Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 152, Number 10: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

March 10, 2018

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE PROTECTION ACT

Ministerial Instructions Regarding the Processing of Applications under the Federal Self-Employed Persons Class (Farm Management)

Notice is hereby given, under subsection 87.3(6) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, that the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration has established the following Ministerial Instructions that, in the opinion of the Minister, will best support the attainment of the immigration goals established by the Government of Canada.

Overview

Authority for these Ministerial Instructions is derived from section 87.3 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA). The Instructions are directed to officers and the Minister’s delegates who are charged with handling and/or reviewing applications for permanent residence.

These Instructions come into force on the day they are published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, and apply to applications received by designated Department of Citizenship and Immigration offices on or after that date.

Any categories for which Instructions are not specifically issued shall continue to be processed in the usual manner, as per processing priorities established by the Department.

These Instructions are consistent with IRPA objectives as laid out in section 3, specifically, to pursue the maximum social, cultural and economic benefits of immigration; to enrich and strengthen the social and cultural fabric of Canadian society; to support the development of a strong and prosperous Canadian economy; to protect public health and safety and to maintain the security of Canadian society.

The Instructions are compliant with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

The Instructions respect all previously established accords and agreements, including the Canada-Quebec Accord on Immigration, and all existing agreements with provinces and territories.

Intake of permanent residents under the Federal Self-Employed Persons Class

Effective upon the date of publication of these Instructions in the Canada Gazette, Part I, the number of new applications that will be accepted for processing annually for Federal Self-Employed Persons Class applications where the relevant experience of the applicant is in the management of a farm under subsection 88(1) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations will be set at zero. This temporary moratorium will remain in place until otherwise indicated in a future Ministerial Instruction.

Disposition of applications

Applications for permanent residence under the Federal Self-Employed Persons Class by applicants whose relevant experience is in management of a farm that are received by designated Department of Citizenship and Immigration offices on or after the date of publication of these Instructions in the Canada Gazette, Part I, will be returned along with the processing fees.

Ottawa, February 23, 2018

Ahmed Hussen
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of seven hydrocarbon-based substances specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas spent sulphidic caustic, montan wax, and montan-wax fatty acids identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on slop oil, naphtha waste, ethyne (acetylene), and montan-wax fatty acids ethylene esters pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c), and on spent sulphidic caustic, montan wax, and montan-wax fatty acids pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca. Comments can also be submitted to the Minister of the Environment using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of seven hydrocarbon-based substances

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of seven hydrocarbon-based substances. Substances in this group were identified as priorities for assessment as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNfootnote 1) of these substances, their Domestic Substances List (DSL) names and their common names are listed in the table below.

Seven hydrocarbon-based substances

CAS RN

DSL name

Common name

64742-40-1notea

Neutralizing agents (petroleum), spent sodium hydroxide

Spent sulphidic caustic

68477-26-9notea,noteb

Wastes, petroleum

Slop oil

68956-70-7notea,noteb

Petroleum products, C5-12, reclaimed, wastewater treatment

Naphtha waste

74-86-2noteb

Ethyne

Ethyne (acetylene)

8002-53-7notea

Montan wax

Montan wax

68476-03-9notea

Fatty acids, montan-wax

Montan-wax fatty acids

73138-45-1notea,noteb

Fatty acids, montan-wax, ethylene esters

Montan-wax fatty acids ethylene esters

Spent sulphidic caustic, slop oil and naphtha waste are by-products or wastes generated by the petroleum industry that are recycled or reclaimed to a large extent by refineries. No information on the quantity of these petroleum refinery wastes generated in Canada was identified; however, they are all high production volume substances in the United States. Portions of these wastes that are not recycled or reclaimed or sold to industrial users are either treated and disposed of, or shipped offsite to provincial and territorial licensed waste disposal facilities, where they may be further processed. They are not used in products available to consumers and are not expected to be released to the environment. Accordingly, exposure to the environment and to the general population from these wastes or by-products is not expected and the potential risk to the environment and human health is expected to be low.

