Vol. 151, No. 10 — March 11, 2017

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of 74 azo disperse dyes specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas 72 of the 74 azo disperse dyes identified in annex 1 are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the 33 disperse dyes identified in annex 2 are currently subject to the Significant New Activity provisions under subsection 81(3) of the Act;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment, conducted pursuant to section 74 of the Act for 72 azo disperse dyes and pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) for the remaining two azo disperse dyes, is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is concluded that 73 azo disperse dyes do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

Whereas it is concluded that Disperse Yellow 3 meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

And whereas options on how best to monitor changes in the use profiles of certain substances recognized to have effects of concern are being investigated,

Notice is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that Disperse Yellow 3 be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on the remaining 73 azo disperse dyes at this time.

Notice is furthermore given that the ministers are releasing a proposed risk management approach document for Disperse Yellow 3 on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca) to continue discussions with stakeholders on the manner in which the ministers intend to develop a proposed regulation or instrument respecting preventive or control actions in relation to the substance. In addition, a consultation document is also being released on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website to initiate discussions with stakeholders on various options on how best to prevent these substances from becoming a risk in the future.

Notice is further given that, pursuant to subsection 87(3) of the Act, the Minister of the Environment intends to amend the Domestic Substances List such that the 33 substances identified in annex 2 are no longer subject to the Significant New Activity provisions under subsection 81(3) of the Act.

Public comment period on the proposed risk management approach document

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of the proposed risk management approach document and the consultation document, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the proposed risk management approach document and/or the consultation document. More information regarding the proposed risk management approach and the consultation document may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments can be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Jane Philpott
Minister of Health

ANNEX 1

Summary of the screening assessment of azo disperse dyes

Pursuant to sections 68 and 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on 74 azo disperse dyes. These substances constitute a subgroup of the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping being assessed as part of the Substance Groupings Initiative of the Government of Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) based on structural similarity and applications. Substances in this grouping were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA and/or were considered as a priority based on other human health concerns. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (see footnote 1) (CAS RN), Domestic Substances List (DSL) name, and Colour Index (C.I.) generic name, or acronym of the azo disperse dyes in this subgroup are presented in the following table.

Identity of substances assessed in the azo disperse dyes screening assessment

CAS RN

DSL name

Colour Index name or acronym

2537-62-4

Acetamide, N-[2-[(2-bromo-6-cyano-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-(diethylamino)phenyl]-

N/A

2832-40-8 (see footnote a)

Acetamide, N-[4-[(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)azo]phenyl]-

Disperse Yellow 3 (Solvent Yellow 77)

3618-72-2 (see footnote b)

Acetamide, N-[5-[bis[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl]amino]-2-[(2-bromo-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-4-methoxyphenyl]-

Disperse Blue 79:1

5261-31-4 (see footnote c)

Propanenitrile, 3-[[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl][4-[(2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl]amino]-

Disperse Orange 30

6232-56-0 (see footnote d)

Ethanol, 2-[[4-[(2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl] methylamino]-

Disperse Orange 5

6250-23-3 (see footnote e)

Phenol, 4-[[4-(phenylazo)phenyl]azo]-

Disperse Yellow 23

6253-10-7 (see footnote f)

Phenol, 4-[[4-(phenylazo)-1-naphthalenyl]azo]-

Disperse Orange 13

6300-37-4 (see footnote g)

Phenol, 2-methyl-4-[[4-(phenylazo)phenyl]azo]-

Disperse Yellow 7

6465-02-7

Carbamic acid, [4-[[4-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)azo]-2-methylphenyl]azo]phenyl]-, methyl ester

N/A

6657-00-7

Phenol, 4-[[2-methoxy-5-methyl-4-(phenylazo)phenyl]azo]-

N/A

12239-34-8 (see footnote h)

Acetamide, N-[5-[bis[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl]amino]-2-[(2-bromo-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-4-ethoxyphenyl]-

Disperse Blue 79

15958-27-7

Propanenitrile, 3-[[4-[(4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl][2-[[(phenylamino)carbonyl]oxy]ethyl]amino]-

N/A

16421-40-2 (see footnote i)

Acetamide, N-[5-[[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl](phenylmethyl)amino]-2-[(2-chloro-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-4-methoxyphenyl]-

