ARCHIVED — Vol. 149, No. 25 — June 20, 2015

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ORDERS IN COUNCIL

NATIONAL ENERGY BOARD

NATIONAL ENERGY BOARD ACT

Order — Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity GC-125 to NOVA Gas Transmission Ltd., in respect of the construction and operation of the North Montney mainline

P.C. 2015-799 June 10, 2015

Whereas, on November 8, 2013, NOVA Gas Transmission Ltd. (“NGTL”) applied to the National Energy Board (“the Board”) pursuant to Part III of the National Energy Board Act (“the NEB Act”) for a certificate of public convenience and necessity in respect of the proposed construction and operation of approximately 301 kilometres of new pipeline and associated works and temporary infrastructure required for construction, for the North Montney mainline (“the project”);

Whereas the Board reviewed NGTL’s application and conducted an environmental assessment of the project under section 22 of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 (“the CEAA”);

Whereas the Board held public hearings allowing interested parties to participate and provide the Board with relevant evidentiary information for informed decisions;

Whereas, on April 15, 2015, pursuant to section 52 of the NEB Act and section 29 of the CEAA, the Board submitted its report on the project entitled NOVA Gas Transmission Ltd. GH-001-2014, dated April 2015 to the Minister of Natural Resources;

Whereas the Crown has undertaken a process of consultation and accommodation with Aboriginal groups relying on the work of the Board and its own consultative activities;

Whereas the Governor in Council accepts, having regard to the Board members’ varying views, the Board’s finding that the project will, if the conditions set out in Appendix II to the Board’s Report are complied with and if NGTL’s environmental protection procedures and mitigation measures are implemented, be required by the present and future public convenience and necessity and is not likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects;

And whereas the Governor in Council considers that the project would diversify Canada’s natural gas export market, support the development of a liquefied natural gas industry in Canada, foster resource development in the North Montney area and enhance Canada’s economic prosperity;

Therefore, on the recommendation of the Minister of Natural Resources, pursuant to paragraph 31(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 and section 54 of the National Energy Board Act, His Excellency the Governor General in Council

  • (a) decides, taking into account the implementation of any mitigation measures specified in the report referred to in paragraph (b), that the project referred to in that paragraph is not likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects;
  • (b) directs the National Energy Board to issue Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity GC-125 to NOVA Gas Transmission Ltd., in respect of the proposed construction and operation of approximately 301 kilometres of new pipeline and associated works and temporary infrastructure required for construction, for the North Montney mainline, subject to the terms and conditions set out in Appendix II of the National Energy Board Report entitled NOVA Gas Transmission Ltd. GH-001-2014, dated April 2015.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This note is not part of the Order.)

Proposal and objective

This Order in Council is required pursuant to section 52 of the National Energy Board Act (NEB Act) and section 31 of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 (CEAA, 2012) to approve the issuance of Certificate GC-125, authorizing the construction and operation of the NOVA Gas Transmission Ltd. (NGTL) North Montney Mainline (the Project).

Background

On November 8, 2013, NGTL applied to the National Energy Board (Board or NEB), under section 52 of the NEB Act, requesting that a certificate of public convenience and necessity (Certificate) be issued for the Project.

The Project would include

  • the Aitken Creek Section, approximately 182 kilometres (km) of 1067 mm nominal pipe size (NPS 42) outside diameter pipeline from Aitken Creek to an interconnection with the existing Saturn Section of the Groundbirch Mainline of the NGTL System;
  • the Kahta Section, approximately 119 km of 1067 mm (NPS 42) pipeline facilities from the North Montney producing area to Aitken Creek;
  • three compressor stations with bi-directional capability: two on the Aitken Creek Section and one on the existing Groundbirch Mainline;
  • sixteen meter stations with six on the Aitken Creek Section and ten on the Kahta Section, one of which will be a bi-directional storage meter station; it would connect the Aitken Creek Section to the Aitken Creek Storage facility (Aitken Creek Interconnect); and
  • temporary infrastructure required for the construction of the Project.

The Project will be located in northeastern British Columbia (BC), and is designed to transport sweet natural gas from the North Montney area to interconnections with the NGTL System and to the proposed Prince Rupert Gas Transmission (PRGT) pipeline. These interconnections will allow gas sales to gas markets across North America and to markets overseas as liquefied natural gas (LNG). Purchase and sale of the North Montney gas delivered to Alberta via NGTL would be facilitated through the NOVA Inventory Transfer (NIT) market, which is a natural gas trading hub where gas is bought and sold electronically.

The Project costs are estimated at $1.67 billion. The Project will have an initial gas transportation capacity of 2.1 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d), expandable to 3.6 Bcf/d. The Project was reviewed by an NEB Panel composed of three members.

Implications

Socio-economic impacts

The Project will inject $1.67 billion in direct investment into the Canadian economy. NGTL estimated Canada-wide employment during construction at 4 077 full-time equivalents (FTEs), benefiting mostly job seekers in BC and Alberta. Indirect employment through contracting activities is expected to be about 3 977 FTEs. NGTL has estimated federal and provincial governments’ direct and indirect economic benefits associated with the Project at $161 million and $135 million, respectively.

The Project will be a major natural gas development infrastructure enabling industry to tap into huge natural gas reserves in place in the region, estimated at 604 trillion cubic feet (Tcf). It will contribute to marketing 84 Tcf of the resource in place. It will also play a key role in LNG market development in Canada. Progress Energy Canada Ltd. (Progress), an indirectly wholly owned subsidiary of Petroliam Nasional Berhad (PETRONAS), is the largest leaseholder in the North Montney area and the Project’s main shipper. It is committed to supplying natural gas from the North Montney area to the Pacific NorthWest LNG Project, which is a proposed LNG liquefaction and export facility (PNW LNG Facility), situated on the coast of BC in Prince Rupert. The proposed PRGT will connect the PNW LNG Facility to the Project at the Mackie Creek Interconnection, which will allow NGTL to deliver 2.1 Bcf/d to Progress starting in 2019.

The NEB is satisfied that NGTL has identified and considered all relevant socio-economic aspects of the Project, and has proposed suitable mitigations to address the Project’s potential adverse socio-economic effects. The NEB concludes that the proposed Project would provide benefits to Aboriginal, local, regional and provincial economies and that any adverse socio-economic impacts of the Project would be adequately addressed by NGTL.

Tolling methodology impacts

NGTL proposed to use a rolled-in tolling methodology whereby current NGTL shippers would help pay for the Project. NGTL argued that the Project will be physically and operationally integrated to its NGTL System, be broadly used by most shippers, and provide an additional source of supply to the NGTL System.

The NEB approved the applied-for rolled-in tolling design during only a transition period (from 2016 to 2018), but imposed specific conditions. The conditions include a requirement for NGTL to maintain a separate cost pool and separate accounting records for the Project. When North Montney gas production is first delivered at the Mackie Creek Interconnection to the PRGT pipeline in 2019, NGTL will then have the option to implement stand-alone tolling on the Project, which will increase tolls, or to apply to the NEB for a revised tolling methodology.

NEB toll decisions are not subject to Governor in Council (GIC) approval or to ministerial review.

Environmental impacts

Because the proposed pipeline is over 40 km in length, it is a designated project under the CEAA, 2012. Pursuant to CEAA, 2012 requirements, the NEB conducted a rigorous and comprehensive environmental assessment (EA). Issues reviewed included environmental protection, land use, lands and resources for traditional uses, impacts on vegetation, wildlife and wildlife habitat, fish and fish habitat, atmospheric and acoustic environment, water quality and quantity, and heritage resources.

The Project runs alongside of existing linear disturbances over 154 km (51% of its length). Participants in the review identified several key environmental issues, including soil, water and air quality, wildlife and wildlife habitat, species at risk, wetlands, migratory birds, and cumulative effects (see footnote 1).

Nine Aboriginal groups participated in identifying the Project potential impacts on Aboriginal traditional land and resource use. Their concerns relate mostly to the cumulative impacts of industrial development on every aspect of their traditional way of life.

Three Aboriginal groups, including Blueberry River First Nations (BRFN), Prophet River First Nation (PRFN) and Saulteau First Nations (SFN), were concerned by the rapid industrialization pace, which drives cumulative effects on their traditional land and resource use.

A majority of the Board’s Panel determined that, with the implementation of NGTL’s environmental protection procedures and mitigation measures, along with the Board’s recommended conditions, the Project is not likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects. The Board conditions included three that are specific to the Peace Moberly Tract (PMT). (see footnote 2) These three conditions require that NGTL develop a protection plan that outlines additional measures that will be implemented to eliminate or minimize the Project’s potential effects within the PMT, in consultation with the SFN, the West Moberly First Nations (WMFN) and relevant government authorities. The protection and consultation plans must be submitted to the NEB for approval prior to construction. NGTL is also required to report to the NEB on its consultation efforts and on the effectiveness of the measures implemented regarding the PMT through monitoring reports during operations.

