Vol. 151, No. 49 — December 9, 2017

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Federal Environmental Quality Guideline for triclosan

Whereas the Minister of the Environment issues the environmental quality guidelines for the purpose of carrying out the Minister’s mandate related to preserving the quality of the environment;

Whereas the guidelines relate to the environment pursuant to paragraph 54(2)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

And whereas the Minister of the Environment has consulted provincial and territorial governments and the members of the National Advisory Committee who are representatives of indigenous governments in accordance with subsection 54(3) of the Act;

Notice is hereby given that the Federal Environmental Quality Guideline for triclosan is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards for nitrogen dioxide

Whereas the Minister of the Environment wishes to set ambient air quality standards issued as environmental quality objectives specifying goals or purposes for pollution prevention or environmental control that lead to improved air quality, healthier communities and the protection of the environment;

Whereas the Minister of Health wishes to preserve and improve public health;

Whereas the ministers have worked collaboratively with provinces and territories, Indigenous peoples’ representatives, and stakeholders from industry, health, and environmental organizations through a consensus-based process under the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) for the development of the Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) for nitrogen dioxide;

Whereas the Minister of the Environment has offered to consult provincial and territorial governments and members of the National Advisory Committee of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 who are representatives of Indigenous peoples, in compliance with subsection 54(3) of the Act;

Whereas at least 60 days have elapsed following the day on which the Minister of the Environment offered to consult in accordance with subsection 54(3) of the Act;

And whereas the objectives for nitrogen dioxide relate to the environment, an area identified in paragraph 54(2)(a) of the Act, and to elements of the environment that may affect the life and health of Canadians, as specified in subsection 55(1) of the Act;

Now, therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 54(1) of the Act, and the Minister of Health, pursuant to subsection 55(1) of the Act, issue these objectives for ambient nitrogen dioxide as described in the Annex.

December 9, 2017

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

  1. The Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) for nitrogen dioxide (NO2)(see footnote 1) are based on three interrelated elements:
    • (i) An averaging time;
    • (ii) Numerical values for each averaging time; and
    • (iii) The statistical form which sets out the method of calculation to determine how the ambient air pollutant concentrations compare to the numerical value of the CAAQS to determine the achievement of the standard.
  2. The CAAQS for NO2 are provided in the table below.

    Averaging Time

    Numerical Values

    Statistical Form

    Year 2020

    Year 2025

    1 hour

    60 ppb (see note a)

    42 ppb

    Three-year average of the annual 98th percentile of the
    daily-maximum 1-hour average concentrations

    Annual (1 year)

    17.0 ppb

    12.0 ppb

    Average over a single calendar year of all the 1-hour average concentrations

    Note a: ppb = parts per billion by volume

  3. The CAAQS for NO2 for the year 2020 come into effect on the day following their publication in the Canada Gazette, Part I, and remain in effect until 11:59 p.m. on December 31, 2024.
  4. The CAAQS for NO2 for the year 2025 will come into effect as of 12:00 a.m. on January 1, 2025.
  5. A review of the CAAQS for NO2 will be undertaken periodically.
  6. The national ambient air quality objectives for nitrogen dioxide (maximum desirable, maximum acceptable, maximum tolerable) that were published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on August 12, 1989, are rescinded on the day of publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Notice.)

Exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the air is associated with both direct and indirect effects on human health and the environment. Direct inhalation of NO2 can adversely affect respiratory function and has also been linked to effects on the cardiovascular system, as well as on fetal growth and birth weight. Direction inhalation of NO2 has also been linked to premature death. Studies indicate that NO2 can adversely affect the health of Canadians even at low concentrations. Direct exposure of plants to NO2 can cause a decrease in the quality, growth and yield of vegetation (including crops), with related financial losses. NO2 contributes to the formation of acid rain, which can be deposited onto soils and surface waters and can cause deforestation, acidify rivers and lakes to the detriment of aquatic life, and corrode buildings, bridges and other infrastructure. Continued deposition of acidic compounds (especially at levels beyond what the ecosystems can tolerate) can lead to significant stress to the environment. Additionally, NO2 also contributes to eutrophication of ecosystems, which is associated with a number of adverse effects such as excessive growth of algae, which can be lethal for fish and reduce the biodiversity of vegetation species. The latest scientific information supports the need for both short-term (one hour) and long-term (annual) ambient air quality standards for NO2 to address these effects on human health and the environment.