ANAM (see footnote aa)

16421-41-3 (see footnote j)

Acetamide, N-[5-[[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl](phenylmethyl)amino]-2-[(2,4-dinitrophenyl)azo]-4-methoxyphenyl]-

N/A

16586-42-8 (see footnote k)

Propanenitrile, 3-[ethyl[3-methyl-4-[(6-nitro-2-benzothiazolyl)azo]phenyl]amino]-

Disperse Red 179 (see footnote bb)

17464-91-4 (see footnote l)

Ethanol, 2,2′-[[4-[(2-bromo-6-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-3-chlorophenyl]imino]bis-

Disperse Brown 1:1

19745-44-9

Propanenitrile, 3-[4-[(5-nitro-2-thiazolyl)azo](2-phenylethyl)amino]-

N/A

19800-42-1 (see footnote m)

Phenol, 4-[[2-methoxy-4-[(4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl]azo]-

Disperse Orange 29

21811-64-3 (see footnote n)

Phenol, 4,4′-[1,4-phenylenebis(azo)]bis-

Disperse Yellow 68

23355-64-8 (see footnote o)

Ethanol, 2,2′-[[3-chloro-4-[(2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl]imino]bis-

Disperse Brown 1

24610-00-2

Benzonitrile, 2-[[4-[(2-cyanoethyl)(2-phenylethyl)amino]phenyl]azo]-5-nitro-

N/A

25150-28-1

Propanenitrile, 3-[[4-[(6,7-dichloro-2-benzothiazolyl)azo]phenyl]ethylamino]-

N/A

25176-89-0 (see footnote p)

Propanenitrile, 3-[[4-[(5,6-dichloro-2-benzothiazolyl)azo]phenyl]ethylamino]-

DAPEP (see footnote cc)

26021-20-5

Acetamide, N-[2-[(2-bromo-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-5-[(2-cyanoethyl)(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]-4-methoxyphenyl]-

Disperse Blue 94

26850-12-4 (see footnote q)

Propanamide, N-[5-[bis[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl]amino]-2-[(2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl]-

Disperse Red 167

27184-69-6

Phenol, 4,4′-[1,4-phenylenebis(azo)]bis[3-methyl-

N/A

28824-41-1

Propanenitrile, 3-[[4-[(4,6-dibromo-2-benzothiazolyl)azo]phenyl]ethylamino]-

N/A

29765-00-2 (see footnote r)

Benzamide, N-[5-[bis[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl]amino]-2-[(4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl]-

BANAP (see footnote dd)

31030-27-0

Benzenamine, 4-[(2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-N-ethyl-N-(2-phenoxyethyl)-

N/A

33979-43-0

Propanenitrile, 3-[[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl][4-[(5,6-dichloro-2-benzothiazolyl)azo]phenyl]amino]-

N/A

41362-82-7

Propanenitrile, 3-[[4-[(5,6-dichloro-2-benzothiazolyl)azo]phenyl]methylamino]-

N/A

42357-98-2

1H-Benz[de]isoquinoline-1,3(2H)-dione, 6-hydroxy-5-[(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-2-methyl-

N/A

42358-36-1

1H-Benz[de]isoquinoline-1,3(2H)-dione, 2-ethyl-6-hydroxy-5-[(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-

N/A

42852-92-6

Acetamide, N-[2-[(2-bromo-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-4-methoxy-5-[(phenylmethyl)-2-propenylamino]phenyl]-

N/A

51249-07-1

3-Pyridinecarbonitrile, 1-(2-ethylhexyl)-1,2-dihydro-6-hydroxy-4-methyl-5-[(2-nitrophenyl)azo]-2-oxo-

N/A

52697-38-8 (see footnote s)

Acetamide, N-[2-[(2-bromo-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-5-(diethylamino)phenyl]-

N/A

53950-33-7 (see footnote t)

Acetamide, N-[2-[(2-bromo-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-5-[(2-cyanoethyl)amino]-4-methoxyphenyl]-

N/A

55252-53-4

Acetamide, N-[2-[(2-cyano-6-iodo-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-(diethylamino)phenyl]-

N/A

55281-26-0 (see footnote u)

