ARCHIVED — Vol. 148, No. 6 — February 8, 2014

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Waiver of information requirements for substances and living organisms (subsections 81(9) and 106(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas any person who proposes to import or manufacture a substance or living organism that is not on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 81(1) or 106(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas any person who proposes to use, manufacture or import for a significant new activity a substance or a living organism that is on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 81(3) or 106(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas any person who proposes to use for a significant new activity a substance or a living organism that is not on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 81(4) or 106(4) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a person may, pursuant to subsection 81(8) or 106(8) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, request any of the requirements to provide information under subsections 81(1), (3) or (4) or 106(1), (3) or (4) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to be waived; and

Whereas a waiver may be granted by the Minister of the Environment under subsection 81(8) or 106(8) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 if

  • (a) in the opinion of the Ministers, the information is not needed in order to determine whether the substance or living organism is toxic or capable of becoming toxic;
  • (b) the substance or living organism is to be used for a prescribed purpose or manufactured at a location where, in the opinion of the Ministers, the person requesting the waiver is able to contain the substance or living organism so as to satisfactorily protect the environment and human health; or
  • (c) it is not, in the opinion of the Ministers, practicable or feasible to obtain the test data necessary to generate the information;

Therefore, notice is hereby given, pursuant to subsections 81(9) and 106(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that the Minister of the Environment waives the requirement to provide information in accordance with the following annex pursuant to subsections 81(8) and 106(8) of the Act.

KAREN L. DODDS
Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Waiver of information requirements

(Subsections 81(9) and 106(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Person to whom a waiver is granted

Information in relation to which a waiver is granted (see reference 1)

3M Canada Company

Data from an acute aquatic toxicity test

Data from an acute mammalian toxicity test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (2)

Data from an in vitro mammalian mutagenicity test

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (2)

Data from a ready biodegradation test (2)

Data from a repeated-dose mammalian toxicity test

Data from a skin sensitization test

Data from a water solubility test

Data from a water extractability test

Advanced Refining Technologies LLC

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Afton Chemical Corp.

Data from an acute aquatic toxicity test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (2)

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Akzo Nobel Functional Chemicals LLC

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Alberdingk Boley Inc.

Data from a water extractability test

Amfine Chemical Corp.

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a boiling point test

Data from a dissociation constants test (2)

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Andicor Specialty Chemicals Corp.

Data from a vapour pressure test

AstraZeneca Canada Inc.

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility (5)

Data from tests conducted to determine the effects of the micro-organism on aquatic plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed to it (2)

Data from tests conducted to determine the effects of the micro-organism on terrestrial plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed to it (2)

Pathogenicity data on aquatic plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed (3)

Pathogenicity data on terrestrial plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed (3)

Atotech Canada Inc.

Data from a dissociation constants test

Aventis CropScience Canada Co.

Data from a dissociation constants test

Baker Hughes Canada Company

Data from a dissociation constants test

BASF Canada Inc.

Data from a boiling point test (4)

Data from a melting point test (2)

Data from a vapour pressure test

Data from a fat solubility test (2)

Data from a dissociation constants test (3)

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (5)

Data from an in vitro mammalian mutagenicity test

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Data from a ready biodegradation test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (4)

Data from a water extractability test

Data from a water solubility test

Bayer Inc.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (6)

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (5)

Data from a water extractability test (4)

Data from a water solubility test

Borealis Compounds Inc.

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a water solubility test

BP Lubricants USA, Inc.

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Brenntag Canada Inc.

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (3)

Data from a water solubility test (2)

Cappelle Inc.

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Castrol Industrial North America, Inc.

Data from an adsorption-desorption test (2)

Data from a dissociation constants test (2)

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (2)

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (2)

Celanese Canada Inc.

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Champion Technologies, Ltd.

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (2)

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a water solubility test

Charles Tennant & Company

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Molecular weight of <500 and <1 000 daltons

Data from a number average molecular weight test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Chemetall GesmbH

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Chemroy Canada Inc.

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a water extractability test

Chemtura Corporation

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a fat solubility test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Chevron Chemical (Canada) Ltd.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (5)

Chevron Lubricants

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a boiling point test

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a fat solubility test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from a melting point test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a water solubility test

Chevron Oronite Chemical Co.

Data from an adsorption-desorption test (6)

Data from a boiling point test (7)

Data from a dissociation constants test (7)

Data from a fat solubility test (6)

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (6)

Data from a melting point test (7)

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (2)

Data from a ready biodegradation test (3)

Data from a vapour pressure test (5)

Data from a water solubility test (7)

Chevron Oronite Company LLC

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (2)

Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LP

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a water solubility test

Clariant (Canada) Inc.

Data from an adsorption-desorption test (3)

Data from a boiling point test (4)

Data from a dissociation constants test (7)

Data from a fat solubility test (2)

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (2)

Data from a particle size distribution test (3)

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Coim USA, Inc.

