Vol. 147, No. 48 — November 30, 2013

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Guidelines for the Reduction of Dyes Released from Pulp and Paper Mills

Whereas MAPBAP acetate is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a Screening Assessment concluded that MAPBAP acetate meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

Whereas MAPBAP acetate is a substance specified on the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas, pursuant to subsection 91(1) of the Act, the Minister of the Environment published in the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, on July 14, 2012, the Guidelines for the Reduction of Dyes Released from Pulp and Paper Mills for the risk management of MAPBAP acetate, and the interested persons had the opportunity to present their comments or file a notice of objections requesting that a board of review be established;

Whereas, pursuant to subsection 92(1) of the Act, the Guidelines for the Reduction of Dyes Released from Pulp and Paper Mills shall be made, and published in the Canada Gazette within 18 months after the publication of that proposed regulation or instrument under subsection 91(1),

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 54(1) of the Act, is pleased to issue the annexed Guidelines for the Reduction of Dyes Released from Pulp and Paper Mills.

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

Guidelines for the Reduction of Dyes Released from Pulp and Paper Mills

Foreword

The Minister of the Environment issued the Guidelines for the Reduction of Dyes Released from Pulp and Paper Mills under subsection 54(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to limit dye quantities released in final effluent.

The Minister of the Environment recommends that the appropriate regulatory agency adopt the annexed Guidelines as baseline standards for the levels of dyes released from pulp and paper mills. However, local conditions, such as density of industrial development, topography and other environmental considerations, may necessitate the adoption of more stringent requirements than those suggested in these Guidelines. Ongoing advances in reduction strategies and in technology should also be taken into account.

Definitions

1. The following definitions apply in these Guidelines:

“MAPBAP acetate”: means a cationic dye (basic) with the chemical name Methylium, [4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]bis[4-(ethylamino)-3-methylphenyl]-acetate, Chemical Abstracts Service (see footnote 1) (CAS) Registry Number 72102-55-7. (MAPBAP acétate)

“Mill”: means a plant that produces pulp, paper, paperboard, hardboard, insulating or building board. (fabrique)

“Operator”: means a person who operates, has control or custody of or is in charge of a mill. (exploitant)

“Paper product”: means paper, coated paper, paperboard, hardboard, boxboard, linerboard, insulating board, building board, corrugating medium, tissue, moulded cellulose product and any other product directly derived from pulp. (produit de papier)

“Primary treatment”: means the settlement tanks that partly remove solid and organic material from pulp and paper mill wastewater and produce outputs in the form of primary sludge and scum. (traitement primaire)

“Pulp”: means processed cellulose fibres that are derived from wood, other plant material or recycled paper products. (pâte)

“Retention”: means the percentage (%) by mass of the MAPBAP acetate bonded to pulp or paper products. (rétention)

“Secondary containment”: means containment that prevents liquids that leak from a storage tank system from reaching outside the containment area and includes double-walled tanks, piping, liners or impermeable barriers. (confinement secondaire)

Scope

2. These Guidelines apply to a mill that uses at least one of the dyes listed in Appendix 1. The Guidelines set out standards and good practices to observe in order to limit dye quantities released in final effluent.

The standards and good practices set out in these Guidelines may be observed using currently available knowledge, methods and technologies from the supplier of these substances as well as from the pulp and paper industry.

Performance guidelines

3. The retention of dyes used in the pulp and paper process that are subject to these Guidelines should respect the standards set out in Appendix 1.

3.1. The removal of solids in the primary wastewater treatment system, which allows for dye removal by adsorption, should respect the standards set out in Appendix 1.

3.2. A containment plan should be in place to prevent the release of dyes into the environment or an effluent treatment system during the storage (for example, fixed supply tank, tote, drum or any other container), handling and disposal of dye.

3.2.1. A secondary containment should be configured with a capacity equal to or greater than

— 110% of the capacity of the tank if there is only one tank; or

— 100% of the capacity of the largest tank plus 10% of the aggregate capacity of all other tanks.

3.2.2. A method for the collection or recirculation of dye should be in place before the purge of dye from equipment, piping or tank containing dyes in order to prevent the release of dye into water.

Declaration of the operator

4. The operator of a mill that is subject to these Guidelines should inform in writing the Minister of the Environment of the intention to implement the Guidelines no later than six months after the final publication of the Guidelines or six months after the initial dye use. The Minister of the Environment should also be notified, in writing, if the operator permanently ceases to use the dye. (see footnote 2)

Monitoring

5. The operator of a mill subject to these Guidelines should measure annually whether activities are carried out in conformity with the standards specified in Appendix 1 and should record the quantity of the dye released into the environment or to an effluent treatment system during its storage, handling or disposal.

Report

6. The operator of a mill that is subject to the Guidelines should provide a report to the Minister of the Environment that includes the following:

— The name and civic address of the mill.

— The name, title, telephone and email address of the operator.

— The quantity of dyes subject to these Guidelines used during the previous calendar year.

— Results of the tests referred to in the Monitoring section, the date of testing, and the method for determining dye retention, if different from that proposed in Appendix 3.