Propanenitrile, 3-[[4-[(2,6-dibromo-4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl]ethylamino]-

Disperse Orange 61

55290-62-5

Benzenesulfonamide, 4-[(1-butyl-5-cyano-1,6-dihydro-2-hydroxy-4-methyl-6-oxo-3-pyridinyl)azo]-N-(2-ethylhexyl)-

N/A

55619-18-6 (see footnote v)

Ethanol, 2,2′-[[4-[(2,6-dibromo-4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl]imino]bis-, diacetate (ester)

N/A

56532-53-7

Acetamide, N-[2-[(2,6-dicyano-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-(dipropylamino)phenyl]-

N/A

58104-55-5

2-Naphthalenesulfonamide, 6-hydroxy-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N-methyl-5-[[4-(phenylazo)phenyl]azo]-

N/A

59709-38-5

β-Alanine, N-[4-[(2-bromo-6-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl]-N-(3-methoxy-3-oxopropyl)-, methyl ester

ANMOM (see footnote ee), (see footnote ff)

61799-13-1

3-Pyridinecarbonitrile, 5-[(2-cyano-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-2-[(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]-4-methyl-6-[[3-(2-phenoxyethoxy)propyl]amino]-

N/A

63133-84-6

1(2H)-Quinolineethanol, 6-[(2-chloro-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-3,4-dihydro-2,2,4,7-tetramethyl-

N/A

63134-15-6

Acetamide, N-[5-(dipropylamino)-2-[[5-(ethylthio)-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl]azo]phenyl]-

Disperse Red 338

63833-78-3

3-Pyridinecarbonitrile, 5-[(2-cyano-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-6-[(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]-4-methyl-2-[[3-(2-phenoxyethoxy)propyl]amino]-

N/A

65122-05-6

Diazene, [(1,3-dihydro-1,1,3-trimethyl-2H-inden-2-ylidene)methyl](2-methoxyphenyl)-

N/A

66693-26-3

Propanamide, N-[5-[bis[2-(2-cyanoethoxy)ethyl]amino]-2-[(2-chloro-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-4-methoxyphenyl]-

Disperse Blue 125

67905-67-3

Propanenitrile, 3-[butyl[4-[(6-nitro-2-benzothiazolyl)azo]phenyl]amino]-

N/A

68214-63-1

3-Pyridinecarbonitrile, 5-[(3,4-dichlorophenyl)azo]-1,2-dihydro-6-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-oxo-1-(phenylamino)-

N/A

68214-66-4

Carbamic acid, [2-[(2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-(diethylamino)phenyl]-, 2-ethoxyethyl ester

N/A

68516-64-3

Propanenitrile, 3-[[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl][4-[(2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-3-methylphenyl]amino]-

N/A

68877-63-4

Acetamide, N-[2-[(2-bromo-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-5-[(2-cyanoethyl)-2-propenylamino]-4-methoxyphenyl]-

N/A

68992-01-8

3-Pyridinecarbonitrile, 1-(2-ethylhexyl)-1,2-dihydro-6-hydroxy-5-[(4-methoxy-2-nitrophenyl)azo]-4-methyl-2-oxo-

N/A

69472-19-1

Propanenitrile, 3-[butyl[4-[(4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl]amino]-

N/A

70210-08-1

2-Naphthalenesulfonamide, N-[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl]-6-hydroxy-N-methyl-5-[[4-(phenylazo)phenyl]azo]-

Disperse Red 151

70660-55-8

1-Naphthalenamine, 4-[(2-bromo-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-N-(3-methoxypropyl)-

N/A

72828-63-8

Benzonitrile, 2-[[4-[[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl]butylamino]-2-methylphenyl]azo]-3-bromo-5-nitro-

N/A

72828-64-9

1,3-Benzenedicarbonitrile, 2-[[4-[[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl]butylamino]-2-methylphenyl]azo]-5-nitro-

Disperse Blue 287

72927-94-7 (see footnote w)

Benzenamine, 4-[(2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-N-(4-nitrophenyl)-

N/A

72968-82-2 (see footnote x)

Methanesulfonamide, N-[2-[(2,6-dicyano-4-methylphenyl)azo]-5-(dipropylamino)phenyl]-

