Vol. 151, No. 24 — June 17, 2017

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Ministerial Condition No. 19007

Ministerial condition

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information pertaining to the substance benzoic acid, 2-benzoyl-, methyl ester, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 606-28-0;

And whereas the ministers suspect that the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

The Minister of the Environment, pursuant to paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, hereby permits the manufacture or import of the substance in accordance with the conditions set out in the following annex.

George Enei
Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Conditions

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. The following definitions apply in these ministerial conditions:

“notifier” means the person who has, on January 10, 2017, provided to the Minister of the Environment the prescribed information concerning the substance, in accordance with subsection 81(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999; and

“substance” means benzoic acid, 2-benzoyl-, methyl ester, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 606-28-0.

2. The notifier may manufacture or import the substance in accordance with the present ministerial conditions.

Restrictions

3. The notifier may manufacture or import the substance subject to the following conditions:

4. The notifier shall transfer the physical possession or control of the substance only to a person who will use it in accordance with section 3.

Record-keeping requirements

5. (1) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records, with any documentation supporting the validity of the information contained in these records, indicating

(2) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records mentioned in subsection (1) at their principal place of business in Canada, or at the principal place of business in Canada of their representative, for a period of at least five years after they are made.

Other requirements

6. The notifier shall inform any person to whom they transfer the physical possession or control of the substance, in writing, of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. The notifier shall obtain, prior to the first transfer of the substance, written confirmation from this person that they were informed of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. This written confirmation shall be maintained at the principal place of business in Canada of the notifier or of their representative in Canada for a period of at least five years from the day it was received.

Coming into force

7. These ministerial conditions come into force on June 1, 2017.

[24-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of 74 substances specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas 54 of the 74 substances annexed hereby are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on 20 substances pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) and on 54 substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed that these substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action at this time under section 77 of the Act for the substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Act.

Notice is further given that options are being considered for follow-up activities to track changes in exposure to 36 substances, as specified in the annexes below.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX I

Summary of the draft screening assessment of substances identified as being of low concern based on the ecological risk classification of organic substances and the threshold of toxicological concern approach for certain substances

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 74 substances. These substances were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority based on other human health or ecological concerns.

The ecological risks of the substances in this assessment were characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC). The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web-derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. As a result of this approach, 640 substances were examined and 548 substances were identified as being of moderate or low ecological concern and do not require further assessment work at this time.

The human health risks of substances in this assessment were characterized using the threshold of toxicological concern (TTC)-based approach for certain substances. The TTC-based approach establishes a human exposure threshold value for a chemical, below which there is a low probability of risk to human health. The TTC-based approach for certain substances was used to examine 237 substances for which exposure to the general population was expected to be limited. As a result of this approach, 89 substances were determined to have exposure estimates below the TTC values and are considered to be of low concern to human health based on current levels of exposure.

When the results of the ERC and TTC-based approach for certain substances were considered together, a subset of 74 substances were identified to be of low concern to both human health and the environment. The remaining substances (i.e. those identified as being either of low concern to the environment through the ERC or of low concern to human health through the TTC-based approach, but not both) will be concluded upon in future assessments.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from the 74 substances identified in Annex II. It is proposed to conclude that these 74 substances do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Based on the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that the 74 substances identified in Annex II do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that the 74 substances listed in Annex II do not meet any of the criteria under section 64 of CEPA.

Consideration for follow-up

While exposures of the environment or of the general population to any of the 74 substances listed in Annex II are not of concern at current levels, 36 of these substances are associated with ecological or human health effects, as identified in Annex II. Therefore, there may be a concern for the environment if exposure to 35 of these 36 substances were to increase, or for human health, if exposure to one of these 36 substances was to increase. Follow-up activities to track changes in exposure or commercial use patterns are under consideration.

Stakeholders are encouraged to provide, during the 60-day public comment period on the draft screening assessment, any information pertaining to the substances that may help inform the choice of follow-up activity. This could include information on new or planned import, manufacture or use of the substances, if the information has not previously been submitted to the ministers.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html).