NO2 is also a precursor pollutant that contributes to the formation of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ground-level ozone (ozone) for which Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) were published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on May 25, 2013. Exposure to these two pollutants increases the risk of adverse human health effects contributing to respiratory and cardiovascular disease and premature death. Ozone can also adversely impact the growth and yield of vegetation (including crops) and PM2.5 can impair visibility and cause haze in some parts of Canada, all of which can result in substantial economic losses. Ozone is also a potent greenhouse gas and a short-lived climate pollutant that contributes to near-term climate change.

The CAAQS were developed considering health and environmental impacts and are intended to drive continuous improvement of air quality in Canada. The CAAQS were developed collaboratively by Health Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada, provinces, territories, Indigenous peoples’ representatives, and stakeholders from industry, health, and environmental organizations through a consensus-based process under the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME).

The CAAQS are a key element of the Air Quality Management System (AQMS), a collaborative approach implemented by federal, provincial and territorial governments for improving air quality in Canada and for protecting the health of Canadians and the environment. As part of the continuing implementation of the AQMS, CCME endorsed the CAAQS for NO2 in November 2017.

The AQMS is comprehensive, considering all significant sources of air pollutant emissions, and providing a consistent, yet flexible, framework to implement air quality management actions. These actions are guided by the Air Zone Management Framework (see footnote 2) of CCME, which includes four air quality management levels that encourage progressively more rigorous actions by jurisdictions as air quality approaches or exceeds the CAAQS, thereby ensuring that the CAAQS are not pollute-up-to levels.

The management levels for the CAAQS for NO2 are summarized in the table below.

 

Range of Ambient Air Pollutant Concentrations

Air quality management levels (see footnote 3) and goals

NO2
1-hour CAAQS
(see note a)
(ppb)

NO2
Annual CAAQS
(see note b)
(ppb)

2020

2025

2020

2025

RED
Reduce ambient air pollutant concentrations below the CAAQS

>60

>42

>17.0

>12.0

ORANGE
Prevent CAAQS exceedance

>31 and ≤60

>31 and ≤42

>7.0 and ≤17.0

>7.0 and ≤12.0

YELLOW
Prevent air quality deterioration

>20 and ≤31

>2.0 and ≤7.0

GREEN
Keep clean areas clean

≤20

≤2.0

Note a: The concentrations have the same statistical form as their corresponding CAAQS (see the Annex above).

Note b: The concentrations have the same statistical form as their corresponding CAAQS (see the Annex above).

To assist in the management of the air quality, provinces and territories have delineated their jurisdictions into local areas called air zones that have different air quality characteristics that are influenced by the number and type of air pollutant sources, meteorology and topography. Provinces and territories lead air quality management actions in the air zones, guided by a number of guidance documents developed by CCME in consultation with stakeholders.

Under the AQMS, federal, provincial and territorial governments have agreed to report regularly on air quality and on the management actions undertaken to improve air quality.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of three substances in the Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides Group — phthalic anhydride, CAS RN (see footnote 4) 85-44-9, maleic anhydride, CAS RN 108-31-6, and trimellitic anhydride, CAS RN 552-30-7 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas phthalic anhydride, maleic anhydride and trimellitic anhydride are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on phthalic anhydride, maleic anhydride and trimellitic anhydride pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of the Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides Group

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of three of the eight substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides Group. These three substances were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. The other five substances were determined to be of low concern through other approaches, and decisions for these substances are provided in separate reports. (see footnote 5) Accordingly, this screening assessment addresses the three substances listed in the table below.

Substances in the Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides Group

CAS RN (see footnote 6)

Domestic Substances List name

Common name

85-44-9

1,3-Isobenzofurandione

Phthalic anhydride

108-31-6

2,5-Furandione

Maleic anhydride

552-30-7

5-Isobenzofurancarboxylicacid, 1,3-dihydro-1,3-dioxo

Trimellitic anhydride

In 2011, imported quantities of phthalic anhydride and trimellitic anhydride were <12 550 000 kg and 1 000 000–10 000 000 kg, respectively, based on surveys issued pursuant to section 71 of CEPA. The two substances were not reported as being manufactured in Canada above the reporting threshold of 100 kg. Maleic anhydride was not included in surveys pursuant to section 71 of CEPA; however, Canadian average annual import volumes of maleic anhydride from 2013 to 2016 were approximately 9 000 000 kg.