DADM (see footnote gg)

73003-64-2

2,4,10-Trioxa-7-azaundecan-11-oic acid, 7-[4-[(2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-3-methylphenyl]-3-oxo-, methyl ester

N/A

73398-96-6

3-Pyridinecarbonitrile, 5-[(9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-1-anthracenyl)azo]-2,6-bis[(2-methoxyethyl)amino]-4-methyl

Disperse Brown 21

79542-46-4

Acetamide, N-[4-chloro-2-[2-(2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-[(2-hydroxy-3-phenoxypropyl)amino]phenyl]-

Disperse Red 349

83249-47-2

Acetamide, N-[2-[(2-bromo-6-cyano-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-(dipropylamino)phenyl]-

N/A

83249-49-4

Benzonitrile, 3-bromo-2-[[4-(diethylamino)-2-methylphenyl]azo]-5-methyl-

N/A

83249-53-0

Methanesulfonamide, N-[2-[(2-bromo-6-cyano-4-methylphenyl)azo]-5-(diethylamino)phenyl]-

N/A

83249-54-1

Methanesulfonamide, N-[2-[(2-bromo-6-cyano-4-methylphenyl)azo]-5-(dipropylamino)phenyl]-

N/A

90729-40-1

3-Pyridinecarbonitrile, 1-butyl-5-[[4-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-2-nitrophenyl]azo]-1,2-dihydro-6-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-oxo-

N/A

93805-00-6 (see footnote y)

Phenol, 4-[[2-methoxy-4-[(2-methoxyphenyl)azo]-5-methylphenyl]azo]-

N/A

106276-78-2 (see footnote z)

Benzoic acid, 2,3,4,5-tetrachloro-6-cyano-, methyl ester, reaction products with 4-[(4-aminophenyl)azo]-3-methylbenzenamine and sodium methoxide

MATCB (see footnote hh)

127126-02-7

Propanenitrile, 3-[[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl][4-[(6,7-dichloro-2-benzothiazolyl)azo]phenyl]amino]

N/A

Abbreviation: N/A, not available

  • Footnote a
    CAS RN 2832-40-8 (Disperse Yellow 3) is included in the current assessment to assess ecological concerns. The substance was a part of the azo solvent dyes assessment as Solvent Yellow 77.
  • Footnote b
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA but was included in this assessment, as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Footnote c
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote d
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote e
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote f
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote g
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote h
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote i
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote j
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote k
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote l
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote m
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote n
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote o
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote p
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote q
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote r
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote s
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote t
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA but was included in this assessment, as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.
  • Footnote u
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote v
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote w
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote x
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote y
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote z
    Previously assessed and concluded in the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.
  • Footnote aa
    The acronym that the substance was previously referred to under the Challenge initiative.
  • Footnote bb
    The acronym that the substance was previously referred to under the Challenge initiative.
  • Footnote cc
    The acronym that the substance was previously referred to under the Challenge initiative.
  • Footnote dd
    The acronym that the substance was previously referred to under the Challenge initiative.
  • Footnote ee
    The acronym that the substance was previously referred to under the Challenge initiative.
  • Footnote ff
    The substance ANMOM (CAS RN 59709-38-5) was included in the Challenge initiative; however, no conclusion under section 64 of CEPA was published for this substance.
  • Footnote gg
    The acronym that the substance was previously referred to under the Challenge initiative.
  • Footnote hh
    The acronym that the substance was previously referred to under the Challenge initiative.

Among the 74 substances in this assessment is Disperse Yellow 3 (CAS RN 2832-40-8, also known as Solvent Yellow 77), which has expected uses as both a solvent and a disperse dye. As such, Disperse Yellow 3 was not originally part of the 73 substances in the draft assessment of azo disperse dyes, but was instead evaluated in the draft assessment of azo solvent dyes under the name Solvent Yellow 77.

