Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 152, Number 33: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

August 18, 2018

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of two substances — naphthenic acids (NAs), CAS RN footnote 1 1338-24-5, and naphthenic acids, calcium salts (calcium naphthenates), CAS RN 61789-36-4 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas naphthenic acids (NAs) and naphthenic acids, calcium salts (calcium naphthenates) are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on NAs and calcium naphthenates pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca. Comments can also be submitted to the Minister of the Environment using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of naphthenic acids and naphthenic acids, calcium salts

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of two substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) as the naphthenic acids and salts group, hereinafter referred to as the commercial naphthenic acids group. Substances in this group were identified as priorities for assessment as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA .

The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNs), their Domestic Substances List (DSL) names and their common name or abbreviation are listed in the table below.

Substances in the commercial naphthenic acids group

CAS RN

DSL name

Common name/abbreviation

1338-24-5Table 1 note a

Naphthenic acids

NAs

61789-36-4Table 1 note a

Naphthenic acids, calcium salts

Calcium naphthenates

Table 1 notes

Table 1 note a

The substance bearing CAS RN is a UVCB (unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products, or biological material).

Return to table 1 note a referrer

This assessment addresses two commercial NAs obtained via the extraction of petroleum distillates. Nineteen other commercial NAs have been or are being addressed through various approaches under the CMP.footnote 2 The commercial NAs differ from complex mixtures of naphthenic acids present as a by-product in oil-sand processed water (OSPW) generated from oil sands mining, extraction and processing of bitumen. Activities to better understand OSPW naphthenic acids are occurring under the Canada-Alberta Joint Oil Sands Monitoring Program (JOSM). In addition, Environment and Climate Change Canada is proposing to add naphthenic acids and their salts that are present in waste generated by processing of oil sands to the National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI), beginning in the 2020 reporting year.

In Canada, NAs and calcium naphthenates were not reported to be manufactured above the reporting threshold in 2011 in response to a survey under section 71 of CEPA. Import quantities reported were in the range of 100 000 to 1 000 000 kg for NAs and from 1 000 to 10 000 kg for calcium naphthenates, according to information submitted under section 71 of CEPA.

In Canada and internationally, NAs are mainly found in lubricants and greases, and in paints and coatings that are intended for professional/industrial use only. Lubricants and greases containing NAs are used primarily in the industrial, transportation and aviation sectors, while paints and coatings containing NAs are used in the automotive and industrial sectors. NAs have also been identified as a component of inks used in the manufacture of polymeric coatings used to package some foods. No use of calcium naphthenates in products available to consumers was identified.

The ecological risks of NAs and calcium naphthenates were characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC). The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are based primarily on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web−derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern to substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified NAs and calcium naphthenates as having a low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from NAs and calcium naphthenates. It is proposed to conclude that NAs and calcium naphthenates do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

NAs and calcium naphthenates were not identified as posing a high hazard to human health on the basis of absence of classifications by other national or international agencies for carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, developmental toxicity or reproductive toxicity. In addition, exposure of the general population to NAs and calcium naphthenates through environmental media, food, or the use of products available to consumers is expected to be minimal and the potential risk to human health is considered to be low.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that NAs and calcium naphthenates do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is therefore proposed to conclude that NAs and calcium naphthenates do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of 10 fatty acids and derivatives specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas 6 of the 10 substances identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on four substances pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act and on six substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action at this time under section 77 of the Act for the six substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Act.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on the remaining four substances at this time.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca. Comments can also be submitted to the Minister of the Environment using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of 10 fatty acids and derivatives

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 10 of 16 substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group. These 10 substances were identified as priorities for assessment as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other considerations. Of the 16 substances, 4 were subsequently determined to be of low concern through other approaches, and proposed decisions for these substances are provided in separate reports.footnote 3, footnote 4 In addition, 2 substances were placed into another substance group, to which they are more appropriately suited, on the basis of chemical structure and uses.footnote 5 Accordingly, this screening assessment addresses the 10 substances listed in the table below. The 10 substances addressed in this draft screening assessment report will hereinafter be referred to as the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group.

Substances in the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group

CAS RNTable 2 note a

Domestic Substances
List
name

Common name

112-38-9

10-Undecenoic acid

Undecylenic acid

463-40-1

9,12,15-Octadecatrienoic acid, (Z,Z,Z)

α-Linolenic acid (ALA)

8001-20-5Table 2 note b,Table 2 note c

Tung oil

Tung oil

8002-65-1Table 2 note b

Fats and glyceridic oils, margosa

Fats and glyceridic oils, margosa

61788-89-4Table 2 note b

Fatty acids,
C18-unsaturated, dimers

Dimer acid

61790-12-3Table 2 note b

Fatty acids, tall-oil

Tall oil fatty acid (tall oil acid)

61790-44-1Table 2 note b

Fatty acids, tall-oil, potassium salts

Potassium tallate

68937-90-6Table 2 note b,Table 2 note c

Fatty acids,
C18-unsaturated, trimers

Trimer acid

90028-66-3Table 2 note b,Table 2 note d

Evening primrose, oenothera biennis, ext.