ANNEX II

Substances proposed as not meeting the criteria under section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999

CAS RN (see footnote 1)

Chemical name

Effects
of concern

60-24-2

Ethanol, 2-mercapto-

No

77-47-4

1,3-Cyclopentadiene, 1,2,3,4,5,5-hexachloro-

Yes
(Ecological)

78-67-1 (see footnote a1)

Propanenitrile, 2,2′-azobis[2-methyl-

No

79-74-3

1,4-Benzenediol, 2,5-bis(1,1-dimethylpropyl)-

Yes
(Ecological)

85-42-7 (see footnote a2)

1,3-Isobenzofurandione, hexahydro-

No

87-66-1 (see footnote a3)

1,2,3-Benzenetriol

No

92-70-6 (see footnote a4)

3-Hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid

Yes
(Ecological)

101-37-1 (see footnote a5)

1,3,5-Triazine, 2,4,6-tris(2-propenyloxy)-

No

103-24-2

Nonanedioic acid, bis(2-ethylhexyl) ester

No

111-55-7 (see footnote a6)

1,2-Ethanediol, diacetate

No

111-96-6 (see footnote a7)

Ethane, 1,1′-oxybis[2-methoxy-

No

112-49-2 (see footnote a8)

2,5,8,11-Tetraoxadodecane

Yes
(Health)

120-11-6

Benzene, 2-methoxy-1-(phenylmethoxy)-4(1-propenyl)-

No

120-24-1

Benzeneacetic acid, 2-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)phenyl ester

No

121-91-5

1,3-Benzenedicarboxylic acid

No

122-68-9

2-Propenoic acid, 3-phenyl-, 3-phenylpropyl ester

No

122-79-2 (see footnote a9)

Acetic acid, phenyl ester

No

126-33-0 (see footnote a10)

Thiophene, tetrahydro-, 1,1-dioxide

No

132-65-0

Dibenzothiophene

No

133-14-2

Peroxide, bis(2,4-dichlorobenzoyl)

Yes
(Ecological)

288-88-0 (see footnote a11)

1H-1,2,4-Triazole

No

614-45-9 (see footnote a12)

Benzenecarboperoxoic acid, 1,1-dimethylethyl ester

No

632-51-9

Benzene, 1,1′,1″,1‴(1,2-ethenediylidene)
tetrakis-

No

793-24-8

1,4-Benzenediamine, N-(1,3-dimethylbutyl)-N′-phenyl-

Yes
(Ecological)

2379-79-5

Anthra[2,3-d]oxazole-5,10-
dione, 2-(1-amino-9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-2-anthracenyl)-

Yes
(Ecological)

3006-86-8

Peroxide, cyclohexylidenebis
[(1,1-dimethylethyl)

Yes
(Ecological)

3081-14-9

1,4-Benzenediamine, N,N′-bis(1,4-dimethylpentyl)-

Yes
(Ecological)

3327-22-8 (see footnote a13)

1-Propanaminium, 3-chloro-2-hydroxy-N,N,N-trimethyl-, chloride

Yes
(Ecological)

3851-87-4

Peroxide, bis(3,5,5-trimethyl-1-oxohexyl)

No

4979-32-2

2-Benzothiazolesulfenamide, N,N-dicyclohexyl

Yes
(Ecological)

5285-60-9

Benzenamine, 4,4′-methylenebis[N(1-methylpropyl)-

Yes
(Ecological)

6858-49-7

Propanedinitrile, [[4-[ethyl[2-[[(phenylamino)carbonyl]oxy]ethyl]amino]-2-methylphenyl]methylene]-

Yes
(Ecological)

8001-04-5 (see footnote a14)

Musks

No

13082-47-8

Xanthylium, 9-(2-carboxyphenyl)-3,6-bis(diethylamino)-, hydroxide

Yes
(Ecological)

13472-08-7 (see footnote a15)

Butanenitrile, 2,2′-azobis[2-methyl-

Yes
(Ecological)

15791-78-3

9,10-Anthracenedione, 1,8-dihydroxy-4-[[4-(2-hydroxyethyl)phenyl]amino]-5-nitro-

Yes
(Ecological)

19720-45-7

9,10-Anthracenedione, 1,4-bis[(2-methylpropyl)amino]-

Yes
(Ecological)

21652-27-7

1H-Imidazole-1-ethanol, 2-(8-heptadecenyl)-4,5-dihydro-, (Z)-

Yes
(Ecological)

26266-77-3

1-Phenanthrenemethanol, dodecahydro-1,4a-dimethyl-7-(1-methylethyl)

Yes
(Ecological)

26544-38-7

2,5-Furandione, dihydro-3-(tetrapropenyl)-

No

27193-86-8

Phenol, dodecyl

Yes
(Ecological)

28173-59-3

Carbonic acid, 2-[(1-amino-9,10-dihydro-4-hydroxy-9,10-dioxo-2-anthracenyl)oxy]ethyl phenyl ester

Yes
(Ecological)

28777-98-2 (see footnote a16)

2,5-Furandione, dihydro-3-(octadecenyl)-

No

28984-69-2

4,4(5H)-Oxazoledimethanol, 2-(heptadecenyl)-

Yes
(Ecological)

29036-02-0

Quaterphenyl

Yes
(Ecological)

29350-73-0

Naphthalene, decahydro-1,6-dimethyl-4-(1-methylethyl)-, [1S-(1α,4α,4aα,6α,8aβ)]-, didehydro deriv.

