Vol. 150, No. 23 — June 4, 2016

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of three distillate aromatic extracts substances — Extracts (petroleum), heavy paraffinic distillate solvent, CAS RN (see footnote 1) 64742-04-7; Extracts (petroleum), light paraffinic distillate solvent, CAS RN 64742-05-8; and Extracts (petroleum), heavy naphthenic distillate solvent, CAS RN 64742-11-6 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas these three distillate aromatic extracts are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on the substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on the substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-938-5212 (fax), eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

JOHN COOPER
Acting Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Distillate Aromatic Extracts

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of the following distillate aromatic extract substances.

CAS RN (see note 1a) Name on the Domestic Substances List
64742-04-7 Extracts (petroleum), heavy paraffinic distillate solvent
64742-05-8 Extracts (petroleum), light paraffinic distillate solvent
64742-11-6 Extracts (petroleum), heavy naphthenic distillate solvent

Following the categorization exercise, distillate aromatic extracts (DAEs) under the three Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNs) 64742-04-7 [Extracts (petroleum), heavy paraffinic distillate solvent], 64742-05-8 [Extracts (petroleum), light paraffinic distillate solvent] and 64742-11-6 [Extracts (petroleum), heavy naphthenic distillate solvent] were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA.

Aromatic extracts are a class of substances derived from the solvent extraction of crude oil vacuum distillation distillate and residual streams. They are considered to be of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products or Biological materials (UVCBs). CAS RNs 64742-04-7, 64742-05-8 and 64742-11-6 are part of the broad class of aromatic extracts and can be referred to as distillate aromatic extracts since they originate from the vacuum distillation stream. Due to their untreated nature, they have high levels of aromatic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These substances are consumed on-site at refineries and are also transported in Canada via trains and trucks for use at industrial and commercial facilities. They were included in the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach (PSSA) because they are related to the petroleum sector and are complex combinations of hydrocarbons.

Estimation of mixture behaviours was accomplished through the use of a suite of representative structures that are expected to be present in these DAEs. In general, the components of DAEs are poorly soluble in water, are very hydrophobic, and are moderately to poorly volatile, although some will evaporate readily from water. DAEs are expected to predominantly reside in sediment and soil, with some lighter components partitioning to air.

Petroleum-derived oils including distillate aromatic extracts can be used as extender oils in the formulation of plastic and rubber products to achieve elasticity and make brittle materials soft and flexible. Extender oils are also a major ingredient in the production of vehicle tires, and are therefore found in crumb rubber (i.e. bits of recycled tires that can be used in the production of rubberized playground and athletic surfaces). Historically, automobile tires were formulated with high PAH extender oils, although recent changes in domestic manufacturing have seen these replaced with low PAH oils. Therefore, there may be residual general population exposure to these distillate aromatic extracts if previously used as extender oils in tire production, where old tires have been recycled into crumb rubber and incorporated in rubber playground and athletic surfaces. There is the potential that rubber surfaces may release component substances, including PAHs, by off-gassing, through natural surface degradation, and during mechanical abrasion and direct contact with skin. Two DAEs (CAS RNs 64742-11-6 and 64742-04-7) are reported as being in industrial and professional use products such as rubbers, adhesives, sealants, solvents and roofing materials.

For the ecological assessment, environmental concentrations were estimated for major ecological exposure scenarios, including manufacturing of rubber products, manufacturing of other products and runoff from tire wear and road care products that are not mixed with asphalt. Levels of exposure are well below those expected to cause harm, indicating a low risk to aquatic organisms. Harm to sediment-dwelling organisms from DAEs is also unlikely, based on the risk quotients for the sediment compartment derived using the equilibrium approach, which would be the same as those for the aquatic compartment.

Considering all available evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from these substances. It is proposed to conclude that distillate aromatic extracts (CAS RNs 64742-04-7, 64742-05-8 and 64742-11-6) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in quantities or concentrations or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

A critical health effect for the initial categorization of these distillate aromatic extracts was carcinogenicity, based on classifications by international agencies. Skin painting studies conducted in laboratory animals show skin tumour formation following chronic dermal exposure to these substances. They have also produced positive results in in vitro genotoxicity assays, and exhibit reproductive toxicity in dermally exposed laboratory animals. These effects are attributed to the high PAH content of distillate aromatic extracts.