Azo disperse dyes are not expected to occur naturally in the environment. No manufacture of any substance above the 100 kg/year reporting threshold has been reported in response to any recent surveys under section 71 of CEPA. Thirteen substances in this subgroup have been reported as having an import quantity above the 100 kg/year survey reporting threshold, with total quantities between 10 000 and 100 000 kg/year. Disperse Yellow 3 had an import quantity between 100 and 1 000 kg/year. Three additional substances were identified as being used in Canada in 2010, based on information submitted by the Ecological and Toxicological Association of Dyes and Organic Pigments Manufacturers (ETAD). No measured concentrations in the Canadian environment have been identified for any of these substances since 1987.

Due to structural similarities and the expectation that azo disperse dyes will act in similar ways in the environment, substances were grouped together with respect to their environmental fate.

Based on the available experimental data, azo disperse dyes have low solubility in water (<1 mg/L) and moderate to high solubility in n-octanol (10–1 000 mg/L). They also possess low vapour pressures (<4.53 × 10−7 Pa), densities higher than that of water (1.19–1.55 g/cm3) and moderate to high octanol–water partition coefficients (log Kow ranging from 3.4 to 5.7).

Empirical data indicate that under aerobic conditions, azo disperse dyes are not expected to degrade rapidly in water, soil or sediment. If released to wastewater, these dyes are expected to be either caught by sludge filters or adsorbed during wastewater treatment, rather than staying in the water compartment. If released to water, it is anticipated that a greater percentage of these substances will find their way into sediment and undergo reductive degradation in anaerobic sediments. The bioavailability of these substances is expected to be low based on their low solubilities in water and slow uptake due to their large cross-sectional diameters. Results from experimental studies suggest that the potential for these substances to bioaccumulate in pelagic organisms is low. Azo disperse dyes are expected to have a common mode of action with respect to ecotoxicity, based on their similar structural components. Due to the potential cleavage of the azo bonds, degradation products can be released containing the amine, aniline or phenolic functional groups resulting from biotransformation of the parent structure.

The available aquatic toxicity data for azo disperse dyes indicated highly variable effects on different taxa and between acute and chronic tests. Acute toxicity tests using fish, crustaceans, and bacteria showed no effects near the known water solubility limits; however, available chronic studies showed that fish and aquatic invertebrates were sensitive to azo disperse dyes, in particular those substances having a smaller molecular weight and cross-sectional diameter, indicating that the smaller-sized azo disperse dyes are likely more bioavailable than the larger azo disperse dyes.

A predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC) in the aquatic environment was calculated to be 0.0025 mg/L, based on the lowest toxicity value from a chronic study on fish (fathead minnow) exposed to Disperse Yellow 7 (CAS RN 6300-37-4). The PNEC was used to represent a subset of azo disperse dyes with a molecular weight less than 360 g/mol. Considering the potential major environmental releases due to industrial activities (textile formulation and dyeing), the predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) for this subset of dyes are likely to exceed their PNEC. There are eight azo disperse dyes in the current subgroup having a molecular weight less than 360 g/mol that have not been identified to be in commerce in Canada. As a result, these eight azo disperse dyes currently do not pose a risk to the environment. However, the future use of an azo disperse dye in textiles with a molecular weight less than 360 g/mol would likely have effects of concern based on its aquatic toxicity.

For substances with a molecular weight greater than or equal to 360 g/mol (including the 13 azo disperse dyes in this subgroup that are in commerce in Canada), the PNEC, if calculated, would exceed the water solubility for most of these substances, suggesting no long-term effect even at their water solubility limits.

For Disperse Yellow 3, the PNEC was calculated as 0.0023 mg/L, based on the read-across of an acute toxicity data for Solvent Yellow 1 (CAS RN 60-09-3, 96-hour LC50). The aquatic PEC from a site-specific textile formulation scenario was estimated as 0.011 mg/L. The outcome of the risk quotient analysis was 4.7, suggesting there should be concerns about aquatic organisms. Furthermore, Disperse Yellow 3 has a molecular weight of 269 g/mol; therefore, there should also be concerns about aquatic organisms if used in textile dyeing.