No

32072-96-1 (see footnote a17)

2,5-Furandione, 3-(hexadecenyl)dihydro-

No

38640-62-9 (see footnote a18)

Naphthalene, bis(1-methylethyl)-

No

53894-23-8

1,2,4-Benzenetricarboxylic acid, triisononyl ester

No

61788-72-5 (see footnote a19)

Fatty acids, tall-oil, epoxidized, octyl esters

Yes
(Ecological)

61789-01-3 (see footnote a20)

Fatty acids, tall-oil, epoxidized, 2-ethylhexyl esters

Yes
(Ecological)

61790-28-1

Nitriles, tallow

No

61790-29-2

Nitriles, tallow, hydrogenated

No

64754-95-6

Castor oil, hydrogenated, lithium salt

No

64800-83-5

Benzene, ethyl(phenylethyl)-

No

68082-35-9

Fatty acids, soya, epoxidized, Me esters

Yes
(Ecological)

68139-89-9

Fatty acids, tall-oil,
maleated

Yes
(Ecological)

68140-48-7

Ethanone, 1-[2,3-dihydro-1,1,2,6-tetramethyl-3-(1-methylethyl)-1H-inden-5-yl]-

No

68398-19-6

Benzene, ethyl(phenylethyl)-, mono-ar-ethyl deriv.

No

68442-69-3

Benzene, mono-C10-14-alkyl derivs.

Yes
(Ecological)

68515-60-6

1,2,4-Benzenetricarboxylic acid, tri-C7-9-branched and linear alkyl esters

No

68603-15-6

Alcohols, C6-12

No

68783-36-8

Fatty acids, C16-22, lithium salts

Yes
(Ecological)

68784-12-3

2,5-Furandione, dihydro-, mono-C15-20-alkenyl derivs.

No

68784-26-9

Phenol, dodecyl-, sulfurized, carbonates, calcium salts, overbased

No

68909-18-2

Pyridinium, 1-(phenylmethyl)-,
Et Me derivs., chlorides

Yes
(Ecological)

68916-97-2

Horehound oil

No

68955-53-3

Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl

Yes
(Ecological)

71486-79-8 (see footnote a21)

Benzenesulfonic acid, mono-C15-30-branched alkyl and di-C11-13-branched and linear alkyl derivs., calcium salts, overbased

Yes
(Ecological)

73984-93-7

1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2(3H)-thione, 5-(tert-dodecyldithio)-

Yes
(Ecological)

80584-90-3

1H-Benzotriazole-1-methanamine, N,N-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-4-methyl-

Yes
(Ecological)

94270-86-7

1H-Benzotriazole-1-methanamine, N,N-bis
(2-ethylhexyl)-ar-methyl-

Yes
(Ecological)

125328-64-5

Nitriles, rape-oil, hydrogenated

No

174333-80-3

Benzaldehyde, 2-hydroxy-5-nonyl-, oxime, branched

No

[24-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

FOOD AND DRUGS ACT

PEST CONTROL PRODUCTS ACT

Third phase of the Chemicals Management Plan — Year one work planning update

The third phase of the Chemicals Management Plan is a five-year plan that began in April 2016. As outlined in the Announcement of planned actions to assess and manage, where warranted, the risks posed by certain substances to the health of Canadians and the environment published in the Canada Gazette, Part I,on June 18, 2016, Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada are addressing certain substances to reduce related human health and environmental risks.

Pursuant to the commitment made in the abovementioned announcement, Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada are providing, annexed hereby, year one updates to activities under the third phase of the Chemicals Management Plan.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
Environment and Climate Change Canada

Marc D’Iorio
Director General
Industrial Sectors, Chemicals and Waste Directorate
Environment and Climate Change Canada

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
Health Canada

ANNEX

Updates on activities under the third phase of the Chemicals Management Plan

1. Background

Under the Chemicals Management Plan, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and the Minister of Health are taking action to protect human health and the environment under several acts, including the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA), the Pest Control Products Act (PCPA), and the Food and Drugs Act (FDA). For details on actions taken under these acts, please refer to the Chemicals Management Plan implementation table at a glance - 2016 to 2020 at https://www. canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances/chemicals-management-plan/implementation-table-at-a-glance-2016-2021.html.