Ethyne is produced from the conversion of methane under high heat in the presence of oxygen. Ethyne is also manufactured by reacting calcium carbide and water, or may be incidentally produced as a co-product during the cracking of natural gas liquids, naphtha, or gas oil. No information on the quantity of ethyne manufactured in Canada was identified; however, it is a high production volume chemical in the United States. The primary use of ethyne is as a raw material for the production of other chemicals (e.g. 1,4-butanediol, acetylenic alcohols, ethyl and methyl vinyl ethers) in closed systems, followed by its use as a fuel for welding, cutting, and heat treating metals. Based on its use in closed industrial environments or as a fuel operating in high temperature combustion conditions, exposure to the environment and to the general population is expected to be minimal. On the basis of the minimal exposure to the environment and the general population from this substance, as well as the low estimated ecotoxicity and human toxicity of this substance, the potential risk to the environment and human health from ethyne is expected to be low.

Montan wax is a solid wax originating from lignite coal. It has similar properties and uses as the petroleum wax petrolatum, but has a non-petroleum source. In addition to crude montan wax, this assessment considers refined (bleached or deresined) montan wax and its components montan-wax fatty acids and montan-wax fatty acids ethylene esters. Refined montan wax is used in products available to consumers, including cosmetics, automotive products, household cleaning products and food packaging materials. Montan wax is expected to be released to wastewater from these uses and subsequently partition to sediments and biosolids, due to its low water solubility. Experimental and modelled toxicity data indicates that montan wax is considered to be of low ecological hazard. In addition, repeat-dose animal studies indicate low toxicity to humans. Given the low environmental and human health hazards associated with these substances, the potential risk to the environment and human health from these waxes is considered to be low.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from spent sulphidic caustic, slop oil, naphtha waste, ethyne, montan wax, montan-wax fatty acids and montan-wax fatty acids ethylene esters. It is proposed to conclude that sulphidic caustic, slop oil, naphtha waste, ethyne, montan wax, montan-wax fatty acids and montan-wax fatty acids ethylene esters do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as these substances are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is also proposed to conclude that spent sulphidic caustic, slop oil, naphtha waste, ethyne, montan wax, montan-wax fatty acids and montan-wax fatty acids ethylene esters do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as these substances are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that spent sulphidic caustic, slop oil, naphtha waste, ethyne, montan wax, montan-wax fatty acids, and montan-wax fatty acids ethylene esters do not meet the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of results of investigations and recommendations for a substance — cyclohexene, 4-ethenyl- (4-vinylcyclohexene or 4-VCH), CAS RNfootnote 1 100-40-3 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on 4-vinylcyclohexene pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on the substance at this time.

Notice is further given that the ministers will consider using information gathering mechanisms, such as those outlined in the Act, to collect information on the substance.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of 4-vinylcyclohexene

Pursuant to section 68 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of cyclohexene, 4-ethenyl-, hereafter referred to as 4-vinylcyclohexene (4-VCH). The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) for 4-VCH is 100-40-3. This substance is among those substances identified as priorities for assessment on the basis of other human health concerns.

4-VCH does not occur naturally in the environment. It is used primarily as an industrial intermediate and is chemically consumed in the manufacture of flame retardants, plastic/rubber materials and other specialty chemicals. 4-VCH may also be found as a residue in styrene-butadiene latex adhesives used in the manufacture or installation of manufactured items, such as carpets and laminated building materials. Concentrations of 4-VCH in the environment are expected to be very low due to rapid oxidation in the atmosphere and the potential for polymerization. In 2008, less than 100 kg of 4-VCH were manufactured in Canada, and between 1 000 and 10 000 kg were imported into Canada.

The ecological risk of 4-VCH was characterized using the ecological risk classification (ERC) of organic substances. The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified 4-VCH as having a low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from 4-VCH. It is concluded that 4-VCH does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

The critical health effects for 4-VCH are carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity as demonstrated in laboratory studies. Low toxicity was observed in short-term inhalation studies.

