Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 152, Number 30: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

July 28, 2018

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Notice of intent to amend the Domestic Substances List under subsection 87(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to indicate that subsection 81(3) of that Act applies to the substance acetamide, N-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-, also known as phenacetin

Whereas the substance phenacetin (Chemical Abstracts Service [CAS] Registry No. 62-44-2) is specified on the Domestic Substances List;footnote 1

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have conducted a screening assessment of phenacetin under section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 footnote 2 and published, on April 15, 2017, the draft screening assessment in the Canada Gazette, Part I, for a 60-day public comment period;

And whereas the ministers suspect that the information concerning a significant new activity in relation to the substance may contribute to determining the circumstances in which the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

Therefore, notice is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment intends to amend the Domestic Substances List pursuant to subsection 87(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to indicate that subsection 81(3) of that Act applies to any significant new activities relating to this substance, as set out in this notice.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days of publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment comments with respect to this proposal. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent by mail to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

The final screening assessment document for this substance may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

George Enei

Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

1. Part 1 of the Domestic Substances List is proposed to be amended by deleting the following:
62-44-2

2. Part 2 of the Domestic Substances List is proposed to be amended by adding the following:

Column 1
Substance

Column 2
Significant new activity for which substance is subject to subsection 81(3) of the Act

62-44-2 S′

  1. In relation to the substance in Column 1, opposite to this section
    • (a) the use of the substance in the manufacture of any of the following products containing the substance at a concentration greater than 0.1% by weight:
      • (i) a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies, or
      • (ii) a cosmetic within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act, other than hair colour products;
    • (b) any activity involving the use of the substance in the following products, containing the substance at a concentration greater than 0.1% by weight, if the total quantity of the substance involved in the activity, during any one calendar year, is greater than 10 kg:
      • (i) a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies, or
      • (ii) a cosmetic within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act, other than hair colour products.
  2. Despite item 1, the use of the substance as a research and development substance or as a site-limited intermediate substance, as these expressions are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers), or as an export-only substance is not a significant new activity.
  3. For each proposed significant new activity, the following information must be provided to the Minister at least 90 days before the commencement of the proposed significant new activity:
    • (a) a description of the significant new activity in relation to the substance;
    • (b) the anticipated annual quantity of the substance to be used in relation to the significant new activity;
    • (c) the information specified in items 3 to 7 of Schedule 4 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);
    • (d) the information specified in paragraphs 2(d) to (f) and 8(f) and (g) of Schedule 5 of those Regulations;
    • (e) a description of the consumer product or cosmetic that contains the substance, the intended use of that consumer product or cosmetic and the function of the substance in that consumer product or cosmetic;
    • (f) a description of how the consumer product or cosmetic is intended to be used or applied;
    • (g) the total quantity of the consumer product or cosmetic expected to be sold in Canada in a calendar year by the person undertaking the significant new activity;
    • (h) a summary of all other information and test data in respect of the substance that are in the possession of the person proposing the significant new activity, or to which they may reasonably be expected to have access, and that permit the identification of hazards of the substance to the environment and human health and the degree of environmental and public exposure to the substance;
    • (i) the identification of every other government agency, either outside or within Canada, that the person proposing the significant new activity has notified of the substance and, if known, the agency’s file number, the outcome of the assessment and the risk management actions in relation to the substance imposed by those agencies;
    • (j) the name, civic and postal addresses, telephone number and, if any, fax number and email address of the person proposing the significant new activity and, if they are not resident in Canada, of the person resident in Canada that is authorized to act on their behalf; and
    • (k) a certification that the information is accurate and complete, dated and signed by the person proposing the significant new activity if they are resident in Canada or, if not, by the person resident in Canada authorized to act on their behalf.
  4. The above information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister.

Coming into Force

3. The Order would come into force on the day on which it is registered.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the notice of intent.)