The third phase of the Chemicals Management Plan includes, among other things, steps to address the remaining 1 550 priority substances of the original 4 300 substances identified as priorities following categorization of the Domestic Substances List exercise under CEPA. It also includes the ongoing development of risk management to prevent or control releases of substances that were found to be harmful to human health or the environment. Addressing these remaining priority substances in Canada supports the global goal of achieving the sound management of chemicals throughout their life cycle by 2020 — a goal that strives to ensure that chemicals are produced and used in ways that minimize significant adverse impacts on human health and the environment.

2. Scope of the year one update

The updates provided in this notice cover the following activities:

3. Updates on activities
Planned information-gathering initiatives 2017–2019

Information from stakeholders is required to inform approaches and decision making for a range of chemical substances. A two-year information-gathering plan can be found at www.ec.gc.ca/ese-ees/default.asp?lang=En&n= F04EE298-1 and provides an overview of potential upcoming information-gathering initiatives. This includes the time periods during which mandatory surveys issued under section 71 of CEPA may be published. Information-gathering initiatives are timed to inform priority-setting, risk assessment and risk management activities. This two-year information-gathering plan will be updated on an annual basis, or as required.

The Notice with respect to substances included as part of the 2017 Inventory Update (the 2017 Inventory Update) was published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on January 14, 2017. The 2017 Inventory Update collects information on 1 430 chemicals and polymers to inform activities in priority-setting and risk assessment programs at Environment and Climate Change Canada and Health Canada, including prioritization for activities post-2020–2021. Thirty-eight substances from the third phase of the Chemicals Management Plan have been included in this initiative, as data would be received in time to inform the assessments. The deadline to respond to this notice is July 17, 2017.

The 2017 Inventory Update for certain micro-organisms is expected to be published in fall 2017.

Two mandatory section 71 notices to support risk management activities were published in April 2017. These notices will collect information on the manufacture, import and use of approximately 80 substances that are toxic or proposed to be toxic under section 64 of CEPA.

Furthermore, targeted follow-ups are being conducted with some notifiers to obtain additional information related to their submission. Information requested may include more current or specific quantity and use information, as well as facility and customer information. The timing of these follow-ups is based on the priority-setting, risk assessment or risk management schedule.

Stakeholders are invited to submit relevant information on substances or indicate their interest in being engaged in discussions on particular substances or substance groups using the Declaration of Stakeholder Interest, available in the Single Window online reporting system at https://ec.ss.ec.gc.ca (select the “Chemicals Management Plan 3” Initiative). Stakeholders are also invited to subscribe to be informed of information sessions and consultations at http://www.chemicalsubstanceschimiques.gc.ca/listserv/index-eng.php.

Updated Two-year Rolling Risk Assessment Publication Plan for the 1 550 existing substances to be addressed under CEPA (2017–2019)

An updated list of the 1 550 existing substances to be addressed can be found at www.ec.gc.ca/ese-ees/default.asp?lang=En&n=2A33EEC9-1. This list includes information on the substance group, on the proposed assessment approach and on the assessment product pertinent to each substance. Updates since the May 2016 publication are also identified. An updated two-year publication plan for substance assessments is also available and provides advance notice of planned publication timelines. This also includes planned publication timelines for final screening assessments for which draft assessments have been published. Information provided to inform risk assessments should ideally be provided six months in advance of the quarter in which the assessment starts. The table mentioned previously includes a column indicating under which quarter the assessments will start for all substances.

Approach for the Identification of Risk Assessment Priorities — Results of the 2016 Prioritization Exercise

A review of new hazard and/or exposure information, which included a review of research, monitoring and international activities for substances that are on the Domestic Substances List,was completed in 2016. For the purposes of this review, the scope focused on substances that were not recently assessed or were not currently being assessed under the Chemicals Management Plan. Additionally, substances that had been recommended for information-gathering activities, as part of the 2015 review for data-gathering activities, were also reviewed. For a complete list of results, please consult www.ec.gc.ca/ese-ees/default.asp?lang=En&n=ADF217F9-1.

As part of the review processes in 2015 and 2016, a total of 36 new risk assessment priorities were identified and will be addressed in the current phase of the Chemicals Management Plan. These review processes also identified candidates for further information gathering prior to determining if they are risk assessment priorities. For example, additional information gathering (i.e. voluntary information gathering activities and targeted food surveillance) is being undertaken for bisphenol S (BPS) and other analogues of bisphenol A (BPA) in order to determine if risk assessment activity is warranted and if so, to inform the potential scope of that activity.

