

ANGLAMOL® 99

C.i. and C. of
three ingredients

12225

The Lubrizol Corporation

ANGLAMOL® 6043

C.i. and C. of
three ingredients

12226

Nalco Canada ULC

NALCO® 64637

C.i. of two ingredients

12227

The Chemours Canada Company

Capstone™ ST-110

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient

12228

Ingevity Corporation

PERAL® 416

C.i. of one ingredient

12229

Power Service Products, Inc.

Clear Diesel Fuel and Tank Cleaner

C.i. of seven ingredients

12230

Cestoil Chemical Inc.

Northshore ST3425

C.i. of two ingredients

12231

Note: C.i. = chemical identity and C. = concentration

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following persons of the Lethbridge Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

William Allan Basso

Jason Darby

Ottawa, August 23, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the London Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Jeni Reynolds

Ottawa, August 23, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following persons of the Vancouver Police Department as fingerprint examiners:

Jeremiah Birnbaum

Lee Chipperfield

Amy Harris

Jacky Man Leong Lam

Russell Alexander Wardrop

Ottawa, August 23, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Winnipeg Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Jenn Masse

Ottawa, August 23, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following persons of the Lethbridge Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

Darren Birrell

Robin A. Klassen, No. 0396

Wes A. Olsen, No. 0394

Dwayne Smith

Stephen Veale

Ottawa, August 23, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as a fingerprint examiner:

Marlon Cortes

Ottawa, August 23, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

AERONAUTICS ACT

Notice of intent to amend the Canadian Aviation Regulations

Notice is hereby given that Transport Canada intends to introduce proposed amendments to the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) to address the impacts of Canadian aviation on climate change.

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), a United Nations specialized agency responsible for civil aviation, undertakes activities to address the environmental impact of aviation at the international level. Once agreement on environmental measures at ICAO is reached, it becomes the responsibility of each ICAO Member State, including Canada, to integrate these measures into its domestic regulatory framework. In June of 2018, the ICAO Council, after consultation with its Member States, approved the International Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPs) for the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA).

CORSIA is one way that Member States of ICAO are working to achieve carbon neutral growth for international aviation from 2020 onwards. It is a market-based measure requiring air operators, both commercial and private, to purchase eligible emission units (equivalent to one tonne of carbon dioxide) on the open market to offset a portion of their emissions.

Forecast advances in aircraft technology, operational improvements and a greater use of sustainable aviation fuels will not be enough to ensure carbon neutral growth from 2020 onwards. Since airlines fly internationally every day, having common international rules that ensure all airlines receive equal treatment is important.

CORSIA is included in Annex 16, Volume IV, to the Chicago Convention on International Civil Aviation. In Canada, CORSIA will be implemented in two phases. The first phase, and the subject of this notice, implements the monitoring, reporting and verification component of Annex 16, Volume IV, and comes into effect on January 1, 2019. This first phase sets the stage for the implementation of the second phase of CORSIA, which is the actual offsetting component of Annex 16, Volume IV, that comes into effect on January 1, 2021.

The outcome of Phase 1 of the monitoring, reporting and verification requirements in these amendments to the Regulations serves to help establish the global 2020 carbon dioxide emissions baseline for the international aviation sector from which ICAO will compute the global international aviation sector’s growth for a given year.

Proposed amendments

The proposed regulatory amendments create requirements that will come into effect on January 1, 2019, and will apply to Canadian airplane operators offering international flights, defined as a flight that takes off in one country and lands in a different one, with more than 10 000 tonnes of total annual carbon dioxide emissions. CORSIA does not cover domestic aviation, flights using aircraft with less than 5 700 kg maximum take-off mass, humanitarian flights, medical evacuation or firefighting operations, state/police flights or helicopters. Further information about the CORSIA provisions, to which the proposed regulatory amendments are aligned, is available on the ICAO website. The website also contains useful guidance materials and reporting templates for operators.

Covered operators will be required to undertake the following activities:

Consultation

Stakeholders have been consulted throughout the development of the ICAO SARPs for CORSIA. Transport Canada consulted with impacted Canadian operators through their associations — namely the National Airlines Council of Canada (NACC), the Air Transport Association of Canada (ATAC) and the Canadian Business Aviation Association (CBAA). Stakeholders have also been well briefed on CORSIA through their international association — the International Air Transport Association (IATA), and the International Business Aircraft Association (IBAC). IATA in particular has put in a significant effort to hold several series of international seminars to help operators understand CORSIA and the obligations for operators. The January and May 2018 IATA seminars were attended by Canadian operators.

Since November 2017, Transport Canada has been providing and continues to provide, as opportunities permit and as requested, briefings, workshops and education sessions to Canadian associations and individual operators.

Further, two of Canada’s airlines participated in a CORSIA implementation pilot project sponsored by ICAO and the German Government. The results of this project have further informed Transport Canada on the real-life functionality of CORSIA and identified areas where stakeholders would require further clarification of the rules, or further guidance. This information was considered by ICAO for suggested improvements to the SARPs.

The public has also been informed through the use of the “Let’s Talk Transportation” website; however, no comments were received. It is not expected that the travelling public will be directly affected in terms of public interest, safety or scheduling.