Description

The notice of intent (NOI) is an opportunity for the public to comment on the proposed amendment to the Domestic Substances List (DSL), pursuant to subsection 87(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), footnote 3 to apply the significant new activity (SNAc) provisions to the substance acetamide, N-(-4-ethoxyphenyl)- (also known as phenacetin, Chemical Abstracts Service [CAS] Registry No. 62-44-2).

Within 60 days of publication of the NOI, any person may submit comments to the Minister of the Environment (the Minister). These comments will be taken into consideration during the development of the Order amending the DSL to apply the SNAc provisions to this substance.

The DSL amendment is not in force until the Order is adopted by the Minister pursuant to subsection 87(3) of CEPA. The Order will be published in the Canada Gazette, Part II.

Information-gathering mechanisms other than the SNAc provisions of CEPA were considered, including the publication of a notice under section 71 of CEPA or the adoption of requirements to report to the National Pollutant Release Inventory. However, these mechanisms would require the information after the substance is used, which could potentially lead to exposures of concern.

Applicability of the proposed Order

At this time, it is proposed that the Order amending the DSL would require any person (individual or corporation) engaging in a significant new activity in relation to phenacetin to submit a Significant New Activity notification (SNAN) containing all of the information prescribed in the Order at least 90 days prior to the import, manufacture, or use of the substance for the significant new activity. In order to address human health concerns, the Order would target the use of the substance in consumer products to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) applies and in cosmetics within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act. For the manufacture of such products or cosmetics with the substance, notification would be required when the concentration of the substance in the product is greater than 0.1% by weight.

For any other activity related to the substance in consumer products and cosmetics, notification would be required when the concentration of the substance in the product or cosmetic is greater than 0.1% by weight, and the total quantity of the substance involved in the activity during a calendar year is greater than 10 kg. For example, notification would be required if a company plans to import a product to be used by consumers where the concentration of the substance in the product is greater than 0.1% by weight and where there are more than 10 kg of the substance involved in a calendar year. Examples of products of concern would include, but would not be limited to, cosmetics and do-it-yourself products. Therefore, the import, manufacture, or use of the substance in such products would require notification.

Activities not subject to the proposed Order

Activities involving the use of the substance in the manufacture of consumer products or cosmetics that contain the substance at a concentration less than 0.1% by weight would be excluded from the application of the proposed Order. Similarly, any other activity involving the use of the substance in a consumer product or cosmetic would not be subject to the Order if the total quantity of the substance used is 10 kg or less in a calendar year. For activities involving more than 10 kg of the substance in a calendar year, the proposed Order would not apply if the concentration of the substance in the consumer product or cosmetic involved in the activity is less than 0.1% by weight.

Activities involving phenacetin in hair colour products are exempt from notification in the proposed Order, as human exposure from these sources is estimated to be low.

The use of phenacetin as a research and development substance, a site-limited intermediate substance, or an export-only substance would not require the submission of a SNAN, as these activities are not expected to result in exposure to the general population in Canada. The terms “research and development substance” and “site-limited intermediate substance” are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers). An export-only substance is a substance that is manufactured or imported in Canada and destined solely for foreign markets.

The proposed Order would not apply to uses of the substance that are regulated under the acts of Parliament listed in Schedule 2 of CEPA, including the Pest Control Products Act, the Fertilizers Act and the Feeds Act. The proposed Order would also not apply to transient reaction intermediates, impurities, contaminants, partially unreacted intermediates or, in some circumstances, to items such as wastes, mixtures or manufactured items. However, it should be noted that individual components of a mixture may be subject to notification under the proposed Order. See subsection 81(6) and section 3 of CEPA and section 3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers for additional information.

Information to be submitted

The NOI sets out the proposed requirements for information that would have to be provided to the Minister 90 days before the day on which the substance is imported, manufactured or used for a significant new activity. The Department of the Environment and the Department of Health will use the information submitted in the SNAN to conduct human health and environmental assessments within 90 days after the complete information is received.