Data from an acute aquatic toxicity test (2)

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (2)

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (2)

Data from a water extractability test

Concept Plastics Ltd.

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a dissociation constants test

Croda Canada Ltd.

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (2)

Crompton Co./Cie

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Cytec Canada Inc.

Data from an acute aquatic toxicity test

Data from an acute mammalian toxicity test

Data from a boiling point test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from a melting point test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (3)

Data from a ready biodegradation test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Data from a water solubility test

Dempsey Corporation

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Dow AgroSciences Canada

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility (2)

Dow Chemical Canada Inc.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a water extractability test

Dow Chemical Canada ULC

Data from an acute aquatic toxicity test (2)

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (3)

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (3)

Data from a water extractability test

Dow Corning Canada, Inc.

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Dow Corning Corporation

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a water solubility test

E.I. du Pont Canada Company

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (3)

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Molecular weight of <500 and <1 000 daltons

Data from a number average molecular weight test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (6)

Data from a ready biodegradation test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Data from a water solubility test (2)

Eastman Chemical Co.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Ecolab Co.

Data from a density test

Elanco, Division Eli Lilly Canada

Contingency plans in the event of an accidental release

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility

Pathogenicity data on aquatic plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed

Potential releases of the micro-organism from facilities in Canada and controls

Recommended procedures for terminating the introduction of the micro-organism

Evonik Degussa Corporation

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Evonik Goldschmidt Canada

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Evonik Goldschmidt Corporation

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (2)

Exxonmobil Oil Corporation

Reaction scheme

Firmenich Inc.

Data from a dissociation constants test

Flochem Ltd.

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Data from a repeated-dose mammalian toxicity test

Forbo Adhesives (Canada), Ltd.

Data from an acute mammalian toxicity test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a water solubility test

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (3)

Gehring-Montgomery Inc.

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test (3)

General Electric Canada, Inc.

Data from an adsorption-desorption test (2)

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a vapour pressure test

GlaxoSmithKline Inc.

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility

Dispersal by gene transfer of traits of pathogenicity to non-human species, toxigenicity and resistance to antibiotics

Involvement in biogeochemical cycling

Pathogenicity data on aquatic plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed

Pathogenicity data on terrestrial plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed

Resistance to antibiotics and tolerance to metals and pesticides

Great Lakes Chemical Corporation

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

H.B. Fuller Canada

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (5)

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (3)

Data from a water extractability test (5)

H.C. Starck GmBH

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a ready biodegradation test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Henkel Canada Corporation

Data from an acute aquatic toxicity test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a water extractability test

Hermann Laue Spice Co. Inc.

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility

Pathogenicity data on aquatic plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed

Pathogenicity data on terrestrial plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed

Hollimex Products Ltd.

Data from a dissociation constants test

Honeywell ASCa., Inc.

Data from an adsorption-desorption test (2)

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (3)

Data from a melting point test (2)

Data from a skin irritation test (2)

Data from a skin sensitization test (2)

Huntsman Advanced Materials Americas Inc.

Data from a dissociation constants test

Huntsman Corporation

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Huntsman International (Canada) Corporation

Data from an acute mammalian toxicity test

Data from a density test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (5)

Huntsman International LLC

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Ilford Imaging Switzerland GMBH

Data from a vapour pressure test

Industrial Colours & Chemicals Ltd.

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

INEOS USA LLC

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Infineum Canada, Ltd.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Innophos Canada, Inc.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a ready biodegradation test

Innovene Canada Partnership

Data from an acute aquatic toxicity test

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a boiling point test

Data from a density test

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an in vitro mammalian mutagenicity test

Data from a melting point test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a spectroscopy test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Data from a water solubility test

International Flavours & Fragrances

Data from a dissociation constants test (2)

Intervet Canada Corp.

Data from a density test

Invista Canada Company

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a fat solubility test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (11)

Data from a water solubility test

Iogen Corp.

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility (3)

ITOCHU Chemicals America, Inc.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

J.M. Huber Corporation

Data from an adsorption-desorption test (2)

Data from a boiling point test (2)

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (2)

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test (2)

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (2)

Data from a ready biodegradation test (2)

Data from a vapour pressure test

Jotun Paints Inc.

Data from a water solubility test

Kemira Chemicals Inc.

Data from an acute mammalian toxicity test

Konica Minolta Business Solution (Canada) Ltd.

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a fat solubility test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

KUBOTA Metal Corporation

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a ready biodegradation test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Laboratoires Choisy

Data from tests of pathogenicity that are valid for related micro-organisms that are pathogenic to humans (2)

Lanxess Inc.

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a boiling point test (3)

Data from a dissociation constants test

Molecular weight of <500 and <1 000 daltons (2)

Data from a number average molecular weight test (2)

Lubrizol Advanced Materials Canada Inc.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Lubrizol Canada Inc.