All of the substances in the Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides Group are primarily used as intermediates in the production of other chemicals. The substances in this group do not naturally occur in the environment. Phthalic anhydride may be formed through the photochemical breakdown of other organic substances in air.

Phthalic anhydride and maleic anhydride are present on the list of substances reported to the National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI). Phthalic anhydride and maleic anhydride have been reported to be released in quantities of 90 kg and 18 kg, respectively. A report from the National Research Council of Canada reported phthalic anhydride to be present in indoor air and dust in homes in Canada.

Phthalic anhydride is primarily used as a chemical intermediate for the synthesis of phthalate esters. It may also be used in the production of polyester resins, alkyd resins, and other chemical substances such as pigments and dyes. In Canada, phthalic anhydride is present in consumer spray paint products, floor polishes, and cosmetic products including nail polishes and eye adhesives. In Canada, it has also been identified for use in the manufacture of food packaging materials.

Based on available information, maleic anhydride is primarily used as a chemical intermediate in the synthesis of unsaturated polyester resins as well as other chemical substances. In Canada, maleic anhydride was identified as an ingredient in shampoos, bubble baths (oil and foam), body cleansers, bath salts, exfoliants, and temporary tattoos. Through safety data sheets, the substance was also identified in wood blending sticks designed to repair minor scratches on wood surfaces. Maleic anhydride has been identified in Canada for use in the manufacture of food packaging materials.

Trimellitic anhydride is used in commercial applications including paint and coating applications and plastic and rubber materials where it functions as an intermediate. The substance was identified for use as a component in resins used in the manufacture of returnable bottles used for milk, water, and juice. Trimellitic anhydride was reported to be used as an ingredient in one product available to consumers (i.e. nail polish) in Canada.

The ecological risks of the substances in the Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides Group were characterized using the Ecological Risk Classification (ERC) of organic substances. The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified three of the substances in the Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides Group as having low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from maleic anhydride, trimellitic anhydride and phthalic anhydride. It is proposed to conclude that maleic anhydride, trimellitic anhydride and phthalic anhydride do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Based on the available information, the critical effect for characterization of the risk to human health from exposure to phthalic anhydride is respiratory sensitization. A comparison of the estimated exposure levels of phthalic anhydride from its uses in products available to consumers including spray paints, floor polishes, and eye adhesives to critical effect levels resulted in margins of exposure that are considered adequate to account for uncertainties in the health and exposure databases. A comparison of estimated exposure to phthalic anhydride from its presence in indoor air to critical effect levels resulted in margins of exposure that are considered adequate to account for uncertainties in the health and exposure databases.

Based on the collective information, the critical effects for characterization of the risk to human health from exposure to maleic anhydride are effects on the kidneys and bladder. A comparison of estimated exposure levels from its uses in products available to consumers to critical effect levels resulted in margins of exposure that are considered adequate to account for uncertainties in the health and exposure databases.

The estimated exposure to trimellitic anhydride from environmental media or food packaging is expected to be negligible and exposure from the use of nail polish is not expected based on the substance function in the product. The overall exposure of the Canadian general population to trimellitic anhydride is negligible; therefore, the risk to human health is considered to be low.

Based on the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that phthalic anhydride, maleic anhydride, and trimellitic anhydride do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that phthalic anhydride, maleic anhydride and trimellitic anhydride do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of 14 substituted diphenylamines (SDPAs) specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) or subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas 4 of the 14 substances identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a final screening assessment for one of these substances, benzenamine, N-phenyl-, reaction products with styrene and 2,4,4-trimethylpentene (BNST), was published under subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on August 1, 2009, and BNST was subsequently added to the List of Toxic Substances, Schedule 1 of the Act, on March 2, 2011;

Whereas a summary of the final screening assessment conducted on the 14 substances pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is now concluded that the 14 substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

And whereas on the basis of information now available, BNST does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 and does not meet the virtual elimination provisions set out in subsection 77(4) of the Act;

Notice is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action at this time under section 77 of the Act for the four substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Act;

Notice is further given that the Minister of the Environment will consider using information-gathering mechanisms, such as those outlined in the Act, to collect commercial information on nine substances identified in the Annex below;

