Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 152, Number 31: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

August 4, 2018

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2018-87-05-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Whereas, pursuant to subsection 87(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 footnote a, the Minister of the Environment has added the substances referred to in the annexed Order to the Domestic Substances List footnote b ;

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 87(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 footnote a, makes the annexed Order 2018-87-05-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, July 18, 2018

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Order 2018-87-05-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Amendment

1 Part I of the Non-domestic Substances List footnote 1 is amended by deleting the following:

39612-00-5
204583-39-1

Coming into Force

2 This Order comes into force on the day on which Order 2018-87-05-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List comes into force.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substance — methanone, diphenyl- (benzophenone), CAS RN footnote 2 119-61-9 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas benzophenone is a substance identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on benzophenone pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substance meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to recommend to Her Excellency the Governor in Council that this substance be added to Schedule 1 of the Act.

Notice is furthermore given that the ministers have released a risk management scope document for this substance to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of risk management actions.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

Comments can also be submitted to the Minister of the Environment, using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves

Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

Marc D’Iorio

Director General
Industrial Sectors, Chemicals and Waste Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin

Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of benzophenone

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of methanone, diphenyl-, herein referred to as benzophenone. Benzophenone was identified as a priority for assessment as it met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN footnote 3) for this substance is 119-61-9.

Benzophenone occurs naturally in the environment and is synthetically manufactured. It is used in Canada in a wide range of applications, including cosmetics, paints and coatings, adhesives and sealants, pest control products, inks, toners and colourants, and may also be used in inks used in some food packaging applications, as well as a flavouring agent in foods. In 2008, less than 1 000 kg of benzophenone were reported to be manufactured in Canada, and between 35 000 and 135 000 kg were reported to be imported in Canada.

The ecological risk of benzophenone was characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC). The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure, with weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified benzophenone as having low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from benzophenone. It is proposed to conclude that benzophenone does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Benzophenone has been reviewed internationally by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). The IARC determined that there is sufficient evidence in laboratory animals for the carcinogenicity of benzophenone. Chronic exposure to benzophenone via the oral route caused cancer in rats and mice. Benzophenone was non-genotoxic in both in vitro and in vivo bioassays. For non-cancer effects, the critical effect following oral administration in laboratory studies was effects on kidneys.

The general population of Canada may be exposed to benzophenone from environmental media and food. Products available to consumers, including cosmetics, baby bottles, and paints and coatings, are also sources of general population exposure in Canada.

A comparison of estimated levels of exposure to benzophenone associated with the use of certain products (e.g. nail polish and interior paint) and critical effect levels results in margins of exposure that are potentially inadequate to account for uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that benzophenone meets the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as it is entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that benzophenone meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 in CEPA.

It is proposed to conclude that benzophenone meets the persistence criteria but not the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment and the risk management scope document for this substance are available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of living organisms — Bacillus cereus (B. cereus strain ATCC footnote 4 14579 and B. subtilis strain 11685-3) — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas B. cereus strain ATCC 14579 and B. subtilis strain 11685-3 (B. cereus) are living organisms on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on these living organisms pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that these living organisms do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Therefore, notice is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these living organisms at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

Annex

Summary of the screening assessment of Bacillus cereus strain ATCC 14579 and Bacillus subtilis strain ATCC 11685-3

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of two strains of Bacillus cereus (B. cereus strain ATCC 14579 and B. subtilis strain 11685-3). B. subtilis strain 11685-3 was listed on the Domestic Substances List (DSL) as a strain of B. subtilis; however, in testing by Health Canada scientists, it was discovered to be in fact a strain of B. cereus. For the purposes of the screening assessment, it will be referred to as B. subtilis strain 11685-3 (B. cereus).

B. cereus strain ATCC 14579 and B. subtilis strain 11685-3 (B. cereus) are bacteria that have characteristics in common with other strains of the species. B. cereus is generally considered ubiquitous and has the ability to adapt to and thrive in many aquatic and terrestrial niches. It is resistant to a range of antibiotics and heavy metals. B. cereus forms endospores that permit survival under suboptimal environmental conditions. Various characteristics of B. cereus make it suitable for use as an active ingredient in commercial and consumer products, including detergents, degreasers, additives for biodegradation and bioremediation, and in various industrial processes.

B. cereus can infect some animals and cause a range of debilitating symptoms, and even death; however, under normal circumstances, it is unlikely to be a serious hazard to healthy livestock or other organisms in the environment. B. cereus can cause mastitis in cows, but affected animals recover rapidly upon treatment with veterinary antibiotics. There are no cases where B. cereus has been shown in the scientific literature to cause adverse effects in organisms in the Canadian environment. B. cereus strain ATCC 14579 reduced the rate of reproduction in springtails (a soil invertebrate), and decreased shoot and root length in red fescue (a terrestrial plant). However, these effects were observed under specific laboratory conditions, which are not a concern under the current known exposure scenarios.

In humans, B. cereus has pathogenic potential in both the otherwise healthy general population and in individuals who are susceptible because of compromised immunity, debilitating disease or extremes of age. B. cereus is a gastrointestinal pathogen that can also cause other types of infection, including endophthalmitis and skin infections. B. cereus is resistant to several clinical antibiotics, which could make infections harder to treat. Laboratory data show that B. cereus strain ATCC 14579 and B. subtilis strain 11685-3 (B. cereus) produce extracellular enzymes and toxins that are known factors for pathogenicity in humans.

This assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of B. cereus with respect to environmental and human health effects associated with consumer and commercial product use and industrial processes subject to CEPA, including releases to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. To update information about current uses of these living organisms, the Government launched a mandatory information-gathering survey (section 71 notice) under section 71 of CEPA, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on September 23, 2017. Information submitted in response to the notice indicates that neither B. cereus strain ATCC 14579 nor B. subtilis strain 11685-3 (Bcereus) was imported into or manufactured in Canada, except (in the case of B. cereus strain ATCC 14579) for limited quantities for academic research, teaching, and research and development activities. The likelihood of exposure to this living organism in Canada resulting from commercial and consumer activity is low.

Based on the information available, it is concluded that B. cereus strain ATCC 14579 and B. subtilis strain 11685-3 (B. cereus) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also concluded that B. cereus strain ATCC 14579 and B. subtilis strain 11685-3 (B. cereus) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that these two strains of B. cereus do not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for these living organisms is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CANADA

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-011-18 — Release of ICES-006, issue 3

Notice is hereby given that Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) has published the following standard:

This standard will come into force upon publication on the official publications section of the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website.

General information

The Interference-Causing Equipment Standards list will be amended accordingly.

Submitting comments

Comments and suggestions for improving this standard may be submitted online using the Standard Change Request form.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website.

Official versions of notices can be viewed on the Canada Gazette website.

July 24, 2018

Martin Proulx

Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Post Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canadian Race Relations Foundation

 

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

 

Commissioner of Corrections

Correctional Service Canada

 

Director

CPP Investment Board

 

Commissioner

Financial Consumer Agency of Canada

 

Commissioners and Chairperson

International Joint Commission

 

Members (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Chief Executive Officer

National Capital Commission

 

Director

National Gallery of Canada

 

Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise

Office of the Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise

 

Commissioner of Competition

Office of the Commissioner of Competition

 

Superintendent

Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy Canada

 

Veterans’ Ombudsman

Office of the Veterans’ Ombudsman

 

Chairperson

Social Security Tribunal of Canada