ARCHIVED — Vol. 148, No. 29 — July 19, 2014

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a living organism — Pseudomonas stutzeri (P. stutzeri) strain ATCC (see footnote 1) 17587 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas P. stutzeri strain ATCC 17587 is a living organism on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on this living organism pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that this living organism does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on this living organism at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Pseudomonas stutzeri Strain ATCC 17587

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have conducted a screening assessment on Pseudomonas stutzeri ATCC 17587. This strain was added to the Domestic Substances List (DSL) under subsection 105(1) of CEPA 1999 because it was manufactured in or imported into Canada between January 1, 1984, and December 31, 1986, and entered or was released into the environment without being subject to conditions under CEPA 1999 or any other federal or provincial legislation.

As a species, P. stutzeri is a naturally occurring bacterium that has the ability to adapt to and thrive in soil, sediments and water. Multiple potential uses of P. stutzeri in household, industrial, commercial and agricultural sectors exist. These include treatment of ponds and aquariums (to breakdown wastes and control odours), waste management, wastewater treatment, septic tank cleaning and deodorizing, drain cleaning and degreasing, bioremediation, and recovery of oil and precious metals. P. stutzeri is also used in enzyme production for the manufacture of foods, detergents, textiles and bioethanol.

Despite the widespread presence of P. stutzeri in soil and water and in close association with plant roots, only one isolate has been reported to be pathogenic towards chickens, which were successfully treated with antibiotics. Certain strains of P. stutzeri have anti-algal, anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties, which allow its use as a biocontrol agent against pest organisms. Experimental challenges with P. stutzeri ATCC 17587 on a soil springtail revealed a significant decrease in adult survival and juvenile production at concentrations that can be reached during bioremediation uses. However, there is no evidence that occasional applications of P. stutzeri ATCC 17587 to soil will adversely affect terrestrial invertebrates at the population level.

There have been no reported human infections attributed to the DSL strain P. stutzeri ATCC 17587. Some strains of P. stutzeri can act as an opportunistic pathogen in susceptible humans. Compared with closely related opportunistic Pseudomonas pathogens, P. stutzeri has a low incidence of nosocomial or secondary infection in individuals with compromised immunity and underlying medical conditions.

This assessment considers environmental and human exposure to P. stutzeri ATCC 17587 from its use in industrial processes, or its deliberate addition to consumer and commercial products in Canada. To update information about current uses, the Government launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA 1999 (Section 71 Notice) as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009. Information submitted in response to the Notice indicates that P. stutzeri ATCC 17587 was not imported into or manufactured in Canada in 2008.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft Screening Assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from P. stutzeri ATCC 17587. It is proposed to conclude that P. stutzeri ATCC 17587 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. Based on the information presented in this draft Screening Assessment, it is also proposed to conclude that P. stutzeri ATCC 17587 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that P. stutzeri ATCC 17587 does not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft Screening Assessment for this living organism is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substance — Carbamic acid, ethyl ester (ethyl carbamate), CAS RN (see footnote 2) 51-79-6 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas carbamic acid, ethyl ester is a substance on the Domestic Substances List;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on the substance pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substance meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas, pursuant to paragraph 2(1)(m) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Government of Canada, in the administration of the Act, shall ensure, having regard to the Constitution and the laws of Canada, and to the extent that is reasonably possible, that all areas of federal regulation for the protection of the environment and human health are addressed in a complementary manner in order to avoid duplication and to provide effective and comprehensive protection;

And whereas risk management measures are being proposed under the Food and Drugs Act to control the presence of carbamic acid, ethyl ester in alcoholic beverages,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 on carbamic acid, ethyl ester at this time.

Notice is furthermore given that the ministers have released a risk management scope document for this substance to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of a risk management approach.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

VIRGINIA POTER
Director General
Chemicals Sector Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Carbamic Acid, Ethyl Ester (Ethyl Carbamate)

Pursuant to section 68 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on carbamic acid, ethyl ester, hereinafter referred to as ethyl carbamate, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) 51-79-6. This substance is part of the Internationally Classified Substance grouping and is among those substances considered priority substances under the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) based on human health concerns.

