Vol. 151, No. 40 — October 7, 2017

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2017-87-08-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Whereas, pursuant to subsection 87(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote a), the Minister of the Environment has added the substance referred to in the annexed Order to the Domestic Substances List (see footnote b);

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 87(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote c), makes the annexed Order 2017-87-08-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, September 22, 2017

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Order 2017-87-08-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Amendment

1 Part I of the Non-domestic Substances List (see footnote 1) is amended by deleting the following:

224635-63-6

Coming into Force

2 This Order comes into force on the day on which Order 2017-87-08-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List comes into force.

[40-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of 15 substances specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the 14 substances identified in Table 1 of the annex below are substances in the Phthalate Substance Grouping and are on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, or were otherwise identified as priorities based on other human health concerns;

Whereas 14 additional substances identified in Table 2 of the annex below were not assessed individually, with the exception of DEHP, but were included within the scope of this assessment because of their potential to contribute to cumulative risk from combined exposure to phthalates;

Whereas DEHP is a substance already listed on Schedule 1 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 and was previously found to be harmful to human health but not to the environment on which human life depends, but there was insufficient information to conclude on its potential to cause harm to the environment;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on the 14 substances in the Phthalate Substance Grouping pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or section 74 of the Act, is annexed hereby;

Whereas significant new information for DEHP, which is related to characterizing environmental risk has become available and has been analyzed pursuant to section 68 of the Act, is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that 13 of the 14 substances in the Phthalate Substance Grouping identified in Table 1 do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act and that B79P meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act; and

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that DEHP meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to recommend to Her Excellency the Governor in Council that B79P be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is further given that the ministers have released risk management scope documents for B79P and DEHP to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of risk management actions for these substances and that new information was considered in the risk management scope for DEHP.

Notice is further given that options are being considered for follow-up activities to track changes in environmental and/or human health exposure to 20 substances, as specified in the annex below.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

Marc D’iorio
Director General
Industrial Sectors, Chemicals and Waste Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of the Phthalate Substance Grouping

Pursuant to sections 68 and 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 14 phthalate esters (phthalates), known collectively as the Phthalate Substance Grouping. Substances in this grouping were identified as priorities for assessment under the Substance Groupings Initiative of the Government of Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan (CMP), because they met categorization criteria under section 73 of CEPA or were considered a priority based on human health concerns. This screening assessment follows the August 2015 publication of four state of the science (SOS) reports and an approach document for cumulative risk assessment of phthalates, and it presents information relevant to concluding on the substances in this grouping under section 64 of CEPA.

The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RN (see footnote 2)), Domestic Substances List (DSL) names and acronyms for phthalates in the Phthalates Substance Grouping screening assessment are listed in the table below.

Table 1. Substances in the Phthalate Substance Grouping

CAS RN

Domestic Substances List name

Acronym

Subgroup

131-11-3

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dimethyl ester

DMP

Short-chain

84-69-5

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis(2-methylpropyl) ester

DIBP

Medium-chain

5334-09-8

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, cyclohexyl 2-methylpropyl ester

CHIBP

Medium-chain

84-64-0

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, butyl cyclohexyl ester

BCHP

Medium-chain

84-61-7

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dicyclohexyl ester

DCHP

Medium-chain

523-31-9

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis(phenylmethyl) ester

DBzP

Medium-chain

68515-40-2

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, benzyl C7-9-branched and linear alkyl esters

B79P

Medium-chain

27987-25-3

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis(methylcyclohexyl) ester

DMCHP

Medium-chain

71888-89-6

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, di-C6-8-branched alkyl esters, C7-rich

DIHepP

Medium-chain

27215-22-1

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, isooctyl phenylmethyl ester

BIOP

Medium-chain

16883-83-3

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, 2,2-dimethyl-1-(1-methylethyl)-3-(2-methyl-1-oxopropoxy)propyl phenylmethyl ester

B84P

Medium-chain

68515-48-0 / 28553-12-0

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, di-C8-10-branched alkyl esters, C9-rich; 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diisononyl ester

DINP

See note below

26761-40-0 / 68515-49-1

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diisodecyl ester

DIDP

Long-chain

3648-20-2

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diundecyl ester

DUP

Long-chain

Note: For the purposes of the health review, DINP was included with the medium-chain phthalate esters subgroup, and for the purposes of the ecological review, it was included with the long-chain phthalate subgroup.