Data from a dissociation constants test (2)

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (2)

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

MeadWestvaco Canada Ltd.

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

MedImmune, LLC

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility (6)

Pathogenicity data on aquatic plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed (6)

Pathogenicity data on terrestrial plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed (6)

Michelin North America (Canada) Inc.

Data from a boiling point test

Data from a melting point test

Momentive Performance Materials

Data from an acute aquatic toxicity test

Data from an adsorption-desorption test (2)

Data from a dissociation constants test (2)

Data from a melting point test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (2)

Data from a ready biodegradation test (2)

Data from a vapour pressure test

Data from a water solubility test (2)

Mitsubishi Canada Ltd.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Nalco Canada Co.

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a density test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (5)

Data from a melting point test

Data from a skin irritation test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Data from a water solubility test

Nalco Chemical Company

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (2)

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (2)

Nanocyl SA

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a ready biodegradation test

Data from a vapour pressure test

NOVA Chemicals Corporation

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

NPA Coatings Inc.

Data from an acute aquatic toxicity test

OCE-Canada Inc.

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Data from a water extractability test

Occidental Chemical Corporation

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (2)

Oleon N.V.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Petro-Canada Inc., 18 PCCW

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Phostech Lithium Inc.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Data from a ready biodegradation test

PPG Canada Inc.

Data from an acute aquatic toxicity test

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (6)

Data from a melting point test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a water extractability test

Procter & Gamble Inc.

Data from a dissociation constants test (3)

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (3)

Pathogenicity data on aquatic plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed

Pathogenicity data on terrestrial plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed

Data from a vapour pressure test

Quadra Chemicals Ltd.

Data from a density test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a ready biodegradation test

Data from a vapour pressure test

R. T. Vanderbilt Company, Inc.

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a fat solubility test

Data from a particle size distribution test

Rhodia Canada Inc.

Data from a dissociation constants test (2)

Data from a fat solubility test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Molecular weight of <500 and <1 000 daltons

Data from a number average molecular weight test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a water solubility test

Robarts Research Institute

Data from tests of pathogenicity that are valid for related micro-organisms that are pathogenic to humans

Pathogenicity data on aquatic plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed

Pathogenicity data on terrestrial plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed

Potential of the micro-organism to have adverse environmental impacts that could affect the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity

Rohm and Haas Canada LP

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (3)

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (4)

Data from a water solubility test

Data from a water extractability test (2)

Schlumberger Canada Ltd.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from a melting point test

Schulke Inc.

Data from a vapour pressure test

SE Tylose GmbH & Co. KG

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

SemBioSys Genetics Inc.

Data from a test to determine its pathogenicity, toxicity or invasiveness

Servier Canada, Inc.

Data from a vapour pressure test

SiREM, A Division of Geosyntec

Pathogenicity data on aquatic plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed

SNF Canada Ltd.

Molecular weight of <500 and <1 000 daltons (2)

Data from a water extractability test

Stepan Canada Inc.

Data from a density test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Stochem Specialty Chemicals, Division of Univar Canada Ltd.

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (2)

Sylvan Chemical Company, Inc.

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a ready biodegradation test

Tempo Canada Inc.

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

The Lubrizol Corporation

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (4)

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test (5)

Tremco Ltd.

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a water solubility test

Univar Canada Ltd.

Data from an acute mammalian toxicity test

University of Guelph

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility

Data from a test conducted to determine its pathogenicity, toxicity or invasiveness

Valspar Inc.

Data from a vapour pressure test

Win Chemicals Ltd.

Data from a boiling point test

Data from a melting point test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Reference 1
The number of times the information requirement was waived for the company is indicated in brackets.

[6-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Waiver of information requirements for substances and living organisms (subsections 81(9) and 106(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas any person who proposes to import or manufacture a substance or living organism that is not on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 81(1) or 106(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas any person who proposes to use, manufacture or import for a significant new activity a substance or a living organism that is on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 81(3) or 106(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas any person who proposes to use for a significant new activity a substance or a living organism that is not on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 81(4) or 106(4) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a person may, pursuant to subsection 81(8) or 106(8) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, request any of the requirements to provide information under subsections 81(1), (3) or (4) or 106(1), (3) or (4) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to be waived; and

Whereas a waiver may be granted by the Minister of the Environment under subsection 81(8) or 106(8) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 if

  • (a) in the opinion of the Ministers, the information is not needed in order to determine whether the substance or living organism is toxic or capable of becoming toxic;
  • (b) the substance or living organism is to be used for a prescribed purpose or manufactured at a location where, in the opinion of the Ministers, the person requesting the waiver is able to contain the substance or living organism so as to satisfactorily protect the environment and human health; or
  • (c) it is not, in the opinion of the Ministers, practicable or feasible to obtain the test data necessary to generate the information;

Therefore, notice is hereby given, pursuant to subsections 81(9) and 106(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that the Minister of the Environment waives the requirement to provide information in accordance with the following annex pursuant to subsections 81(8) and 106(8) of the Act.