The information requirements in the proposed Order relate to general information in respect to the substance, details surrounding its use, and to exposure information. Some of the proposed information requirements are set out in the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Additional guidance on preparing a SNAN can be found in section 4 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers.

Compliance

When assessing whether or not a substance is subject to SNAc provisions, footnote 4 a person is expected to make use of information in their possession or to which they may reasonably be expected to have access. This means information in any of the notifier’s offices worldwide or other locations where the notifier can reasonably have access to the information. For example, manufacturers are expected to have access to their formulations, while importers or users of a substance, mixture, or product are expected to have access to import records, usage information and the relevant safety data sheet (SDS).footnote 5

Although an SDS is an important source of information on the composition of a purchased product, it should be noted that the goal of the SDS is to protect the health of workers in the workplace from specific hazards of chemical products. Therefore, an SDS may not list all product ingredients that may be subject to an order due to human health or environmental concerns. Any person requiring more detailed information on product composition is encouraged to contact their supplier.

If any information becomes available that reasonably supports the conclusion that the substance phenacetin is toxic or capable of becoming toxic, the person who is in possession of or has knowledge of the information and is involved in activities with the substance is obligated, under section 70 of CEPA, to provide that information to the Minister without delay.

A company can submit a SNAN on behalf of its clients. For example, in cases where a person takes possession and control of a substance from another person, they may not be required to submit a SNAN, under certain conditions, if the activities were covered by the original SNAN. The Substances Management Advisory Note, “Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,” provides more detail on this subject.

Any person who transfers the physical possession or control of a substance subject to an order should notify all persons to whom the physical possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the order, including the obligation to notify the Minister of any significant new activity and to provide all the required information outlined above.

A pre-notification consultation (PNC) is recommended for notifiers who wish to consult during the planning or preparation of their SNAN to discuss any questions or concerns they have about the prescribed information and test plans.

Where a person has questions concerning their obligations to comply with an order, believes they may be out of compliance, or would like to request a PNC, they are encouraged to discuss their particular circumstances by contacting the Substances Management Information Line.footnote 6

CEPA is enforced in accordance with the publicly available Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. In instances of non-compliance, consideration is given to the following factors when deciding which enforcement measure to take: nature of the alleged violation, effectiveness in achieving compliance with CEPA and its regulations, and consistency in enforcement.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substance — acetamide, N-(4-ethoxyphenyl)- (phenacetin), CAS footnote 7  RN 62-44-2 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas acetamide, N-(4-ethoxyphenyl)- (phenacetin) is a substance identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on the substance pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby; and

Whereas it is concluded that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on phenacetin at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Notice is further given that the Minister of the Environment intends to amend the Domestic Substances List pursuant to subsection 87(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to indicate that subsection 81(3) of that Act applies with respect to phenacetin.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of phenacetin

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of acetamide, N-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-, hereinafter referred to as phenacetin. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) for phenacetin is 62-44-2. This substance is among those substances identified as priorities for assessment as it met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA.

In 2008, there were no reports of manufacture or import above the reporting threshold of 100 kg in Canada, although phenacetin was reported as being imported into Canada in quantities below or equal to the reporting threshold. Phenacetin was formerly used as an analgesic and antipyretic, but has not been used in Canada as a therapeutic agent since 1973. It is used primarily as a laboratory reagent, and in a small number of oxidative hair dye preparations, where it functions as a stabilizer for hydrogen peroxide.

The ecological risk of phenacetin was characterized using the Ecological Risk Classification of organic substances (ERC). The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified phenacetin as having a low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from phenacetin. It is concluded that phenacetin does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

For the general population of Canada, potential exposure to phenacetin was estimated from dermal contact with the scalp during the use of hair dyes.