Phthalates in the Phthalate Substance Grouping assessment were divided into short-chain, medium-chain and long-chain subgroups, based on the length of the carbon backbone in the ester side groups. The primary basis for the subgroups from a health hazard perspective was a structure activity relationship (SAR) analysis using studies related to certain events in the mode of action for phthalate-induced androgen insufficiency during male reproductive development in the rat. From an ecological perspective, subgrouping was based primarily on differences in log Kow and water solubility, and their resulting effects on bioaccumulation and ecotoxicity. Phthalates within each subgroup are likely to have similar chemical properties while toxicological properties are largely, but not exclusively, similar. The above table also identifies the subgroup to which each phthalate in the grouping was assigned.

Fourteen additional phthalates on the Domestic Substances List were included within the scope of the screening assessment in the context of their potential to contribute to cumulative risk from combined exposure to phthalates. Substance identity information for the additional phthalates considered in this assessment is provided in the table below. Of these 14 additional phthalates, 13 were not assessed individually; therefore, no conclusion under section 64 of CEPA is made on these additional phthalates. The remaining substance, DEHP, was previously assessed in 1994; however, at that time there was insufficient information to provide an ecological conclusion. Information has since become available to support a conclusion on its potential to cause harm to the environment.

Table 2. Additional phthalates considered in the evaluation of cumulative risk

CAS RN

Domestic Substances List name

Acronym

Subgroup

84-66-2

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diethyl ester

DEP

Short-chain

131-16-8

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dipropyl ester

DPrP

Medium-chain

84-74-2

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dibutyl ester

DBP

Medium-chain

85-68-7

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, butyl phenylmethyl ester

BBP

Medium-chain

84-75-3

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dihexyl ester

DnHP

Medium-chain

111381-89-6

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, heptyl nonyl ester, branched and linear

79P

Medium-chain

27554-26-3

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diisooctyl ester

DIOP

Medium-chain

117-81-7

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis(2-ethylhexyl) ester

DEHP

Medium-chain

68648-93-1

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, mixed decyl and hexyl and octyl diesters

610P

Long-chain

117-84-0

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dioctyl ester

DnOP

Long-chain

68515-43-5

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, di-C9-11-branched and linear alkyl esters

D911P

Long-chain

111381-91-0

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, nonyl undecyl ester, branched and linear

D911P-2

Long-chain

85507-79-5

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diundecyl ester, branched and linear

DIUP

Long-chain

68515-47-9

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, di-C11-14-branched alkyl esters, C13-rich

DTDP

Long-chain

Results from a 2012 section 71 survey determined that 6 of the 28 phthalates being considered in the assessment (DINP, DIDP, DUP, DEHP, D911P and DIUP) were manufactured in and/or imported into Canada in quantities greater than 10 000 000 kg/year, while 7 (BCHP, CHIBP, DBzP, DMCHP, BIOP, DnHP and DPrP) were below the reporting threshold of 100 kg/year. Manufacture and import quantities for the remaining 15 phthalates were in the range of 10 000 to 1 000 000 kg/year. Phthalates are used in a variety of consumer, commercial and industrial products in Canada, including plastics, paints and coatings, adhesives and sealants, automotive parts, electronics, and personal care products.

Water is expected to be the primary receiving medium for phthalates, although some release into air may also occur. When released into the environment, short-chain phthalates are predicted to distribute into water, air and soil, while long-chain phthalates will distribute mainly into soil and sediment with lesser proportions present in the water column. Substances in the medium-chain subgroup exhibit a range of physical-chemical properties; therefore, the predicted distribution among environmental media varies across the substances.

Phthalates biodegrade and are not expected to persist in the environment, although degradation rates vary with phthalate molecular size and physicochemical properties, substrate concentration and environmental conditions. Degradation proceeds more slowly under low oxygen conditions, such as may occur in sediment and soil, potentially increasing exposure times for organisms residing in these media. Furthermore, information on Canadian phthalate use and release patterns suggests that exposure to phthalates in the Canadian environment may be continuous. Due to rapid biodegradation, exposure to phthalates will be greatest for organisms inhabiting areas close to release sites.