Exposure of the general population to 4-VCH is expected to be low. Exposure from environmental media is not expected, given that industry uses 4-VCH in closed systems. Quantities in commerce are also low. 4-VCH may be found as a residue in manufactured products containing styrene-butadiene adhesives. Available information indicates a potential for exposure as a result of off-gassing from a limited number of manufactured items containing these adhesives, but exposure would be limited, occurring only over a short period of time. Given the nature of potential exposure, risk to human health is considered to be low.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that 4-VCH does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Overall conclusion

It is concluded that 4-VCH does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

Consideration for follow-up

While exposure of the general population to 4-VCH is not of concern at current levels, this substance is associated with human health effects of concern. Therefore, there may be a concern for human health if exposure were to increase. Follow-up activities may involve including the substance in future information gathering initiatives, such as a mandatory survey under section 71 of CEPA.

The Government will use the data gathered through these follow-up activities to prioritize further information gathering or risk assessment of this substance, if required.

The screening assessment for this substance is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Proposed guidance on the use of quantitative microbial risk assessment in drinking water

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of proposed guidance on the use of quantitative microbial risk assessment in drinking water as part of the guidelines for Canadian drinking water quality. The proposed guidance document is available from March 9, 2018, to May 11, 2018, on the Consulting with Canadians website. Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of Health written comments on the proposed document. Comments must be sent to the Secretariat of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water, either by email at water_eau@hc-sc.gc.ca, or by regular mail to the Water and Air Quality Bureau, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, A.L. 4903D, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

March 9, 2018

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Executive summary

Quantitative microbiological risk assessment (QMRA) is an approach that can be used by regulatory agencies and drinking water authorities to quantify the health risks from microorganisms for water sources. It follows a common approach that includes hazard identification, exposure assessment, dose-response assessment and risk characterization. QMRA examines the entire drinking water system, from the source water to the consumer, to understand the potential impacts on public health.

Health Canada has developed and uses a QMRA model to support the development of drinking water guidelines regarding enteric viruses and protozoa. The model can also be used as part of site-specific risk assessments at drinking water treatment facilities.

Health Canada recently completed its review of the use of QMRA in drinking water. This guidance document provides an overview of the considerations, assumptions, and limitations that are necessary for conducting site-specific risk assessments. It also describes the principles, equations, and literature values used by the Health Canada QMRA model.

Assessment

QMRA can be a very useful tool in support of water safety management decisions. A well-formulated and thoughtful QMRA can offer important information on prioritizing hazards, identifying alternative risk management priorities and options, selecting appropriate interventions, conducting cost-benefit analyses of risk management actions and setting health-based performance targets. It is important to remember that QMRA does not calculate actual disease outcomes, but provides a measure of probability that disease may occur through the water system.

The intent of this document is to provide stakeholders, such as provincial and territorial regulatory authorities, decision makers, drinking water system owners, and consultants, with guidance on the use of QMRA to assist in understanding microbiological risks in Canadian water systems.

International considerations

QMRA is increasingly being applied by international agencies and governments at all levels as the foundation for informed decision-making surrounding the health risks from pathogens in drinking water. The World Health Organization, the European Commission, the Netherlands, Australia and the United States have all made important advances in QMRA validation and methodology. These agencies and governments have adopted approaches that use QMRA to inform the development of health targets and risk management regarding microbiological contaminants.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH ACT

Notice of annual increase of Health Canada’s Drug Master Files and Certificate of a Pharmaceutical Product fees

Notice is hereby given that the Minister of Health, under the Ministerial Authority to Enter into Contract, hereby updates the fees that are payable for the provision of Drug Master Files and Certificate of a Pharmaceutical Product services by 2%, beginning April 1, 2018. These fees will continue to be updated annually, with an automatic 2% increase to align with the Drug Program’s regulatory user fees.

The current fees and the fees updated as of April 1, 2018, are listed below.

Any inquiries or comments about the updated fees can be directed to Etienne Ouimette, Director General, Resource Management Operations Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, 613-957-6690 (telephone) or cri_irc_consultations@hc-sc.gc.ca (email).

