ARCHIVED — Vol. 148, No. 4 — January 25, 2014

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

MIGRATORY BIRDS CONVENTION ACT, 1994

Notice of intent

Notice is hereby given that the Department of the Environment intends to recommend to the Governor in Council that amendments be made to the Migratory Birds Regulations, pursuant to section 12 of the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994.

The purpose of these amendments to Schedule I of the Migratory Birds Regulations is to change hunting season dates, set daily bag limits and possession limits, as well as make other related modifications for certain species of migratory game birds for the 2014–15 and 2015–16 hunting seasons. The proposed regulatory amendments are in response to changes in the status of migratory game bird populations and will ensure the sustainable harvest of migratory game bird populations in Canada.

Commencing with the 2014–15 hunting season, Environment Canada will be moving from an annual to a biennial regulatory amendment cycle for the hunting regulations. The amendment and corresponding formalized consultation processes will remain consistent with what was done in previous years, with the only change being that the amendments will now occur every two years. However, Environment Canada will continue to evaluate the status of migratory game birds on an annual basis to ensure that urgent amendments can be made if necessary.

Canadian hunting regulations for migratory game birds are reviewed by Environment Canada, with input from the provinces and territories and a range of other interested stakeholders. Environment Canada produces three reports as part of its formalized consultation process. The first report, issued in January and titled Population Status of Migratory Game Birds in Canada, contains population and other biological information on migratory game birds, thus providing the scientific basis for management. The second report, also issued in January and titled Proposals to Amend the Canadian Migratory Birds Regulations, outlines the proposed changes to the hunting regulations, as well as proposals to amend the special conservation measures for overabundant species and other proposed amendments to the Migratory Birds Regulations. These two reports are distributed to organizations and individuals with an interest in migratory game bird conservation and provide the opportunity for input regarding the proposed regulatory amendments. The third report, Migratory Birds Regulations in Canada, issued in July, summarizes the hunting regulations for the upcoming two hunting seasons, and is also provided to organizations and individuals with an interest in migratory game bird conservation.

Electronic copies of the above-mentioned documents may be viewed at the following address: http://ec.gc.ca/rcom-mbhr/default.asp?lang=En&n=0EA37FB2-1.

Interested parties who wish to comment on the proposed amendments are invited to submit their comments within a 30-day period after the second report, Proposals to Amend the Canadian Migratory Birds Regulations, has been posted on the Environment Canada Web site. The closing date for consultations will also be on the Web site.

Comments can be submitted to the Director General, Canadian Wildlife Service, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3 or to MBRegs.Reports@ec.gc.ca.

January 16, 2014

SUE MILBURN-HOPWOOD
Director General
Canadian Wildlife Service

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substance — Phenol, 2-(2H-benzotriazol-2-yl)-4,6-bis(1,1-dimethylpropyl)- (BDTP), CAS (see footnote 1) RN 25973-55-1 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Phenol, 2-(2H-benzotriazol-2-yl)-4,6-bis(1,1dimethylpropyl)- (BDTP) is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on BDTP pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that BDTP meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

And whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) are satisfied that the criteria set out under subsection 77(4) of the Act are met,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the ministers propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that BDTP be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose risk management measures to achieve the objective of virtual elimination of releases of the substance.

Notice is furthermore given that the ministers have released a risk management scope document for BDTP to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of a risk management approach.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Act, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

VIRGINIA POTER
Director General
Chemicals Sector Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of BDTP

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Phenol, 2-(2H-benzotriazol-2-yl)-4,6-bis(1,1-dimethylpropyl)-, hereinafter referred to as BDTP, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) 25973-55-1. This substance was identified as a priority for screening assessment because it met the criteria for persistence and inherent toxicity to non-human organisms during the categorization of the Domestic Substances List (DSL).

BDTP does not occur naturally in the environment. The substance is not manufactured in Canada, but the results from a survey conducted under the authority of section 71 of CEPA 1999 indicate that in the year 2000, between 100 000 and 1 000 000 kg of the substance were imported into Canada for use as an ultraviolet light absorber in automotive and industrial coatings, paints and plastics. Based on more recent information provided by stakeholders, the use of BDTP in Canada remains the same, but the quantity imported has decreased: an estimated total of 10 000 to 100 000 kg of BDTP was imported into Canada in 2010.