In the environment, phthalates are bioavailable but do not have high bioaccumulation and biomagnification potential due to a high rate of biotransformation in biota. Most long-chain phthalates demonstrate low hazard potential in aquatic and terrestrial species, while short- and medium-chain phthalates exhibit moderate to high hazard potential. While narcosis is an important mode of toxic action for phthalates, particularly under short-term exposure, there is strong evidence that some phthalates may also elicit longer-term chronic adverse effects through other, specific modes of action. In particular, some phthalates may have the ability to affect the normal functioning of endocrine systems in organisms. While strong in vivo evidence of effects on endocrine systems in aquatic organisms has only been demonstrated for a small number of medium-chain phthalates, evidence suggests that many medium-chain phthalates and some short-chain and long-chain phthalates possess properties that could allow them to adversely influence endocrine activity under some conditions.

Results from an analysis of risk quotients, comparing estimated potential exposures for individual phthalates (predicted environmental concentration, PEC) with their potential for adverse effects (predicted no-effect concentration, PNEC), determined that 13 phthalates in the Phthalates Substance Grouping present a low risk of causing adverse effects to aquatic species based on current exposure levels in the Canadian environment. Two phthalates, B79P and DEHP, have the potential to cause adverse effects in populations of aquatic organisms in Canada at current exposure levels.

A cumulative risk analysis, using the sum of internal toxic units (ITUs) approach and considering predicted exposure levels for each of the 28 phthalates examined in the assessment, indicated there is no ecological concern due to cumulative effects based on lethality and a narcotic mode of action.

For the general population in Canada, exposure estimates derived from biomonitoring data, when available, were compared to environmental media and food exposure estimates. The principal source of exposure to DMP is expected to be from breast milk and food, with indoor air and dust also acting as contributors. Dermal and inhalation (aerosol) exposure to cosmetics and personal care products were also evaluated for adults and infants. Sources of exposure for medium-chain phthalates are indoor air, dust, food and breast milk. Due to the information received indicating that a portion of these substances in manufactured items may come in contact with skin, exposure scenarios were identified to characterize dermal exposure for adults and infants. DIBP and DINP may also be present in children’s toys and articles; therefore, oral exposure from mouthing these products was also evaluated. The principal source of exposure to DIDP and DUP for the general population is expected to be house dust (oral ingestion) as well as food and beverages for DIDP (oral ingestion). Exposure scenarios were identified to characterize dermal exposure for adults and children for both long-chain phthalates.

With regard to human health, the health effects data for medium-chain phthalates shows that there is evidence of effects in animal studies that include developmental, reproductive and systemic effects related to the liver and kidneys. Of these, depending on the phthalate in question, the critical effect for risk characterization is developmental effects on males, as the available evidence is strongest for effects on the development of the reproductive system, such as indications of feminization in males, reproductive tract malformations, and effects on fertility related to a relatively well-studied mode of action called the “rat phthalate syndrome” (RPS). This syndrome has been associated with the lowest levels of exposure to this subgroup examined to date in animal studies. The health effects database for short-chain and long-chain phthalate esters shows no evidence of adverse effects on the development of the reproductive system in males. The critical levels selected for risk characterization for DMP were mainly related to mild changes in brain weights after chronic dermal exposure. The health effects database for long-chain phthalates shows that the critical effect for risk characterization is effects on the liver.

Comparisons of estimates of exposure to the 10 medium-chain phthalates in the Phthalate Substance Grouping from various sources, such as environmental media, food, contact with plastic articles (PVC, polyurethane, polyester, etc.), toys and/or personal care products, as well as biomonitoring levels (if available) for all age groups with the appropriate critical effect levels, result in margins of exposures (MOEs) that are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the exposure and health effects databases. Further, these margins are also considered protective of potential reproductive effects not only in males exposed at older life stages, but also in females, in addition to effects in other organ systems. Comparisons of estimates of exposure to DMP from environmental media, food, and personal care products, as well as biomonitoring levels for all age groups, with the appropriate critical effect levels, result in MOEs that are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the exposure and health effects databases. Comparisons of estimates for exposure to DIDP and DUP from various sources such as environmental media, food and contact with plastic articles, as well as from biomonitoring levels, as available, with critical effect levels results in margins that are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the exposure and health effects databases. Those margins are also protective of potential limited developmental and reproductive effects of DIDP and DUP toxicity not only in males, but also in females, as well as other systemic effects.

Results of the section 71 industry survey indicate that CHIBP, BCHP and BIOP are not currently in use above the reporting threshold of 100 kg, and the likelihood of exposure to the general population in Canada is considered to be low. Hence, the potential risk to human health is considered to be low for these three substances.

