Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 152, Number 20: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

May 19, 2018

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of 11 substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the 11 substances identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on the 11 substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca. Comments can also be submitted to the Minister of the Environment, using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 11 of 13 substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Musks (macro/poly cyclic) Group. These 11 substances were identified as priorities for assessment as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. Two of the 13 substances were determined to be of low concern through other approaches, and proposed decisions for these substances are provided in a separate report.footnote 1 Accordingly, this draft screening assessment addresses the 11 substances listed in the table below. The 11 substances addressed in this draft screening assessment report are hereinafter referred to as the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group.

Substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group

CAS RNfootnote 2

Domestic Substances List name

Common name

Subgroup

106-02-5

Oxacyclohexadecan-2-one

Exaltolide

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

109-29-5

Oxacycloheptadecan-2-one

Hexadecanolide

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

502-72-7

Cyclopentadecanone

Exaltone

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

541-91-3

Cyclopentadecanone, 3-methyl-

Muskone/Muscone

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

542-46-1

9-Cycloheptadecen-1-one, (Z)-

Civetone

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

7779-50-2

Oxacycloheptadec-7-en-2-one

Hexadecenlactone/Ambrettolide

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

28645-51-4

Oxacycloheptadec-10-en-2-one

Isoambrettolide

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

37609-25-9

5-Cyclohexadecen-1-one

Musk amberol/Ambrettone

Macrocyclic lactones and ketones

1335-94-0

Irone

Irone

Ionones

7779-30-8

1-Penten-3-one, 1-(2,6,6-trimethyl-2-cyclohexen-1-yl)-

1-Methyl-α-ionone

Ionones

108-94-1

Cyclohexanone

Cyclohexanone

Cyclohexanone

Exaltolide, isoambrettolide, 1-methyl-α-ionone, and cyclohexanone were reported to be imported into Canada in total quantities up to 166 810 kg in 2011. In the same year, exaltolide and isoambrettolide were not reported to be manufactured in Canada, whereas the other six substances were manufactured in Canada at quantities up to 950 kg. No quantities were reported for the other substances in this group above the reporting threshold of 100 kg in the 2011 calendar year.

Substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group are used primarily as fragrances or fragrance ingredients. Exaltolide, muskone/muscone, civetone and cyclohexanone occur naturally in the environment. In Canada, substances in this group are used in a variety of applications such as in cosmetics (including body lotion and eau de toilette), sunscreen, and do-it-yourself products (including wall paint).

The ecological risks of the substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group were characterized using the Ecological Risk Classification of organic substances (ERC), which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified the substances in this assessment as having low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from the 11 substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group. It is proposed to conclude that the 11 substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

For the human health risk assessment, the 11 substances in this group were separated into the macrocyclic lactones and ketones subgroup, the ionones subgroup and one substance (cyclohexanone). Substances in the macrocyclic lactones and ketones subgroup are considered to have a low hazard potential. On the basis of available health effects information for structurally related substances, the ionones subgroup has adverse effects, including kidney changes with repeated dose exposures by dermal and inhalation routes. On the basis of this assessment, cyclohexanone demonstrates low potential for adverse effects via the oral and inhalation routes of exposure.

Environmental media and food were not identified as significant sources of exposure to Canadians. For all subgroups, estimates of exposure were derived based on levels of substances in products available to consumers, such as cosmetics. On the basis of these estimates of exposure compared with critical effect levels identified from laboratory studies, margins of exposure are considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that the 11 substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that the 11 substances in the Macrocyclic Lactones and Ketones, Ionones and Cyclohexanone Group do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Proposed guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for strontium

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of a proposed guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for strontium. The proposed technical document for this guideline is available from May 18, 2018, to July 20, 2018, on the Consulting with Canadians website. Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of Health written comments on the proposed document. Comments must be sent to the Secretariat of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water, either by email at HC.water-eau.SC@canada.ca, or by regular mail to the Water and Air Quality Bureau, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, A.L. 4903D, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

May 18, 2018

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Proposed guideline

A maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 7.0 mg/L is proposed for total strontium in drinking water.

Executive summary

Strontium is widely distributed in nature and has been identified in many different minerals. It may be present in water in the environment from natural sources (rock and soil weathering) or as a result of human activities. Although not actively mined in Canada, strontium can be released to the environment as a by-product of other mining operations or from its usage in many industries. Strontium is used in electrical applications and paint, to remove lead from zinc electrolytic solutions, in pyrotechnics and signalling devices, as well as in the manufacture of various other products (e.g. glass, ceramic permanent magnets and glazes, aluminum alloys). Strontium salts are employed in Canada for their beneficial effects on health, either as natural health products (licensed mainly to help support bone health) or in cancer therapy. Radioactive forms of strontium are used in medical applications, such as bone imaging. Strontium is naturally found in the environment as a mixture of four radioisotopes, which are considered stable and weakly radioactive. The focus of this document is limited to strontium’s chemical properties.

This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with strontium in drinking water. It assesses new studies and approaches and takes into consideration the availability of appropriate treatment technology. Based on this review, the proposed guideline for strontium in drinking water is a maximum acceptable concentration of 7.0 mg/L.