Ethyl carbamate is a by-product of the fermentation process and has been detected in many types of fermented foods and beverages. It is also a constituent of tobacco plants and is present in mainstream tobacco smoke.

Based on information obtained from stakeholder consultation in 2012–2013, no single company has been identified as having imported or used ethyl carbamate above the reporting threshold of 100 kg per year in Canada. In Canada and internationally, the current uses of ethyl carbamate are limited to medical laboratory research.

Ethyl carbamate has high water solubility, a very low octanol-water partition coefficient, and moderate vapour pressure. If released to the environment, the substance is not expected to significantly partition into air. Based on a low Henry’s Law constant, the majority of ethyl carbamate is expected to reside in water and soil. Partitioning to sediments is expected to be limited; however, given that the substance is highly water soluble, it could be found in pore water.

Ethyl carbamate demonstrated low toxicity to aquatic organisms; however, some genetic and carcinogenic effects have been observed in worms and frogs. Considering the low quantity of ethyl carbamate in commerce in Canada and its limited uses, environmental releases of this substance are not expected to be significant. Therefore, environmental exposure of organisms is considered to be negligible, and ethyl carbamate is not expected to pose a risk to organisms in Canada.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from ethyl carbamate. It is proposed to conclude that ethyl carbamate does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

The critical effect for characterization of risk to human health associated with exposure to ethyl carbamate is carcinogenicity; ethyl carbamate is a multisite carcinogen in animal studies. The margins of exposure between upper-bounding estimates of dietary exposure for adults from alcohol consumption and the critical effect level for cancer are potentially inadequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases. Corresponding margins of exposure for the general population, excluding alcohol consumption, are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

Based on the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that ethyl carbamate meets the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as it is entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that carbamic acid, ethyl ester (ethyl carbamate) meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft screening assessment for ethyl carbamate, as well as the risk management scope document, is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

EXPLANATORY NOTE

Proposed Decision on the Draft Screening Assessment of Carbamic Acid, Ethyl Ester

The ministers propose to take no further action under CEPA 1999 on carbamic acid, ethyl ester at this time in recognition of the fact that the only source of concern is its presence in certain alcoholic beverages. Carbamic acid, ethyl ester is not intentionally added to food and beverages. It is a natural fermentation by-product. Risk management measures are currently in place and others are being proposed under the Food and Drugs Act to reduce human exposure to carbamic acid, ethyl ester from alcoholic beverages. The ministers are satisfied that the Food and Drugs Act is a more appropriate federal statute to manage the potential risks posed by carbamic acid, ethyl ester.

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose that carbamic acid, ethyl ester not be added to Schedule 1 of CEPA 1999 at this time; however, if the final conclusion is that the substance is toxic and “no further action” is recommended, the substance will be added to the Non-Statutory List on the CEPA Environmental Registry, which is the list of substances that have been assessed and found to meet at least one of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999, but that have not been added to Schedule 1 of the Act. This list is available at www.ec.gc.ca/lcpe-cepa/default.asp?lang=En&n=1D74AD69-1.

For more information on the assessment and risk management of carbamic acid, ethyl ester, a substance in the Internationally Classified Substance grouping, please consult www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca or contact the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

VIRGINIA POTER
Director General
Chemicals Sector Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substance — Ethanol, 2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]- (AEEA), CAS RN (see footnote 3) 111-41-1 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Ethanol, 2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]- is a substance on the Domestic Substances List;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on the substance pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that this substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on this substance at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Ethanol, 2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]-

Pursuant to section 68 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Ethanol, 2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]-, hereinafter referred to as AEEA. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) for AEEA is 111-41-1. This substance is part of the Internationally Classified Substance Grouping and is among those substances considered priority substances under the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) based on human health concerns.