One Panel member dissented with the Panel majority, concluding that the Project would likely cause significant adverse effects to the current Aboriginal use of land and resources for traditional purposes within the PMT, an area of high value to Aboriginal people, which is traversed by an 8.8 km of the proposed pipeline. Therefore, he recommended that the GIC approve the Kahta to Mackie Creek section of the Project, but not the pipeline section that would traverse the PMT (from Mackie Creek to Saturn). Alternatively, the dissenting Panel member recommended that the recommendation be sent back to the NEB for reconsideration, before the GIC makes a final decision on the section of the proposed Project that goes through the PMT.

Impacts on landowners

The Project would be located on private and provincial Crown lands. Approximately 16% (or 29 km) of the Aitken Creek Section will be on freehold land and 84% (or 153 km) on provincial Crown land, while 100% of the Kahta Section will be located on provincial Crown land.

The NEB approved the Project routing and found the NGTL’s process for land acquisition acceptable.

Consultation

Process

On February 5, 2014, the NEB issued the Hearing Order GH-001-2014, setting out the process and providing a list of issues to be considered. The NEB carried out two oral hearing portions for six days each in Calgary, Alberta and Fort St. John, BC.

The Board determined that 51 applicants were eligible to participate, of which 39 parties were granted an intervenor status and 12 participated as commenters. There were 37 commercial parties and 3 government participants, including Environment Canada (EC), the BC Ministry of Natural Gas Development and Alberta Energy. EC participated in the review process in the capacity of a commenter.

Seven Aboriginal groups (see footnote 3) participated as intervenors in the review process. Oral traditional evidence was submitted by four First Nations. The Board received seven eligible Participant Funding Program applications from Aboriginal groups and a landowner. These applicants received funding awards totalling $235,550.

Stakeholder issues

Commercial parties

NGTL’s proposed rolled-in tolling was of concern to most commercial parties during proceedings. The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers and Progress supported the Project and NGTL’s proposed rolled-in tolling. They recommended the issuance of a Certificate for the Project.

Other commercial parties, including Alliance Pipeline Ltd., ATCO Gas, a division of ATCO Gas and Pipelines Ltd., (see footnote 4) the Export Users Group, (see footnote 5) FortisBC Energy Inc. and Westcoast Energy Inc., most of whom are NGTL’s competitors, opposed NGTL’s proposed rolled-in tolling for various reasons, including unfair competition, economic inefficiency, cross-subsidization and the high risk borne by current NGTL System customers due to uncertainty around the LNG liquefaction facility project.

Aboriginal groups

Five of the seven Aboriginal groups who participated in the review, namely the BRFN, the Fort Nelson First Nation (FNFN), the PRFN, the SFN and the WMFN, were concerned by the inability to input into the Project design, the potential Project-related effects on traditional land and resource use, and field research methods and data collection protocols used by NGTL.

These Aboriginal groups stressed that the Project will intensify the cumulative effects of increased industrialization on their traditional use of land and resources, which would affect their ability to carry on their cultural and traditional way of life. For the PRFN, NGTL’s preferred route for the Project crosses their Treaty 8 territory. The WMFN argued that increased industrialization has gradually encroached on its territory, limiting its ability to exercise traditional activities in the areas. The BRFN is also concerned that the Project will impact three areas of high importance to them, including the area northwest of Beryl Prairie, the Pink Mountain area, and the area north of Wonowon. Both the SFN and the WMFN see the PMT as being of high cultural and spiritual value to them.

NGTL argued that its preferred route is the optimal solution that balances all considerations, including commercial, stakeholder, environmental, socio-economic and technical considerations.

The NEB found that all potentially affected Aboriginal groups were provided with sufficient information about the Project, and had an opportunity to make their views about the Project known to NGTL and to the NEB. Except for the portion of the Project that crosses the PMT area, the NEB had no concerns about the Project route. To address residual concerns about the Project routing through the PMT, the Board imposed several conditions on the Project.

Governments

With respect to wildlife and wildlife habitat and caribou, EC determined that there is potential that the Project may result in the destruction of critical habitat for the Graham local population unit and recommended the avoidance of all activities likely to destroy critical habitat, in a manner that is consistent with the Species at Risk Act (SARA) and the Recovery Strategy for the Woodland Caribou, Southern Mountain Caribou Population.

Regarding the Northern Mountain caribou, EC determined that a portion of the pipeline right-of-way (RoW) is located within the Pink Mountain local population unit and recommended that all activities be consistent with the Northern Mountain Caribou Management Plan.

Crown consultation

The Crown owes a duty to consult and accommodate Aboriginal groups where appropriate when it considers conduct which could adversely impact Aboriginal and treaty rights. For the Project, the Crown relied on the NEB review process and its own consultative activities to discharge its duty to consult. The Crown determined that the NEB process was fair and helped potentially affected Aboriginal groups to make their concerns known to the NEB and NGTL, and that these concerns have been adequately addressed by imposing 45 terms and conditions to which the Certificate would be subject. These 45 conditions would mitigate any potential effects and ensure that the Project can be constructed and operated safely for Canadians and for the environment. The conditions imposed would ensure that the potential effects of the Project on Aboriginal and treaty rights and the traditional use of lands and resources would be eliminated or minimized throughout the Project’s life cycle.

NEB approval

The Board’s Panel majority recommended that a Certificate be issued under section 52 of the NEB Act for the construction and operation of the proposed North Montney Mainline. The majority of the Panel recommended that, with the 45 terms and conditions contained in Appendix II of the NEB Report, the Project is not likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects and is in the public interest.

Departmental contact

For more information, please contact

Terry Hubbard
Director General
Petroleum Resources Branch
Natural Resources Canada
Telephone: 613-992-8609

[25-1-o]

PUBLIC HEALTH AGENCY OF CANADA

QUARANTINE ACT

Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to Ebola Virus Disease in Canada Order (No. 3)

P.C. 2015-812 June 11, 2015

Whereas the Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to Ebola Virus Disease in Canada Order (No. 2), P.C. 2014-1264, will cease to have effect on June 30, 2015;

Whereas the Governor in Council wishes to renew that Order;

And whereas the Governor in Council continues to be of the opinion that

  • (a) there is an outbreak of a communicable disease, namely Ebola virus disease, in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone;
  • (b) the introduction or spread of the disease would pose an imminent and severe risk to public health in Canada;
  • (c) the entry of persons who have recently been in any of those countries into Canada may introduce or contribute to the spread of the disease in Canada; and
  • (d) no reasonable alternatives to prevent the introduction or spread of the disease are available;

Therefore, His Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of Health, pursuant to section 58 of the Quarantine Act (see footnote a), makes the annexed Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to Ebola Virus Disease in Canada Order (No. 3).

MINIMIZING THE RISK OF EXPOSURE TO EBOLA VIRUS DISEASE IN CANADA ORDER (NO. 3)

Definition of “Agency”

1. In this Order, “Agency” means the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Conditions of entry — Guinea, Liberia or Sierra Leone

2. (1) A person who has been in Guinea, Liberia or Sierra Leone in the 21 days before the day of their entry into Canada must, on entry into Canada,

  • (a) disclose that fact to a screening officer at the entry point;
  • (b) immediately undergo a medical examination if a quarantine officer determines that the person is exhibiting symptoms of Ebola virus disease;
  • (c) immediately report to a public health authority or the Agency, as specified by a quarantine officer, in the manner that the officer specifies, if the officer determines that the person is not exhibiting symptoms of Ebola virus disease and if
    • (i) the person knows they have been exposed to the Ebola virus, or
    • (ii) the person had unprotected direct contact with a person exhibiting symptoms of Ebola virus disease, with the contaminated environment or cadaver of such a person, or with a vector that is capable of transmitting the Ebola virus; and
  • (d) if they are not a person referred to in paragraph (b) or (c), report to a public health authority or the Agency, as specified by a quarantine officer, in the manner that the officer specifies.

Persons required to undergo medical examination

(2) A person who is required to undergo a medical examination under paragraph (1)(b) must, after undergoing the examination,

  • (a) contact a quarantine officer before leaving the place where the examination takes place and answer any questions that are related to the person’s exposure or possible exposure to the Ebola virus;
  • (b) if they meet at least one of the criteria set out in subparagraphs (1)(c)(i) and (ii),
    • (i) immediately report to a public health authority or the Agency, as specified by the quarantine officer, in the manner that the officer specifies, and
    • (ii) isolate themselves without delay, and remain in isolation from other persons until the expiry of the 21-day period that begins on the day on which the person enters Canada, as instructed by the public health authority or the Agency, as the case may be;
  • (c) if they do not meet any of the criteria set out in subparagraphs (1)(c)(i) and (ii), report to a public health authority or the Agency, as specified by the quarantine officer, in the manner that the officer specifies; and
  • (d) do the following during the 21-day period that begins on the day on which the person enters Canada:
    • (i) measure their body temperature twice a day, record the measurements in writing and report them to the public health authority or the Agency, as the case may be, in the time and manner that it specifies,
    • (ii) if they are required to report to a public health authority, answer any questions about their body temperature or symptoms that they are asked by an official of the authority or the Agency,
    • (iii) if they are required to report to the Agency, answer any questions about their body temperature or symptoms that they are asked by an official of the Agency,
    • (iv) report any travel intentions to the public health authority or the Agency, as the case may be, and
    • (v) immediately report any symptom of Ebola virus disease to, and follow any instructions provided by, the public health authority or the Agency, as the case may be.