In preliminary soil and sediment toxicity studies on other azo substances, no effects were found at the concentration of 1 000 mg/kg soil (dry weight); the analogue demonstrated moderate toxicity in sediment organisms. Based on these data across the substances in this grouping, it is expected that azo disperse dyes would not be harmful to soil or sediment-dwelling organisms.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from 73 of the 74 azo disperse dyes evaluated in the Azo Disperse Dye subgroup. It is concluded that these 73 azo disperse dyes do not meet the criteria in paragraph 64(a) or 64(b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

CAS RN 2832-40-8 (Disperse Yellow 3) was assessed for its use in dye formulation and textile dyeing for ecological concerns. Considering lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment and in the screening assessment for azo solvent dyes, it is concluded that CAS RN 2832-40-8, Disperse Yellow 3 (also known as Solvent Yellow 77) meets the criteria under paragraph 64(a) of CEPA, as it is entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity. However, this substance does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Carcinogenicity and genotoxicity are considered critical health effects of potential concern for aromatic azo and benzidine-based substances, due to potential azo bond cleavage and release of aromatic amines. Therefore, the health effects of the azo disperse dyes were evaluated by examining their hazard potential (including their ability to undergo reductive cleavage and the hazard potential of the released aromatic amines), and the direct and prolonged exposure potential for the general population.

Direct and prolonged general population exposure potential from textiles was expected for 13 of the 64 azo disperse dyes being assessed for human health in this assessment: Disperse Blue 79:1, Disperse Orange 30, Disperse Blue 79, ANAM, Disperse Brown 1:1, Disperse Brown 1, Disperse Red 167, BANAP, CAS RN 52697-38-8, Disperse Orange 61, CAS RN 63833-78-3, ANMOM, and Disperse Yellow 3. Aside from Disperse Yellow 3, limited health effects data were available for the 13 substances in that group. Therefore, critical effect levels were selected based on Disperse Yellow 3 as well as on read-across to other azo disperse dyes not formally part of this assessment, specifically Disperse Yellow 97 (Sudan I/Solvent Yellow 14) and Disperse Red 17.

The critical effect levels for the available hazard data were used to characterize risk to the 13 substances for which exposure of the general population of Canada is expected. Margins between estimates of exposure from direct and prolonged contact to textiles containing these dyes and the critical effect level were considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

For the remaining 51 of 64 azo disperse dyes being assessed for human health in this assessment, no information was identified to support current sources of exposure to these substances for the general population of Canada; therefore, exposure to these substances is not expected. As a result, risk for the general population of Canada from exposure to these 51 substances is not expected.

Some of the azo disperse dyes in this assessment have effects of concern based on potential carcinogenicity. While available information does not indicate a risk to human health for Canadians at current levels of exposure, there may be a concern if exposures were to increase.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment, and based on information for Disperse Yellow 3 (Solvent Yellow 77) presented in the azo solvent dyes screening assessment, it is concluded that 64 of the 74 substances in this assessment, including the 13 substances previously assessed for which significant new information was available, as well as ANMOM (CAS RN 59709-38-5), do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

In addition, there are no updates to the conclusions made with respect to paragraph 64(c) for 10 substances previously considered by the Government of Canada under the Challenge Initiative of the CMP.

Overall conclusion

It is concluded that 73 of the 74 azo disperse dyes identified above do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

It is concluded that CAS RN 2832-40-8 (Disperse Yellow 3) meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 in CEPA. The information supporting the human health assessment for this substance under the name Solvent Yellow 77 appears in the screening assessment of azo solvent dyes.

It has been determined that CAS RN 2832-40-8 (Disperse Yellow 3) meets the persistence criteria but does not meet the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA.

Although a risk to human health has not been identified for the general population of Canada at current levels of exposure, some substances in this assessment are recognized to have effects of concern based on their potential carcinogenicity. There may be a concern for human health if exposures to the general population of Canada to these substances were to increase.

Likewise, while azo disperse dyes having molecular weights below 360 g/mol were not identified to pose a risk to the environment as these substances were not reported as being in commerce, the use of an azo disperse dye in textiles with a molecular weight less than 360 g/mol would likely have effects of concern based on their aquatic toxicity.

Options on how best to monitor changes in the use profiles of these substances are being investigated. Stakeholders will have the opportunity to provide feedback on a consultation document, describing potential options for information gathering or preventive actions, which is published concurrently with this assessment.