Notice is also hereby given that the ministers are satisfied that the inclusion of BNST on the List of Toxic Substances is no longer necessary and are therefore recommending to the Governor in Council the deletion of BNST from the List of Toxic Substances in accordance with subsection 90(2) of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of 14 substituted diphenylamines

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on 14 substituted diphenylamines (SDPAs). The SDPAs were identified as priorities for action as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority based on other human health concerns or on their potential use as alternatives for each other. One of these 14 SDPAs is benzenamine, N-phenyl-, reaction products with styrene and 2,4,4-trimethylpentene, known as BNST, which had previously been assessed during the Challenge initiative of the Chemicals Management Plan, and which is reassessed based on new information obtained after the original assessment.

The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (see footnote 7) (CAS RN) and Domestic Substances List (DSL) names of the 14 SDPAs are listed below. These include seven discrete substances and seven substances that are UVCBs (Unknown or Variable Composition, Complex Reaction Products, or Biological Materials). They are all diphenylamines with various degrees of phenyl or alkyl substitution and similar physical-chemical properties. The seven substances that are UVCBs also contain chemical structures that are the same or analogous to the discrete SDPAs in this assessment.

Identity of substances in the SDPAs assessment

CAS RN

Domestic Substances List name

Chemical structure(s) used in the ecological assessment

101-67-7

Benzenamine, 4-octyl-N-(4-octylphenyl)-

Dioctyl DPA

4175-37-5 (see note a)

Benzenamine, 4-octyl-N-phenyl-

Monooctyl DPA

10081-67-1

Benzenamine, 4-(1-methyl-1-phenylethyl)-N-[4-(1-methyl-1-phenylethyl)phenyl]-

Dimethyl distyrenated DPA

15721-78-5

Benzenamine, 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)-N-[4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl]-

Dioctyl DPA

24925-59-5

Benzenamine, 4-nonyl-N-(4-nonylphenyl)-

Dinonyl DPA

26603-23-6

Benzenamine, ar-octyl-N-(octylphenyl)-

Dioctyl DPA

27177-41-9 (see note b)

Benzenamine, ar-nonyl-N-phenyl-

Monononyl DPA

36878-20-3

Benzenamine, ar-nonyl-N-(nonylphenyl)-

Monononyl DPA (see note c)

Dinonyl DPA (see note d)

68411-46-1

Benzenamine, N-phenyl-, reaction products with 2,4,4-trimethylpentene

Monobutyl monooctyl DPA(see note e)

Monooctyl DPA(see note f)

Dioctyl DPA(see note g)

68442-68-2 (see note h)

Benzenamine, N-phenyl-, styrenated

Monostyrenated DPA (see note i)

Distyrenated DPA (see note j)

68608-77-5

Benzenamine, 2-ethyl-N-(2-ethylphenyl)-, (tripropenyl) derivs.

Diethyl monononyl DPA (see note k)

Diethyl dinonyl DPA (see note l)

68608-79-7

Benzenamine, N-phenyl-, (tripropenyl) derivs.

Monononyl DPA (see note m)

Dinonyl DPA (see note n)

68921-45-9 (see note o), (see note p)

Benzenamine, N-phenyl-, reaction products with styrene and 2,4,4-trimethylpentene (BNST)

Monooctyl DPA (see note q)

Dioctyl DPA (see note r)

Monostyrenated DPA (see note s)

Monooctyl monostyrenated DPA (see note t)

184378-08-3

Benzenamine, N-phenyl-, reaction products with isobutylene and 2,4,4-trimethylpentene

Monooctyl DPA (see note u)

Monobutyl monooctyl DPA (see note v)

Dioctyl DPA (see note w)

Dibutyl DPA (see note x)

Monobutyl DPA (see note y)

SDPAs do not occur naturally in the environment. Based on the results of the mandatory and voluntary surveys for the years 2006, 2011, and 2012, and the DSL Inventory Update for 2008, they are used in high quantities in Canada. In 2011, between 1 000 000 and 10 000 000 kg of SDPAs were imported into Canada, either as individual substances or as part of specialty chemical additive packages, according to the results of the CEPA section 71 survey. In the same year, over 10 000 000 kg of SDPAs were also manufactured in Canada, the majority (over 90%) of which was exported. CAS RN 68921-45-9 (BNST) was not surveyed in 2011. For BNST, between 100 000 and 1 000 000 kg of this SDPA was imported into Canada in 2006, and between 1 000 000 and 10 000 000 kg was manufactured in 2006 according to the results of the CEPA section 71 survey. The major uses of SDPAs in Canada are as antioxidants in automotive and industrial lubricants. SDPAs are also used as antioxidants/antidegradants in the manufacturing of plastics or polyurethane foams and rubber products, and are imported in polymers or polyols.