BDTP has a low solubility in water, a high octanol-water partition coefficient and a low vapour pressure. It is not expected to be significantly present in air, and is not subject to long-range atmospheric transport. If released to water, the substance is likely to largely partition to particles and organic matter because of its hydrophobic nature, consequently ending up in sediments. If released to soil, it remains in that medium.

Experimental data indicate that BDTP is not expected to degrade rapidly in water, soil, or sediment. Based on experimental data and model predictions, the substance has the potential to bioconcentrate and bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms and may biomagnify in trophic food webs. Therefore it is proposed to conclude that BDTP meets the criteria for persistence and bioaccumulation as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations.

In Canada, BDTP is expected to be primarily released to surface water and ultimately end up in sediment; however, no monitoring data in any environmental medium in Canada has been identified. The substance has been found in the environment (water, soil, sediment, and biota) in other countries.

To evaluate potential exposure to BDTP in the Canadian aquatic environment, predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) were estimated for two representative industrial sites, aiming to characterize the industrial releases of this substance to surface waters from the manufacture of plastics and from the manufacture of paints and coatings. The aquatic PECs were in turn used to estimate tissue residues of BDTP in mid-trophic-level fish, which were further applied to calculate the total daily intakes (TDIs) for fish-consuming terrestrial organisms (minks and river otters) to be used as indicators of exposure.

The only empirical aquatic toxicity data available for BDTP are acute toxicity data, indicating no significant effect on different taxa at or above saturation in water. However, no reported value of any ecotoxicity endpoint is considered acceptable to calculate the predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC) for the aquatic compartment. No toxicity data were found for soil- or sediment-dwelling organisms; therefore, no PNECs were calculated for these two compartments.

Considering that aquatic PECs for both industrial sites fall below the water solubility of BDTP, the estimated releases of this substance to surface water are not expected to pose harm to aquatic organisms following short-term exposure. However, experimental data from acute toxicity studies may underestimate the long-term aquatic toxicity of this substance, given the poor bioavailability of the test substance in water. During short-term exposure, the uptake rate of BDTP from water alone may not be adequate to reach the internal effect concentration in test organisms.

To assess the long-term effect and the dietary factor associated with exposure to BDTP, a critical body burden (CBB) approach was used, in which the chronic external effect concentration was estimated for fish, based on the bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of this substance and the internal effect threshold for this class of chemicals. The estimated chronic external effect concentration was slightly below the aquatic PECs, suggesting that there could be a risk to aquatic organisms associated with long-term exposure (via combined water and food) at the concentration of this substance predicted to be in the Canadian environment.

The risk to terrestrial wildlife exposed through diet was also assessed by developing the chronic toxicity thresholds for mink and river otter based on data from a repeated-dose toxicity study in rats, and comparing these thresholds to the total daily intakes (TDIs) for these terrestrial organisms that were calculated from the residue concentrations of BDTP in mid-trophic-level fish that mink and river otter would consume. Since the TDIs were above the corresponding chronic toxicity thresholds of this substance, results indicate a risk to terrestrial wildlife associated with a long-term consumption of BDTP-contaminated fish in Canada.

Based on the overall results of the ecological assessment, it is proposed to conclude that BDTP meets the criteria under paragraph 64(a) of CEPA 1999 as it is entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity. Based on the information available, there is low risk of harm to the broader integrity of the environment from this substance. It is therefore proposed to conclude that BDTP does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(b) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

The health effects database for BDTP is limited, but chronic toxicity studies for selected analogues indicated no evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals, and the available data do not indicate genotoxic potential. Based on the collective information on BDTP and selected analogues, the primary health effect associated with exposure to BDTP is liver toxicity. However, exposure of the general population of Canada to BDTP through environmental media is expected to be minimal, and exposure from use of consumer products is not expected. Based on the foregoing, the risk to human health is considered to be low. It is proposed to conclude that BDTP does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that Phenol, 2-(2H-benzotriazol-2-yl)-4,6-bis(1,1- dimethylpropyl)- (CAS RN 25973-55-1) meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft Screening Assessment, as well as the risk management scope document for the substance, is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of results of investigations and recommendations for a substance — Ethene, CAS (see footnote 2) RN 74-85-1 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on ethene pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that ethene does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on the substance at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Ethene

Pursuant to section 68 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of ethene (commonly referred to as “ethylene”), Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 74-85-1.