The critical effect for risk characterization was determined to be carcinogenicity, based principally on the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) conclusion that there is sufficient evidence that phenacetin is carcinogenic to humans and laboratory animals. Non-cancer effects, including nephropathy and haematotoxicity, have also been observed in humans and during laboratory studies. Margins between estimates of exposure and critical effect levels observed in animal studies are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases for cancer and non-cancer endpoints.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that phenacetin does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that phenacetin does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for this substance is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

Consideration for follow up

Because phenacetin is listed on the Domestic Substances List (DSL), its import and manufacture in Canada are not subject to notification under the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) under subsection 81(1) of CEPA. However, since phenacetin is considered to have human health effects of concern, there is suspicion that new activities that have not been identified or assessed could lead to this substance meeting the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA. Therefore, the Government of Canada intends to amend the DSL, under subsection 87(3) of the Act, to indicate that the significant new activity (SNAc) provisions under subsection 81(3) of the Act apply with respect to this substance.

A significant new activity can include an activity that has not been conducted with the substance in the past, or an existing one with a different quantity or in different circumstances that could affect the exposure pattern of the substance. The SNAc provisions trigger an obligation for a person (individual or corporation) to provide, and for the Government to assess, specific information about a substance when a person proposes to use the substance in a significant new activity. The ministers will assess the information provided by the notifier and other information available to them to determine whether the substance, if used in the proposed new activity, could pose a risk to the environment or human health and, if so, whether risk management is required.

DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES

CANADA-NOVA SCOTIA OFFSHORE PETROLEUM RESOURCES ACCORD IMPLEMENTATION ACT

Notice of suspension and setting aside of fundamental decisions of the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board

On March 23, 2018, the Minister of Natural Resources received notice of the following six fundamental decisions from the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board related to the 2018 calls for bids:

  1. The making of a call for bids (NS18-1);
  2. The terms and conditions of an exploration licence (NS18-1);
  3. The terms and conditions of a significant discovery licence (NS18-1);
  4. The making of a call for bids (NS18-2);
  5. The terms and conditions of an exploration licence (NS18-2); and
  6. The terms and conditions of a significant discovery licence (NS18-2).

Pursuant to section 34 of the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Resources Accord Implementation Act, this notice confirms that the Minister of Natural Resources suspended the implementation of these fundamental decisions for a period ending on May 22, 2018.

Following the suspension and pursuant to paragraph 35(1)(a) of the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Resources Accord Implementation Act, this notice confirms that on May 22, 2018, the Minister of Natural Resources set aside these fundamental decisions.

Terence Hubbard

Director General
Petroleum Resources Branch

On behalf of the Minister of Natural Resources

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Delta Police Department as a fingerprint examiner:

Ray E. Warren

Ottawa, July 3, 2018

Ellen Burack

Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

GLOBAL AFFAIRS CANADA

Canada’s continued trade relationship with the United Kingdom post-Brexit

On March 29, 2017, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (hereinafter referred to as “the United Kingdom”) invoked Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty and notified the European Council of its intention to withdraw from the European Union on March 30, 2019. This withdrawal from the European Union is also known as “Brexit”.

Through this notice, the Government of Canada wishes to inform Canadians of the expected change to the scope of application of the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (hereinafter referred to as “CETA”) between Canada and the European Union, resulting from the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union, as well as of Canada’s continued engagement with the United Kingdom on trade issues.

At the time of the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union, the United Kingdom will cease to be considered a party to the European Union treaties and, thus, will lose those treaties’ benefits and obligations. This withdrawal will affect all treaties between Canada and the European Union, including CETA, which has been provisionally applied since September 21, 2017.

International trade is a key driver of economic growth, contributing to a prosperous middle class. The Government of Canada is committed to maintaining predictable and stable trade relations with the United Kingdom following its withdrawal from the European Union. Since countries’ future trade relations with the United Kingdom will be affected by the outcome of the ongoing negotiations between the United Kingdom and the European Union, Canada is closely following those negotiations and is hopeful that the parties will reach an agreement soon.

One of the possible outcomes of the terms of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union includes the possibility for a time-limited transition period following Brexit during which the United Kingdom would, in some aspects, continue to be treated like a Member State of the European Union. Depending on the details and other outcomes of such a transition period, Canada would consent to the United Kingdom remaining party to CETA and all other Canada–European Union agreements.