Persons at higher risk of developing symptoms

(3) A person who is required to report to a public health authority or the Agency under paragraph (1)(c) must comply with the obligations set out in subparagraph (2)(b)(ii) and paragraph (2)(d).

Persons at risk of developing symptoms

(4) A person who is required to report to a public health authority or the Agency under paragraph (1)(d) must comply with the obligations set out in paragraph (2)(d).

Exception

(5) A person who is hospitalized because they exhibit the symptoms of Ebola virus disease is not required to comply with the obligations set out in subsections (2) to (4) while they are hospitalized.

Reduction in 21-day period

(6) If a person can prove that, since leaving Guinea, Liberia or Sierra Leone but before entering Canada, they have been in a place other than Guinea, Liberia or Sierra Leone, including on a ship in international waters, the 21-day period referred to in subparagraph (2)(b)(ii) and paragraph (2)(d) is reduced by the number of days that the person spent in the place.

Quarantine Act — powers and obligations

3. For greater certainty, this Order does not affect any of the powers and obligations set out in the Quarantine Act.

EFFECTIVE PERIOD

Effective period

4. This Order has effect for the period beginning on July 1, 2015 and ending on December 31, 2015.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This note is not part of the Order.)

Proposal

The Order in Council, entitled the Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to Ebola Virus Disease in Canada Order (No. 3), extends the requirements for travellers arriving in Canada from countries affected by the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) by a period of six months.

Objective

This Order will ensure that the health and safety of the public remain protected as the Ebola outbreak continues, by ensuring that all travellers arriving to Canada from Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone continue to identify themselves and be monitored by public health authorities until December 31, 2015.

Background

Ebola Virus Disease is a severe disease that causes haemorrhagic fever in humans and animals. Diseases that cause haemorrhagic fevers, such as Ebola, are often fatal as they affect the body’s vascular system (how blood moves through the body). This can lead to significant internal bleeding and organ failure. While there has been progress in combatting the EVD in West Africa, the World Health Organization re-affirmed on January 20, 2015 that the outbreak continues to be a public health emergency of international concern under the International Health Regulations. As of May 11, 2015, there have been no cases of EVD in Canada.

On November 10, 2014, the Government of Canada made the Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in Canada Order (No. 2), which is in effect until June 30, 2015. However, as the Ebola outbreak continues, there is recognition that individuals coming into Canada with a travel history from Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone will need to be assessed and monitored beyond that date. Until the outbreak is under control in these countries, the Government of Canada will continue to take enhanced action at Canada’s borders and work closely with the provinces and territories to support the monitoring and, in some cases, isolation of travellers arriving in Canada who have recently been in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

This added protection will continue to complement other Canadian EVD preparedness and response activities, including the routine screening of all travellers at points of entry for EVD and other communicable diseases, the development of an EVD vaccine, and the recent deployment and training of Rapid Response Teams to ensure Canada is ready to respond in the event there is a first case of EVD in Canada.

Implications

Key obligations for travellers

The Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to Ebola Virus Disease in Canada Order (No. 3) continues to obligate all travellers to disclose to a Screening Officer (a Canada Border Services Agent) if they have been in Guinea, Liberia or Sierra Leone in the last 21 days. The Screening Officer will refer travellers with a recent history of travel to Guinea, Liberia or Sierra Leone to a Quarantine Officer for detailed screening and temperature check.

Travellers who have EVD symptoms such as fever, chills, sore throat, or muscle aches will be immediately required to undergo a medical examination at a hospital and be placed under isolation. The Quarantine Officer will coordinate the patient transfer with the province or the territory and local public health authorities. Symptomatic travellers who do not require hospitalization after the medical exam will be required to subsequently report to a public health authority or the Public Health Agency of Canada for continued monitoring, and may, depending on whether they have or may have been exposed to the Ebola virus, be required to isolate themselves and remain in isolation from other people for up to 21 days.

Travellers who have no symptoms of EVD but who have or may have been exposed to the Ebola virus (for example, needlestick injury, family contacts of Ebola cases) are at higher risk of developing EVD. These travellers will be required to immediately report to a public health authority specified by a Quarantine Officer and isolate themselves from other people without delay for up to 21 days after arrival into Canada. They will be monitored for EVD signs and symptoms, including twice-daily temperature checks and will be required to answer questions about their body temperature or symptoms and follow further directions.

All other travellers, including health care and humanitarian workers, who have no EVD symptoms and no known possible exposure to EVD will be required to report to a public health authority or the Public Health Agency of Canada for up to 21 days after arrival in Canada. They will be required to take their temperature twice daily, self-monitor for EVD signs and symptoms, and report daily to the public health authority. They will also be required to report planned travel, answer any questions about their body temperature or symptoms and follow further directions. The public health authority will determine if any additional public health actions, such as isolation, are needed, e.g. following direct contact with Ebola patients, cadavers or the Ebola virus.

Travellers who develop symptoms of EVD will also be required to report immediately to a public health authority as instructed by the Quarantine Officer and follow any instructions provided.

Failure to comply with this Order is an offence under section 71 of the Quarantine Act. The maximum penalties (on summary conviction) are a fine of up to $750,000 and/or imprisonment for six months.

Consultation

Provinces and territories were consulted on the initial Order and informed of the extension of border measures through this Order (No. 3). The Agency will continue to collaborate with provinces and territories on the implementation of the Order and address any forthcoming challenges or concerns

Departmental contact

Gina Howell
Director
Office of Border Health Services
Public Health Agency of Canada
Telephone: 613-277-3045
Email: gina.howell@phac-aspc.gc.ca

[25-1-o]

STATISTICS CANADA

2016 Census of Agriculture

P.C. 2015-790 June 10, 2015

His Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of Industry, pursuant to section 20 and subsection 21(1) of the Statistics Act (see footnote b), prescribes the questions to be asked in the 2016 Census of Agriculture, in accordance with the annexed schedule.

SCHEDULE

STEP 1

1. Enter the Business Number (GST/HST) issued by Canada Revenue Agency for this agricultural operation.

_____________________________RT___________

2. Enter the farm name (if applicable).

____________________________________________________________

3. Enter the corporation name (if different from the farm name).

____________________________________________________________

4. Enter the name and address of the person completing this questionnaire.

Family name ___________________ Given name and initial(s) ______________________

Telephone number _____- _____- _____ Alternate telephone number ____- _____- _____

Mailing address ___________________________________________________________

Name of village, town or city _________________________________________________

Province _______ Postal code _____ _____

E-mail _____________________________________________

CONFIDENTIAL WHEN COMPLETED This information is collected under the authority of the Statistics Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. S-19. Completion of this questionnaire is required under this Act. Your information may be used by Statistics Canada in support of our other surveys or for analysis.

STEP 2

Answer the following questions about each person responsible for the MANAGEMENT DECISIONS made for this agricultural operation as of May 10, 2016.

SURNAME OR FAMILY NAME

GIVEN NAME and INITIAL(S)

Operator 1

_________________________ _________________________

Operator 2

_________________________ _________________________

Operator 3

_________________________ _________________________

If there are more than three operators, provide names and telephone numbers in the COMMENTS section on page 16.

OPERATOR 1

Sex ○  Male○ Female

Date of birth dd mm yyyy

Telephone number _____ _____ _____

Postal code _____ _____

5. Farm work

In 2015, what was each operator’s average time contribution to this agricultural operation?

(Include custom work done for others.)

(Fill in one circle only per operator.)

On average:

  • ○  more than 40 hours per week
  • ○  30 to 40 hours per week
  • ○  20 to 29 hours per week
  • ○  fewer than 20 hours per week
6. Other work

In 2015, did this operator receive a wage or salary from another job or operate another business not involved with this agricultural operation?

(Do not include custom work done for others.)

(Fill in one circle only per operator.)

○  No

○  Yes → If Yes, indicate the average time contribution to all other work.

On average:

  • ○  more than 40 hours per week
  • ○  30 to 40 hours per week
  • ○  20 to 29 hours per week
  • ○  fewer than 20 hours per week
OPERATOR 2

Sex ○  Male○ Female

Date of birth dd mm yyyy

Telephone number _____ _____ _____

Postal code _____ _____

5. Farm work

In 2015, what was each operator’s average time contribution to this agricultural operation?

(Include custom work done for others.)

(Fill in one circle only per operator.)