Exposure and risk to human health was characterized for the distillate aromatic extract CAS RNs 64742-04-7, 64742-05-8 and 64742-11-6, considering that exposures may occur during their production and storage at refineries, during bulk transportation between industrial facilities, and from their potential presence in crumb rubber derived from old tire stocks. Additionally, compositional testing of Canadian marketplace products was used to assess whether these substances are found in products available for purchase by the general population.

The vapour pressure of aromatic extracts is low; therefore, inhalation exposure to these substances during transportation and production and storage at refineries is low. Crumb rubber extracted with biological fluids did not release PAHs; therefore, any oral or dermal exposure to crumb rubber is not expected to give rise to a significant exposure to aromatic extracts. Air monitoring studies that quantified the benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) concentration in air from the off-gassing of rubberized surfaces under ideal weather conditions showed both no increase and only an incremental increase above background B[a]P levels typically found in ambient air. As exposures are either not expected or, if exposure does occur, are expected to be low, risk to human health is likewise considered to be low.

High PAH oils, including these distillate aromatic extracts, have the potential to be used as extender oils in the production of rubber and plastic consumer products. Results from the compositional analysis of commonly available soft rubber and plastic marketplace products in Canada indicate that these distillate aromatic extracts are not being used in these product formulations.

Therefore, it is proposed to conclude that distillate aromatic extracts (CAS RNs 64742-04-7, 64742-05-8 and 64742-11-6) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that distillate aromatic extracts (CAS RNs 64742-04-7, 64742-05-8 and 64742-11-6) do not meet the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of two substances — Asphalt, CAS RN (see footnote 2) 8052-42-4, and Oxidized Asphalt, CAS RN 64742-93-4 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas asphalt and oxidized asphalt are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on the substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on the substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-938-5212 (fax), eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

JOHN COOPER
Acting Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Asphalt and Oxidized Asphalt

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of two substances known as asphalt and oxidized asphalt.

CAS RN (see note 2a) Name on the Domestic Substances List
8052-42-4 Asphalt
64742-93-4 Asphalt, oxidized

Asphalt (CAS RN 8052-42-4) and oxidized asphalt (CAS RN 64742-93-4) were identified as priorities for assessment as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. These substances were included in the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach (PSSA) because they are related to the petroleum sector and are considered to be of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products or Biological materials (UVCBs).

Asphalt and oxidized asphalt are complex combinations of high molecular weight organic compounds containing a relatively high proportion of hydrocarbons; carbon (C) numbers are predominantly greater than C25, with high carbon-to-hydrogen ratios. They are residual substances derived from the high temperature vacuum distillation of petroleum. The composition and the physical-chemical properties of asphalt and oxidized asphalt vary depending on the sources of crude oil, processing steps and blending stocks involved in their production.

Asphalt and oxidized asphalt are used primarily (approximately 98%) in the construction of roads and in roofing materials, but they may be found in adhesives and sealants, paints and coatings, and other miscellaneous consumer products. Other residual substances in the asphalt group with different CAS RNs might also be used in asphalt formulations if they meet the material specifications. As data on asphalt formulations (final formulated products) generally do not specify a CAS RN, and all residuals are expected to behave similarly when used in these products, the results of the analyses herein on these asphalt formulations for the purpose of assessing asphalt and oxidized asphalt may also apply to other substances in the asphalt group. For the purpose of this assessment, the term “asphalts” is used to refer to different grades and types of asphalt (CAS RN 8052-42-4) and oxidized asphalt (CAS RN 64742-93-4).

Release of components of asphalts to the environment is considered likely to be low based on experimental studies on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) leaching from paving and roofing asphalt formulations. In addition, asphalt can stabilize and entrap contaminants or other petroleum substances mixed with asphalt, making them unavailable to organisms or the environment.