Ethene is a simple double-bonded hydrocarbon, and is a ubiquitous gas in the environment. It is introduced into the environment from both natural and anthropogenic sources, including emissions from vegetation of all types and micro-organisms, as a product of incomplete combustion of organic material (such as wood and agricultural wastes) and of fossil fuels, and during its industrial production and use. Ethene is also produced endogenously by humans and mammals.

Ethene has been internationally identified as a high production volume (HPV) chemical. Worldwide, ethene is the petrochemical product manufactured in the largest quantity, with global production capacity in 2011 estimated to be 138 million tonnes per year. In 2011, Canada ranked sixth in worldwide ethene production capacity at nearly 5.5 million tonnes per year, representing 4.0% of worldwide capacity. In 2000, ethene production in Canada was slightly lower, with production of 4.3 million tonnes per year, based on results from a survey conducted under section 71 of CEPA 1999. In this same survey, imported quantities of ethene were comparatively negligible.

In Canada and worldwide, ethene is predominantly used as a monomer for the manufacture of polyethylene plastics, as an intermediate for other organic chemicals, and as fuel gas in industrial facilities. Relatively small amounts are also used in commercial settings worldwide for the controlled growth or ripening of vegetation such as fruits, vegetables and flowers. In Canada, ethene is used commercially to inhibit the sprouting of potatoes during long-term storage, and for the ripening of bananas and possibly other produce.

In Canada, anthropogenic ethene concentrations in air are mostly attributed to the combustion of fossil fuels and to the use of ethene in various industrial processes. Canadian automotive releases to air were estimated at 3 449 tonnes in 2005. The majority of this (70 %) was estimated to be released from cars manufactured before 1992. Vehicles newer than 1992 models emit considerably less ethene due to advances in automotive engine technology and emissions controls and requirements for cleaner burning fuels in the United States and Canada.

Ethene is included in the National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI), to which facilities manufacturing, importing, or otherwise using more than 10 tonnes of the substance per year must report their releases. In 2009, facilities across Canada reported to the NPRI on-site environmental releases totalling approximately 1 320 tonnes. Industrial releases have dropped by over 50% since 2000, due largely to the amount of ethene being recycled. The majority of reported ethene releases are to air.

In Canada, ethene has been measured in outdoor, indoor and personal air (i.e. air near a person’s breathing zone collected using mobile air sampling equipment carried by participants), as well as in vegetation, soil and surface seawater. As a combustion byproduct, ethene has been measured in vehicular exhaust and in cigarette smoke. Ethene has not been reported in drinking water or consumer products in Canada.

Experimental and modelled data show that ethene is neither persistent nor bioaccumulative in the environment, based on criteria in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations.

Terrestrial plants are highly sensitive to ethene in air; critical toxicity values in air were determined for long-term and short-term exposure.

Air monitoring data were used to determine if ambient concentrations of ethene in urban and rural air or near industrial sites could be harmful to terrestrial plants. Based on a comparison of levels expected to cause harm to organisms with estimated exposure levels and on other information, ethene has a low risk of harm to terrestrial plants due to industrial emissions or ambient concentrations. The estimated frequency of occurrences of sufficient concentration from industrial emissions to be of concern is one occurrence per year.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms or the broader integrity of the environment from this substance. It is therefore proposed to conclude that ethene does not meet criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have immediate or long-term harmful effects on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Based principally on weight-of-evidence-based assessments of international agencies, ethene was “not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans (Group 3),” and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has concluded that relevant studies on ethene have indicated low toxicity.