KAREN L. DODDS
Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Waiver of information requirements

(Subsections 81(9) and 106(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Person to whom a waiver is granted

Information in relation to which a waiver is granted (see reference 2)

Afton Chemical Canada Corporation

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility

Akzo Nobel Surface Chemistry LLC

Data from a density test

Aquabounty Technologies Inc.

Data from a test conducted to determine its pathogenicity, toxicity or invasiveness

Arkema Canada Inc.

Data from melting point test

Data from boiling point test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Ashland Canada Corp.

Data from a fat solubility test (2)

Data from a dissociation constants test (2)

AstraZeneca Canada Inc.

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility (4)

Data from tests conducted to determine the effects of the micro-organism on aquatic plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed to it (2)

Data from tests conducted to determine the effects of the micro-organism on terrestrial plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed to it (2)

Pathogenicity data in aquatic plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed (2)

Pathogenicity data on terrestrial plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed (2)

BASF Canada Inc.

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test (3)

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (3)

Data from a water solubility test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Bayer Inc.

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Bio Agri Mix LP

Data from a boiling point test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Data from a density test

BN ImmunoTherapeutics Inc.

Data from tests conducted to determine the effects of the micro-organism on aquatic plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed to it (3)

Data from tests conducted to determine the effects of the micro-organism on terrestrial plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed to it (3)

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility (3)

Buckman Laboratories of Canada, Ltd.

Data from a water extractability test

Charles Tennant & Company

Data from a water solubility test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Chemtura Canada Co/CIE

Data from an in vivo genotoxicity test (6)

Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LP

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (6)

Data from a dissociation constants test (3)

Clariant (Canada) Inc.

Data from a vapour pressure test (4)

Coim USA, Inc.

Data from a water extractability test (2)

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (2)

Data from an acute aquatic toxicity test (2)

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (2)

Danisco Canada Inc.

Data from a melting point test

Data from a boiling point test

Data from a density test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Data from a water solubility test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Dow Chemical Canada ULC

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Dow Corning Canada Inc.

Data from a water solubility test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (2)

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from a repeated-dose mammalian toxicity test

Dow Corning Corporation

Data from a water solubility test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Ecolab Co.

Data from an acute inhalation mammalian toxicity test

Data from an acute dermal mammalian toxicity test

Data from a skin sensitization test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Elanco, Division Eli Lilly Canada

Data from tests conducted to determine the effects of the micro-organism on aquatic plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed to it (3)

Data from tests conducted to determine the effects of the micro-organism on terrestrial plant, invertebrate and vertebrate species likely to be exposed to it (3)

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility (3)

Data from a melting point test (2)

Data from a boiling point test (2)

Data from a vapour pressure test (2)

Data from a density test (2)

H J Heinz Company of Canada

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility (2)

Heinzseed division of Heinz Company of Canada

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility

Inolex Chemical Company

Data from a water solubility test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Iogen Corp.

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility

Itaconix Corporation

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Matsumura Oil Research Corp.

Data from a dissociation constants test

Merck Canada Inc.

Data from an acute mammalian toxicity test

Metabolix, Inc.

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (2)

Momentive Specialty Chemicals Canada Inc.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Nalco Canada Co.

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (2)

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (2)

Novozymes Canada Limited

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility (2)

Procter & Gamble Inc.

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (2)

Riches, McKenzie & Herber/Mitsubishi

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Rockwool International A/S

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Sika Canada Inc.

Data from a water solubility test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from a vapour pressure test

Stepan Canada Inc.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test (2)

Data from a density test (2)

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

STERIS Canada Inc.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Teck Metals Ltd.

Data from a ready biodegradation test

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.

Data from a dissociation constants test

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Umicore Canada Inc.

Data from a ready biodegradation test

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test

Data from an acute aquatic toxicity (Daphnia) test

Data from an acute aquatic toxicity (Fish) test

Data from an acute aquatic toxicity (Algae) test

Data from an adsorption-desorption test

Data from an in vivo genotoxicity test

Univar Canada Ltd.

Data from an octanol/water partition coefficient test (3)

Data from an acute mammalian toxicity test

Valspar Industries, Inc.

Data from a hydrolysis as a function of pH test

Data from an acute aquatic toxicity

Waterville TG Inc.

Data from a vapour pressure test

Reference 2
The number of times the information requirement was waived for the company is indicated in brackets.