Environmental exposure to SDPAs was examined in multiple scenarios representing industrial activities and overall uses of SDPAs in Canada. The key activities examined were the manufacturing of SDPAs and the blending of lubricants, which are the major anticipated sources of release to the environment. Additional activities were examined, including SDPA uses in the plastics and rubber sectors, automotive and powertrain assembly lines, disposal of lubricants, and biosolids amendment to agricultural land. These scenarios focused on the total representative SDPA structures, given that SDPAs are potential replacements for each other, and changes in product formulations could occur with the total SDPA usage remaining relatively constant.

SDPAs are characterized by low water solubilities, low vapour pressures and high to very high octanol–water partition coefficients. Among the SDPA structures, those with the log Kow of less than 9 (i.e. monooctyl DPA, dimethyl distyrenated DPA, monononyl DPA, monostyrenated DPA, distyrenated DPA, dibutyl DPA, monobutyl DPA, monobutyl monooctyl DPA and monooctyl monostyrenated DPA) are considered to be bioavailable, while those with the log Kow exceeding 9 (i.e. dioctyl DPA, dinonyl DPA, diethyl monononyl DPA and diethyl dinonyl DPA) are not easily absorbed from the exposure medium or diet and thus are considered to have very low bioavailability and have limited bioaccumulation potential. Due to their lack of bioavailability, dioctyl DPA, dinonyl DPA, diethyl monononyl DPA, and diethyl dinonyl DPA are considered to have a lower ecological hazard potential.

Due to their hydrophobic nature, SDPAs in the environment are primarily associated with sediments, suspended particulate matter and soil. They are considered to be persistent in the environment, but are not expected to undergo long-range transport in water or air. Therefore, long-term exposures are expected to be near discharge areas and closer to emission sources.

Analyses revealed that the potential for adverse effects from SDPAs in the environment, including benthic species, aquatic species (fish), piscivorous mammals, and soil-dwelling organisms, is low. The determination of SDPA toxicity in aquatic species is affected by their low water solubilities, where effects are observed at exposure concentrations that surpass substance solubility limits. Low toxicity to soil- and sediment-dwelling organisms was also observed in SDPA exposure studies using the earthworm and freshwater midge as test species, respectively. Toxicity to the representative piscivorous mammal species was evaluated using a read-across approach with rodent data, resulting in a toxicity reference value indicating potential for adverse effects (<10 mg/kg bw/day). To evaluate ecological effects of SDPAs, critical body burden (CBR) calculations were conducted for representative benthic species, aquatic species (fish), piscivorous mammals, and soil-dwelling organisms, and compared to the internal threshold levels of narcotic chemicals causing death. The CBR values were found to be below the threshold levels for both acute and chronic exposures, indicating minimal potential risk from exposure to SDPAs.

Considering all the lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is currently a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from the 14 SDPAs considered in this assessment. It is concluded that the 14 SDPAs considered in this assessment do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

The human health assessment considers all available lines of evidence on the 14 SDPA substances. For the human health assessment, exposure of the general population to SDPAs from environmental media is expected to be low, given the physical-chemical properties and use pattern of these substances. Exposure from food is not expected. Exposure of the general population from the use of products available to consumers results primarily from foam cushioning and automotive lubricants via oral and dermal routes, respectively.

Available empirical data for 8 of the 14 substances in this grouping indicates that these substances are not likely genotoxic. Based on the empirical data available for this substance grouping, health effects following short-term oral exposure in animal studies include the liver and hematological and/or clinical chemistry parameters. The kidney is a target organ at higher levels.

Comparisons of estimates of exposure of the general population to SDPAs from levels in environmental media and from use of products available to consumers with levels associated with adverse health effects are considered to be adequate to account for uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that the 14 SDPAs considered in this assessment do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Overall conclusion

It is concluded that the 14 SDPAs considered in this assessment do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA. This conclusion also applies to BNST, one of the 14 substances assessed; this substance had previously been found to meet the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA in a 2009 screening assessment conducted during the Challenge initiative of the Chemicals Management Plan.