Based on the information available, there is evidence that phthalates in the medium-chain subgroup have a common mode of action, as they elicit effects on the developing male reproductive system indicative of RPS. Although the MOEs associated with the original 10 medium-chain phthalates included in this assessment are currently considered adequate on an individual substance basis, these MOEs do not address potential risk from concurrent exposure to these and other similar phthalates. As mentioned above, an additional 5 phthalates (BBP, DBP, DEHP, DnHP, and DIOP) were considered in the evaluation of cumulative risk for human health based on information indicating that their mode of action is likely to be similar to that of phthalates in the medium-chain subgroup, as well as evidence that they may represent a potential for exposure to the general population of Canada.

A cumulative risk assessment, using a conservative, lower-tiered hazard index (HI) approach has been conducted and is not worrisome for the potential cumulative risk of medium-chain phthalates for the general Canadian population, specifically the more sensitive subpopulations (pregnant women / women of childbearing age, infants, and children) at current exposure levels. The HI values for the three subpopulations with the highest estimated exposure levels are all below 1. Hence, further refinement to a higher-tiered assessment is not necessary at this time.

Proposed conclusion

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from 13 of the phthalates in the Phthalate Substance Grouping (DMP, DIBP, CHIBP, BCHP, DCHP, DBzP, DMCHP, DIHepP, BIOP, B84P, DINP, DIDP and DUP); however, there is a risk of harm to organisms, but not to the broader integrity of the environment, from one phthalate included in the Phthalate Substance Grouping, B79P, and one additional phthalate, DEHP. DEHP was previously assessed by Environment Canada and Health Canada in 1994 under the Priority Substances Assessment Program. The assessment concluded that DEHP is harmful to human health in Canada. However, a conclusion for potential harm to the environment could not be determined at that time due to insufficient information.

It is proposed to conclude that 13 of the 14 substances in the Phthalate Substance Grouping do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is proposed to conclude that the remaining substance in the Phthalate Substance Grouping, B79P, as well as DEHP, meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) of CEPA as they are entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity. However, it is proposed to conclude that B79P and DEHP do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(b) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

It is proposed to conclude that all 14 phthalates in the Phthalate Substance Grouping do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Therefore, it is proposed to conclude that B79P and DEHP meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA. B79P and DEHP have been determined not to meet the persistence and bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA.

Considerations for follow-up

While one substance, B79P, is proposed to be harmful to the environment and not harmful to human health at current levels of exposure, B79P may have human health effects of concern if exposure were to increase.

In addition to B79P, 19 other substances are also hazardous and may therefore be of concern to human health or the environment if exposure were to increase. The other 19 substances are DMP, DIBP, CHIBP, BCHP, DCHP, DBzP, DMCHP, DIHepP, BIOP, B84P, DINP, DEP, DPrP, DBP, BBP, DnHP, 79P, DIOP, and DnOP. Follow-up activities to track changes in exposure and/or commercial use patterns are under consideration.

Stakeholders are encouraged to provide, during the 60-day public comment period on the draft screening assessment, any information pertaining to the substances that may help inform the choice of follow-up activity. This could include information on new or planned import, manufacture or use of the substances, if the information has not previously been submitted to the ministers.

The draft screening assessment and the risk management scope documents for these substances are available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html).

[40-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of the final decision after screening assessment of a substance — 1,1-ethanediol, 2,2,2-trichloro- (chloral hydrate), CAS RN (see footnote 3) 302-17-0 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas chloral hydrate is a substance identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (the Act);

Whereas a summary of the final screening assessment conducted on chloral hydrate pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is concluded that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on the substance at this time under section 77 of the Act;

Notice is also hereby given that the Minister of the Environment will consider using information-gathering mechanisms, such as those outlined in the Act, to collect commercial information on the substance.

Minister of the Environment
Catherine McKenna

Minister of Health
Ginette Petitpas Taylor

ANNEX

Summary of the final screening assessment of chloral hydrate

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 1,1-ethanediol, 2,2,2-trichloro-, hereinafter referred to as chloral hydrate. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) for chloral hydrate is 302-17-0. This substance is among those substances identified as priorities for assessment, as it met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA.

Chloral hydrate does not occur naturally in the environment. In Canada, it is primarily found in chlorinated drinking water as a disinfection by-product. It is also an active ingredient in prescription drugs used as sedatives and hypnotics, a medicinal ingredient in natural health products licensed as homeopathic medicines, and an intermediate for industrial metal plating.