The current screening assessment concludes that the potential ecological concern identified in the previous assessment of the 33 disperse dyes identified in Annex 2 with respect to new uses as described in the final screening assessment of 145 substances categorized as persistent, bioaccumulative and inherently toxic (PBiT), published in April 2008, and in the assessment of Disperse Orange 5 in Batch 5 of the challenge published in August 2009, has changed. The current screening assessment concludes that these substances are no longer of concern to the environment, nor considered as having effects of concern. Consequently, amendments to the Domestic Substances List, indicating that the Significant New Activity (SNAc) provisions under subsection 81(3) of the Act no longer apply to these substances, are being considered.

The assessment report for certain azo disperse dyes, the proposed risk management approach document for Disperse Yellow 3 as well as the consultation document on the options for addressing aromatic azo and benzidine-based substances with effects of concern are available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

ANNEX 2

Disperse dyes currently subject to SNAc provisions proposed to be rescinded

CAS RN

DSL name

Colour Index name or acronym

2537-62-4

Acetamide, N-[2-[(2-bromo-6-cyano-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-(diethylamino)phenyl]-

N/A

6232-56-0

Ethanol, 2-[[4-[(2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl] methylamino]-

Disperse Orange 5

6465-02-7

Carbamic acid, [4-[[4-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)azo]-2-methylphenyl]azo]phenyl]-, methyl ester

N/A

15958-27-7

Propanenitrile, 3-[[4-[(4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl][2-[[(phenylamino)carbonyl]oxy]ethyl]amino]-

N/A

19745-44-9

Propanenitrile, 3-[4-[(5-nitro-2-thiazolyl)azo](2-phenylethyl)amino]-

N/A

24610-00-2

Benzonitrile, 2-[[4-[(2-cyanoethyl)(2-phenylethyl)amino]phenyl]azo]-5-nitro-

N/A

25150-28-1

Propanenitrile, 3-[[4-[(6,7-dichloro-2-benzothiazolyl)azo]phenyl]ethylamino]-

N/A

28824-41-1

Propanenitrile, 3-[[4-[(4,6-dibromo-2-benzothiazolyl)azo]phenyl]ethylamino]-

N/A

31030-27-0

Benzenamine, 4-[(2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-N-ethyl-N-(2-phenoxyethyl)-

N/A

33979-43-0

Propanenitrile, 3-[[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl][4-[(5,6-dichloro-2-benzothiazolyl)azo]phenyl]amino]-

N/A

41362-82-7

Propanenitrile, 3-[[4-[(5,6-dichloro-2-benzothiazolyl)azo]phenyl]methylamino]-

N/A

42852-92-6

Acetamide, N-[2-[(2-bromo-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-4-methoxy-5-[(phenylmethyl)-2-propenylamino]phenyl]-

N/A

55252-53-4

Acetamide, N-[2-[(2-cyano-6-iodo-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-(diethylamino)phenyl]-

N/A

56532-53-7

Acetamide, N-[2-[(2,6-dicyano-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-(dipropylamino)phenyl]-

N/A

61799-13-1

3-Pyridinecarbonitrile, 5-[(2-cyano-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-2-[(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]-4-methyl-6-[[3-(2-phenoxyethoxy)propyl]amino]-

N/A

63133-84-6

1(2H)-Quinolineethanol, 6-[(2-chloro-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-3,4-dihydro-2,2,4,7-tetramethyl-

NA

63134-15-6

Acetamide, N-[5-(dipropylamino)-2-[[5-(ethylthio)-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl]azo]phenyl]-

Disperse Red 338

63833-78-3

3-Pyridinecarbonitrile, 5-[(2-cyano-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-6-[(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]-4-methyl-2-[[3-(2-phenoxyethoxy)propyl]amino]-

N/A

68214-66-4

Carbamic acid, [2-[(2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-(diethylamino)phenyl]-, 2-ethoxyethyl ester

N/A

68516-64-3

Propanenitrile, 3-[[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl][4-[(2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-3-methylphenyl]amino]-

N/A

68877-63-4

Acetamide, N-[2-[(2-bromo-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-5-[(2-cyanoethyl)-2-propenylamino]-4-methoxyphenyl]-

N/A

70660-55-8

1-Naphthalenamine, 4-[(2-bromo-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-N-(3-methoxypropyl)-