AEEA does not occur naturally in the environment. In Canada, AEEA is imported both as a pure substance and as a component of products. In 2008, a quantity lower than the reporting threshold of 100 kg of AEEA was manufactured in Canada, and more than 500 000 kg of AEEA were imported into Canada. In 2011, AEEA was not manufactured in Canada, and between 100 000 and 500 000 kg of AEEA were imported into Canada in the same year. AEEA can be used as a chemical intermediate, as a curing agent for epoxy resins, as a component of adhesives and sealants used in asphalt paving or patching, as a component in super glue, and as a component of corrosion inhibitors and lubricant additives. As a chemical intermediate, AEEA is used to manufacture surfactants, which in turn have applications as industrial detergents and in personal care products. AEEA is used as a component in foodpackaging adhesives and inks with no direct contact with food, and as a component of an agent used in the paper manufacturing process. AEEA is also used as a component in additives for closed recirculating cooling systems where the water treated will not come into direct contact with food.

AEEA is characterized by a moderate vapour pressure, a very low Henry’s Law constant, and very low or negligible log Koc and log Kow values. AEEA is miscible in water. Monitoring data on AEEA in the Canadian environment have not been identified.

AEEA has a short half-life in air and it is not expected to be present in the atmosphere. AEEA is readily biodegradable in water and it is not expected to remain in soil or sediments for prolonged periods of time. Based on the available empirical and modelled evidence, AEEA has a limited persistence potential in air, water, soil and sediments.

AEEA has a low bioaccumulation potential. This was evidenced by very low empirical and modelled bioconcentration and bioaccumulation values for fish.

Several studies have been conducted for AEEA to identify ecotoxicological effects of the substance on aquatic organisms, including micro-organisms, crustaceans and fish. Results of these studies indicated that AEEA has a low to moderate potential to cause acute toxic effects in exposed organisms. Longer-term ecotoxicological studies were not available for AEEA. It was noted that at higher exposure concentrations, AEEA increased the alkalinity of the aqueous test solutions, and this may have contributed to additional toxic effects to exposed organisms. Effects of AEEA on soil and sediment organisms have not been studied; however, such effects are not expected to be greater than those determined in aquatic species.

AEEA is imported as a minor component in products or mixtures that are used in industrial or consumer applications. Many of these products undergo curing. The potential for AEEA releases into the environment from these cured products as well as from AEEA applications in asphalt cement is not expected to be significant. AEEA can also be a minor constituent of imported solid products in building materials, but with very limited potential for releases. The main source of release of AEEA is expected to occur from industrial uses of the pure substance as a chemical intermediate. An industrial release scenario was developed where AEEA is discharged into water. AEEA is assumed to be chemically converted during industrial processes, and it is expected that it no longer exists in its parent form. Therefore, the only quantitative scenario considered was based on disposal of unreacted residual AEEA from the cleaning of empty transport and processing containers. Based on this conservative scenario, exposure to organisms in the environment would be below levels expected to cause harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from AEEA. It is proposed to conclude that AEEA does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Critical effects for characterization of risk to human health for AEEA are developmental and reproductive effects in animal studies.

There were no reports of AEEA in environmental media identified for Canada. Exposure of the general population to AEEA from environmental media is not expected, given that it is not manufactured in Canada and that its use is limited to a few industrial applications. Canadians are also not expected to be exposed to AEEA through food consumption or the use of consumer products. Accordingly, the risk to human health is considered to be low.

Based on the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that AEEA does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that AEEA does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

Because AEEA is listed on the Domestic Substances List, its import into and manufacture in Canada are not subject to notification under subsection 81(1) of CEPA 1999. Since AEEA is recognized for its high human health hazard (i.e. developmental and reproductive effects in animal studies), there is suspicion that new activities that have not been identified or assessed could lead to AEEA meeting the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999. Therefore, pending further investigation, the Government of Canada may consider amending the Domestic Substances List, under subsection 87(3) of CEPA 1999, to indicate that the significant new activity (SNAc) provisions under subsection 81(3) of the Act apply with respect to the substance.