The animal database for ethene, as well as the available epidemiology studies, did not demonstrate a cancer concern and the overall genotoxicity test results were negative. The critical human health effects associated with exposure to ethene are nasal effects, based on observations in experimental animals. The critical effect level was compared to the highest concentration of ethene measured in air in Canada, which resulted in wide margins of exposure that were considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases. On the basis of the adequacy of the margins between upper-bounding estimates of exposure to ethene and critical effect levels, it is proposed to conclude that ethene does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that ethene (CAS RN 74-85-1) does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft Screening Assessment for this substance is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Filing of claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 12(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer of the Workplace Hazardous Materials Directorate hereby gives notice of the filing of the claims for exemption listed below.

In accordance with subsection 12(2) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, affected parties may make written representations to the screening officer with respect to the claim for exemption and the material safety data sheet to which it relates. Affected parties means a person who is not a competitor of the claimant and who uses, supplies or is otherwise involved in the use or supply of the controlled product at a work place, and includes

  • (a) a supplier of the controlled product;
  • (b) an employee at the work place;
  • (c) an employer at the work place;
  • (d) a safety and health professional for the work place;
  • (e) a safety and health representative or a member of a safety and health committee for the work place; and
  • (f) a person who is authorized in writing to represent
    • (i) a supplier referred to in paragraph (a) or an employer referred to in paragraph (c), or
    • (ii) an employee referred to in paragraph (b), except where that person is an official or a representative of a trade union that is not certified or recognized in respect of the work place.

Written representations respecting a claim for exemption cited in the present notice, or respecting the material safety data sheet or label to which the claim relates, must cite the appropriate registry number, state the reasons and evidence upon which the representations are based and be delivered within 30 days of the date of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to the screening officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Directorate, 427 Laurier Avenue West, 7th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

STEPHANIE REID
Chief Screening Officer

The claims listed below seek a business exemption from the disclosure of employer confidential information in respect of a controlled product. The confidential information would otherwise be required to be disclosed by the provisions of the applicable provincial legislation relating to occupational health and safety.

Claimant

Product Identifier (As shown on the MSDS)

Subject of the Claim for Exemption

Registry Number

Greensolv Inc., Baie D’Urfé, Quebec

GREENSOLV 294WL

Chemical identity and concentration of four ingredients.

9016

Schlumberger Canada Limited, Calgary, Alberta

External CT Corrosion Inhibitor A265

Chemical identity of three ingredients.

9041

Schlumberger Canada Limited, Calgary, Alberta

EZEFLO F108 Surfactant

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9042

The claims listed below seek an exemption from the disclosure of supplier confidential business information in respect of a controlled product; such disclosure would otherwise be required under the provisions of the Hazardous Products Act.

Claimant

Product Identifier (As shown on the MSDS)

Subject of the Claim for Exemption

Registry Number

Weatherford, Calgary, Alberta

PChem™ BS 648

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9004

Weatherford, Calgary, Alberta

PChem™ IS 48

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9005

Stepan Company, Northfield, Illinois

AGENT 4902-018A

Chemical identity of three ingredients.

9006

Engenium Chemicals Corporation, Calgary, Alberta

HydroCOR

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9007

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

RESOLV® VX10853

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9008

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M ™ Liquid Pavement Making 5050 Part B

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9009

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M™ ADHESION PROMOTER

Chemical identity of three ingredients.

9010

Afton Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia

HiTEC 335 Performance Additive

Chemical identity of seven ingredients.

9011

Momentive Performance Materials, Markham, Ontario

SAG* 770 foam control agent

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9012

Momentive Performance Materials, Markham, Ontario

Niax* catalyst EF-350

Chemical identity of two ingredients.

9013

Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations, Calgary, Alberta

MaxPerm-20A

Chemical identity of two ingredients.

9014

Dow Chemical Canada ULC, Calgary, Alberta

XUR201300673-10

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9015

Hydro Technologies (Canada) Inc., Québec, Quebec

HY BRITE®RBC-8000

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients.