Current fees and the fees updated as of April 1, 2018

Services

Fee as of April 1, 2017

New Fee as of May 1, 2017

Fee as of April 1, 2018

Certificate of Pharmaceutical Product (or a supplemental copy of a Certificate of Pharmaceutical Product)

$86

N/A

$88

New Drug Master Files — file registration

$442

$1,200

$1,224

Drug Master Files — letter of access

$200

$170

$173

Drug Master Files — biannual updates

$200

N/A

N/A

Drug Master Files — update

N/A

$520

$530

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT

Notice of annual increase of fees pursuant to the Fees in Respect of Drugs and Medical Devices Regulations

Notice is hereby given, under section 19.2 of the Financial Administration Act, that in keeping with section 4 of the 2011 Fees in Respect of Drugs and Medical Devices Regulations, every fee outlined by the Regulations is to be increased annually by 2%, rounded up to the nearest dollar.

The current fees and the fees updated as of April 1, 2018, are listed below.

Any inquiries or comments about the updated fees can be directed to Etienne Ouimette, Director General, Resource Management Operations Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, 613-957-6690 (telephone) or cri_irc_consultations@hc-sc.gc.ca (email).

The current fees and the fees updated as of April 1, 2018

Fee Category

Section in Fees in Respect of Drugs and Medical Devices Regulations

Fee as of April 1, 2017

Fee as of April 1, 2018

PART 2 — DRUGS

Fees for Examination Services — Schedule 1

New active substance

6

$341,770

$348,606

Clinical or non-clinical data and chemistry and manufacturing data

6

$173,106

$176,569

Clinical or non-clinical data only

6

$80,794

$82,410

Comparative studies

6

$48,834

$49,811

Chemistry and manufacturing data only

6

$23,089

$23,551

Published data only

6

$19,147

$19,530

Switch from prescription to non-prescription status

6

$46,491

$47,421

Labelling only

6

$3,111

$3,174

Administrative submission

6

$324

$331

Disinfectants

6

$4,305

$4,392

Drug identification number application —labelling standards

6

$1,726

$1,761

Remission

Remission processing fee

11(1)(a)(iii)

$566

$578

Establishment Licence Fees

Fabrication of Drugs — Schedule 2

Basic fee

19(1), 27, 28(1)(a), 28(2)(a)

$17,402

$17,751

Each additional category

19(1)(a)

$4,361

$4,449

Dosage form classes:

$0

$0

2 classes

19(1)(b)

$8,708

$8,883

3 classes

19(1)(b)

$17,402

$17,751

4 classes

19(1)(b)

$21,762

$22,198

5 classes

19(1)(b)

$26,106

$26,629

6 classes

19(1)(b)

$30,454

$31,064

Each additional class

19(1)(b)

$1,748

$1,783

Sterile dosage forms

19(1)(c)

$8,708

$8,883

Packaging/Labelling of Drugs — Schedule 3

Basic fee

20(1), 20(3)(a), 28(1)(b), 28(2)(b)

$11,636

$11,869

Each additional category

20(1)(a)

$2,907

$2,966

Dosage form classes:

$0

$0

2 classes

20(1)(b)

$5,803

$5,920

3 or more classes

20(1)(b)

$8,708

$8,883

Importation and Distribution of Drugs — Schedule 4

Basic fee

21(a), 22, 28(1)(c) and (d), 28(2)(c) and (d)

$7,256

$7,402

Each additional category

21(a)(i), 22(a)

$1,816

$1,853

Dosage form classes:

$0

$0

2 classes

21(a)(ii), 22(b)

$3,630

$3,703

3 or more classes

21(a)(ii), 22(b)

$7,256

$7,402

Each fabricator

21(b)(i)

$1,748

$1,783

Each additional dosage form class for each fabricator

21(b)(ii)

$881

$899

Distribution or Wholesaling

Distribution or wholesaling fee

23

$4,361

$4,449

Testing

Testing fee

24

$2,907

$2,966

Drug Analysis — Schedule 5

Vaccines (1)

25

$29,001

$29,582

Drugs, not included in items 1, 6 and 9 of this Schedule, that are listed in Schedule D to the Food and Drugs Act

25

$11,603

$11,836

Drugs for human use that are listed in Schedule F to the Food and Drug Regulations that are controlled drugs or narcotics

25

$8,708

$8,883

Drugs for human use, not included in any other item, for which a drug identification number has been assigned

25

$4,361

$4,449

Radiopharmaceuticals

25

$0

$0

Whole blood and its components (6)