A SNAc can include an activity that has not been conducted with the substance in the past or an existing activity with a different quantity or in different circumstances that could affect the exposure pattern of the substance. The SNAc provisions trigger an obligation for a person to notify and the government to assess information about a substance when a person proposes to use the substance in a significant new activity. The provisions are used to assess the risks associated with the proposed new activity before the new activity is undertaken. The Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health assess the information provided by the notifier and other information available to them to determine whether the substance, if used in the proposed new activity, could pose a risk to the environment or human health, and if so, whether new or additional risk management is required.

The draft screening assessment for AEEA is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of four cresol substances specified on the Domestic Substances List — phenol, methyl- (CAS RN (see footnote 4) 1319-77-3) [subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999] and phenol, 2-methyl- (CAS RN 95-48-7), phenol, 3-methyl- (CAS RN 108-39-4) and phenol, 4-methyl- (CAS RN 106-44-5) [paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act]

Whereas phenol, methyl- is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the Screening Assessment conducted on the four cresol substances, pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) of the Act for phenol, 2-methyl-; phenol, 3-methyl- and phenol, 4-methyl- and section 74 of the Act for phenol, methyl-, is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that these substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on phenol, 2-methyl-; phenol, 3-methyl- and phenol, 4-methyl- at this time, and

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on phenol, methyl- at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Cresol (Phenol, methyl-) Substances

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have conducted a screening assessment of the group of substances listed in the table below, referred to collectively as the cresols (phenol, methyl-) subgroup.

CAS RNs and Domestic Substances List (DSL) names for substances in the cresols subgroup

CAS RN DSL Name Common Name
95-48-7* Phenol, 2-methyl- o-cresol
108-39-4* Phenol, 3-methyl- m-cresol
106-44-5* Phenol, 4-methyl- p-cresol
1319-77-3 Phenol, methyl- Mixed cresols

* This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999, but was included in this assessment because it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.

These substances are part of the Internationally Classified Substance Grouping, and are among those considered priority substances under the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) based on human health concerns.

Manufacture of cresols in the 2011 calendar year was in the range of 100 000–1 000 000 kg while imports were in the range of 10 000–100 000 kg, according to recent surveys under section 71 of CEPA 1999. Much of the manufacturing activity was associated with the incidental production of cresols during processing of other materials.

Cresols are widespread in nature, occurring naturally in plants and as natural components of crude oil, coal tar and brown cresylic-type mixtures. In addition, they can be produced endogenously by many organisms, such as mammals and micro-organisms. Cresols occur naturally in a variety of foods and beverages, but levels in foods are generally low. They are also natural products of incomplete combustion, and may be produced and released from natural fires associated with lightning, spontaneous combustion, and volcanic activity.

Cresols are organic substances with a variety of industrial and consumer applications. They are used as intermediates in the production of antioxidants, resins and plasticizers, pesticides, dyes, deodorizing and odour-enhancing compounds, fragrances, pharmaceuticals and other chemicals (e.g. photographic developers and explosives). Cresols are also used as industrial cleaners and solvents, synthetic food flavours, preservatives in drugs and natural health products, and fragrances in pest control products.

Based on certain assumptions and reported use patterns, cresols are expected to be released primarily to air, with releases also occurring to surface waters and soil. The chemical properties of high water solubility, moderate vapour pressure, and low to moderate sorption potential indicate that, when released into the environment, cresols can be expected to distribute into air, water or soil, depending upon the compartment of release. Cresols have been detected in all environmental media, including air, surface and ground waters, sediment, soil and biota. However, given the extensive natural presence of these substances in the environment, their occurrence in a medium cannot always be linked with anthropogenic activities.