On average:

  • ○  more than 40 hours per week
  • ○  30 to 40 hours per week
  • ○  20 to 29 hours per week
  • ○  fewer than 20 hours per week

6. Other work

In 2015, did this operator receive a wage or salary from another job or operate another business not involved with this agricultural operation?

(Do not include custom work done for others.)

(Fill in one circle only per operator.)

○  No

○  Yes → If Yes, indicate the average time contribution to all other work.

On average:

  • ○  more than 40 hours per week
  • ○  30 to 40 hours per week
  • ○  20 to 29 hours per week
  • ○  fewer than 20 hours per week
OPERATOR 3

Sex ○  Male○ Female

Date of birth dd mm yyyy

Telephone number _____ _____ _____

Postal code _____ _____

5. Farm work

In 2015, what was each operator’s average time contribution to this agricultural operation?

(Include custom work done for others.)

(Fill in one circle only per operator.)

On average:

  • ○  more than 40 hours per week
  • ○  30 to 40 hours per week
  • ○  20 to 29 hours per week
  • ○  fewer than 20 hours per week
6. Other work

In 2015, did this operator receive a wage or salary from another job or operate another business not involved with this agricultural operation?

(Do not include custom work done for others.)

(Fill in one circle only per operator.)

○  No

○  Yes → If Yes, indicate the average time contribution to all other work.

On average:

  • ○  more than 40 hours per week
  • ○  30 to 40 hours per week
  • ○  20 to 29 hours per week
  • ○  fewer than 20 hours per week

STEP 3

Enter the MAIN FARM LOCATION of this operation.

7. Enter the civic address. For the Prairies and parts of British Columbia, report in question 8.

Number Road or street

__________ ___________________________________________________

Name of village, town, city or municipality

___________________________________________________

Province ____ Postal code ___ ___

8. In the Prairies and parts of British Columbia, enter:

Quarter ____ Section ____ Township____ Range____ Meridian____

STEP 4

What UNIT OF MEASURE will be used to report land areas? Use this unit to report all areas throughout the questionnaire unless otherwise specified.

(Fill in one circle only.)

9.

○  Acres      1 acre = 0.40 hectare = 1.18 arpent

○  Hectares 1 hectare = 2.47 acres = 2.92 arpents

○  Arpents (Quebec only) 1 arpent = 0.85 acre = 0.34 hectare

STEP 5

Answer the following questions about the TOTAL AREA OF WORKABLE and NON-WORKABLE LAND of this operation in 2016.

  • Workable land includes all cropland, nursery, sod, summerfallow, pasture, etc.
  • Non-workable land includes:
  • All idle land: woodlots, bush, ponds, bogs, marshes, buffer zones, etc.
  • All land buildings are located on: greenhouses, mushroom houses, farmhouse, barns, etc.

Area in 2016

10. Total area owned (Include all workable and non-workable land.)    _________
11. Leased FROM governments (land operated under licence, permit or lease, etc.) _________
12. Rented or leased FROM others    _________
13. Crop-shared land USED by this operation   _________
14. Other areas USED by this operation (land trading, rent-free, etc.) _________
15. TOTAL of questions 10 to 14   _________

LAND AREA used by others

 
16. Area of land USED BY OTHERS (rented, leased or crop-shared TO others land trading, rent-free, etc.) _________

NET AREA of this operation 

 
17. Question 15 minus question 16. This is the NET AREA.  
Report on this area throughout the questionnaire. _________

STEP 6

Answer the following questions about HAY or FIELD CROPS grown on this operation.

  • Include
    • all hay and field crops to be harvested or used as green manure in 2016, even if they were sown or planted in an earlier year;
    • all land to be seeded, even if not yet seeded.
  • Do not include land used by others.
  • Report the areas only once, even if more than one crop will be harvested in 2016.
  • Report vegetables in STEP 7 and fruits, berries and nuts in STEP 8.

Area in 2016

18. Wheat

  • Spring wheat (Report durum wheat below.)
  • Durum wheat
  • Winter wheat (to be harvested in 2016)
_________
_________
_________
19. Oats _________
20. Barley _________
21. Mixed grains _________

22. Corn

  • Corn for grain (Report sweet corn in STEP 7.)
  • Corn for silage, etc.
_________
_________
23. Rye
  • Fall rye (to be harvested in 2016)
_________
24. Canola (rapeseed) _________
25. Soybeans _________
26. Flaxseed _________
27. Dry field peas (Report fresh green peas in STEP 7.) _________
28. Chick peas (including garbanzo beans) _________
29. Lentils _________
30. Dry white beans (navy and pea beans) _________
31. Other dry beans (pinto, kidney, cranberry beans,
lima, great northern, etc.)
_________
32. Alfalfa and alfalfa mixtures for hay, silage, green feed,
dehydrated alfalfa, etc.
_________

33. All other tame hay and fodder crops for hay or silage
(clover, sorghum, millet, etc.)

(Report pasture in STEP 10.)

_________

34. Forage seed to be harvested in 2016 for seed
(including turf grass seed)

(Report sod in STEP 9.)

_________
35. Potatoes _________
36. Mustard seed _________
37. Sunflowers (standard and dwarf varieties) _________
38. Canary seed _________
39. Ginseng _________
40. Buckwheat _________
41. Sugar beets _________
42. Triticale _________

43. Other field crops (caraway seed, hemp, tobacco, spelt,
coriander and other spices, etc.)

Specify: __________

__________

__________

_________

_________

_________

44. TOTAL area of hay and field crops

(Total of questions 18 to 43)

_________

STEP 7

Are any VEGETABLES grown on this operation for sale?

  • Do not include land used by others.
  • For potatoes, dry field peas and all dry beans, report in STEP 6.
  • For greenhouse vegetables, report in STEP 19.

○  No → Go to STEP 8

○  Yes → • Report the total area planted or to be planted in 2016.

• Report in the same unit of measure as in STEP 4.

Example: An operation grows 7 1/3 acres of
sweet corn for sale.
Area in 2016 (Fraction)
This area would be reported as: 7 1/3  

 

Area in 2016

 
    (Fraction)
45. Sweet corn _____________ _ /_

46. Tomatoes

_____________

_ /_

47. Cucumbers (all varieties)

_____________

_ /_

48. Green peas (Report dry field peas in question 27, on page 4.)

_____________

_ /_

49. Green and wax beans

_____________

_ /_

50. Cabbage (Report Chinese cabbage below.)

_____________

_ /_

51. Chinese cabbage

_____________

_ /_

52. Cauliflower

_____________

_ /_

53. Broccoli

_____________

_ /_

54. Brussels sprouts

_____________

_ /_

55. Carrots (including baby carrots)

_____________

_ /_

56. Rutabagas and turnips

_____________

_ /_

57. Beets

_____________

_ /_

58. Radishes

_____________

_ /_

59. Shallots and green onions

_____________

_ /_

60. Dry onions, yellow, Spanish, cooking, etc.

_____________

_ /_

61. Celery.

_____________

_ /_

62. Lettuce (all head and leaf varieties)

_____________

_ /_

63. Spinach.

_____________

_ /_

64. Peppers

_____________

_ /_

65. Pumpkins

_____________

_ /_

66. Squash and zucchini

_____________

_ /_

67. Asparagus, producing

_____________

_ /_

68. Asparagus, non-producing

_____________

_ /_

69. Other vegetables (herbs, rhubarb, melons, garlic, gourds, etc.)

Specify: __________ __________ _/_

__________ __________ _/_

__________ __________ _/_

 

_____________

_ /_

70. TOTAL area of vegetables (Total of questions 45 to 69)

_____________

_ /_

STEP 8

Are any FRUITS, BERRIES or NUTS grown on this operation for sale?

  • Do not include land used by others.

○  No → Go to STEP 9

○  Yes → Report in the same unit of measure as in STEP 4.

Area in 2016
(producing and non-producing)

(Fraction)
71. Apples _____________ _ /_

72. Pears

_____________

_ /_

73. Plums and prune

_____________

_ /_

74. Cherries (sweet)

_____________

_ /_

75. Cherries (sour)

_____________

_ /_

76. Peaches

_____________

_ /_

77. Apricots

_____________

_ /_

78. Grapes

_____________

_ /_

79. Strawberries

_____________

_ /_

80. Raspberries

_____________

_ /_

81. Cranberries

_____________

_ /_

82. Blueberries (highbush blueberries and
wild blueberries grown on managed land)

_____________

_ /_

83. Saskatoons

_____________

_ /_

84. Other fruits, berries or nuts
(nectarines, currants, blackberries, hazelnuts, etc.)

Specify: __________ __________ _/_

__________ __________ _/_

__________ __________ _/_

_____________

_____________

_____________

_ /_

_ /_

_ /_

85. TOTAL area of fruits, berries and nuts

(Total of questions 71 to 84)

_____________

_ /_

STEP 9

Are any SOD, NURSERY PRODUCTS or CHRISTMAS TREES grown on this operation for sale?

  • For greenhouse products, report in STEP 19.

○  No → Go to STEP 10

○  Yes → Report the total area under cultivation in 2016.