Considerations for follow-up

While exposure of the environment to SDPAs is not of concern at current levels, some of the representative chemical structures of SDPAs are bioavailable. Therefore, there may be a concern if environmental exposure were to increase. Follow-up activities for the substances identified by CAS RNs 4175-37-5, 10081-67-1, 27177-41-9, 36878-20-3, 68411-46-1, 68442-68-2, 68608-79-7, 68921-45-9, and 184378-08-3 will involve including the substance in future information-gathering initiatives, such as a mandatory survey under section 71 of CEPA.

The Government will use the data gathered through these follow-up activities to prioritize further information gathering or risk assessment of these substances, if required.

The screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

[49-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE

PROCEEDS OF CRIME (MONEY LAUNDERING) AND TERRORIST FINANCING ACT

Ministerial directive

Whereas section 11.42 of the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act (the Act) gives the Minister of Finance the authority to issue a directive to any person or entity subject to the Act, in order to safeguard the integrity of Canada’s financial system.

I issue the following directive:

Every person or entity referred to in section 5 of the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act (the Act) shall treat all transactions originating from, or destined to, North Korea (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) as high risk for the purposes of subsection 9.6(3) of the Act.

Rationale for directive

The Minister of Finance has issued this directive in response to a call from the Financial Action Task Force, which called on its members to take measures in relation to North Korea on the grounds that the state’s anti-money laundering or anti-terrorist financing measures are ineffective or insufficient.

Coming into force

This directive will come into force on the day of its publication in the Canada Gazette, Part I.

Termination date

This directive will apply until such time as it is amended or revoked by the Minister of Finance.

Ottawa, November 29, 2017

The Honourable William Francis Morneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Finance

[49-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Filing of claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 12(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of the filing of the claims for exemption listed below.

In accordance with subsection 12(2) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, affected parties, as defined, may make written representations to the screening officer with respect to the claim for exemption and the safety data sheet (SDS) or label to which it relates. Written representations must cite the appropriate registry number, state the reasons and evidence upon which the representations are based and be delivered within 30 days of the date of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to the screening officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau, 269 Laurier Avenue West, 8th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

Julie Calendino
Chief Screening Officer

On February 11, 2015, the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) was amended and the Controlled Products Regulations (CPR) and the Ingredient Disclosure List were repealed and replaced with the new Hazardous Products Regulations (HPR). The revised legislation (HPA/HPR) is referred to as WHMIS 2015 and the former legislation (HPA/CPR) is referred to as WHMIS 1988. Transitional provisions allow compliance with either WHMIS 1988 or WHMIS 2015 for a specified period of time.

The claims listed below seek an exemption from the disclosure of supplier confidential business information in respect of a hazardous product; such disclosure would otherwise be required under the provisions of the relevant legislation.

Claimant

Product Identifier

Subject of the Claim for Exemption

Registry Number

Allnex Canada Inc.,
(c/o Goodmans, LLP)

EBECRYL® 265 radiation curing resins

C.i. of one ingredient

11802

CES Energy Solutions

DM-3033

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient

11803

Schlumberger Canada Limited

Acid Corrosion
Inhibitor A233

C.i. and C. of
four ingredients
C. of four ingredients

11804

Nalco Canada ULC

SICI21011C

C.i. and C. of
four ingredients
C. of four ingredients

11805

Stepan Company

AGENT 2337-92N

C.i. and C. of
four ingredients
C. of one ingredient

11806

TORAY Composite Materials America, Inc.

Torayca® G-85 Prepreg

C.i. and C. of
nine ingredients

11807

Baker Hughes
Canada Company

TOLAD™ 3060 ADDITIVE

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient
C. of one ingredient

11808

The Lubrizol Corporation

Lubrizol® PV1206

C.i. and C. of
two ingredients

11809

OceanMax International Ltd.

Propspeed Etching Primer Base

C.i. and C. of
six ingredients

11810

Suez Water Technologies & Solutions

SPEC-AID 8Q5153ULS

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient

11811

Chemours Canada Company

Capstone™ ST-300
Protector

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient

11812

Chemours Canada Company

Capstone™ FS-63 Fluorosurfactant

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient
C. of one ingredient

11813

Chemours Canada Company

Capstone™ FS-3100

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient
C. of one ingredient

11814

Schlumberger Canada Limited

LUBE OB*

C.i. and C. of
two ingredients
C. of three ingredients

11815

Ingevity Corporation

Indulin UFC

C.i. and C. of
three ingredients

11816

BASF Canada Inc.