Further, international environmental non-governmental organizations have also been involved throughout the development of CORSIA, and have provided information material to the general public.

Expected impacts 

Transport Canada estimated the compliance costs to impacted airplane operators for the monitoring, reporting, and verification requirements, as well as the expected financial resources required for Transport Canada to oversee and administer compliance activities. The total present value of the costs over the 2019–2035 period is estimated to be about $7.4M, including

The costs to airplane operators are not expected to be significant in magnitude relative to other operating expenditures in the aviation industry. Smaller airplane operators are expected to assume lower costs, as they will be eligible for simplified monitoring, reporting, and verification procedures, and because they will have a smaller aircraft fleet to monitor. According to Transport Canada’s emission modelling, a total of 19 airplane operators are expected to implement the monitoring, reporting and verification requirements. The estimated costs may vary according to what is already implemented by industry, such as the methodologies currently used by airplane operators to collect and process data on fuel consumption.

A benefit of CORSIA is that it is a measure designed to reduce the impacts of climate change from international aviation in a globally consistent manner. This consistency applied in all ICAO Member States will ensure that all operators will be treated in the same manner on the same routes so as to maintain a level global playing field for the international aviation sector while addressing climate change.

In terms of benefits, implementation of the monitoring, reporting and verification procedures could lead to a better monitoring of fuel consumption for impacted operators. In the medium and long term, this could spur more research in fuel efficient technologies, as well as encourage their implementation.

Comments

Enquiries regarding this notice of intent may be directed to the Chief, Environment Protection and Standards, Transport Canada, Safety and Security, AARTG, Place de Ville, Tower C, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N5, CARRAC@tc.gc.ca by September 22, 2018.

GLOBAL AFFAIRS CANADA

Notice of intent to conduct impact assessments of the Canada-Mercosur Free Trade Agreement negotiations

On March 9, 2018, Canada officially launched comprehensive free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations with Mercosur countries (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay).

As part of its Trade Diversification Agenda, the Government of Canada is expanding its impact assessment (IA) process for the negotiation of an FTA with Mercosur. As indicated in the news release, the IAs for the Canada-Mercosur FTA will include environment, labour, and gender, and will be used to inform these negotiations.

All interested parties are invited to provide comments on any likely and significant impacts and opportunities that the Canada-Mercosur FTA may have on the environment, labour, and gender in Canada.

The environmental assessment will follow the standard procedure, which includes a qualitative and quantitative environmental assessment linking the results of the economic assessment to an analysis of the likely environmental effects of the FTA. For more information on the full process, please see the Global Affairs Canada website.

The labour assessment will be integrated into the economic assessment. A summary of this economic assessment will be made public.

The Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) initial report will contain an analysis of the potential effects on gender and diversity within Canada of the FTA. A summary of the GBA+ initial report will be published for comment.

The Government of Canada is committed to policies that expand opportunities for more Canadians to compete and succeed in international markets while protecting their interests. Mutually supportive trade, economic, environmental and social policies can contribute to this objective. To this end, the Minister of International Trade Diversification has directed officials to seek information and otherwise improve their understanding of the relationship between trade and the environment, labour, and gender at the earliest stages of decision making, and to do this through an open and inclusive process. These assessments of trade negotiations with Mercosur, which will be conducted in addition to the regular environmental assessment process, are critical to this work.

All interested parties are invited to submit their comments on the impact assessments of the Canada-Mercosur negotiations by October 14, 2018.

Contributions can be sent by email or mail to the following:

PTAConsultationsPCP@international.gc.ca

Consultations on the impact assessments of the Canada-Mercosur FTA negotiations
Trade Negotiations — Trade Agreements and NAFTA Secretariat (TCT)
Global Affairs Canada
125 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 1J1

Please read the privacy notice statement carefully prior to sending a written submission.

Related link: Canada-Mercosur Free Trade Agreement

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

INSURANCE COMPANIES ACT

Temple Insurance Company — Letters patent of amalgamation and order to commence and carry on business

Notice is hereby given of the issuance,

August 21, 2018

Jeremy Rudin
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Director

Canada Council for the Arts

 

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Post Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

September 16, 2018

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

 

Vice-President

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Nature

 

Chairperson

Canadian Race Relations Foundation

 

Regional Member (Quebec)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

 

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

 

Director

CPP Investment Board

 

Director

Farm Credit Canada

September 27, 2018

Chief Executive Officer

The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited

 

Commissioner

Financial Consumer Agency of Canada

 

Commissioners and Chairperson

International Joint Commission

 

Members (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Marine Atlantic Inc.

 

Chairperson

National Arts Centre Corporation

 

Vice-Chairperson

National Arts Centre Corporation

 

Chief Executive Officer

National Capital Commission

 

Director

National Gallery of Canada

 

Commissioner of Competition

Office of the Commissioner of Competition

 

Superintendent

Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy Canada

 

Veterans’ Ombudsman

Office of the Veterans’ Ombudsman

 

Director (Federal)

Oshawa Port Authority

 

Usher of the Black Rod

Senate

 

Chairperson

Telefilm Canada

 

Member (Marine and Medical)

Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

VIA Rail Canada Inc.