Area in 2016

86. TOTAL area of SOD under cultivation for sale _____________

87. TOTAL area of NURSERY products grown for sale (shrubs, trees, vines, ornamentals,
bulbs, etc., grown out-of-doors, or in cold frames or tunnels)

_____________

88. TOTAL area of CHRISTMAS TREES grown for sale (Include naturally established or planted areas, regardless of stage of growth. Only include areas that are pruned or managed with the use of fertilizer or pesticides.)

_____________

STEP 10

LAND USE
  • Do not include land used by others.

Area in 2016

89. Enter the NET AREA from question 17 on page 3

Report below how the area in question 89 is used.

_____________

Area in 2016

90. Sum of all areas reported for field crops and hay, vegetables, fruits, berries, nuts, sod, nursery products and Christmas trees (Total of questions 44, 70, 85, 86, 87 and 88) _____________

91. Summerfallow (Include cropland on which no crops will be grown during the year but that will have weeds controlled by tillage or chemical application.)

_____________

92. Tame or seeded pasture (Do not include areas to be harvested for hay, silage or seed.)

_____________

93. Natural land for pasture (Include woodland used as pasture.)

_____________

94. Woodlands and wetlands (woodlots, sugarbush, tree windbreaks, bush, ponds, bogs,
marshes, sloughs, etc.)

_____________

95. All other land (idle land, land on which farm buildings, barnyards, lanes, home gardens,
greenhouses and mushroom houses are located)

_____________

96. TOTAL of questions 90 to 95

(This total should equal the NET AREA reported in question 89.)

_____________

STEP 11

If SUMMERFALLOW was reported in question 91, what is the area on which each of the following forms of weed control will be used in 2016:

Area in 2016

97.  
  • Chemfallow only

_____________

  • Summerfallow, tilled only

_____________

  • Chemical and tillage weed control on the same land (Do not include area already reported as “Chemfallow only” or “Summerfallow, tilled only”.)

_____________

STEP 12

For the LAND SEEDED or TO BE SEEDED, report the area of each of the following practices:

  • Include the area that was prepared last fall or this spring.
  • Do not include land in summerfallow this year.

Area

98.  

○ No-till seeding or zero-till seeding (Include direct seeding into undisturbed stubble or sod.)

_____________

○ Tillage that retains most of the crop residue on the surface
(Include minimum tillage.)

_____________

○ Tillage that incorporates most of the crop residue into the soil

_____________

STEP 13

In 2015, did this operation:

99. practice in-field winter grazing or feeding?

○  No

○  Yes

100. practice rotational grazing?

○  No

○  Yes

101. plow down green crops?

○  No

○  Yes

102. have winter cover crops (including fall rye, winter wheat, red clover, etc.)?

○  No

○  Yes

103. have windbreaks or shelterbelts (natural or planted)?

○  No

○  Yes

STEP 14

In 2015, what was the area of this operation from which CROP RESIDUE (straw, stover, stalks) was BALED for bedding or sale?

  • Include residue from small grains and oilseeds, and corn stalks.
  • Do not include hay, corn silage or other forages.

Area in 2015

104. Report the area from which crop residue was baled in 2015

_____________

STEP 15

In 2015, were HERBICIDES, INSECTICIDES, FUNGICIDES, COMMERCIAL FERTILIZER, LIME, TRACE MINERALS or NUTRIENTS used on this operation?

  • Do not include
    • greenhouse or mushroom areas;
    • treated seed.

○  No → Go to STEP 16

○  Yes → Report land areas only once for each input, even if there was more than one application in 2015.

105. Report the area of land on which each of the following inputs was used on this operation in 2015:

Area in 2015

  • Herbicides

_____________

  • Insecticides

_____________

  • Fungicides

_____________

  • Commercial fertilizer

_____________

  • Lime

_____________

  • Trace minerals and nutrients (copper, manganese, etc.

_____________

STEP 16

In 2015, was MANURE applied on this operation?

○  No → Go to STEP 17

○  Yes

106. Report the area of land for each method of application:

Area in 2015

○ Solid or composted manure, incorporated into soil

_____________

○ Solid or composted manure, not incorporated

_____________

○ Liquid manure, injected or incorporated into soil

_____________

○ Liquid manure, not incorporated

_____________

STEP 17

In 2015, was an IRRIGATION system used on this operation to apply water on land?

  • Include all methods of irrigation (pivot, sprinklers, surface, side or wheel rolls, drip, etc.)
  • Do not include greenhouse or mushroom areas.

○  No → Go to STEP 18

○  Yes

Area irrigated in 2015

107. Report the total area of land irrigated in 2015

_____________

STEP 18

Does this operation produce any ORGANIC products for sale?

  • Include certified products or those in the process of becoming certified.

○  No → Go to STEP 19

○  Yes

108. What is the status of the organic products in 2016?

(Fill in all applicable circles.)

○  Certified by an organic certifying body

○  Transitional (in the process of becoming certified)

109. Enter the name of the certifying body. ___________________________________

STEP 19

Are any GREENHOUSE PRODUCTS grown on this operation for sale?

  • For sod, nursery products and Christmas trees, report in STEP 9.
  • For unheated cold frames or tunnels, report these areas in STEP 7 or STEP 8.

○  No → Go to STEP 20

○  Yes

110. Will the area be reported in square feet or square metres?

○  square feet OR ○  square metres

Area in 2016

111. TOTAL area under glass, plastic or other protection used for growing plants

_____________

Area on May 10, 2016

Of this total, report the area on May 10, 2016, for each of the following:  

112. Flowers (cut flowers, ornamental bedding and potted plants, etc.)

_____________

113. Greenhouse vegetables

_____________

114. Other greenhouse products (vegetable bedding plants, cuttings, tree seedlings, etc.)

Specify: ___________________________________

 

_____________

STEP 20

Are any MUSHROOMS grown on this operation for sale?

○  No → Go to STEP 21

○  Yes

115. Will the area be reported in square feet or square metres?

○  square feet OR ○  square metres

Area on May 10, 2016

116. TOTAL growing area (standing footage) for mushrooms on May 10, 2016

_____________

STEP 21

Were any MAPLE TREES TAPPED on this operation in 2016?

○  No → Go to STEP 22

○  Yes

Number of taps in 2016

117. TOTAL number of taps made on maple trees in the spring of 2016

_____________

STEP 22

Does this operation own any BEES for honey production or BEES for pollination?

○  No → Go to STEP 23

○  Yes Report bees owned, regardless of location.

Number of colonies on
May 10, 2016

118. On May 10, 2016, how many live colonies of honeybees (used for honey production or pollination) are owned by this operation?

_____________

119. On May 10, 2016, how many other pollinating bees (leafcutter, blue orchard, bumble, etc.) are owned by this operation?

_____________

Number on May 10, 2016

  • Select one unit of measure:

○  Gallons or

○  Number of bees or

○  Colonies

_____________

STEP 23

In 2015, which of the following TECHNOLOGIES were used on this operation?

  • Include work done by others on this operation.

(Fill in all applicable circles.)

120.

  • ○  Computers/laptops for farm management
  • ○  Smart phones/tablets for farm management
  • ○  Automated steering (auto-steer)
  • ○  GPS technology
  • ○  GIS mapping (e.g., soil mapping)
  • ○  Greenhouse automation
  • ○  Robotic milking
  • ○  Automated environmental controls for animal housing
  • ○  Automated animal feeding
  • ○  Other technology — Specify: __________
  • ○  None of the above

STEP 24

On May 10, 2016, are there any POULTRY on this operation?

○  No → Go to STEP 25

○  Yes

  • Report all poultry on this operation, regardless of ownership, including those grown under contract.
  • Include poultry for sale and poultry for personal use.
  • Do not include poultry owned but kept on an operation operated by someone else.

Number of birds on
May 10, 2016

Chickens for eggs

121. Pullets intended for laying table eggs, under 19 weeks

_____________

122. Laying hens that produce table eggs, 19 weeks and over

_____________

123. Layer and broiler breeders (pullets and hens)

_____________

Chickens for meat

124. Broilers, roasters and Cornish (Report breeders in question 123.)

_____________

125. TOTAL hens and chickens (Total of questions 121 to 124)

_____________

Other poultry

126. Turkeys (all ages)

_____________

127. Other poultry (geese, ducks, roosters, ostriches, emus, pheasants, quail, pigeons, etc.)

Specify: __________

__________

__________

_____________

_____________

_____________

STEP 25

In 2015, were any CHICKENS or TURKEYS produced on this operation for sale?

○  No → Go to STEP 26

○  Yes Report the production on a live weight basis.

128. Will production be reported in kilograms or pounds?

○  kilograms OR ○  pounds

Production in 2015
(live weight)

129. Broilers, roasters and Cornish

_____________

130. Turkeys

_____________

STEP 26

In 2015, were any EGGS produced on this operation for sale?

○  No → Go to STEP 27

○  Yes Report the number of dozens in 2015.