Solar T Violet 43L

C.i. of one ingredient

11817

Nalco Canada ULC

EMBR18233A

C.i. and C. of
two ingredients
C. of four ingredients

11818

Henkel Canada Corporation

LOCTITE LIOFOL LA 5026-21

C.i. of two ingredients

11819

Henkel Canada Corporation

LOCTITE LIOFOL LA 6127

C.i. of one ingredient

11820

Ingevity Corporation

EVOFLEX CA-4

C.i. and C. of
two ingredients

11821

Allnex Canada Inc.,
(c/o Goodmans, LLP)

EBECRYL® 220 radiation curing resins

C.i. of one ingredient

11822

Note: C.i. = chemical identity and C. = concentration

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Bruce, Shelly

2017-1461

Associate Chief of the Communications Security Establishment

 

Chabot, Geneviève

2017-1425

Canadian Human Rights Commission

 

Deputy Chief Commissioner

 

Lafontaine, Monique

2017-1420

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

 

Full-time member

 

Parole Board of Canada

 

Full-time members

 

Ontario Regional Division

 

Stewart, Shannon

2017-1411

Sullivan, Christopher H.

2017-1412

Tremblay, Vianney

2017-1410

Prairies Regional Division

 

Agar, Amy

2017-1416

Perry, Sue

2017-1417

Part-time members

 

Atlantic Regional Division

 

Innis, William B.

2017-1409

Ontario Regional Division

 

Carter, M. Lynn

2017-1413

Keane, Sean

2017-1414

Malcolm, Peter Bruce

2017-1415

Prairies Regional Division

 

Burch, Frederick

2017-1418

Pottruff, Betty Ann, Q.C.

2017-1419

Pham, Thao

2017-1403

Associate Deputy Minister of Transport

 

Yaskiel, Ava

2017-1402

Associate Deputy Minister of Finance

 

November 30, 2017

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

BOARDS OF TRADE ACT

Brighton and District Chamber of Commerce

Notice is hereby given that Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, by Order in Council dated October 19, 2017, has been pleased to change the name of the Brighton and District Chamber of Commerce to the Brighton-Cramahe Chamber of Commerce upon petition made therefor under section 39 of the Boards of Trade Act.

November 27, 2017

Virginie Ethier
Director

For the Minister of Industry

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

BOARDS OF TRADE ACT

Chambre de commerce de Cowansville et région

Notice is hereby given that Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, by Order in Council dated October 26, 2017, has been pleased to change the name of the Chambre de commerce de Cowansville et région to the Chambre de commerce de Brome-Missisquoi upon petition made therefor under section 39 of the Boards of Trade Act.

November 29, 2017

Virginie Ethier
Director

For the Minister of Industry

[49-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary as a fingerprint examiner:

Matthew Matthews

Ottawa, November 21, 2017

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

[49-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary as a fingerprint examiner:

Alexander H. Harvey

Ottawa, November 21, 2017

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

[49-1-o]

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

President and Chief Executive Officer

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

 

Chairperson

Business Development
Bank of Canada

 

Directors

Canada Foundation for Innovation

December 10, 2017

Members

Canada Post Corporation

December 29, 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

 

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Dairy Commission

 

Deputy Chairperson

Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Refugee Appeal Division

December 14, 2017

Governor

International Development Research Centre

December 15, 2017

Members (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Chairperson

Military Grievances External Review

December 15, 2017

Chief Electoral Officer

Office of the Chief Electoral Officer

 

Commissioner of Lobbying

Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying

 

Commissioner of Official Languages

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages for Canada

 

Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner

Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner

 

Information Commissioner

Office of the Information Commissioner

 

Senate Ethics Officer

Office of the Senate Ethics Officer

 

Commissioner

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

 

Chairperson

Social Security Tribunal

January 9, 2018

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Full-time and Part-time Members

Immigration and Refugee Board

December 31, 2017

Members

Veterans Review and Appeal Board

December 31, 2017

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

Commissioner

International Joint Commission

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