25

$0

$0

Hemodialysis products

25

$0

$0

Drugs that are labelled as disinfectants, including those listed in paragraph 9(f) of this Schedule, but excluding other drugs labelled as disinfectants of medical devices

25

$0

$0

Drugs that meet the requirements of a class monograph having one of the following titles (9):

$0

$0

Acne Therapies

25

$0

$0

Antidandruff Products

25

$0

$0

Antiperspirants

25

$0

$0

Antiseptic Skin Cleaners

25

$0

$0

Athlete’s Foot Treatments

25

$0

$0

Contact Lens Disinfectants 9(f)

25

$0

$0

Fluoride-Containing Anti-Caries Products

25

$0

$0

Medicated Skin Care Products

25

$0

$0

Sunburn Protectants

25

$0

$0

Throat Lozenges

25

$0

$0

Fees for the Examination of Dealer’s Licence Applications

Dealer’s Licence

Dealer’s licence

31(1)

$5,082

$5,184

Fees for Right to Sell Drugs

Annual fee

35(1)

$1,152

$1,176

PART 3 — MEDICAL DEVICE FEES

Fees for the Examination of Medical Device Licence Applications

Class II Medical Devices

Class II — Licence application

39(1)

$397

$405

Class III Medical Devices — Schedule 6

Licence application

40(1)(a), 41(a)

$5,691

$5,805

Licence application for a near patient in vitro diagnostic devices

40(1)(a), 41(a)

$9,687

$9,881

Change referred to in paragraph 34(a) of the Medical Devices Regulations that relates to manufacturing

40(1)(a), 41(a)

$1,433

$1,462

Any other change referred to in paragraph 34(a) or (b) of the Medical Devices Regulations

40(1)(a), 41(a)

$5,330

$5,437

Class IV Medical Devices — Schedule 7

Licence application

40(1)(b), 41(b)

$13,235

$13,500

Licence application for devices that contain human or animal tissue

40(1)(b), 41(b)

$12,347

$12,594

Licence application for near patient in vitro diagnostic device

40(1)(b), 41(b)

$22,560

$23,012

Change referred to in paragraph 34(a) of the Medical Devices Regulations that relates to manufacturing

40(1)(b), 41(b)

$1,433

$1,462

Any other change referred to in paragraph 34(a) or (b) of the Medical Devices Regulations

40(1)(b), 41(b)

$6,073

$6,195

Remission

Remission processing fee

44(1)(a)(iii)

$61

$63

Fee for Right to Sell Licensed Class II, III or IV Medical Devices

Fee (if annual gross revenue medical device sales is less than $20,000)

48(1)(a)

$61

$63

Fee (in any other case)

48(1)(b)

$375

$383

Fees for the Examination of an Application for an Establishment Licence

Medical devices establishment licence

51(1)

$8,109

$8,272

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

PATENT ACT

Notice of annual increase of fees pursuant to the Certificate of Supplementary Protection Regulations

Notice is hereby given that, in keeping with subsection 9(1) of the Certificate of Supplementary Protection Regulations, the fee has increased, and will increase, by the annual 2% amount, rounded up to the nearest dollar. These changes will apply to applications filed after September 21, 2017, and April 1, 2018.

The current fee and the fee updated as of April 1, 2018, are listed below.

Any inquiries or comments about the updated fees can be directed to Etienne Ouimette, Director General, Resource Management Operations Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, 613-957-6690 (telephone) or cri_irc_consultations@hc-sc.gc.ca (email).

The current fee and the fee updated as of April 1, 2018
-

Subsection in the Certificate of Supplementary Protection Regulations

New Fee as of September 21, 2017

Fee as of April 1, 2018

Certificate of supplementary protection

9(1)

$9,011

$9,192

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Filing of claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 12(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of the filing of the claims for exemption listed below.