9017

Cleansorb Ltd., Guildford, Surrey

ACIDGEN FG2

Chemical identity of two ingredients.

9018

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

NALCO® ASP560

Chemical identity of four ingredients.

9019

Afton Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia

POLARTECH® 6000 P BASE

Chemical identity of five ingredients.

9020

Calfrac Well Services Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

DWP-222

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9021

Calfrac Well Services Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

DWP-232

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients.

9022

Afton Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia

HiTEC® 6606 Fuel Additive

Chemical identity of three ingredients.

9023

Afton Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia

NEMO 1126

Chemical identity of three ingredients.

9024

Bio-Lab Canada Inc., West Hill, Ontario

GUARDEX® SHIMMER®

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9025

Univar Canada Ltd., Richmond, British Columbia

TOLONATE X FLO 100

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9026

DuPont Electronic Technologies-MCM, Raleigh, North Carolina

5029

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9027

DuPont Electronic Technologies-MCM, Raleigh, North Carolina

PE825

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9028

Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugarland, Texas

SULFIX™ 9617 SCAVENGER

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9029

Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugarland, Texas

EnviroSweet™ WCW7745

Chemical identity of two ingredients.

9030

Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugarland, Texas

TOLAD™ 9704 ADDITIVE

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9031

Chevron Oronite Company LLC, Bellaire, Texas

LUBAD 1761

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9032

Calfrac Well Services Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

DWP-126

Chemical identity of two ingredients.

9033

Dow Corning Corporation, Midland, Michigan

DOW CORNING® WG-9010 OPTICAL ADHESIVE

Chemical identity of three ingredients.

9034

Win Chemicals Ltd., Burlington, Ontario

JK-50

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9035

Win Manuco Ltd, Burlington, Ontario

LFQ

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients.

9036

Win Manuco Ltd, Burlington, Ontario

eQi

Chemical identity and concentration of five ingredients.

9037

Cansolv Technologies Inc., Montréal, Quebec

Cansolv ™ Absorbent DC-103 Concentrate

Chemical identity of three ingredients.

9038

DuPont Electronic Technologies-MCM, Raleigh, North Carolina

BQ311

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9039

Advanced Refining Technologies LLC, Columbia, Maryland

ICR 512

Chemical identity of two ingredients.

9040

Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugarland, Texas

Hi-M-PACT ™ 5557 KHI Hydrate Inhibitor

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9043

Champion Technologies Ltd. Calgary, Alberta

Flotron® M-300

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients.

9044

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

SPEC-AID 8Q7501ULS

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9045

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

SPEC-AID 8Q5373ULS

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9046

Hydro Technologies (Canada) Inc., Québec, Quebec

HY BRITE® CBR-1308

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients.

9047

Trican Well Service Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

WXB-16

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9048

Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugarland, Texas

CRO2032X CORROSION INHIBITOR

Chemical identity of five ingredients.

9049

BASF Canada Inc., Mississauga, Ontario

Pluracoat® Performa CF 20

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9050

Akzo Nobel Surface Chemistry LLC, Chicago, Illinois

Redicote® AP-1

Chemical identity and concentration of five ingredients.

9051

Akzo Nobel Surface Chemistry LLC, Chicago, Illinois

Armohib C1-31

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients.

9052

Afton Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia

POLARTECH AMIDE MA 550 DT

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9053

Afton Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia

Cutsol

Chemical identity of four ingredients.

9054

Afton Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia

PETROMIX FC-M

Chemical identity of five ingredients.

9055

Afton Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia

CUTSOL HD

Chemical identity of four ingredients.

9056

Bio-Lab Canada Inc., West Hill, Ontario

OMNI® SHIMMER®

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9057

E.I. DuPont Canada Company, Mississauga, Ontario

Capstone® FS-35

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9058

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

DESMOLUX® VPLS 2265 radiation curing resins

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9059

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

DESMOLUX® U 200 radiation curing resins

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9060

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

DESMOLUX® U 100 radiation curing resins

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9061

Allnex Canada Inc., (c/o Goodmans, LLP), Toronto, Ontario

DESMOLUX® D 100 radiation curing resins

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9062

Multi-Chem Production Chemicals Co., Calgary, Alberta

MC MX 5-3504

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9063

Stepan Company, Northfield, Illinois

AGENT 150-S24

Chemical identity of two ingredients.