High aerobic biodegradation rates and low bioaccumulation potential reduce the exposure potential of cresols to organisms. While cresols demonstrate low to moderate toxicity in laboratory testing, a number of aquatic and terrestrial species have demonstrated a capacity to effectively metabolize and excrete these substances, thereby reducing the potential for adverse effects. Cresols may have the potential to contribute to adverse ecosystem effects through rapid depletion of dissolved oxygen under conditions of large-scale release into waters with limited oxygen exchange. Quantitative analyses based on empirical and modelled toxicity and environmental concentration data were conducted for air, soil, surface waters and sediment; these predicted that the highest environmental concentrations of cresols originating from industrial sources will be much lower than experimentally determined no-effect levels.

Monitoring data indicate that levels of cresols in the Canadian environment are generally low. However, cresols were present at very high concentrations in a limited number of sediment samples, and it is possible that organisms residing in the vicinity of these sampling locations may be adversely impacted by the presence of cresols. These sites are likely influenced by the production of cresols from endogenous sources and/or associated with areas of known historical industrial contamination. The corresponding aqueous concentrations of cresols at a number of these sites in the Canadian environment were below detection limits despite the high sediment concentrations detected at these sites and the high water solubility of cresols, which places further weight on the likely contribution of endogenous production within the surface sediment.

Considered together, these factors reduce the overall level of concern about cresols in the Canadian environment. Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms or the broader integrity of the environment from these substances. It is proposed to conclude that o-cresol, m-cresol, and p-cresol and mixed cresols do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999 as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have immediate or long-term harmful effects on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

For the human health assessment, it is expected that exposure to cresols from their naturally occurring presence in a variety of foods and beverages represents the predominant source of total intake for the Canadian population. Since no anthropogenic source would significantly increase intake beyond that from consumption of cresols through foods and beverages, margins of exposure from dietary sources of cresols were not derived.

Carcinogenicity is a potential critical effect of cresols, although tumours occurred only at high oral doses in experimental animals. Additionally, limited inhalation studies in experimental animals exposed to o-cresol and/or p-cresol resulted in adverse effects on the respiratory tract, blood and liver. The margins of exposure between effect levels in animal studies and upper-bounding estimates of inhalation exposure to individuals in the vicinity of industrial sites were considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

Based on the adequacy of the margins between upper-bounding estimates of exposure and critical effect levels in experimental animals, it is proposed to conclude that o-cresol, m-cresol and p-cresol and mixed cresols do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that cresols do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft screening assessment for cresol (phenol, methyl-) substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Filing of claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 12(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer of the Workplace Hazardous Materials Directorate hereby gives notice of the filing of the claims for exemption listed below.

In accordance with subsection 12(2) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, affected parties may make written representations to the screening officer with respect to the claim for exemption and the material safety data sheet to which it relates. “Affected parties” means a person who is not a competitor of the claimant and who uses, supplies or is otherwise involved in the use or supply of the controlled product at a work place, and includes

  • (a) a supplier of the controlled product;
  • (b) an employee at the work place;
  • (c) an employer at the work place;
  • (d) a safety and health professional for the work place;
  • (e) a safety and health representative or a member of a safety and health committee for the work place; and
  • (f) a person who is authorized in writing to represent
    • (i) a supplier referred to in paragraph (a) or an employer referred to in paragraph (c), or
    • (ii) an employee referred to in paragraph (b), except where that person is an official or a representative of a trade union that is not certified or recognized in respect of the work place.

Written representations respecting a claim for exemption cited in the present notice, or respecting the material safety data sheet or label to which the claim relates, must cite the appropriate registry number, state the reasons and evidence upon which the representations are based and be delivered within 30 days of the date of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to the screening officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Directorate, 427 Laurier Avenue West, 7th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

STEPHANIE REID
Chief Screening Officer

The claims listed below seek exemption from the disclosure of supplier confidential business information in respect of a controlled product; such disclosure would otherwise be required under the provisions of the Hazardous Products Act.