Evening primrose oil

92044-87-6Table 2 note b,Table 2 note d

Fatty acids, coco, 2-ethylhexyl esters

Ethylhexyl cocoate

Table 2 notes
Table 2 note a

The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.

Return to table 2 note a referrer

Table 2 note b

The substance bearing this CAS RN is a UVCB (unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products, or biological material).

Return to table 2 note b referrer

Table 2 note c

The substance bearing this CAS RN was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA, but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.

Return to table 2 note c referrer

Table 2 note d

The substance bearing this CAS RN was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA, but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other ecological considerations.

Return to table 2 note d referrer

Of the 10 fatty acids and derivatives, 4 were reported, pursuant to a survey under section 71 of CEPA, to have been manufactured in Canada in 2011, at quantities of 1 430 kg for tall oil acid, 10 000–100 000 kg for potassium tallate and 100–1 000 kg each for dimer acid and trimer acid. Of the 10 substances, 7 were reported to have been imported into Canada the same year, at quantities of 1 000–10 000 kg for ALA, 120 412 kg for tung oil, 6 317 473 kg for tall oil acid, 47 992 kg for potassium tallate, 293 472 kg for dimer acid, 1 088 638 kg for trimer acid and 6 470 kg for ethylhexyl cocoate. The remaining 3 substances, undecylenic acid; fats and glyceridic oils, margosa; and evening primrose oil, were not reported to be manufactured in or imported into Canada in 2011 above the reporting threshold of 100 kg.

Undecylenic acid and ALA are naturally occurring compounds and the remaining substances in this group are derived from natural sources such as plants. The substances in the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group have a number of reported uses including lubricants and greases, adhesives and sealants, paints and coatings, fuels and related products, and food packaging. Some of these products are available to consumers. Several of the substances included in the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group are used in cosmetics, as well as in natural and non-prescription health products.

The ecological risks of the substances in the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group were characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC), which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern to substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified the substances in this assessment as having a low-to-moderate potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from 10 substances in the Fatty Acids and Derivatives Group. It is proposed to conclude that undecylenic acid; ALA; tung oil; fats and glyceridic oils, margosa; tall oil acid; potassium tallate; evening primrose oil; dimer acid; trimer acid; and ethylhexyl cocoate do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

ALA was assessed together with a group of aliphatic acids by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in 2014. ALA and the major components of fats and glyceridic oils, margosa; tall oil acid; evening primrose oil; dimer acid; trimer acid and the free fatty acids of ethylhexyl cocoate were not identified by the OECD as possessing properties indicating a hazard for human health for systemic health effects, as supported by the toxicity information of tung oil.

The European Food Safety Authority concluded in 2010 that laboratory studies on the conjugated form of a major component of tung oil did not indicate a risk for genotoxicity, reproductive toxicity or carcinogenicity.

In the Multi-Chemical Tiered I Human Health Risk Assessments carried out by the Australian government Department of Health in 2017, dimer acid was considered as not to pose unreasonable risk to human health.

Based on information from the above-noted international assessments, ALA; tung oil; fats and glyceridic oils, margosa; tall oil acid; potassium tallate; evening primrose oil; dimer acid and trimer acid were not identified as having systemic health effects of concern, and risk to human health is considered to be low.

General population exposure to undecylenic acid can occur from its use as a flavouring agent in certain foods, from cosmetics, and from natural health products. Exposure to ethylhexyl cocoate can occur from its use in cosmetics. The available health effects information on undecylenic acid and its sodium salt, as well as on ethylhexyl cocoate and its hydrolyzed products, indicates effects on the weight of the body/organs and effects on clinical chemistry parameters. The margins of exposure between estimated levels of exposure for both these substances and the critical effect levels in laboratory studies are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that undecylenic acid; ALA; tung oil; fats and glyceridic oils, margosa; tall oil acid; potassium tallate; evening primrose oil; dimer acid; trimer acid; and ethylhexyl cocoate do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Therefore, it is proposed to conclude that undecylenic acid; ALA; tung oil; fats and glyceridic oils, margosa; tall oil acid; potassium tallate; evening primrose oil; dimer acid; trimer acid; and ethylhexyl cocoate do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that the 10 fatty acids and derivatives do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Final guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for chromium

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of a final guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for chromium. The technical document for this guideline is available on the Water Quality website. This document underwent a public consultation period of 60 days in 2015 and was updated to take into consideration the comments received.