Dozens of eggs in 2015

131. Table eggs (dozens)

_____________

132. Hatching eggs (dozens)

_____________

STEP 27

In 2015, was there a COMMERCIAL POULTRY HATCHERY located on this operation?

○  No → Go to STEP 28

○  Yes

Number of birds
hatched in 2015

133. In 2015, how many chicks or other poultry were hatched?

_____________

STEP 28

On May 10, 2016, are there any LIVESTOCK on this operation?

○  No → Go to STEP 29

○  Yes

  • Report all animals on this operation, regardless of ownership, including those that are boarded, custom-fed or fed under contract.
  • Include all animals kept by this operation, regardless of ownership, that are pastured on a community pasture, grazing co-op or public land.
  • Do not include animals owned but kept on a farm, ranch or feedlot operated by someone else.
CATTLE OR CALVES

134. Are there any cattle or calves on this operation?

○  No → Go to question 141

○  Yes

Number on May 10,
2016

135. Calves, under 1 year

_____________

136. Steers, 1 year and over

_____________

137. Heifers, 1 year and over:

  • for slaughter or feeding
  • for beef herd replacement
  • for dairy herd replacement
_____________
_____________
_____________

138. Cows:

  • mainly for beef purposes
  • mainly for dairy purposes
_____________
_____________

139. Bulls, 1 year and over

_____________

140. TOTAL cattle and calves (Total of questions 135 to 139)

_____________
PIGS

141. Are there any pigs on this operation?

○  No → Go to question 148

○  Yes

Number on May 10,
2016

142. Boars

_____________

143. Sows and gilts for breeding

_____________

144. Nursing pigs

_____________

145. Weaner pigs

_____________

146. Grower and finishing pigs

_____________

147. TOTAL pigs (Total of questions 142 to 146)

_____________
SHEEP OR LAMBS

148. Are there any sheep or lambs on this operation?

○  No → Go to question 153

○  Yes

Number on May 10,
2016

149. Rams

_____________

150. Ewes

_____________

151. Lambs

_____________

152. TOTAL sheep and lambs (Total of questions 149 to 151)

_____________
OTHER LIVESTOCK

153. Are there any other livestock on this operation?

○  No → Go to STEP 29

○  Yes Report animals of all ages unless otherwise specified.

Number on May 10,
2016

154. Horses and ponies

_____________

155. Goats

_____________

156. Llamas and alpacas

_____________

157. Bison (buffalo)

_____________

158. Elk (wapiti)

_____________

159. Deer (Do not include wild deer.)

_____________

160. Rabbits

_____________

161. Mink (Report breeding stock only.)

_____________

162. Other livestock (fox, wild boars, donkeys, mules, chinchillas, etc.)

Specify: __________

__________

__________

_____________

_____________

_____________

STEP 29

Answer the following questions about the MARKET VALUE of land and buildings on this operation.

  • Include
    • the value of all land and all structures such as houses, farm buildings, silos, etc., that are part of this operation;
    • the value of all fixed equipment such as bulk tanks, farrowing pens, etc., in farm buildings on this operation.
  • Do not include the value of any land and buildings rented or leased TO others.

Present market value
(dollars only)

163. Estimate the present market value of land and buildings that are:

  • owned
  • rented or leased FROM others or governments

$_____, _____, ____ .00

$_____, _____, ____ .00

STEP 30

Answer the following questions about FARM MACHINERY and EQUIPMENT that are owned or leased by this operation as of May 10, 2016.

  • Include all farm machinery and equipment owned or leased by this operation or jointly with a different operation.
  • Do not include machinery that is rented on a short-term basis (hourly or daily rentals).
  • Report fixed equipment in STEP 29.
Example: An operation owns one combine, valued at $100,000, and shares ownership of another combine, valued at $60,000, equally with another operation. These two combines would be reported as: Number owned and leased Present market value (owned and leased)
(dollars only)
  1 (Fraction)
1/2
$ , 130, 000.00

164. Tractors:

  • under 60 p.t.o. hp. (including garden tractors, ATVs, etc.)
  • 60 - 149 p.t.o. hp.
  • over 149 p.t.o. hp.

___
___
___

_/_
_/_
_/_

$_, ___, ___.00
$_, ___, ___.00
$_, ___, ___.00

165. Pick-ups, cargo vans, cars and other passenger vehicles used in the farm busines

___

_/_

$_, ___, ___.00

166. Other farm trucks

___

_/_

$_, ___, ___.00

167. Grain combines and swathers

___

_/_

$_, ___, ___.00

168. Forage harvesters, balers, mower-conditioners, etc.

___

_/_

$_, ___, ___.00

169. Tillage, cultivation, seeding and planting equipment

___

_/_

$_, ___, ___.00

170. Irrigation equipment

___

_/_

$_, ___, ___.00

171. All other farm machinery and equipment not reported above, such as
sprayers, elevators, wagons, manure spreaders, dryers, portable grinder-mixers,
other harvesting equipment, Christmas tree balers, etc.

___

_/_

$_, ___, ___.00

172. TOTAL present market value of all farm machinery and equipment
(Total of questions 164 to 171)

___

_/_

$_, ___, ___.00

STEP 31

Questions about GROSS FARM RECEIPTS and OPERATING EXPENSES in 2015
  • Report for the 2015 calendar year OR for the last complete accounting (fiscal) year.
GROSS FARM RECEIPTS (before deducting expenses)
  • Include
    • receipts from all agricultural and forest products sold;
    • program and insurance payments and custom work receipts.
  • Do not include
    • sales of capital items (quota, land, machinery, etc.);
    • the sale of any goods purchased only for resale.

Amount (dollars only)

173. In 2015, what were the TOTAL gross farm receipts?

$___, ___, ___.00

174. Of the above, what were the sales of firewood, pulpwood, logs, fence posts and pilings?

$___, ___, ___.00
TOTAL FARM OPERATING EXPENSES
  • Include only the farm business share of amounts paid.
  • Do not include
    • costs of any goods purchased only for resale;
    • depreciation or capital cost allowance.

Amount (dollars only)

175. In 2015, what were the TOTAL farm operating expenses?

$___, ___, ___.00

STEP 32

In 2015, did this operation pay any wages or salaries to employees?

  • Include family and non-family.
  • Do not include custom or contract workers.

○  No → Go to STEP 33

○  Yes

176. In 2015, how many employees were paid on:

  • a) a year-round full-time basis (30 or more hours per week) __________
  • b) a year-round part-time basis (less than 30 hours per week) __________
  • c) a seasonal or temporary basis __________

177. TOTAL number of employees receiving a wage or salary in 2015 __________

178. In 2015, how many of the total number of employees receiving a wage
or salary (question 177) were family members? __________

STEP 33

In 2015, did this operation SELL any agricultural products DIRECTLY TO CONSUMERS for human consumption?

  • Do not include the sale of any goods purchased only for resale.

○  No → Go to STEP 34

○  Yes

179. In 2015, which of the following products were sold directly to consumers for human consumption? (Fill in all applicable circles)

○  Unprocessed agricultural products (such as fruits, vegetables, meat cuts, poultry, eggs, maple syrup, honey, etc.)

○  Value-added products (such as jellies, sausages, wine, cheese, etc.)

180. In 2015, which of the following methods were used to sell directly to consumers for human consumption? (Fill in all applicable circles.)

○  Farm gate sales, stands, kiosks, U-pick

○  Farmers’ markets

○  Community Supported Agriculture (CSA)

○  Other methods — Specify: ______________________________

______________________________

STEP 34

Answer the following questions about the OPERATING ARRANGEMENT of this agricultural operation in 2016.

181. What is the operating arrangement of this operation?

(Fill in one circle only.)

  • ○  Sole proprietorship
  • ○  Partnership without a written agreement
  • ○  Partnership with a written agreement
  • ○  Family corporation (including corporations with one or more shareholders)
  • ○  Non-family corporation

If question 181 does not describe the operating arrangement of this operation, report in the COMMENTS section on page 16.

STEP 35

As of May 10, 2016, did this operation have a WRITTEN SUCCESSION PLAN?

A succession plan is more extensive than a will. It is a formalized plan that ensures the future continuity of the farm business. It contains three elements: transfer of management and control; transfer of assets and ownership; and transfer of labour.

○  No → Go to STEP 36

○  Yes

182. In your written succession plan, will the successor(s) for this operation be:

(Fill in all applicable circles.)

  • ○  Family member(s)
  • ○  Non-family member(s)

STEP 36

In 2015, were there any renewable energy producing systems, regardless of ownership, on this operation?

  • Include systems that produce energy for this operation or for sale.

○  No → End of questionnaire, thank you.

○  Yes

183. In 2015, which of the following renewable energy producing systems were on this operation?

(Fill in all applicable circles.)