Claimant Product Identifier (As shown on the MSDS) Subject of the Claim for Exemption Registry Number

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

DUAL SPACER
SURFACTANT A

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

9199

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

DUAL SPACER
SURFACTANT B

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

9200

Calfrac Well Services Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

DWP-973

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

9201

Chevron Oronite Company LLC, Bellaire, Texas

OLOA 54000

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9202

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

RESOLV™ EC2630A

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9203

Momentive Specialty Chemicals Inc., Oshawa, Ontario

EPI-REZ Resin 6520-WH-53

Chemical identity and concentration of three ingredients

9204

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M™ SMC/Fiberglass Repair (90 minutes) Adhesive PN 08274 - Accelerator

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9205

Afton Chemical Corporation,
Richmond, Virginia

HiTEC® 12204 Performance Additive

Chemical identity of four ingredients

9206

Win Manuco Ltd., Burlington, Ontario

ALB

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9207

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M™ Fire Barrier Rated Foam, FIP, 1-Step, Part A

Chemical identity of three ingredients

9208

Arkema Canada Inc., Burlington, Ontario

LUPEROX® EZ Breaker 200G

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9209

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

UCECOAT® 7674 radiation curing resins

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9210

Fluid Energy Group Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

Enviro-Syn HCR 2000 Series

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9211

Hydro Technologies (Canada) Inc.,
Québec, Quebec

HY BRITE® RBC-1300

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

9212

Stepan Company, Northfield, Illinois

AGENT 4702-55

Chemical identity of three ingredients

9213

W-TECH Technologies Ltd.,
Vancouver, British Columbia

ADDITIVE NCS

Chemical identity of four ingredients

9214

Momentive Performance Materials, Markham, Ontario

Niax* catalyst A-300

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9215

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M™ Hybrid Sealant 730, Clear

Chemical identity of two ingredients

9216

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M™ PRIMER 94

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9217

Canadian Energy Services,
Calgary, Alberta

EnerScav C

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9218

Momentive Performance Materials, Markham, Ontario

Niax* silicone L-580

Chemical identity of three ingredients

9219

Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugar Land, Texas

PAO3086 ASPHALTENE INHIBITOR

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9220

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M™ Scotch-Weld™ Epoxy Adhesive DP920, Off-White, Part B

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9221

Champion Technologies Ltd.,
Calgary, Alberta

Emulsotron X-8645

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9222

Rohm and Haas Canada LP,
West Hill, Ontario

Preferred DC

Chemical identity of two ingredients

9223

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M™ Scotch-Weld™ Acrylic Adhesive DP-825, Part A

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9224

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

DESMOLUX® XP2738 radiation curing resins

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9225

Chevron Oronite Company LLC, Bellaire, Texas

LUBAD 1829

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9226

DuPont Electronic Technologies-MCM, Raleigh, North Carolina

PE826

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9227

Champion Technologies Ltd.,
Calgary, Alberta

Emulsotron X-8572

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9228

Multi-Chem Production Chemicals Co.,
Calgary, Alberta

RockOn™ MX 5-2556

Chemical identity of three ingredients

9229

Multi-Chem Production Chemicals Co., Calgary, Alberta

RockOn™ MX 5-3447

Chemical identity of two ingredients

9230

Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugar Land, Texas

CRONOX™ 283ES CORROSION INHIBITOR

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

9231

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

PROSWEET OC2557

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

9232

Win Chemicals Ltd., Burlington, Ontario

CVS

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

9233

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

EnterFast® EC9008B

Chemical identity of three ingredients

9234

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M™ Scotch-Weld™ Acrylic Adhesive DP8410NS Green, Part A

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9235

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M™ Scotch-Weld™ Acrylic Adhesive DP8410NS Green, Part B