[6-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substance — Ethylbenzene, CAS (see footnote 1) RN 100-41-4 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas ethylbenzene is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on the substance pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substance meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that the substance be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is furthermore given that the ministers have released a risk management scope document for the substance to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of a risk management approach.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), or substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Act, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

VIRGINIA POTER
Director General
Chemicals Sector Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Ethylbenzene

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of benzene, ethyl- also known as ethylbenzene (Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 100-41-4). Ethylbenzene was identified as a priority for assessment on the basis of “greatest potential” for human exposure and also because it was classified by other agencies on the basis of carcinogenicity.

Ethylbenzene occurs naturally in the environment in crude oil and, as a result, can be a component of vehicle and aviation fuels. It occurs naturally in some natural gas streams, and as a result of incomplete combustion of natural materials, making it a component of forest fire smoke. Ethylbenzene is a component of mixed xylenes, which are used as solvents in various applications including in paints, stains, and automotive cleaners. Ethylbenzene is also synthetically produced and mainly used in the manufacture of styrene. Styrene is then used to manufacture various types of polymers, such as polystyrene. Ethylbenzene is used in the oil and gas industry in a number of oilfield applications, such as a non-emulsifier, as an acid additive and as a surfactant in hydraulic fracturing fluids. Minor applications of the synthetically produced ethylbenzene include use as a solvent and for the production of other chemicals such as diethylbenzene.

The most recent available information on ethylbenzene production in Canada is from 2003, during which a total of 906 000 tonnes of ethylbenzene were produced. Approximately 545 tonnes of ethylbenzene were imported into Canada in 2009, and approximately 51.6 tonnes were exported in the same year. Results from the Notice with Respect to certain substances on the Domestic Substances List (DSL), published under section 71 and conducted for the year 2000, indicated that approximately 1 700 000 tonnes of ethylbenzene at a concentration greater than 1% were manufactured in and imported into Canada during that year, mainly by companies in the petrochemical sector. Ethylbenzene has been internationally identified as a high production volume (HPV) chemical.

Ethylbenzene is included in the National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI), to which facilities manufacturing, importing, or otherwise using more than 10 tonnes per year of the substance must report their releases. In 2011, facilities across Canada reported to the NPRI on-site environmental releases totalling approximately 325 tonnes, transfers for disposal totalling 1 800 tonnes, and transfers for recycling totalling 541 tonnes.

Ethylbenzene has been detected in ambient and indoor air, drinking water, surface water, groundwater, soil, and biota, but not in sediment in Canada. Ethylbenzene has also been detected in various food items in various countries. Ethylbenzene has been identified in products, such as liquid and aerosol coatings, caulking, lacquers, stains and varnishes, and building materials. Ethylbenzene has also been measured in blood samples from individuals living in the United States.

Based on its physical and chemical properties and half-lives in air, surface water and groundwater, wastewater treatment systems, aquifer, soil, and sediments, ethylbenzene is expected to degrade relatively rapidly in water, soil, and sediment, but is not expected to degrade quickly in air. It is therefore persistent in air but not in water, soil, or sediment. Ethylbenzene has a low potential to accumulate in organisms or biomagnify in trophic food chains. Therefore, it is proposed that the substance meets the persistence criteria but not the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA 1999. In addition, the available toxicity data indicate that ethylbenzene is moderately toxic to aquatic and terrestrial species.

For this Screening Assessment, the predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) in air, surface water, sediment, and soil do not exceed concentrations associated with effects, even when conservative scenarios are used. The risk quotient (RQ) obtained for groundwater exceeded a value of 1 in a conservative scenario, which suggests potential risk to organisms living in groundwater near landfills. However, given the uncertainty associated with the relevance of the available toxicity data, the extent of risks is unclear.

Based on the information available, there is low risk of harm to organisms or the broader integrity of the environment from this substance. It is therefore proposed to conclude that ethylbenzene does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

The critical health effects associated with exposure to ethylbenzene are considered to be tumour induction and non-cancer systemic effects, primarily on the auditory system and on the liver, kidney and pituitary glands. Minor developmental effects, haematological effects, effects on the endocrine system (thyroid hyperplasia), and on the central nervous system were observed at higher dose levels and following prolonged exposure periods.

The general population of Canada is exposed to ethylbenzene from environmental media, food, and the use of consumer products. The margins between levels associated with effects in experimental animals and upper-bounding estimates of exposure from environmental media (including vehicle interior air), food, and from scenarios, such as pumping gasoline or living near service stations are considered to be adequate to address uncertainties related to the health effects and exposure for both cancer and non-cancer effects. However, margins between upper-bounding estimates of exposure from use of certain consumer products (i.e. concrete sealant, lacquer/stain/varnish) and critical effect levels are considered potentially inadequate to address uncertainties related to the health effects and exposure.