9064

Stepan Company, Northfield, Illinois

PETROSTEP S-1 HA

Chemical identity of two ingredients.

9065

Stepan Company, Northfield, Illinois

AGENT 150-S23

Chemical identity of two ingredients.

9066

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Nalco® EC6790A

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9067

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

FR-66

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients.

9068

Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas

CL-23 Crosslinker

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9069

Calfrac Well Services Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

DWP-134

Chemical identity and concentration of three ingredients.

9070

Trican Well Service Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

Mudwash

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients.

9071

Trican Well Service Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

MWC-2

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients.

9072

Construction DJL Inc., Carignan, Quebec

Polytech ET1

Chemical identity and concentration of three ingredients.

9073

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

PROSWEET S1790

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9074

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

SPEC-AID 8Q206ULS

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9075

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

SPEC-AID 8Q213C

Chemical identity and concentration of three ingredients.

9076

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

SPEC-AID 8Q206S ULS

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9077

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

SPEC-AID 8Q107ULS

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9078

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

SPEC-AID 8Q5151ULS

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9079

GE Water & Process Technologies Canada, Oakville, Ontario

PROSWEET S-1791

Chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients.

9080

Quadra Chemicals Ltd., Vaudreuil-Dorion, Quebec

JEFFTREAT® M510D

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9081

Quadra Chemicals Ltd., Vaudreuil-Dorion, Quebec

JEFFTREAT® MS-300 50/50

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9082

Quadra Chemicals Ltd., Vaudreuil-Dorion, Quebec

JEFFTREAT® MS-300

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9083

Quadra Chemicals Ltd., Vaudreuil-Dorion, Quebec

JEFFTREAT® M510E

Chemical identity and concentration of one ingredient.

9084

BASF Canada Inc., Mississauga, Ontario

TINUVIN XT 850 GRANULES

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9085

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M™Scotch-Weld™ Low Odour Acrylic Adhesive DP8810NS, Off-white, Part A

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9086

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M™Scotch-Weld™ Low Odour Acrylic Adhesive DP8810NS, Green, Part A

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9087

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M™Scotch-Weld™ Low Odour Acrylic Adhesive DP8805NS, Green, Part A

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9088

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M™Scotch-Weld™ Low Odour Acrylic Adhesive DP8405NS, Green, Part A

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9089

Weatherford, Calgary, Alberta

PE 810

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9090

Weatherford, Calgary, Alberta

HGA-70

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9091

ECO-TEC Inc., Pickering, Ontario

ECO BRINE-XLH

Chemical identity of two ingredients.

9092

Hach Company, Ames, Iowa

Amino Acid F Reagent

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9093

Hach Company, Ames, Iowa

Amino Acid F Reagent Powder for Analyzers

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9094

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

NALCO® 73801WR

Chemical identity of two ingredients.

9095

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

NALCO® DVS3C005

Chemical identity of one ingredient.

9096

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

EC1447WR CORROSION

Chemical identity of four ingredients.

9097

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

3D TRASAR® 3DT197

Chemical identity of two ingredients.

9098

[4-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

BOARDS OF TRADE ACT

La Chambre de commerce de Ville-Marie

Notice is hereby given that His Excellency the Governor General in Council, by Order in Council dated October 24, 2013, has been pleased to change the name of La Chambre de commerce de Ville-Marie to the Chambre de commerce Témis-Accord and to change its boundaries to Angliers, Béarn, Duhamel-Ouest, Fugèreville, Laforce, Latulipe, Gaboury, Laverlochère, Lorrainville, Moffet, Saint-Bruno-de-Guigues, Saint-Édouard-de-Fabre, the unorganized territory of Laniel and the cities of Belleterre and Ville-Marie upon petition made therefor under sections 4 and 39 of the Boards of Trade Act.