August 16, 2018

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Guideline

A maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 0.05 mg/L (50 µg/L) is established for total chromium in drinking water.

Executive summary

Chromium occurs naturally in small amounts in rocks and soils, some of which is released into the aquatic environment through weathering and erosion processes. More than 70% of chromium in the environment comes from anthropogenic sources, such as non-ferrous base metal smelters, refineries, leather tanning industries, urban storm water runoff, effluent streams from pulp and paper mills and discharges from thermal generating stations. Chromium can exist in nine different oxidation states, with the trivalent [Cr(III)] and hexavalent [Cr(VI)] forms being the most common in the environment.

The guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with chromium in drinking water. It incorporates new studies and approaches and takes into consideration the availability of appropriate treatment technology. Based on this review, the drinking water guideline for total chromium is a maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 0.05 mg/L (50 µg/L).

Health effects

Chromium toxicity in humans varies depending on the form of the compound, its oxidation state and the route of exposure. Studies show that there is little or no toxicity associated with the trivalent form of chromium, whereas hexavalent chromium compounds are classified as carcinogenic to humans by the inhalation route of exposure, based on sufficient evidence in humans and animals.

The critical health effect on which to establish a guideline for chromium in drinking water is diffuse hyperplasia of the small intestine, as it is the most sensitive endpoint and a precursor of tumour formation. The physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for mice and humans and benchmark dose (BMD) modelling were used to determine appropriate external doses in humans from animal data. The MAC for chromium in drinking water is based on the health effects of Cr(VI) and considers the cancer and non-cancer effects together.

Exposure

Background levels of chromium in surface water and groundwater are a direct function of regional geology, mineral weathering processes, sediment loading rates and precipitation patterns. Average concentrations of total chromium in uncontaminated surface waters are generally below 1 µg/L. Chromium levels in groundwater can be significantly higher than levels in surface water.

Canadians can be exposed to total chromium through its presence in food, drinking water, dust, soil and air. The single most important source of exposure to Cr(VI) is drinking water. In order to be most protective of human health, this assessment assumes that all the chromium present in drinking water is in the form of Cr(VI).

Analysis and treatment

There are several approved analytical methods available to measure total chromium [i.e. the sum of Cr(III) and Cr(VI)] in drinking water at levels well below the MAC.

Given the presence of oxidants and disinfectants in treated water, Cr(III) is likely to be oxidized to Cr(VI) after treatment. For this reason, it is important to ensure the removal of both chromium species. At the municipal level, the best available technologies for the treatment of total chromium are coagulation/filtration, ion exchange, reverse osmosis and lime softening. Reduction/coagulation/filtration, weak-base ion exchange and strong-base ion exchange are effective technologies for removing Cr(VI) from drinking water.

At the residential level, drinking water treatment technologies able to be certified to NSF International (NSF) standards for reduction of total chromium, as well as Cr(VI) and Cr(III) individually, include adsorption, reverse osmosis and distillation. It is important to note that reverse osmosis and distillation systems should be installed only at the point of use, as the treated water may be corrosive to internal plumbing components.

International considerations

Other organizations have set guidelines or regulations pertaining to the concentration of chromium in drinking water. The provisional guideline value of the World Health Organization, the standard of the European Union and the guideline value of Australia are all set at 0.05 mg/L for chromium in drinking water. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has established a standard of 0.1 mg/L for total chromium in drinking water.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Filing of claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 12(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of the filing of the claims for exemption listed below.

In accordance with subsection 12(2) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, affected parties, as defined, may make written representations to the screening officer with respect to the claim for exemption and the safety data sheet (SDS) or label to which it relates. Written representations must cite the appropriate registry number, state the reasons and evidence upon which the representations are based and be delivered within 30 days of the date of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to the screening officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau, 269 Laurier Avenue West, 8th Floor (4908-B), Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

Sanjana Sivasalapathi
Chief Screening Officer

On February 11, 2015, the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) was amended, and the Controlled Products Regulations (CPR) and the Ingredient Disclosure List were repealed and replaced with the new Hazardous Products Regulations (HPR). The revised legislation (HPA/HPR) is referred to as WHMIS 2015 and the former legislation (HPA/CPR) is referred to as WHMIS 1988. Transitional provisions allow compliance with either WHMIS 1988 or WHMIS 2015 for a specified period of time.

The claims listed below seek an exemption from the disclosure of supplier confidential business information in respect of a hazardous product; such disclosure would otherwise be required under the provisions of the relevant legislation.