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that ethylbenzene meets the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as it is entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that ethylbenzene meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft Screening Assessment, as well as the risk management scope document for the substance, is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www. chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[6-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substance — Hexachloroethane, CAS (see footnote 2) RN 67-72-1 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas hexachloroethane is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on the substance pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on the substance at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Hexachloroethane

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of hexachloroethane, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 67-72-1. Hexachloroethane was identified as a priority for assessment as it had been found to meet categorization criteria for persistence, bioaccumulation and inherent toxicity to aquatic life. Hexachloroethane was also classified by other agencies as a possible carcinogen to humans according to IARC (Group 2B) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (Group C).

Hexachloroethane is not known to occur naturally. Hexachloroethane was previously imported in Canada for use as a chemical intermediate, as a flux agent for grain refining and degassing of aluminum alloys, as a flame retardant in industrial laminating resins and as a reactant in military smoke ammunition. Recent information indicates that small quantities of hexachloroethane continue to be imported and used for degassing of aluminum alloys. In Canada, hexachloroethane is not intentionally manufactured for commercial distribution; rather, it is formed during other processes in the chlorinated chemical industry and can also be produced as a by-product of the chlorination of water and sewage and the incineration of chlorinated hydrocarbons. Based on the results of a survey conducted under section 71 of CEPA 1999 for the year 2000, approximately 150 tonnes of hexachloroethane were manufactured in Canada and between 10 and 100 tonnes were imported into Canada.

The use of hexachloroethane is slowly being phased out in Canada and internationally. Based on reported use patterns, hexachloroethane is expected to be released mainly to air, with smaller releases to water and soil.

Based on its physical and chemical properties, hexachloroethane is not expected to degrade quickly in the environment and is persistent in air, water and soil. Hexachloroethane does not have the potential to accumulate in organisms or biomagnify in trophic food chains. The substance therefore meets the persistence criteria but not the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA 1999. Empirical acute aquatic toxicity values also indicate that the substance is highly hazardous to aquatic organisms.

For the ecological screening assessment, a number of models were run, using conservative scenarios and assumptions, to determine concentrations of hexachloroethane in air, water and sediment. The predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) in water and air do not exceed concentrations associated with effects, even when using conservative scenarios and assumptions. Although the measured concentrations of hexachloroethane in sediments exceeded effect levels, the data are older and the concentrations were from an area where known releases have ceased and where remediation activities have taken place.

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that hexachloroethane does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

The principal source of exposure of the general population to hexachloroethane is indoor air. Intakes from ambient air, drinking water and soil are expected to be negligible. Food was not considered to be a source of hexachloroethane exposure.

Based principally upon the weight-of-evidence evaluations of international agencies, a critical effect for the characterization of risk to human health is carcinogenicity. Following chronic oral exposure to hexachloroethane, significant increases in the incidence of liver tumours and kidney tumours were observed in mice and rats, respectively. Increased incidences of pheochromocytomas of the adrenal gland were also observed in hexachloroethane-exposed rats. However, results of assays for genotoxicity were generally negative. Other effects observed in experimental animals exposed to hexachloroethane include non-cancer effects in the kidney, as well as developmental toxicity at higher levels of exposure.

The margin between the estimates of intake of hexachloroethane by the general population and the critical non-cancer effect level for renal toxicity in experimental animals is considered adequate to account for uncertainty in the health effects and exposure databases.

On the basis of the adequacy of margins between exposure and critical effect levels, it is proposed to conclude that hexachloroethane does not meet the criteria set out in paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that hexachloroethane does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

Because this substance is listed on the Domestic Substances List, it is not subject to notification under the New Substance Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers). However, given its hazardous properties, there is concern that new activities that have not been identified or assessed under CEPA 1999 could lead to this substance meeting the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act. Therefore, it is recommended to amend the Domestic Substances List, under subsection 87(3) of the Act, to indicate that subsection 81(3) of the Act applies with respect to this substance, so that any significant new activity is notified and undergoes ecological and human health risk assessments before the substance is imported, manufactured or used for the significant new activity.

The draft Screening Assessment for this substance is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[6-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES AND OCEANS

FISHERIES ACT

Notice respecting the Agreement between the Government of New Brunswick and the Government of Canada regarding the administration of the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations in New Brunswick

Notice is hereby given that the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans intends to conclude with the province of New Brunswick the agreement entitled “Administrative Agreement between the Government of New Brunswick and the Government of Canada regarding the administration of the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations in New Brunswick.”

Interested persons requiring additional information, or wishing to consult the Agreement, should send a request to the email address: ww-eu@ec.gc.ca. Interested persons may, within 30 days after the publication of this notice, file comments with respect to the proposed agreement. All such comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice, and be sent to James Arnott, Wastewater Program, Department of the Environment, 351 Saint-Joseph Boulevard, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3 or at the following email address: ww-eu@ec.gc.ca.