January 6, 2014

MARCIE GIROUARD
Director
For the Minister of Industry

[4-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Supplementary letters patent

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of the Canada Corporations Act, supplementary letters patent have been issued to

File No.

Name of Company

Date of S.L.P.

021724-7

THE CANADIAN SOCIETY OF BIOENGINEERING/ LA SOCIÉTÉ CANADIENNE DE GÉNIE AGROALIMENTAIRE ET DE BIOINGÉNIERIE

29/11/2013

777686-1

THREE TO BE

16/12/2013

January 16, 2014

MARCIE GIROUARD
Director
For the Minister of Industry

[4-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Supplementary letters patent — Name change

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of the Canada Corporations Act, supplementary letters patent have been issued to

File No.

Old Name of Company

New Name of Company

Date of S.L.P.

438106-8

Abilities Arts Festival: A Celebration of Disability Arts and Culture

Tangled Art + Disability

09/12/2013

034796-5

CANADIAN KODOKAN BLACK BELT ASSOCIATION

JUDO CANADA

10/12/2013

443306-8

Juridiction canadienne du Droit Humain/ Droit Humain Canadian Jurisdiction

Fédération canadienne du Droit Humain

20/12/2013

264774-5

Social Investment Organization Association pour l’Investissement Responsable

RESPONSIBLE INVESTMENT ASSOCIATION ASSOCIATION POUR L’INVESTISSEMENT RESPONSABLE

03/12/2013

429783-1

THE ULTRAMAR FOUNDATION/ LA FONDATION ULTRAMAR

VALERO ENERGY FOUNDATION OF CANADA / FONDATION ÉNERGIE VALERO DU CANADA

01/01/2014

January 16, 2014

MARCIE GIROUARD
Director
For the Minister of Industry

[4-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

COMPETITION ACT

Revised Competition Act pre-merger notification transaction-size threshold for 2014

Pursuant to subsection 110(8) of the Competition Act, I hereby determine that the amount for the year 2014, for the purposes of any of subsections 110(2) to (6) of the Competition Act, is 82 million dollars.

JAMES MOORE
Minister of Industry

[4-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SLPB-001-14 — Licensing Framework for Broadband Radio Service (BRS) — 2500 MHz Band

The intent of this notice is to announce the release of the document entitled Licensing Framework for Broadband Radio Service (BRS) — 2500 MHz Band, which sets out decisions with respect to the auction process for spectrum licences in the 2500 MHz band. In particular, the document announces the decisions related to the licensing process, the auction format and the auction rules, as well as the conditions of licence applicable to the 2500 MHz band.

This document (hereinafter referred to as the Framework) is the result of the consultation process initiated through Notice DGSO-004-12, Consultation on a Licensing Framework for Broadband Radio Service (BRS) — 2500 MHz Band published in the Canada Gazette, and of the policy decisions announced in March 2012 in Industry Canada’s Policy and Technical Framework: Mobile Broadband Services (MBS) — 700 MHz Band, Broadband Radio Service (BRS) — 2500 MHz Band (SMSE-002-12).

Clarification questions

Industry Canada will accept written questions seeking clarification of the rules and policies set out in the Framework. Written questions will be accepted until April 28, 2014. Every effort will be made to post the questions received, along with Industry Canada’s responses, by August 18, 2014, depending on the volume of questions received. Any answers provided to these questions will be considered as clarification of the policies set out in the abovementioned SMSE-002-12 document, and as amendments or supplements to the rules set out in the Framework.

Questions should be submitted in electronic format (Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF) to the following email address: spectrum.auctions@ic.gc.ca.

Written questions should be addressed to the Manager, Auction Operations, Spectrum Licensing Policy Branch, Industry Canada, 235 Queen Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H5.

All questions should cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, the publication date, the title and the notice reference number (SLPB-001-14). Questions and responses will be posted on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum by the date specified above.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html. Printed copies of the Canada Gazette can be ordered by telephoning the sales counter of Publishing and Depository Services at 613-941-5995 or 1-800635-7943.