In accordance with subsection 12(2) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, affected parties, as defined, may make written representations to the screening officer with respect to the claim for exemption and the safety data sheet (SDS) or label to which it relates. Written representations must cite the appropriate registry number, state the reasons and evidence upon which the representations are based and be delivered within 30 days of the date of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to the screening officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau, 269 Laurier Avenue West, 8th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

Julie Calendino
Chief Screening Officer

On February 11, 2015, the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) was amended and the Controlled Products Regulations (CPR) and the Ingredient Disclosure List were repealed and replaced with the new Hazardous Products Regulations (HPR). The revised legislation (HPA/HPR) is referred to as WHMIS 2015 and the former legislation (HPA/CPR) is referred to as WHMIS 1988. Transitional provisions allow compliance with either WHMIS 1988 or WHMIS 2015 for a specified period of time.

The claims listed below seek an exemption from the disclosure of supplier confidential business information in respect of a hazardous product; such disclosure would otherwise be required under the provisions of the relevant legislation.

The claims seeking an exemption from the disclosure of supplier confidential business information

Claimant

Product Identifier

Subject of the Claim for Exemption

Registry Number

Canadian Energy Services

PCSURF-3511

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

11885

Momentive Performance Materials

Niax* catalyst EF-708

C.i. and C. of two ingredients C. of two ingredients

11886

Nalco Canada ULC

NALCO® EC1652A

C.i. and C. of two ingredients C. of two ingredients

11887

Flotek Chemistry

StimOil PD 126

C.i. and C. of two ingredients C. of three ingredients

11888

Canadian Energy Services

WRXSOL Poly CI-A

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

11889

Nalco Canada ULC

CORR11540W

C.i. and C. of three ingredients C. of four ingredients

11890

Canadian Energy Services

WRXSOL Poly CI-B

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

11891

Covestro LLC

BAYFILL 56IF05U

C.i. of two ingredients C. of four ingredients

11892

The Lubrizol Corporation

Lubrizol ® 5060

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

11893

The Lubrizol Corporation

ADDCO TM 402-G

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

11894

LIFELAST

DuraShield 310 Resin

C. of eight ingredients C.i. of two ingredients

11895

BP Lubricants

Molub-Alloy OG 936 SF Heavy Spray

C. of eight ingredients

11896

BP Lubricants

Rustilo Aqua 21

C. of five ingredients

11897

BP Lubricants

Optigear Synthetic X 320 AD

C. of one ingredient

11898

BP Lubricants

Alpha HC 320 EP

C. of three ingredients

11899

BP Lubricants

Alpha HC 320

C. of one ingredient

11900

BP Lubricants

Hysol SL 35 XBB

C. of seven ingredients

11901

BP Lubricants

Alusol SL 51 XBB

C. of seven ingredients

11902

Americhem Clay Stabilizer, LLC

ACS ClayLOK

C.i. and C. of three ingredients

11903

Multi-Chem Production Chemicals Co.

MC MXI 3-2831

C.i. of two ingredients

11904

Multi-Chem Production Chemicals Co.

MC MX 924A-5

C.i. of two ingredients

11905

Calfrac Well Services Ltd.

DynaRate 6524

C.i. of three ingredients

11906

Halliburton Group Canada

D-AIR 3000W

C.i. of one ingredient C. of two ingredients

11907

Halliburton Group Canada

HAI-404M

C.i. of six ingredients C. of ten ingredients

11908

Halliburton Group Canada

LCA-1

C.i. of one ingredient C. of one ingredient

11909

Nalco Canada ULC

FROTH PRO 706

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

11910

Covestro LLC

Bayhydur 303

C.i. of one ingredient C. of three ingredients

11911

Covestro LLC

BAYTHERM 871 COMPONENT B

C.i. of one ingredient C. of five ingredients

11912

Covestro LLC

BAYDUR 684 COMP B

C.i. and C. of three ingredients

11913

Baker Hughes Canada Company

PETROSWEET™ HSO3510A SCAVENGER

C.i. and C. of one ingredient C. of eight ingredients

11914

Imperial Oil Limited

Mobil Rarus 829

C. of four ingredients

11915

Imperial Oil Limited

CAT EXTREME APPLICATION GREASE 1

C. of nine ingredients

11917

Suez Water Technologies & Solutions Canada

PROSWEET S1800

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

11918

Calfrac Well Services Ltd.