Two-year Rolling Risk Assessment Publication Plan for the remaining existing living organisms to be assessed under CEPA (2017–2019)

A two-year publication plan for existing living organisms assessment publications can be found at www.ec.gc.ca/ese-ees/default.asp?lang=En&n=9AFFB8E3-1 and will be updated yearly. This plan also includes final screening assessments for which draft assessments have been published.

Publication of prioritization results for the revised In Commerce List with supporting rationale

Draft prioritization results for the revised In Commerce List will be published on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website for a 60-day public comment period in the summer of 2017. These results, along with a description of the approach to the prioritization of the revised In Commerce List, will identify which substances are recommended for evaluation of potential risks to human health and/or the environment.

Updated Two Year Rolling Risk Management Activities and Consultations Schedule (2017–2019)

The third phase of the Chemicals Management Plan includes the ongoing development and implementation of risk management instruments. This work includes activities to measure and report on the effectiveness of risk management actions. An updated two-year rolling schedule of risk management activities and consultation opportunities can be found at www.ec.gc.ca/ese-ees/default.asp?lang=En&n=8727ECCE-1. The schedule will continue to be updated yearly.

Update on Chemicals Management Plan health research and monitoring activities

Research projects addressing risk assessment and regulatory knowledge gaps and data needs, including environmental fate and effects, toxicology, sources or pathways of exposure, and the development of methods/tools for assessment of Chemicals Management Plan chemicals/substances were completed and others were initiated. Closely integrated with health and environmental research are monitoring and surveillance activities. Monitoring and surveillance studies focused on population studies, biomonitoring-related research, food surveillance (directed and total diet studies) and targeted environmental monitoring, as well as the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) [http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/contaminants/human-humaine/chms-ecms-eng.php] and the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (the MIREC Study) [http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/contaminants/human-humaine/mirec-eng.php]. Related publications can be found at http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/sr-sr/pubs/proj/index-eng.php.

In July 2017, Health Canada is planning to release the Fourth Report on Human Biomonitoring of Environmental Chemicals in Canada. The report will present data for 56 substances measured in the CHMS (2014–2015), including the first national baseline levels for parabens. The report will be available on Health Canada’s Biomonitoring web page at http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/contaminants/human-humaine/index-eng.php, and summary data will be published on the Government of Canada’s Open Data Portal at http://open.canada.ca/en/open-data. Sample collection is currently underway for cycle 5 (2016–2017) and is planned for cycle 6 (2018–2019).

Update on nanomaterials

As a part of the third phase of the Chemicals Management Plan, Environment and Climate Change Canada and Health Canada are undertaking an approach to address nanoscale forms of substances on the Domestic Substances List. Based on comments received following consultations in 2016 and a stakeholder workshop, the approach to prioritization of nanomaterials in commerce is now being finalized. Ongoing stakeholder consultations on the approach to nanomaterial prioritization and risk assessment are planned for 2017 and beyond. The approach and results of prioritization are expected to become available in the spring of 2018. This initiative will ensure that the potential human health and ecological risks of nanomaterials will be adequately identified and addressed. It will also serve to identify data needs and provide input to the mechanism for prioritizing research activities in the area of nanomaterials.

Internationally, the Government of Canada collaborates with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and other countries as it relates to ongoing research, development, and publication of guidance for nanomaterials.

Updates on activities made under the Food and Drugs Act and the Food and Drug Regulations

In September 2016, Health Canada provided an update on its Path Forward for Contaminants and Other Adulterating Substances in Foods, which can be found at http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/securit/chem-chim/contaminants-adulterantes-eng.php. That update describes, as a part of the broader Government of Canada initiative under the Regulatory Transparency and Openness Framework, recent amendments to the Food and Drug Regulations published in the Canada Gazette, Part II, on April 15, 2016, which has created a more efficient and responsive framework for setting regulatory limits and prohibitions for contaminants and other adulterating substances in food. These regulatory amendments will better support the development of more timely risk management actions for contaminants and other adulterating substances in food, including substances evaluated under the Chemicals Management Plan.

Under the Chemicals Management Plan, epichlorohydrin and 2-nitropropane were concluded to be harmful to human health. Effective June 29, 2016, and as part of its risk management commitments under the Chemicals Management Plan, Health Canada’s Food Directorate removed epichlorohydrin and 2-nitropropane from the Lists of permitted food additives, which can be found at http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/securit/addit/list/index-eng.php.