Based on physical-chemical properties such as high Kow, high Koc, very low vapour pressure and water solubility under environment-relevant conditions, asphalts are not expected to disperse in the environment or to be bioavailable. Modelled ecotoxicity data and results from ecological toxicity studies on bean and corn seeds exposed to oxidized asphalt indicate low toxicity. Use of hot-mix asphalt as lining for fish ponds, and low aquatic toxicity of runoff from unsealed asphalt pavement also indicate that the bioavailability and ecotoxicity of asphalts is very low. Although spills of asphalt materials are reported, asphalts are not likely to disperse in the environment because of their low mobility. The lack of bioavailability and low toxicity of asphalts also indicate that the ecological concern of spilled asphalt materials is considered to be low.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms or the broader integrity of the environment from these substances. It is proposed to conclude that asphalt and oxidized asphalt (CAS RNs 8052-42-4 and 64742-93-4) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

A critical health effect for the initial categorization of asphalt and oxidized asphalt was carcinogenicity, based on classifications by international agencies. PAHs and benzene, minor components of asphalt, have been identified by Health Canada and several international regulatory agencies as carcinogens. PAHs (as represented by benzo[a]pyrene equivalents) and benzene were therefore selected as high-hazard components of asphalt for use in characterizing long-term exposure and risk to the general population in the vicinity of asphalt production and storage facilities. Naphthalene, a volatile PAH, was selected to characterize shorter-term exposure to bystanders.

The potential for exposure of the general population to asphalt includes consideration of inhalation exposure in the vicinity of either asphalt-producing and refining industries or of paving operations. Dermal exposure can occur from use of consumer products, including as a result of application of asphalt-based pavement sealant in residential settings. Long-term oral exposure to asphalt components (i.e. PAHs) can occur as asphalt components may migrate from asphalt surfaces indoors and are found in house dust. Risks to human health were characterized for these potential exposures.

For short-term inhalation exposure in the vicinity of paving operations, a margin of exposure based on an upper-bound exposure of a bystander to naphthalene, and the effect level in exposed animals causing a local effect on nasal olfactory epithelium, was considered adequate. Short-term dermal exposure to asphalt from asphalt-containing products is not considered to constitute a risk to human health due to a lack of toxicity exhibited by asphalt in short-term animal studies, and due to negligible dermal absorption of asphalt.

For potential inhalation exposures to asphalt from fugitive and point releases from the production and refinement of asphalt in the vicinity of facilities, margins of exposure between upper-bounding estimates of exposures to benzene and to PAHs, and estimates of cancer potency previously developed for inhalation exposure to benzene and to PAHs, are considered adequate to address uncertainties in health effects and exposure databases.

For potential long-term oral exposure to asphalt components that may migrate indoors over time from asphalt driveway sealcoat (where exposure is through ingestion of house dust that contains asphalt-derived PAHs), margins of exposure between oral exposure to PAHs and a conservative point of departure for benzo[a]pyrene are considered adequate to address uncertainties in health effects and exposure databases.

Therefore, general population exposure to asphalt and oxidized asphalt is not considered to constitute a risk to human health.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that asphalt and oxidized asphalt (CAS RNs 8052-42-4 and 64742-93-4) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that asphalt and oxidized asphalt (CAS RNs 8052-42-4 and 64742-93-4) do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position Order in Council
Bédard, Jean 2016-364
  • Canadian International Trade Tribunal
 
  • Acting Chairperson
 
Bracken, The Hon. J. Keith 2016-346
  • Government of British Columbia
 
  • Administrator
 
  • June 5 to June 8, 2016
 
Gallini, Nancy T. 2016-358
  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
 
  • Member
 
Marchildon, Sophie 2016-365
  • Canadian Human Rights Tribunal
 
  • Full-time member
 
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council  
  • Members
 
  • D’Amours, Sophie
2016-357
  • Woodhouse, Kimberly A.
2016-356
Specific Claims Tribunal  
  • Part-time members
 
  • Grist, The Hon. William G. E.
2016-362
  • MacDougall, The Hon. Barry G. A.
2016-360
  • Mayer, The Hon. Paul
2016-361
Whalen, The Hon. Raymond P. 2016-409
  • Government of Newfoundland and Labrador
 
  • Administrator
 
  • May 26, 2016
 
Yufe, Alyssa 2016-363
  • Social Security Tribunal
 
  • Employment Insurance Section
 
  • Part-time member
 

May 27, 2016

DIANE BÉLANGER
Official Documents Registrar

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DEPARTMENT OF INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. DGSO-002-16 — Available personal communications services (PCS) spectrum in the 2 GHz frequency range

The purpose of this notice is to inform interested parties of the updated list of available licences for PCS spectrum in various markets across Canada. Since 2003, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada has made PCS spectrum available for licensing on a first-come, first-served (FCFS) basis. Interested parties are encouraged to view the most recent updates on the Department’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/h_sf02092.html.