  • ○  Solar panels
  • ○  Wind turbines
  • ○  Anaerobic biodigester (biogas or methane)
  • ○  Biodiesel production systems
  • ○  Geothermal electric power generator
  • ○  Hydro electric power generator
  • ○  Other renewable energy producing systems — Specify: ___________________
Purpose of the Census of Agriculture and users of the data

The Census of Agriculture provides the only comprehensive and integrated profile of the physical, economic, social and environmental aspects of Canada’s agriculture industry. It is conducted every five years. The data are needed to make informed decisions about business management strategies, agricultural policies, programs and services that directly affect farmers and rural communities.

Census data provide a reliable source of information to farm organizations, government departments, agriculture suppliers and service providers, and researchers that help them to understand and respond to changes in agriculture.

But why in May?

Statistics Canada recognizes that mid-May is one of the busiest times of the year for farmers. However, collecting the data at the same time as the Census of Population streamlines procedures and saves millions of dollars.

Use of record linkages

To enhance the data from this census and to minimize the reporting burden, Statistics Canada may combine it with information from other surveys or from administrative sources.

The law protects what you tell us

The confidentiality of your census responses is protected by the law. All Statistics Canada employees have taken an oath of secrecy. Your personal census information cannot be given to anyone outside Statistics Canada without your consent. This is your right.

Fax or e-mail transmission disclosure

Statistics Canada advises you that there could be a risk of disclosure during facsimile or e-mail transmission. However, upon receipt, Statistics Canada will provide the guaranteed level of protection afforded all information collected under the authority of the Statistics Act.

COMMENTS

If you have any questions on the Census of Agriculture, call us free of charge, 1-855-859-6273. Please mail your questionnaire today.

Census of Agriculture results will be available in May 2017: www.statcan.gc.ca.

Thank you for your co-operation.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This note is not part of the Order.)

Proposal

The Minister of Industry proposes that May 2016 be fixed as the month in which Statistics Canada will conduct the 2016 Census of Agriculture, in conjunction with the Census of Population, and requests the schedule for the 2016 Census of Agriculture be prescribed, as provided by the Statistics Act.

Purpose

The purpose of this Order is to fix May 2016 as the month in which Statistics Canada will conduct the 2016 Census of Agriculture, and to prescribe the questions included in the 2016 Census of Agriculture.

Background

The Statistics Act specifies that starting in 1976 and in every tenth year thereafter, unless otherwise directed by the Governor in Council, a census of agriculture shall be taken by Statistics Canada (paragraph 20(b)) and gives the Minister of Industry the authority to prescribe the rules, instructions, forms, and schedules to carry out the work of Statistics Canada (section 7). The Statistics Act also requires that the questions included in the Census of Agriculture shall be prescribed by order of the Governor in Council and published in Part I of the Canada Gazette (section 21).

All agriculture operations in Canada are legally required to complete the census questionnaire, according to the Statistics Act. Statistics Canada is bound by law to protect the confidentiality of the information respondents provide in the census. The questionnaire can be completed by anyone who is responsible for the management decisions of the operation or another person familiar with the operation.

Implications

The Census of Agriculture collects information on every agricultural operation in Canada related to farm business structure, land use and farm practices, products (crops and livestock), total revenues and expenses; land, buildings and farm machinery values; and finance, new technology, direct marketing, succession planning and renewable energy producing systems. It is the main source of data available in a standardized format for small geographical areas. It provides nationally comparable data that can be cross-classified to show details. The Census of Agriculture is taken to support the industry and decision making by both the public and private sectors.

Although the questionnaire is updated every census to reflect the changing requirements of data users, certain basic or core questions appear on every census. These questions — such as farmland area, livestock numbers and crop areas — are considered essential by the major users of Census of Agriculture data because it allows them to measure change over time. Adding new questions and dropping others allows data to be collected that reflect changes in the agriculture industry. Four new topics were included in the 2016 questionnaire: the adoption of technologies, direct marketing, succession planning and renewable energy systems. These topics reflect changes in the industry and strong user demand for this new information. Also, in an effort to reduce respondent burden, the detailed questions related to farm operating expenses have been replaced with one question asking for total farm operating expenses.

The month of May is proposed to maintain comparability of the data with those of previous censuses, a key requirement for data users. The Census of Agriculture will be conducted concurrently with the Census of Population, realizing significant cost savings. The two censuses have been conducted jointly since 1956.

Consultations

To determine the questions to be asked in the 2016 Census of Agriculture, Statistics Canada conducted comprehensive consultations and received 203 submissions from diverse groups, including federal government departments and agencies, provincial ministries, industry organizations, academics, farm services companies and consulting firms. The general public was also invited to participate in online consultations. Consultations on the 2016 Census of Agriculture occurred from October 2012 to July 2013. Testing of the questions occurred between February 2013 and May 2014.

New or changed questions were developed at the head office and tested a number of times with farm operators across Canada through one-on-one interviews on their farms and in focus groups. Farm operators selected for testing reflected regional diversity — in types of agriculture, production techniques, languages and terminology, and in policies or issues that could affect the sensitivity of questions. This testing helped to improve the questions and the instructions to complete the questionnaire. Respondent burden, content testing results, user priorities and budgets were all taken into consideration in determining the final content of the 2016 Census of Agriculture questionnaire. The final report entitled Census of Agriculture: Content Consultations can be viewed on the Statistics Canada Web site at: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/95-635-x/95-635-x2014001-eng.htm.

Departmental contact

Jean-Pierre Simard
Director General
Agriculture, Energy, Environment and Transportation Statistics Branch
Census of Agriculture
Statistics Canada
Telephone: 613-951-0741
Email: Jean-Pierre.Simard@statcan.gc.ca

[25-1-o]

STATISTICS CANADA

2016 Census of Population

P.C. 2015-789 June 10, 2015

His Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of Industry, pursuant to subsections 19(1) and 21(1) of the Statistics Act (see footnote c), fixes May 2016 as the month in which a census of population shall be taken by Statistics Canada and prescribes the questions to be asked in the 2016 Census of Population, as set out in the annexed schedule.

SCHEDULE

STEP A

CONFIDENTIAL WHEN COMPLETED

1. What is your telephone number? _____- _____- _____

2. What email address could we use to contact your household, if applicable?

________________________________________________________________

3. What is the address of this dwelling?

Number
(and suffix, if applicable)
(e.g., 302, 151 B, 16 1/2) ____________________

Street name, street type (e.g., DR = Drive), direction (e.g., N = North)

______________________________________________________

Apartment/unit ___________

City, municipality, town, village, Indian reserve

______________________________________

Province / territory

________________

Postal code

_____ _____

4. What is the mailing address of this dwelling, if different from above?
(e.g., Rural Route, PO Box, Lot and Concession or General Delivery)

____________________________________________________________

STEP B

1. Including yourself, how many persons usually live at this address on May 10, 2016?

Include: all persons who have their main residence at this address, even if they are temporarily away.

See the instructions on page 3 (joint custody, students, landed immigrants, secondary residence, etc.).

______ ← Number of persons

2. Including yourself, list all persons who usually live here on May 10, 2016.

Important: Begin the list with an adult followed, if applicable, by that person’s spouse or common-law partner and by their children.

Continue with all other persons who usually live at this address.

FAMILY NAME(S) GIVEN NAME(S)
Person 1 ________________________ ________________________
Person 2 ________________________ ________________________
Person 3 ________________________ ________________________
Person 4 ________________________ ________________________
Person 5 ________________________ ________________________
Person 6 ________________________ ________________________
Person 7 ________________________ ________________________
Person 8 ________________________ ________________________
Person 9 ________________________ ________________________
Person 10 ________________________ ________________________

STEP C

Did you leave anyone out of step B because you were not sure the person should be listed?

For example, a student, a child in joint custody, a person temporarily away, a person who lives here temporarily, a resident from another country with a work or study permit, a refugee claimant, etc.

  • ○ No
  • ○ Yes → Specify the name, the relationship and the reason.

Name(s) and
relationship ___________________________________________________________

Reason ___________________________________________________________

STEP D

1. Is anyone listed in step B a farm operator who produces at least one agricultural product intended for sale? For example, crops, livestock, milk, poultry, eggs, greenhouse or nursery products, Christmas trees, sod, honey, bees, maple syrup products, furs, etc.

○ No → Go to step E ○ Yes

2. Does this farm operator make the day-to-day management decisions related to the farm?

○ No ○ Yes

STEP E

Copy the names in step B to question 1, at the top of pages 4 to 7.

Keep the same order.

If more than six persons live here, you will need an extra questionnaire; call 1-855-700-2016.

1. WHOM TO INCLUDE IN STEP B

  • All persons who have their main residence at this address on May 10, 2016, including newborn babies, room-mates and persons who are temporarily away,
  • Canadian citizens, landed immigrants (permanent residents), persons asking for refugee status (refugee claimants), persons from another country with a work or study permit and family members living here with them,
  • Persons staying at this address temporarily on May 10, 2016 who have no main residence elsewhere.