Claimant

Product Identifier

Subject of the Claim for Exemption

Registry Number

Halliburton Group Canada

CT-ARMOR

C.i. of one ingredient

12174

Halliburton Group Canada

TRANSCEND-325

C.i. of one ingredient

12175

Dow Chemical Canada ULC

NorKool(TM) Inhibitor 231

C.i. and C. of three ingredients
C. of two ingredients

12176

Chemtrade Logistics INC.

Clar+Ion A502P

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12177

Chemtrade Logistics INC.

Clar+Ion A502.5P

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12178

Chemtrade Logistics INC.

Clar+Ion A505P

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12179

Chemtrade Logistics INC.

Clar+Ion A510P

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12180

Chemtrade Logistics INC.

Clar+Ion A515P

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12181

Chemtrade Logistics INC.

Hyper+Ion 705

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12182

HP Inc.

CP830Series

C.i. of three ingredients

12183

HP Inc.

CP831Series

C.i. of three ingredients

12184

Nalco Canada ULC

Corsamul 800 HF

C.i. and C. of four ingredients

12185

Ingevity Corporation

INDULIN® AA-28

C.i. and C. of three ingredients

12186

ChemTreat Inc.

ChemTreat FL5202ZC

C.i. and C. of three ingredients

12187

3M Canada

3M™ Screen Print
UV Gloss Clear 9760LX

C.i. of one ingredient
C. of five ingredients

12188

Baker Hughes
Canada Company

ScaleSorb 7

C.i. and C. of one ingredient
C. of three ingredients

12189

Calfrac Well Services Ltd.

R-V1012

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12190

Calfrac Well Services Ltd.

R-V1013

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12191

Momentive Performance Materials

Niax* silicone L-580

C.i. and C. of three ingredients
C. of one ingredient

12192

Nalco Canada ULC

NALCO® DVSLC009

C.i. of one ingredient

12193

Covestro LLC

DESMODUR E 743

C.i. and C. of one ingredient
C. of two ingredients

12194

Pilot Chemical Company

Aristol A/W

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12195

Pilot Chemical Company

Aristonic Acid 9900

C. of one ingredient

12196

The QUIKRETE
Companies, LLC

TSA Target Shotcrete Accelerator

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

12198

Nalco Canada ULC

HSCV18391A

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

12199

Diacon Technologies Ltd.

CHECKMATE

C.i. of two ingredients

12200

Enviro Tech Chemical Services, Inc.

SAFE ACID NHF

C.i. of one ingredient

12201

Schlumberger Canada
Limited

Fed-Lube SW

C.i. and C. of one ingredient
C. of three ingredients

12202

Henkel Canada Corporation

LOCTITE LIOFOL LA 6130

C.i. of one ingredient

12203

Nalco Canada ULC

3D TRASAR™ 3DT397

C.i. of three ingredients

12204

Nalco Canada ULC

ELIMIN-OX® 22330

C.i. of one ingredient

12205

Afton Chemical Corporation

HiTEC 5158 Performance Additive

C.i. of one ingredient
C. of two ingredients

12206

LiquidPower Speciality Products Inc.

EP™ 2500 Flow Improver

C.i. of four ingredients

12207

Note: C.i. = chemical identity and C. = concentration

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Chatham-Kent Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Jeff Bennett

Ottawa, August 2, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the New Westminster Police Department as a fingerprint examiner:

Rochelle Desranleau

Ottawa, August 2, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following persons of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as fingerprint examiners:

Dawn Doyle

Krista Wallis

Ottawa, August 2, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following persons of the St. Thomas Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

James Peter Fast

Terri Lynn Hikele

Marc Travis Vaughan

Ottawa, August 2, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the West Vancouver Police Department as a fingerprint examiner:

Dominic Toa

Ottawa, August 2, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Brockville Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Paul Smith

Ottawa, August 2, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Delta Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Suki Thind

Ottawa, August 2, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Sarnia Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Craig Huggett

Ottawa, August 2, 2018

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Post Corporation

 

Director

Farm Credit Canada

September 27, 2018

Commissioner

Financial Consumer Agency of Canada

 

Members

Historic Sites and Monuments Board
of Canada

September 14, 2018

Commissioners and Chairperson

International Joint Commission

 

Members
(appointment
to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Chairperson

National Arts Centre Corporation

 

Vice-Chairperson

National Arts Centre Corporation

 

Chief Executive Officer

National Capital Commission

 

Director

National Gallery
of Canada

 

Commissioner of Competition

Office of the Commissioner of Competition

 

Superintendent

Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy Canada

 

Veterans’
Ombudsman

Office of the
Veterans’ Ombudsman

 

Chairperson

Telefilm Canada

 

Director

VIA Rail Canada Inc.

September 7, 2018

President and Chief Executive Officer

VIA Rail Canada Inc.

September 7, 2018