Process

The Department will use the FCFS process to assign all remaining PCS spectrum and will process applications as they are received.

Licences are subject to the fees established in the Canada Gazette notice No. DGRB-005-03, available at http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf08105.html. Fees for cellular and PCS licences are based on the amount of spectrum assigned (i.e. the number of megahertz) and the total population of the service area. Further information on the licence fees for cellular and PCS licences is available in Client Procedures Circular CPC-2-1-10, Spectrum Licence Fee Calculations for Cellular and Incumbent Personal Communications Services (PCS), at http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf01291.html.

The licensee must comply on an ongoing basis with the applicable eligibility criteria in the Radiocommunication Regulations. Licence conditions are available for review at http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/h_sf02092.html.

Application details

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada asks that interested parties submit their application(s) to the following email address: ic.spectrumoperations-operationsduspectre.ic@canada.ca.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html.

May 25, 2016

PETER HILL
Director General
Spectrum Management Operations Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following persons of the Edmonton Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

Ottawa, May 5, 2016

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Halifax Regional Police as a fingerprint examiner:

Ottawa, May 5, 2016

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following persons of the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal as fingerprint examiners:

Ottawa, May 10, 2016

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following persons of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as fingerprint examiners:

Ottawa, May 10, 2016

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Windsor Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Cory M. Bell

Ottawa, May 10, 2016

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Edmonton Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Ottawa, May 5, 2016

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following persons of the Halifax Regional Police as fingerprint examiners:

Ottawa, May 5, 2016

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal as a fingerprint examiner:

Jean-Paul Meunier

Ottawa, May 10, 2016

KATHY THOMPSON

Assistant Deputy Minister

Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Saanich Police as a fingerprint examiner:

Ottawa, May 10, 2016

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Victoria Police Department as a fingerprint examiner:

Ottawa, May 10, 2016

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Vancouver Fraser Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS the Governor in Council, pursuant to Part 5.1 of the Port Authorities Management Regulations, issued a Certificate of Amalgamation containing letters patent to amalgamate the Vancouver Port Authority, the Fraser River Port Authority and the North Fraser Port Authority to continue as the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (“Authority”), effective January 1, 2008;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the real property, other than federal real property, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS, pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), the Authority wishes to lease as lessee, the real property bearing parcel identifier (PID) 029-629-594;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister of Transport issue supplementary letters patent to set out the leasehold interest in Schedule C of the letters patent;

AND WHEREAS the Minister of Transport is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

INTEREST LANDS TO WHICH INTEREST RELATES
Leasehold interest granted pursuant to a Land Lease between TFN Industrial Lands Corporation and Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, forming part of an Agreement to Lease between Tsawwassen First Nation, Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, and TFN Economic Development Corporation, dated September 5, 2014. PID: 029-629-594 Lot F, District Lot 184, Group 2, New Westminster District, Plan EPP52169 (see plan as to limited access)

ISSUED this 16th day of March, 2016.

____________________________________

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Vancouver Fraser Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS the Governor in Council, pursuant to Part 5.1 of the Port Authorities Management Regulations, issued a Certificate of Amalgamation containing letters patent to amalgamate the Vancouver Port Authority, the Fraser River Port Authority and the North Fraser Port Authority to continue as the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (“Authority”), effective January 1, 2008;

WHEREAS Schedule B of the letters patent sets out the federal real property managed by the Authority;

WHEREAS the Authority wishes to exchange real property pursuant to subparagraph 46(1)(b)(i) of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”);

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent amending Schedule B of the letters patent to reflect the exchange;

AND WHEREAS the Minister of Transport is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

PID Number Description
  Lot 1, Blocks 28, 29, 30 and 31, District Lot 204, Group 1, New Westminster District, Plan EPP54737

Note: PID number will be assigned by the Land Title Office upon registration of title of this land.

ISSUED this 12th day of May, 2016.

___________________________________

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

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