2. WHERE TO INCLUDE PERSONS WITH MORE THAN ONE RESIDENCE

  • CHILDREN IN JOINT CUSTODY should be included in the home of the parent where they live most of the time. Children who spend equal time with each parent should be included in the home of the parent with whom they are staying on May 10, 2016.
  • STUDENTS who return to live with their parents during the year should be included at their parents’ address, even if they live elsewhere while attending school or working at a summer job.
  • SPOUSES OR COMMON-LAW PARTNERS TEMPORARILY AWAY who stay elsewhere while working or studying should be listed at the main residence of their family, if they return periodically.
  • PERSONS IN AN INSTITUTION for less than six months (for example, in a home for the aged, a hospital or a prison) should be listed at their usual residence.

IF THIS ADDRESS IS:

  • ○ a SECONDARY RESIDENCE (for example, a cottage) for ALL PERSONS who stayed here on May 10, 2016 (all these persons have their main residence elsewhere in Canada), mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and your main residence address at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions.
  • ○ a DWELLING OCCUPIED ONLY BY RESIDENTS OF ANOTHER COUNTRY VISITING CANADA (for example, on vacation or on a business trip), mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and your country of residence at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions.
  • ○ the HOME OF A GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVE OF ANOTHER COUNTRY (for example, an embassy or a high commission) and family members, mark this circle. Print your name, your telephone number and the country that you represent at the bottom of this page. Do not answer other questions.

Name

________________________________________________________

Telephone number

_____-_____-_____

Number
(and suffix, if applicable)
(e.g., 302, 151 B, 16 1/2) ____________________

Street name, street type (e.g., DR = Drive), direction (e.g., N = North)

______________________________________________________

Apartment/unit ___________

City, municipality, town, village, Indian reserve

______________________________________

Province / territory

________________

Postal code

_____ _____

Country

________________________________________

Mail this questionnaire in the enclosed envelope today.

1 NAME

In the spaces provided, copy the names in the same order as in step B. Then answer the following questions for each person.

PERSON 1

Family name

_______________________________

Given name

_______________________________

The following questions refer to each person’s situation on May 10, 2016, unless otherwise specified.

2 What is this person’s sex?

  • ○ Male
  • ○ Female

3 What are this person’s date of birth and age?

Example:

Day

23

Month

02

Year

1974

If exact date is not known, enter best estimate.

For children under the age of 1, enter 0.

Age 42

Day

____

Month

______

Year

________

Age ________

4 What is this person’s marital status?

Mark “⊗”one circle only.

  • ○ Never legally married
  • ○ Legally married (and not separated)
  • ○ Separated, but still legally married
  • ○ Divorced
  • ○ Widowed

5 Is this person living with a common-law partner?

Common-law refers to two people who live together as a couple but who are not legally married to each other.

  • ○ Yes
  • ○ No

6 What is the relationship of this person to Person 1?

If none of the responses in the list describes this person’s relationship to Person 1, then specify a response under “Other relationship”.

Person 1

⊗ PERSON 1

Person 2

  • ○ Opposite-sex husband or wife of Person 1
  • ○ Opposite-sex common-law partner of Person 1
  • ○ Same-sex married spouse of Person 1
  • ○ Same-sex common-law partner of Person 1
  • ○ Son or daughter of Person 1 only
  • ○ Grandchild of Person 1
  • ○ Son-in-law or daughter-in-law of Person 1
  • ○ Father or mother of Person 1
  • ○ Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1
  • ○ Brother or sister of Person 1
  • ○ Foster child
  • ○ Room-mate, lodger or boarder

Other relationship — specify:

_____________________________

_____________________________

Person 3-6

  • ○ Son or daughter of both Persons 1 and 2
  • ○ Son or daughter of Person 1 only
  • ○ Son or daughter of Person 2 only
  • ○ Grandchild of Person 1
  • ○ Son-in-law or daughter-in-law of Person 1
  • ○ Father or mother of Person 1
  • ○ Father-in-law or mother-in-law of Person 1
  • ○ Brother or sister of Person 1
  • ○ Foster child
  • ○ Room-mate, lodger or boarder

Other relationship — specify:

___________________________

___________________________

7 Can this person speak English or French well enough to conduct a conversation?

Mark “⊗” one circle only.

  • ○ English only
  • ○ French only
  • ○ Both English and French
  • ○ Neither English nor French

8 a) What language does this person speak most often at home?

  • ○ English
  • ○ French

Other language — specify:

___________________________

___________________________

b) Does this person speak any other languages on a regular basis at home?

  • ○ No
  • ○ Yes, English
  • ○ Yes, French

Yes, other language — specify:

___________________________

___________________________

9 What is the language that this person first learned at home in childhood and still understands?

If this person no longer understands the first language learned, indicate the second language learned.

  • ○ English
  • ○ French

Other language — specify:

___________________________

___________________________

This question is for all persons listed on the questionnaire. If you are answering on behalf of other people, please consult each person.

10 Does this person agree to make his or her 2016 Census information available in 2108 (92 years after the census)?

  • ○ Yes
  • ○ No

Only if you answer “Yes” will your responses be available to future generations and historical researchers, 92 years after the 2016 Census, in 2108.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This note is not part of the Order.)

Proposal

This Order fixes May 2016 as the month in which Statistics Canada will conduct the 2016 Census of Population pursuant to subsection 19(1) of the Statistics Act, and prescribes the schedules for the 2016 Census of Population, as provided by section 7 of the Statistics Act.

Background

The Statistics Act specifies that the Census of Population shall be taken by Statistics Canada every five years in a month to be fixed by the Governor in Council (subsection 19(1)) and gives the Minister of Industry the authority to prescribe the rules, instructions, forms, and schedules to carry out the work of Statistics Canada (section 7). The Statistics Act also requires that the questions included in the census of population shall be prescribed by order of the Governor in Council and published in the Canada Gazette (section 21).

All residents of Canada are legally required to complete the census questionnaire, according to the Statistics Act. Statistics Canada is bound by law to protect the confidentiality of the information respondents provide in the census. Every household in Canada is included, as well as Canadians and their families who are working abroad for the federal, provincial and territorial governments, Canadian embassies or the Canadian Armed Forces.

Implications

The Census of Population collects demographic and linguistic information on every person living in Canada. It is the main source of data available in a standardized format for small geographical areas. It provides nationally comparable data that can be cross-classified to show details. The Census of Population is taken to meet statutory requirements as well as to support decision-making by both the public and private sectors. The questions for the 2016 Census of Population are the same as the 2011 Census of Population. Minor modifications have been made to the instructions.

To substantially reduce the burden on Canadians, and improve the quality of income data compared to previous censuses, Statistics Canada will use income and benefits data from the Canada Revenue Agency for all census respondents to replace questions previously asked on the 2011 National Household Survey questionnaire.

The month of May is proposed that to maintain comparability of the data with previous censuses that have been conducted in the same month, comparability being a key requirement for users.

Consultations

To determine the questions to be asked in the 2016 Census of Population, Statistics Canada conducted comprehensive consultations with 293 organizations, including 38 federal departments, 136 provincial/territorial and municipal government organizations, Aboriginal organizations, organizations representing official language minority communities, organizations representing or providing services to Canadians with disabilities, immigrant communities, academia, and non-profit organizations.

There was overall support for the content included in the 2011 Census and no new priority data needs were identified during consultations. The final report entitled Census Program Content Consultation Report, Census year 2016 can be viewed on the Statistics Canada Web site at http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2016/consultation/contentReport-RapportContenu/index-eng.cfm.

The general public was also invited to participate in online consultations. Consultations for the 2016 Census of Population occurred from December 2010 to November 2012. Testing of the questions occurred between June 2013 and May 2014.

Statistics Canada contact

Marc Hamel
Director General
Census Management Office
Statistics Canada
613-951-2495
Marc.Hamel@statcan.gc.ca

[25-1-o]

  • Footnote 1
    Environment Canada identified four key environmental issues, including issues associated with wildlife and wildlife habitat, species at risk (SAR), wetlands and migratory birds, as well as cumulative effects associated with migratory birds and wetlands. EC did not comment on soil, water and air quality.
  • Footnote 2
    This area lies between Moberly Lake and the Peace River, and is an Area of Critical Community Interest (ACCI) according to the Saulteau First Nations and the West Moberly First Nations.
  • Footnote 3
    These are the Dene Tha’ First Nation (DTFN), the Blueberry River First Nations (BRFN), the Fort Nelson First Nation (FNFN), the McLeod Lake Indian Band (MLIB), the Prophet River First Nation (PRFN), the Saulteau First Nations (SFN), and the West Moberly First Nations (WMFN).
  • Footnote 4
    ATCO Gas distributes natural gas throughout most of Alberta.
  • Footnote 5
    The Export Users Group includes five companies that hold Transmission South capacity on the Westcoast pipeline system and export delivery capacity on the NGTL System.
  • Footnote a
    S.C. 2005, c. 20
  • Footnote b
    R.S., c. S-19
  • Footnote c
    R.S., c. S-19