The ecological risk of chloral hydrate was characterized using the ecological risk classification (ERC) of organic substances. The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established primarily on the basis of metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is then used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified chloral hydrate as having low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this final screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from chloral hydrate. It is concluded that chloral hydrate does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Drinking water is the primary source of exposure to chloral hydrate for the general population of Canada. Exposure of the general population through its use in the metal plating industry is not expected, as chloral hydrate is consumed in the plating process.

Chloral hydrate was previously assessed by Health Canada, and a drinking water guidance document was published that determined that the amount of chloral hydrate typically found in drinking water is well below the level at which health effects may be observed. A health-based value was derived, with an increased incidence of liver histopathology as the critical health effect.

On the basis of the information presented in this final screening assessment, it is concluded that chloral hydrate does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that chloral hydrate does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

Follow-up

While exposure of the general population to chloral hydrate is not of concern at current levels, this substance is considered to have health effects of concern on the basis of its potential carcinogenicity. Therefore, there may be a concern for human health if exposure were to increase. Follow-up activities will involve including the substance in future information-gathering initiatives, such as a mandatory survey under section 71 of CEPA.

The Government will use the data gathered through these follow-up activities to prioritize future information-gathering activities or risk assessment of this substance, as required.

The final screening assessment for this substance is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html).

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Filing of claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 12(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of the filing of the claims for exemption listed below.

In accordance with subsection 12(2) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, affected parties, as defined, may make written representations to the screening officer with respect to the claim for exemption and the safety data sheet (SDS) or label to which it relates. Written representations must cite the appropriate registry number, state the reasons and evidence upon which the representations are based and be delivered within 30 days of the date of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to the screening officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau, 269 Laurier Avenue West, 8th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

Julie Calendino
Chief Screening Officer

On February 11, 2015, the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) was amended and the Controlled Products Regulations (CPR) and the Ingredient Disclosure List were repealed and replaced with the new Hazardous Products Regulations (HPR). The revised legislation (HPA/HPR) is referred to as WHMIS 2015 and the former legislation (HPA/CPR) is referred to as WHMIS 1988. Transitional provisions allow compliance with either the WHMIS 1988 or WHMIS 2015 for a specified period of time.

The claims listed below seek an exemption from the disclosure of supplier confidential business information in respect of a hazardous product; such disclosure would otherwise be required under the provisions of the relevant legislation.

Claimant

Product Identifier

Subject of the Claim for Exemption

Registry Number

Calfrac Well Services Ltd.

CalSurf 9400

C.i. of one ingredient

11738

Halliburton Group Canada

Excelerate LX-5

C.i. and C. of
two ingredients
C. of one ingredient

11739

Schlumberger Canada
Limited

NOVATHIN L

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient
C. of one ingredient

11740

Schlumberger Canada
Limited

NULLFOAM

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient
C. of one ingredient

11741

Schlumberger Canada
Limited

SAFE-VIS OGS

C. of one ingredient

11742

BASF Canada Inc.

Basazol Green 16LN

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient
C. of one ingredient

11743

HPPE

CleanSurf 32

C.i. and C. of
four ingredients
C. of one ingredient

11744

HPPE

NE27CX

C.i. and C. of
three ingredients

11745

Calfrac Well Services Ltd.

CalSurf 9698

C.i. of six ingredients

11746

Rocanda Enterprises Ltd.

ROC-CS510

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient

11747

Cytec Industries Inc.

AEROFLOAT® 208 Promoter, Aqueous

C.i. and C. of
three ingredients

11748

Cytec Industries Inc.

AERO® MX-983 Promoter

C.i. and C. of
three ingredients
C. of three ingredients

11749

Cytec Industries Inc.

AERO® 7152 Promoter

C.i. and C. of
three ingredients
C.i. of one ingredient
C. of two ingredients

11750

Cytec Industries Inc.

AERO® 7260 HFP

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient
C. of three ingredients

11751

Allnex Canada Inc. (c/o Goodmans, LLP)

EBECRYL® 438 radiation curing resins

C.i. of one ingredient

11752

Halliburton Group Canada

TRANSCEND-450

C.i. and C. of
six ingredients
C. of three ingredients

11753

Calfrac Well Services Ltd.

CalTreat 7310

C.i. of one ingredient

11754

Calfrac Well Services Ltd.