DynaRate 6106

C.i. and C. of one ingredient C. of two ingredients

11919

Baker Hughes Canada Company

BPR 44855R SETTLING AID

C. of four ingredients C.i. of one ingredient

11920

Covestro LLC

BAYFILL 53IF33

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

11921

Nalco Canada ULC

NALCO® 63431

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

11922

Schlumberger Canada Limited

WT-1040

C. of one ingredient

11923

Schlumberger Canada Limited

CAL-ACID* 2020

C. of two ingredients

11924

Afton Chemical Corporation

HiTEC 6406C Fuel Additive

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

11925

Baker Hughes Canada Company

HI-M-PACT™ 5557 KHI Hydrate Inhibitor

C.i. of one ingredient C. of four ingredients

11926

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Burns, Marta E.

2018-174

Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta

-

Justice

-

Court of Appeal of Alberta

-

Judge ex officio

-

Federal Court

-

Judges

-

Federal Court of Appea

-

Judges ex officio

-

Norris, John

2018-185

Walker, Elizabeth

2018-184

Her Majesty’s Court of Queen’s Bench for Saskatchewan

-

Judges/Juges

-

MacMillan-Brown, Heather D., Q.C.

2018-175

McCreary, Meghan, Q.C.

2018-176

Leef, Karen D. M.

2018-177

Superior Court of Justice in and for the Province of Ontario, a member of the Family Court branch

-

Judge

-

Court of Appeal for Ontario

-

Judge ex officio

-

Paquet, Sarah

2018-179

Shared Services Canada

-

Executive Vice-president

-

Semaan, Nada

2018-178

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

-

Director

-

Supreme Court of British Columbia

-

Judges

-

Baker, Wendy A., Q.C.

2018-172

Matthews, Sharon, Q.C.

2018-173

Norell, Barbara J., Q.C.

2018-171

Wallace, Peter

2018-145

Secretary of the Treasury Board

-

March 1, 2018

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA SHIPPING ACT, 2001

Western Canada Marine Response Corporation

Notice of an addition to the fees charged by Western Canada Marine Response Corporation pursuant to an arrangement required by subsection 168(1) of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001
Description

Western Canada Marine Response Corporation (“WCMRC”) is a certified response organization pursuant to section 169 of the Act in respect of a rated capability of 10 000 tonnes and a geographic area covering the waters bordering British Columbia (including the shorelines associated with such waters) and excluding waters north of 60° north latitude. This notice establishes an additional bulk oil cargo fee for the Trans Mountain Expansion Project, to be charged in addition to the registration and bulk oil cargo fees, and any amendments thereto, as published by notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I.

Definitions
Trans Mountain Expansion Project bulk oil cargo fee

Interested persons may, within 30 days after the date of publication of this notice, file notices of objection that contain the reasons for the objection to the Manager, Marine Safety and Security, Transport Canada, Place de Ville, Tower C, 10th Floor, 330 Sparks Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N8, 613-993-8196 (fax), marinesafety-securitemaritime@tc.gc.ca (email). All such representations must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, the name of the response organization submitting the list of proposed amended fees, and the date of publication of the notice of proposed amended fees.

February 28, 2018

Mark Johncox, CA

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Current opportunities

Position

Organization

Closing date

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Infrastructure Bank

-

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

-

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Post Corporation

-

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

-

President

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

-

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Dairy Commission

-

President

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

-

Chairperson and Members

Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board

March 19, 2018

Commissioner of Corrections

Correctional Service Canada

-

Director

First Nations Financial Management Board

March 12, 2018

Members (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

-

Parliamentary Librarian

Library of Parliament

-

Director (Federal Representative)

Nanaimo Port Authority

March 12, 2018

Chief Electoral Officer

Office of the Chief Electoral Officer

-

Information Commissioner

Office of the Information Commissioner

-

Director (Federal Representative)

Port Alberni Port Authority

March 12, 2018

Commissioner

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

-

Chairperson

Social Security Tribunal

-

Vice-Chair and Members

Standards Council of Canada

March 26, 2018

Executive Director

Telefilm Canada

-

Chief Executive Officer

Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority

-

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Full-time and Part-time Members

Immigration and Refugee Board

June 29, 2018

Members

Parole Board of Canada

-

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

Commissioner

International Joint Commission