GAIL SHEA
Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

[6-1-o]

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BANK ACT

HSBC Bank Canada — Letters patent of amalgamation and order to commence and carry on business

Notice is hereby given of the issuance,

  • pursuant to subsection 229(1) of the Bank Act, of letters patent amalgamating and continuing HSBC Bank Canada, HSBC Finance Corporation Canada and HSBC Financial Corporation Limited as one bank under the name, in English, HSBC Bank Canada and, in French, Banque HSBC Canada, effective January 1, 2014; and
  • pursuant to subsection 48(4) of the Bank Act, of an order authorizing HSBC Bank Canada to commence and carry on business, effective January 1, 2014.

January 27, 2014

JULIE DICKSON
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

[6-1-o]

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

INSURANCE COMPANIES ACT

Intact Insurance Company — Letters patent of amalgamation and order to commence and carry on business

Notice is hereby given of the issuance

  • pursuant to subsection 251(1) of the Insurance Companies Act, of letters patent amalgamating and continuing Intact Insurance Company, AXA Pacific Insurance Company, and AXA Insurance (Canada) as one company under the name, in English, Intact Insurance Company and, in French, Intact Compagnie d’assurance, effective January 1, 2014; and
  • pursuant to subsection 52(4) of the Insurance Companies Act, of an order authorizing Intact Insurance Company to commence and carry on business, and to insure risks falling within the classes of accident and sickness insurance, aircraft insurance, automobile insurance, boiler and machinery insurance, credit insurance, credit protection insurance, fidelity insurance, hail insurance, legal expenses insurance, liability insurance, property insurance, and surety insurance, effective January 1, 2014.

January 21, 2014

JULIE DICKSON
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

[6-1-o]

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

TRUST AND LOAN COMPANIES ACT

HSBC Trust Company (Canada) — Letters patent of amalgamation and order to commence and carry on business

Notice is hereby given of the issuance,

  • pursuant to subsection 234(1) of the Trust and Loan Companies Act, of letters patent amalgamating and continuing HSBC Trust Company (Canada) and Household Trust Company as one company under the name, in English, HSBC Trust Company (Canada) and, in French, Société de fiducie HSBC (Canada), effective January 1, 2014; and
  • pursuant to subsection 52(5) of the Trust and Loan Companies Act, of an order authorizing HSBC Trust Company (Canada) to commence and carry on business, effective January 1, 2014.

January 27, 2014

JULIE DICKSON
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

[6-1-o]

NOTICE OF VACANCY

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

Superintendent (full-time position)

Salary range: $262,600–$308,900
Location: National Capital Region or Toronto

Established in 1987 by an Act of Parliament, the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI) is the primary regulator of federally chartered financial institutions — banks as well as federally regulated trust and loan companies, insurance companies, co-operative credit associations, fraternal benefit societies — and federally administered pension plans. OSFI is accountable to the Minister of Finance for the maintenance of public confidence, for administering the statutes, regulations and guidelines governing federally incorporated financial institutions and for dealing effectively with institutions in difficulty. OSFI employs approximately 650 people in offices located in Ottawa, Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver. The Office of the Chief Actuary within OSFI also provides actuarial advice to the Government of Canada and conducts reviews of certain provincially chartered financial institutions by virtue of federal–provincial arrangements or through agency agreements with the Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation.

As the head of the organization, the Superintendent of Financial Institutions is responsible for leading and overseeing OSFI in supervising and regulating financial institutions and pension plans under federal jurisdiction with a view to contributing to public confidence through its work toward a safe and sound Canadian financial system and to safeguarding policyholders, depositors and pension plan members from undue loss.

The ideal candidate would possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study (e.g. economics, finance, law, accounting or public or business administration), or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and/or experience.

The ideal candidate would have extensive management experience at the most senior levels, including managing human and financial resources, with demonstrated success in strategic management and in leading change or new initiatives. Experience working in or with a regulatory agency and with the interpretation and application of legislation and regulatory requirements is desired. He or she would also have experience in the development and communication of strategic advice to senior officials. Experience in leading a multi-disciplinary team, as well as experience in developing and maintaining partnerships among organizations, is sought.

The ideal candidate would have knowledge of the legislative framework, mandate, role and responsibilities of OSFI, including its relationship with the Minister of Finance and the Government. He or she would have knowledge of the financial sector, including the strategic challenges faced by financial service organizations, based ideally on working experience within the sector. This knowledge would include familiarity with the types of institutions and pension plans operating within the sector, both in Canada and internationally, the types of products offered and lines of business carried on within the sector. He or she would also have an awareness of emerging trends in the sector and knowledge of risks and the principles of risk management. A good understanding of prudential regulation and supervision within the financial sector is desired. The candidate would also have knowledge of the Canadian government including its policies, practices and decision-making frameworks.