CalSurf 9750

C.i. of three ingredients

11755

Stepan Company

Stepanblend FF40

C.i. and C. of
three ingredients

11756

Calfrac Well Services Ltd.

CalSurf 9703

C.i. of two ingredients

11757

Calfrac Well Services Ltd.

DynaRate 6104

C.i. of one ingredient

11758

Momentive Performance Materials

Niax* silicone L-5639

C.i. and C. of
two ingredients
C. of two ingredients

11759

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada

MAX-AMINE GT741C

C.i. and C. of
three ingredients

11760

Allnex Canada Inc. (c/o Goodmans, LLP)

EBECRYL® 450 radiation curing resins

C.i. of one ingredient

11761

BASF Canada Inc.

WALLTITE® XL RESIN

C.i. and C. of
five ingredients

11762

Cytec Industries Inc.

CYFLOC® HX-3000 Flocculant

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient
C. of three ingredients

11763

Momentive Performance Materials

LC-5635

C.i. and C. of
four ingredients

11764

Evonik USA Inc.

TOMAMINE
AMPHOTERIC 12

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient

11765

Flotek Chemistry

StimOil® ENXA

C.i. and C. of
three ingredients

11766

Afton Chemical Corporation

HiTEC 65010 Fuel Additive

C.i. and C. of
three ingredients

11767

BASF Canada Inc.

Neozapon® Orange
NB 251 A

C.i. and C. of
one ingredient
C.i. of two ingredients
C. of one ingredient

11768

Note: C.i. = chemical identity and C. = concentration

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointment

Name and position

Instrument of Advice dated September 25, 2017

Scheer, Andrew

Queen’s Privy Council for Canada

Member

September 29, 2017

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

[40-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Ahmed, Shirzad S.

2017-1153

Federal Court

 

Judge

 

Federal Court of Appeal

 

Member ex officio

 

Fisher, The Hon. Barbara L.

2017-1151

Court of Appeal for British Columbia

 

Justice of Appeal

 

Court of Appeal of Yukon

 

Judge

 

Gillis, Kelly

2017-1155

Deputy Head of Infrastructure and Communities to be styled Deputy Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

 

Huppé, Roch

2017-1167

Comptroller General of Canada

 

Laliberté, Pierre

2017-1139

Canada Employment Insurance Commission

 

Commissioner

 

Matthews, William

2017-1165

Associate Deputy Minister of National Defence to be styled Senior Associate Deputy Minister of National Defence

 

Nordheimer, The Hon. Ian V. B.

2017-1152

Court of Appeal for Ontario

 

Justice of Appeal

 

Superior Court of Justice in and for the Province of Ontario

 

Judge ex officio

 

Perry, Antoinette

2017-1150

Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Prince Edward Island

 

Thomas, Jody

2017-1164

Deputy Minister of National Defence

 

Venner, Gordon

2017-1166

Associate Deputy Minister of National Defence

 

September 29, 2017

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

[40-1-o]

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. Moving forward, the Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous Canadians and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website (http://www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/slctnPrcs.asp?menu=1&lang=eng).

Position

Organization

Closing date

Chairperson

Business Development Bank of Canada

October 23, 2017

Chairperson of the Board of Directors

Canada Post Corporation

October 16, 2017

Members of the Board of Directors

Canada Post Corporation

November 17, 2017

Director (Chief Executive Officer)

Canada Science and Technology Museum

October 10, 2017

Vice-Chairperson (Telecommunications)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

October 18, 2017

Directors

Federal Bridge Corporation Limited

October 23, 2017

Chairperson

Invest in Canada Hub

October 9, 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Invest in Canada Hub

October 11, 2017

Directors

Invest in Canada Hub

October 25, 2017

Vice-Chairperson

Invest in Canada Hub

October 25, 2017

Chief Electoral Officer

Office of the Chief Electoral Officer

 

Commissioner of Lobbying

Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying

 

Commissioner of Official Languages

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages for Canada

 

Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner

Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner

 

Information Commissioner

Office of the Information Commissioner

 

Senate Ethics Officer

Office of the Senate Ethics Officer

 

Chairperson

Royal Canadian Mint

October 18, 2017

Commissioner

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

October 23, 2017

Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson

Veterans Review and Appeal Board

 

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Full-time and
Part-time Members

Immigration and Refugee Board

December 31, 2017

Members

Veterans Review
and Appeal Board

December 31, 2017

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

Commissioner

International Joint
Commission

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