N/A

72828-63-8

Benzonitrile, 2-[[4-[[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl]butylamino]-2-methylphenyl]azo]-3-bromo-5-nitro-

N/A

72828-64-9

1,3-Benzenedicarbonitrile, 2-[[4-[[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl]butylamino]-2-methylphenyl]azo]-5-nitro-

Disperse Blue 287

73003-64-2

2,4,10-Trioxa-7-azaundecan-11-oic acid, 7-[4-[(2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-3-methylphenyl]-3-oxo-, methyl ester

N/A

73398-96-6

3-Pyridinecarbonitrile, 5-[(9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-1-anthracenyl)azo]-2,6-bis[(2-methoxyethyl)amino]-4-methyl-

Disperse Brown 21

79542-46-4

Acetamide, N-[4-chloro-2-[2-(2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-[(2-hydroxy-3-phenoxypropyl)amino]phenyl]-

Disperse Red 349

83249-47-2

Acetamide, N-[2-[(2-bromo-6-cyano-4-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-(dipropylamino)phenyl]-

N/A

83249-49-4

Benzonitrile, 3-bromo-2-[[4-(diethylamino)-2-methylphenyl]azo]-5-methyl-

N/A

83249-53-0

Methanesulfonamide, N-[2-[(2-bromo-6-cyano-4-methylphenyl)azo]-5-(diethylamino)phenyl]-

N/A

83249-54-1

Methanesulfonamide, N-[2-[(2-bromo-6-cyano-4-methylphenyl)azo]-5-(dipropylamino)phenyl]-

N/A

90729-40-1

3-Pyridinecarbonitrile, 1-butyl-5-[[4-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-2-nitrophenyl]azo]-1,2-dihydro-6-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-oxo-

N/A

127126-02-7

Propanenitrile, 3-[[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl][4-[(6,7-dichloro-2-benzothiazolyl)azo]phenyl]amino]-

N/A

[10-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Fried, Jonathan

2017-151

International Economic Relations

 

Coordinator

 

Linklater, Les

2017-149

Associate Deputy Minister of Public Works and Government Services, to be styled Associate Deputy Minister of Public Services and Procurement

 

Tapley, Catrina

2017-150

Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet (Operations), Privy Council Office

 

Sukstorf, Commander Sandra

2017-147

Military Judge

 

March 3, 2017

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

[10-1-o]

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. Moving forward, the Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous Canadians and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website (http://www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/slctnPrcs.asp?menu=1&lang=eng).

Position

Organization

Closing date

Chairperson

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

March 7, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Museum of History

March 7, 2017

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum of History

March 7, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

March 7, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Nature

March 7, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

March 15, 2017

Regional Member (Manitoba/Saskatchewan)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

March 15, 2017

Regional Member (Ontario)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

March 15, 2017

Vice-Chairperson (Broadcasting)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

March 15, 2017

Member (Yukon Territory)

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada

March 7, 2017

Chairperson

National Capital Commission

March 8, 2017

Chairperson

National Gallery of Canada

March 13, 2017

Vice-Chairperson

National Gallery of Canada

March 7, 2017

Commissioner

Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs Canada

March 6, 2017

Chairperson

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

March 13, 2017

Member

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

March 13, 2017

Directors

Public Sector Pension Investment Board

March 31, 2017

Vice-Chairperson (Appeal Division)

Social Security Tribunal

March 21, 2017

Vice-Chairperson (General Division, Employment Insurance Section)

Social Security Tribunal

March 21, 2017

Vice-Chairperson (General Division, Income Security Section)

Social Security Tribunal

March 21, 2017

Chairperson

Standards Council of Canada

March 6, 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Standards Council of Canada

March 6, 2017

Members

Standards Council of Canada

March 6, 2017

Members

Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada

March 20, 2017

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

Commissioner for Workers

Canada Employment Insurance Commission

Chairperson

Canada Foundation for Innovation

President

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

Chairperson

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

Directors

First Nations Financial Management Board

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

Chairperson

National Battlefields Commission

Commissioner

National Battlefields Commission

Procurement Ombudsman

Office of the Procurement Ombudsman

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Members (full-time)

Veterans Review and Appeal Board

[10-1-o]

  • Footnote 1
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.