Consultations are planned to take place in 2017 on amendments to the Food and Drug Regulations to include data requirements to support environmental assessment of new active ingredients in drugs that will allow for the determination of potential risks to the environment and to human health resulting from the release of these substances into the environment (i.e. indirect exposure).

In addition, consultations were held in January and February 2016, on areas where improvements could be made to existing non-regulatory initiatives (NRIs) and where development of new NRIs may be appropriate to reduce the release into the environment of substances in products regulated under the Food and Drugs Act. A recommended path forward document is being developed and will outline where improvements could be made to NRIs as well as where relationships/partnerships among stakeholders could be expected to help build support for NRIs. This document is planned for publication in the summer of 2017.

Update on pesticide re-evaluations

In 2016, Health Canada published the re-evaluation management policy, following a public consultation earlier in the year. This policy outlines the various steps involved in the re-evaluation of pesticides and the timelines attached to each step. A policy for consultation on cancellations and amendments following re-evaluation and special reviews was also published in 2016. Health Canada published for consultation 22 re-evaluation/special reviews and finalized 18 re-evaluation and special review decisions (see http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/pubs/pest/_decisions/index-eng.php). The five-year plan with timelines for the proposed and final re-evaluation/special review decisions will also be updated in the coming year.

4. Contact information

Substance Management Information Line

Telephone: 1-800-567-1999 (in Canada) or 819-938-3232
Fax: 819-938-5212
Email: eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position Order in Council

Forbes, Chris
Deputy Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

2017-544

Lyon, Andrea
Deputy Clerk of the Privy Council and Associate Secretary to the Cabinet
and
Government of Canada
Commissioner to administer oaths

2017-542


2017-543

McGuire, Francis
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
President

2017-555

Roy, Guylaine
Associate Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage

2017-545

June 8, 2017

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

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INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CANADA

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY ACT

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-015-17 — Decisions on the Licensing Framework for Non-Geostationary Satellite Orbit (NGSO) Systems and Clarification of Application Procedures for All Satellite Licence Applications

Notice is hereby given that Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) has released the following document:

The document sets out ISED’s decisions resulting from the consultation process undertaken in SMSE-009-17 — Consultation on the Licensing Framework for Non-Geostationary Satellite Orbit (NGSO) Systems and Clarification of Application Procedures for All Satellite Licence Applications.

All comments received in response to the consultation are available on ISED’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website at http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/home.

The moratorium on commercial NGSO satellite applications will be lifted at 08:00 ET on June 26, 2017. The licence application that was under consideration by ISED when the moratorium was imposed was placed on hold, and its priority has been preserved. The applicant will have the opportunity to revise its application to align it with the updated procedures and resubmit. If the application is resubmitted by the time the moratorium is lifted, it will be treated first. All other applications will be treated in the order in which they are received. All applications should be submitted to ic.satelliteauthorizationautorisationsatellite.ic@canada.ca.

An information session on the revised procedures will be held on June 12, 2017. Information on the time and location of this session will be published on ISED’s website with this document.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on ISED’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website at http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html.

June 5, 2017

Martin Proulx
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

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PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. Moving forward, the Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous Canadians and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website (http://www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/slctnPrcs.asp?menu=1&lang=eng).

Position

Organization

Closing date

Directors

Canada
Infrastructure Bank

June 30, 2017

President and CEO

Canada Infrastructure Bank

June 30, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

July 6, 2017

Directors

Canadian Commercial Corporation

June 22, 2017

President

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

June 30, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

June 30, 2017

Directors

Export Development Canada

June 22, 2017

Chairperson

National Farm Products Council

July 6, 2017

Member

National Farm Products Council

July 20, 2017

Chairperson

National Seniors Council

June 19, 2017

Member

National Seniors Council

June 19, 2017

Commissioner of Lobbying

Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying

 

Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner

Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner

 

Information Commissioner

Office of the Information Commissioner

July 14, 2017

Members

Social Security Tribunal

June 30, 2017

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Members

Veterans Review and Appeal Board

July 31, 2017

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

Commissioner

British Columbia Treaty Commission

Director

Canada Post Corporation

Chairperson

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Director

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

President

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Directors

First Nations Financial Management Board

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

President

International Development Research Centre

Commissioner

International Joint Commission

Chief Executive Officer

Invest in Canada Agency

Chief Electoral Officer

Office of the Chief Electoral Officer

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