Should the European Union and the United Kingdom not reach an agreement on their future relationship in time for Brexit, the Government of Canada is discussing a transitional agreement with the United Kingdom that will allow a seamless transition of CETA, while respecting the United Kingdom’s lack of jurisdiction to negotiate free trade agreements while it is a Member State of the European Union. Post-Brexit, once the United Kingdom has the legal competence to negotiate trade agreements, Canada will work with the United Kingdom to ensure we take full advantage of our particular bilateral trade relationship.

The United Kingdom is an important trading partner for Canada. The United Kingdom is Canada’s largest trading partner in the European Union, and fifth on a global basis.

The Government of Canada will continue to inform Canadians as it continues to actively engage the European Union and the United Kingdom in an effort to minimize disruptions from Brexit for Canadians.

For more information, consult the CETA web page.

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

Director

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

July 30, 2018

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Post Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canadian Race Relations Foundation

 

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

 

Commissioner of Corrections

Correctional Service Canada

 

Director

CPP Investment Board

 

Commissioner

Financial Consumer Agency of Canada

 

Member (Sask., Man., and Alta.)

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada

July 30, 2018

Commissioners and Chairperson

International Joint Commission

 

Members (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Chief Executive Officer

National Capital Commission

 

Director

National Gallery of Canada

 

Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise

Office of the Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise

 

Commissioner of Competition

Office of the Commissioner of Competition

 

Superintendent

Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy Canada

 

Veterans’ Ombudsman

Office of the Veterans’ Ombudsman

 

Chairperson

Social Security Tribunal of Canada

 

TREASURY BOARD SECRETARIAT

Regulatory modernization — Request for stakeholder comments

Background

Canada’s regulatory environment is constantly evolving. In recent years, the Government of Canada has undertaken a number of initiatives to modernize the Canadian regulatory system and improve its performance for both Canadians and businesses.

A renewed modernization effort began in 2016, when the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat launched a review of Canada’s regulatory policy framework, the Cabinet Directive on Regulatory Management. The review responded to emerging risks, improved good regulatory practices, addressed stakeholder frustrations, and aligned the regulatory framework with the Government’s new policy agenda.

The renewed and finalized Cabinet Directive on Regulation (CDR), which will come into effect in fall 2018, sets the foundation for an ambitious second stage of the modernization agenda. In addition to implementing stronger analytical and transparency requirements, the CDR introduces an obligation that departments and agencies review their regulatory stock as the final stage in the regulatory life cycle.

In 2016, the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat was also given the mandate to lead the Government of Canada’s regulatory cooperation priorities. Since then, the Government’s work has renewed and formalized the Canada–United States (U.S.) Regulatory Cooperation Council; established additional formal regulatory cooperation tables, such as the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Regulatory Reconciliation and Cooperation Table (RCT) and the Canada–European Union Regulatory Cooperation Forum (RCF); and examined ways to further reduce regulatory misalignment and barriers to trade in consultation with Canadian and international stakeholders.

Additional modernization projects are underway. The Government of Canada introduced changes to the Red Tape Reduction Act, the Government’s legislative tool to measure and limit administrative burden, in order to encourage better alignment with key trading partners by recognizing the role regulatory cooperation plays in lowering costs to Canadian businesses. The Act will undergo a full review by 2020. Furthermore, the Government committed to developing an e-regulation system — an online platform to engage Canadians on regulations to improve the transparency and efficiency of the overall regulatory process.

Purpose

In 2017, the Advisory Council on Economic Growth recommended that the Government of Canada continue to find ways to promote a regulatory system that is able to evolve to fit an economy where innovation and change are the norm. The Advisory Council’s December report highlighted that regulations should be agile and adaptive enough to balance health, safety and security considerations without imposing barriers to innovation and competitiveness.