The ideal candidate would have the ability to lead and manage a public institution, and provide the vision and strategic direction needed to ensure OSFI is able to carry out its mandate and achieve its objectives. The ability to establish alliances with strategic partners within and outside the financial sector and to negotiate with a broad range of stakeholders is desired. He or she would have the ability to identify and understand emerging trends and risks in the financial industry, and to develop appropriate regulatory and supervisory responses. The candidate would also have the ability to champion and sustain change and create an environment that embraces and encourages innovation, as well as communicate a compelling vision that generates enthusiasm and commitment in people. Superior communication skills, both written and oral, are sought. The ability to identify and understand the opportunities and challenges of new technologies and their attendant issues for financial services firms (e.g. e-commerce and client data security) would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate would be a strategic, innovative and analytical leader with sound judgement, high ethical standards and superior interpersonal skills. A person of integrity, he or she would also be objective, fair, discreet and diplomatic.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

The successful candidate must reside in or be willing to relocate to the National Capital Region or Toronto, or to a location within reasonable commuting distance of either of these locations. He or she must be prepared to respect necessary confidentiality requirements and to travel regularly within Canada and abroad to attend meetings in support of OSFI’s activities.

The successful candidate may not beneficially own, directly or indirectly, any shares of any financial institution, bank holding company, insurance holding company or of any other body corporate, however created, carrying on any business in Canada that is substantially similar to any business carried on by any financial institution. Moreover, the candidate may not, directly or indirectly, hold any interest or right in membership shares of a federal credit union, within the meaning of section 2 of the Bank Act, in excess of the minimum number of membership shares of the federal credit union that is required for membership or exercise any right he or she has as a member of such a federal credit union, except any right that he or she has as a customer of the federal credit union.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/index.asp?lang=eng.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a confidential report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae to OSFI-superintendent@spencerstuart.com.

Further details about OSFI and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.osfi-bsif.gc.ca.

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

[6-1-o]

NOTICE OF VACANCIES

CANADA INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS BOARD

Vice-Chairperson (two full-time positions)

Salary range: $172,900 to $203,300
Location: National Capital Region

The Canada Industrial Relations Board (CIRB) is an independent, representational quasi-judicial tribunal that is responsible for the interpretation and administration of the provisions of Part I and II of the Canada Labour Code and Part II of the Status of the Artist Act (SAA) that require hearing and determination. The Code applies to the federally regulated private sector and governs the acquisition and termination of collective bargaining rights by unions, the orderly management of the collective bargaining process and adjudication of unfair labour practice complaints. The Status of the Artist Act applies to independent artists and producers under federal jurisdiction.

The Vice-Chairpersons are responsible for conducting and directing adjudicative and mediation processes that authoritatively and conclusively resolve industrial relation disputes and contribute to and promote effective industrial relations in works, undertakings and businesses that fall within the authority of the Parliament of Canada by interpreting and applying the Canada Labour Code and other relevant legal and industrial relations standards.

The ideal candidates would have a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study, or an acceptable combination of equivalent education, training and/or job-related experience. A degree in law would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidates would have leadership experience within the private or public sector as well as experience and expertise in the field of industrial relations. Candidates for these positions should have experience in the interpretation and application of labour legislation and experience in mediating disputes between labour and management. Experience in rendering decisions or in presenting cases before an adjudicative tribunal would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidates would possess knowledge of the Canada Labour Code and applicable regulations as well as of other related legislation at the federal and provincial levels. They would possess a broad understanding of labour–management relations and knowledge of the practices and principles underlying collective bargaining, mediation and alternative dispute resolution. Knowledge of the industrial sectors subject to the Canada Labour Code and the environment within which employers and trade unions operate, as well as knowledge of the procedures and practices involved in conducting an administrative hearing and the legal principles involved, particularly as they relate to evidence, legal interpretation and natural justice is also desired.

The ideal candidates would have the ability to interpret the provisions of relevant statutes, regulations and other documents in an adjudicative context, and to assess the relevance of precedents in order to render decisions that are fair and equitable. They would also have the ability to analyze extensive amounts of varied and complex information, differing opinions and complex situations in addition to the ability to effectively conduct administrative hearings and to render timely decisions, while anticipating their short- and long-term consequences. They would also have the ability to develop effective working relationships and build consensus as well as the ability to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing, including the ability to write clear and well-reasoned decisions. The preferred candidates would be impartial, possess high ethical standards, sound judgment and integrity, superior interpersonal skills, tact and discretion.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

The successful candidates must be Canadian citizens or permanent residents within the meaning of subsection 2(1) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and must not hold any other employment or office in respect of which remuneration is received.

The successful candidates must reside in or relocate to the National Capital Region or to a location within reasonable commuting distance and be willing to travel regularly to attend hearings and various other conferences and meetings in all parts of Canada.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The preferred candidates must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/index.asp?lang=eng.

The selected candidates will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a confidential report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about this organization and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.cirb-ccri.gc.ca/eic/site/047.nsf/eng.home.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by February 24, 2014, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

[6-1-o]

  • Footnote 1
    The Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 2
    The Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.