Health effects

Although only a few studies conducted in humans have documented adverse effects of strontium on bone, many animal studies have observed adverse bone effects following ingestion of high doses of strontium. Since the highest sensitivity to adverse bone effects occurs during the first year of life, infants are considered to be the sensitive subpopulation for strontium toxicity. Consequently, the proposed MAC of 7.0 mg/L has been established based on studies of bone effects in young rats.

Exposure

Canadians are primarily exposed to strontium through food and drinking water. Strontium concentrations in Canadian food items vary across cities and years and depend on the food item and soil conditions. Strontium levels in Canadian drinking water can vary greatly, depending on geological formations and anthropogenic activities surrounding the source water, with groundwater generally presenting higher levels than surface water. Intake of strontium from drinking water is not expected to occur through either skin contact or inhalation.

Analysis and treatment

Several analytical methods are available for the analysis of total strontium in drinking water at levels well below the proposed MAC. Total strontium includes both its dissolved and particulate forms in a water sample. Therefore, if the two forms are measured separately, the two concentrations must be added before comparison with the MAC.

Chemical precipitation and ion exchange techniques are the two best technologies for removal of naturally occurring strontium in drinking water. Conventional treatment is not effective for strontium removal. At the municipal level, available technologies for the treatment of total strontium include chemical precipitation, ion exchange and reverse osmosis. Other strategies for reducing exposure to strontium include switching to a new source, blending and interconnecting with another water system.

At the residential level, treatment devices using ion exchange or reverse osmosis technologies would be effective at removing strontium from drinking water, although none are currently certified for that purpose. It is important to note that reverse osmosis systems should be installed only at the point of use, as the treated water may be corrosive to internal plumbing components.

International considerations

Leading international organizations have not established guidelines or regulations pertaining to the concentration of strontium in drinking water, although some have derived reference levels. The World Health Organization has established a tolerable daily intake of 0.13 mg/kg body weight per day based on thyroid histological changes in young rats. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has calculated a reference dose of 0.3 mg/kg body weight per day and a health reference level of 1.5 mg/L, based on decreased bone calcification rate in male weanling rats. That Agency also identified strontium as a candidate in its most recent prioritization exercise. Neither the European Union nor Australia has established a limit for strontium in drinking water.

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Bédard, Jean, Q.C.

2018-497

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

 

Chairperson

 

Bossenmaier, Greta

2018-506

National Security and Intelligence Advisor to the Prime Minister

 

Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta

 

Justices

 

Court of Appeal of Alberta

 

Judges ex officio

 

Dilts, Nancy, Q.C.

2018-501

Fagnan, Jane A.

2018-503

Grosse, April D.

2018-504

Kirker, Anne, Q.C.

2018-502

Labrenz, David, Q.C.

2018-480

Neilson, James T., Q.C.

2018-500

Crabtree, The Hon. Thomas J.

2018-482

Supreme Court of British Columbia

 

Judge

 

National Farm Products Council

 

Cyr, Yvon

2018-470

Member

 

Douglas, Brian

2018-496

Member and chairman

 

Richard, The Hon. J. C. Marc

2018-481

Chief Justice of New Brunswick

 

Riendeau, Serge

2018-469

Canadian Dairy Commission

 

Chief Executive Officer

 

Steele, Alexandra

2018-505

Federal Court

 

Prothonotary

 

May 10, 2018

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CANADA

INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CANADA

TELECOMMUNICATIONS ACT

Notice No. SMSE-008-18 — Release of amendments to CB-02 and REC-LAB

Notice is hereby given that Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) has published amendments to the following documents:

These documents will come into force upon their publication on the official publications page of the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website.

General information

The lists of Procedures for Conformity Assessment Bodies will be amended accordingly.

Submitting comments

Interested parties are requested to provide their comments online within 60 days of the date of publication of this notice using the General Inquiry form. Comments and suggestions for improving the procedures may be submitted online using the Standard Change Request form.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website.

Official versions of notices can be viewed on the Canada Gazette website.

May 11, 2018

Martin Proulx
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Chairperson

Atlantic Pilotage Authority

May 21, 2018

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Infrastructure Bank

 

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Post Corporation

 

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

 

Commissioner of Corrections

Correctional Service Canada

 

Director

CPP Investment Board

 

Members (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Parliamentary Librarian

Library of Parliament

 

Director

National Gallery of Canada

 

President

National Research Council of Canada

 

Canadian Representative

Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Commission

 

Chief Electoral Officer

Office of the Chief Electoral Officer

 

Commissioner of Competition

Office of the Commissioner of Competition

 

Parliamentary Budget Officer

Office of the Parliamentary Budget Officer

 

Superintendent

Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy Canada

 

Veterans’ Ombudsman

Office of the Veterans’ Ombudsman

 

Members (April to June 2018 cohort)

Parole Board of Canada

June 29, 2018

Chairperson

Social Security Tribunal of Canada

 

Chief Statistician of Canada

Statistics Canada

 

Executive Director

Telefilm Canada

 

Chief Executive Officer

Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority

 

Continuous intake

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Full-time and Part-time Members

Immigration and Refugee Board

June 29, 2018

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

Commissioners

International Joint Commission