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9236

Hydro Technologies (Canada) Inc.,
Québec, Quebec

HY BRITE® RA-1504

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

9237

Hydro Technologies (Canada) Inc.,
Québec, Quebec

HY BRITE® CK-1109

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

9238

Univar Canada Ltd., Richmond, British Columbia

ACRYSIRUP DR-460

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

9239

Univar Canada Ltd., Richmond, British Columbia

ACRYSIRUP 3018 A&B

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

9240

IPAC Chemicals Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia

Envirobind CAP

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient

9241

Univar Canada Ltd., Richmond, British Columbia

ACRYSIRUP TW-008

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

9242

Evonik Corporation, Parsippany, New Jersey

Protectosil®
CHEM-TRETE® PB 100

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients

9243

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Nalco® OS7070

Chemical identity of three ingredients

9244

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

Scotchkote 626-120 Fusion Bonded Epoxy Coating

Chemical identity of one ingredient

9245

Momentive Performance Materials,
Markham, Ontario

Niax* flame lamination additive FLE-200

Chemical identity of three ingredients

9246

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

Scotchkote 726 Low Temperature Cure Fusion Bonded Epoxy Resin

Chemical identity of two ingredients

9247

[29-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDIAN AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT

MAA-NULTH FIRST NATIONS FINAL AGREEMENT

List of geographic features

In accordance with 1.14.11 of the Maa-nulth First Nations Final Agreement (the “Final Agreement”) notice is hereby provided that British Columbia and the Maa-nulth First Nations have reached an agreement under 20.7.1 of the Final Agreement on a list of geographic features to be named or renamed in the Nuu-chah-nulth language, and that in accordance with 20.7.2 of the Final Agreement the Final Agreement is deemed to be amended to include such list as an Appendix. Further, British Columbia and the Maa-nulth First Nations have agreed in accordance with 1.14.11 of the Final Agreement that the wording and form of the deemed amendment is to add Appendix Z — Names to be Recorded in the British Columbia Geographic Names Information System.

April 1, 2011

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN IN RIGHT OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA as represented by the Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation or duly authorized signatory

Per: LLOYD ROBERTS
Executive Director

Executed in the presence of:

CHARLES HUNTER
Implementation Director

As to the authorized signatory for the Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation

HUU-AY-AHT FIRST NATIONS as represented by the Huu-ay-aht First Nations Government

Per: ROBERT DENNIS Sr.
Chief Councillor

Per: DEREK PETERS
Ta’yii Hawilth

Executed in the presence of:

R. BRENT LEHMANN
Barrister and Solicitor

As to the authorized signatories for Huu-ay-aht First Nations Government

KA:’YU:’K’T’H’/CHE:K’TLES7ET’H’ FIRST NATIONS as represented by the Ka:’yu:’k’t’h’/Che:k’tles7et’h’ First Nations Government

Per: THERESE SMITH
Legislative Chief

Executed in the presence of:

R. BRENT LEHMANN
Barrister and Solicitor

As to the authorized signatory for Ka:’yu:’k’t’h’/Che:k’tles7et’h’ First Nations Government

TOQUAHT NATION as represented by the Toquaht Nation Government

Per: ANNE MACK
Tyee Ha’wilth

Executed in the presence of:

R. BRENT LEHMANN
Barrister and Solicitor

As to the authorized signatory for Toquaht Nation Government

UCHUCKLESAHT TRIBE as represented by the Uchucklesaht Tribe Government

Per: CHARLIE COOTES
Chief Councillor

Executed in the presence of:

R. BRENT LEHMANN
Barrister and Solicitor

As to the authorized signatory for Uchucklesaht Tribe Government

UCLUELET FIRST NATION as represented by Ucluelet First Nation Government

Per: CHARLES MCCARTHY
President

Executed in the presence of:

R. BRENT LEHMANN
Barrister and Solicitor

As to the authorized signatory for Ucluelet First Nation Government

  • Footnote 1
    ATCC: American Type Culture Collection.
  • Footnote 2
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 3
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 4
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.