Recognizing the importance of ensuring that regulatory frameworks remain effective and relevant, the Government of Canada announced in Budget 2018 that it would pursue a “regulatory reform agenda … to make the Canadian regulatory system more agile, transparent and responsive, so that businesses across the country can explore and act on new opportunities, resulting in benefits for all Canadians.”

Budget 2018 allocated funding for targeted regulatory reviews in three initial key sectors:

  1. agri-food and aquaculture;
  2. health/bio-sciences; and
  3. transportation and infrastructure, including emerging technologies such as autonomous vehicles.

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat is coordinating the three-year targeted regulatory review process with federal departments and agencies, beginning with the examination of regulatory requirements and practices in the three key sectors. Targeted reviews will identify bottlenecks and irritants, and will explore ways to enable regulations to be more agile, transparent, and responsive so that Canadian businesses can grow, resulting in benefits for all Canadians.

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat is seeking public views on the regulatory review process, guided by the following questions:

  1. In your view, are there existing regulatory requirements or practices that impede economic development, competitiveness, or growth for your firm or sector? What are their impacts? How should the Government address these irritants?
  2. Are there existing or emerging technologies, processes, or products in your firm or sector facing barriers because of federal regulations? What changes or tools should the Government consider to facilitate the development, integration, or approval of these technologies, processes, or products for Canadians?
  3. Do you see opportunities for regulatory experimentation in your sector, and if so, what would this look like?

Where possible, please provide the following for each response:

The Government of Canada is also seeking views on areas that could be impacted by new or disruptive technologies and that are not yet regulated, as these areas offer potential for Canada to develop new, agile regulatory frameworks. While the initial focus of the review is on the three targeted sectors, comments from stakeholders in all sectors of Canada’s economy are welcome to inform future review work.

Submissions

The Government of Canada is inviting comments from all stakeholder groups. Please provide your input by September 15, 2018. Submissions can be sent to regulatoryreviews-examensreglementaires@tbs-sct.gc.ca.

Your detailed input will help the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, as well as implicated departments and agencies, in providing practical recommendations on how to identify and resolve irritants and barriers to innovation and economic growth to build a more nimble Canadian regulatory system.

Previously submitted input, ideas, and feedback on formal regulatory cooperation initiatives such as the Canada–U.S. Regulatory Cooperation Council, the Federal/ Provincial/Territorial Regulatory Reconciliation and Cooperation Table (RCT), and the Canada–European Union Regulatory Cooperation Forum (RCF) will also be considered and evaluated as part of this regulatory review work and do not need to be resubmitted.

Transparency

The Government of Canada may make public some or all of the responses received or may provide summaries in its public documents. Therefore, parties making submissions are asked to clearly indicate the name of the individual or the organization that should be identified as having made the submission.

In order to respect privacy and confidentiality, when providing your submission please advise whether

Information received throughout this submission process is subject to the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act. Should you express an intention that your submission, or any portions thereof, be considered confidential, the Government of Canada will make all reasonable efforts to protect this information.

Contact

Lindsay Wild
Director, Regulatory Reviews
Regulatory Affairs Sector
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Email: regulatoryreviews-examensreglementaires@tbs-sct.gc.ca

BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at June 30, 2018

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

21.2

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

7,877.4

 

Advances

-

 

Other receivables

3.6

 
   

7,881.0

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

23,724.4

 

Government of Canada bonds

79,750.0

 

Other investments

425.4

 
   

103,899.8

Property and equipment

 

571.5

Intangible assets

 

41.2

Other assets

 

205.9

 

112,620.6


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

86,063.6

Deposits

Government of Canada

22,027.8

 

Members of Payments Canada

250.2

 

Other deposits

3,123.1

 
   

25,401.1

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

-

Other liabilities

 

638.5

   

112,103.2

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Investment revaluation reserve footnote *

387.4

 
   

517.4

112,620.6

I declare that the foregoing statement is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, July 17, 2018

Sabrina Liguori
Senior Director, Financial Services

I declare that the foregoing statement is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, July 17, 2018

Carolyn A. Wilkins
Senior Deputy Governor