January 10, 2014

FIONA GILFILLAN
Director General
Spectrum Licensing Policy Branch

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NOTICE OF VACANCY

CANADIAN POLAR COMMISSION

Chairperson and Chief Executive Officer (part-time)

The Arctic is emerging as a new focus for intense economic, political, and scientific engagement among both Arctic and non-Arctic nations. As early as 2015, the Arctic Ocean could be seasonally ice-free, opening a whole new frontier for natural resource development and transportation, but potentially accelerating global climate change. The opportunities — and challenges — for Canada and the world are enormous.

The Government has brought forward an integrated Northern Strategy focused on four pillars: strengthening Canada’s sovereignty in the North, protecting our environmental heritage, promoting economic and social development, and improving and devolving governance. Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) leads the development and implementation of this Northern Strategy on behalf of the federal government.

Established in 1991 as a departmental corporation within AANDC’s portfolio and mandated to promote the development and dissemination of knowledge in respect of the polar regions, the Canadian Polar Commission is well placed to provide advice to the Minister related to the Northern Strategy.

The Canadian Polar Commission is tasked, therefore, with providing research and advice to the Minister on key topics related to the Government’s Northern Strategy.

The Chairperson, as Chief Executive Officer, is responsible for planning, administering, monitoring, and evaluating the main activities of the Canadian Polar Commission. The Chairperson directs and manages the Commission’s activities and meetings; provides corporate leadership in the formulation, interpretation, and communication of broad corporate long-range principles, policies, and objectives; and ensures the effective and economic management of human, financial, and material resources.

The ideal candidate will have a degree from a recognized university or a combination of equivalent education, job-related training and/or experience. He/she will have executive level experience, including the management of financial and human resources, as well as experience in strategic planning and managing organizational change to promote improved organizational governance and performance. The ideal candidate would have experience in building and maintaining productive and effective relationships with diverse stakeholders, in addition to working with government officials and working on Northern issues. Experience working in the North as well as working with, or for, international organizations would be considered assets.

The preferred candidate would have knowledge of the mandate, operations, and public policy role of the Commission as well as the legislative framework in which it operates. He/she will have knowledge of the federal government’s Northern Strategy and how the Commission can assist in meeting the objectives and priorities of that Strategy. In addition, knowledge of the key players, organizations, issues and events in the Arctic, both domestically and internationally, is desired. Knowledge of the operations of the federal government, including those related to sound governance and management principles, accountability and transparency is desired.

The ideal candidate would have the ability to provide excellent management, leadership and the vision necessary to ensure the realization of the strategic direction of the Commission. He/she would possess the ability to analyze complex situations in order to develop strategies, provide professional and sound advice, and make suitable decisions, while anticipating their short- and long-term impact. He/she will be able to interact and work effectively and constructively with individuals from diverse sectors and cultural backgrounds, as well as establish credibility and influence with international and Aboriginal organizations, territorial and federal governments, the international polar community, and key stakeholders, in order to advance the goals of the Commission and polar knowledge in Canada. The ideal candidate will possess superior communication skills both orally and in writing, and the ability to act as the Commission’s spokesperson in dealing with stakeholders, media, governments, and other organizations on a national and international level.

Along with superior interpersonal skills, the ideal candidate would possess sound judgement, strong ethical standards and integrity, be diplomatic and flexible, and be a strategic and innovative leader.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred. Familiarity with Aboriginal languages of the North would be considered an asset.

Full-time employees in the federal public administration are not eligible to be appointed as members of the Board.

Persons appointed to the Board must have knowledge or experience that will assist the Commission in the furtherance of its purpose having regard to the ethnic, linguistic and regional diversity of Canada’s polar regions.

In addition to being available for approximately 50 days per year for Board and Committee activities and related travel both nationally and internationally, the chosen candidate will also be required to travel to the Commission’s annual meetings which will be held across Canada — half of these north of 60° north latitude.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Officer Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/index.asp?lang=eng.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the organization and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.polarcom.gc.ca/eng.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by February 10, 2014, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancy will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services Canada, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

[4-1-o]

  • Footnote 1
    The Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 2
    The Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.