— The quantity of dyes subject to these Guidelines released to the environment or to an effluent treatment system as a result of its storage, handling or disposal during the previous calendar year.

The operator should provide the first report to the Minister of the Environment three years after the final publication of these Guidelines. Subsequently, an annual report would only be sent if the standards of Appendix 1 were not respected or if at least one of the dyes subject to these Guidelines were released to the environment or to an effluent treatment system as a result of the storage, handling or disposal of dye for that calendar year. (see footnote 3)

Record keeping

7. The operator of a mill that is subject to these Guidelines should keep a record of all relevant information and documents including test data for a period of at least five years beginning on the date of their creation. The record should be available to the Minister of the Environment on request.

Appendix 1: Standards

Substance

Minimum retention in final paper products (see footnote 4)

Solids removal efficiency by
the wastewater primary
treatment system (see footnote 5)

MAPBAP acetate (CAS No. 72102-55-7)

90%

75%

Appendix 2: Calculation of solids removal efficiency by the primary treatment system

Detailed information can be found in the surrounding text

Where

ESS = solids removal efficiency (%)

SSo = solids concentration at the outlet of the primary treatment system (mg/L)

SSI = solids concentration at the inlet of the primary treatment system (mg/L)

Note: The sampling should be conducted while the primary treatment system is stable and the mill is in operation.

Appendix 3: Proposed method for measuring dye retention on fibres

Equipment

— Spectrophotometer

— Fibreglass filter paper (1.5-mm nominal porosity)

— Deionized water

— Büchner vacuum flask

— Magnetic stirrer hot plate

— Beakers

— Graduated cylinder

— Analytical balance measuring to at least four decimal places (g)

— Pipettes

— pH meter

— Conductivity meter

Products

— Dye to be tested

— Fresh, undyed (never dried) pulp

Procedure

1. Preparation of dye solution

a. Dilute the dye to 0.2 g/L (Ci) with deionized water.

2. Use the spectrophotometer to determine the maximum absorption wavelength and develop a “concentration-absorbance” curve using that value. Establish the minimum dye concentration that can be measured with this instrument (minimum measurable value).

3. Pulp retention measure

a. Dilute 2.00 g of dry pulp in deionized water until you achieve a 1% consistency.

b. Agitate at 50°C for two minutes or until no fibre flocs remain.

c. Filter with the Büchner and filter paper and keep the filtrate in a beaker.

d. Measure the filtrate absorbance (A int) at the wavelength established in Step 2 in order to estimate the interference caused by suspended solids and the filtrate colour.

e. Measure the quantity of dry pulp on the filter paper.

f. Calculate the pulp retention. A 99% minimum value is required to minimize interference with the absorption measure. For lower retention, increase the quantity of pulp or use a lower-porosity fibreglass filter.

4. Dye retention measure

a. Weigh 2.00 g of dry pulp.

b. Add 180 ml of deionized water.

c. Add 20 ml of the dye solution (Vi) to the pulp to obtain a concentration of 0.002 g pure dye/g dry pulp.

  • The final consistency of the pulp should be 1%.

d. Agitate at 50°C for two minutes or until no fibre flocs remain.

e. Filter with the Büchner and filter paper.

f. Measure the filtrate volume (Vf).

g. Measure the filtrate absorbance (Af).

h. Calculate the corrected absorbance (A corr) = Af – A int (from Step 3d).

i. Calculate the dye concentration in the filtrate (Cf) with the “concentration-absorbance” curve (Step 2), using the corrected absorbance (A corr).

j. Calculate the quantity of (pure) dye in the filtrate (Df) = Vf × Cf [g].

k. Calculate the initial quantity of (pure) dye (Di) = Vi × Ci [g].

l. Measure the pH and conductivity of the filtrate (for reference only).

m. Calculate the dye retention = (Di – Df) / Di × 100%.

n. Repeat Step 4 twice. Record the mean retention, pH and conductivity.

Notes

a. The initial dye quantity per gram of pulp used is based on the hypothesis that the lowest value the spectrophotometer can measure in the filtrate is 1 ppm of dye and that the dye retention is approximately 90%. The quantity of dye may need to be adjusted should these hypotheses not apply.

b. Instruments used should be calibrated.

c. Results should be presented to the appropriate significant decimal places.

d. The minimum measurable value of the instruments should be determined.

e. If a measurement falls below the minimum measurable value for an instrument, then the minimum measurable value should be used or reported.

f. Factors that may affect dye retention include conductivity (salts), temperature, pH, quantity of anionic trash in water, pulp type, dye type, pulp consistency, and initial concentration.

Appendix 4: Operator Declaration Form on the Implementation of the Guidelines for the Reduction of Dyes Released from Pulp and Paper Mills

This form may be used as a template to show conformance to section 4 “Operator Declaration” of the Guidelines.

Name and civic address of the mill:

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

Declaration:

checkbox Our mill is not using any of the substances subject to the Guidelines for the reduction of dyes released from pulp and paper mill.

checkbox Our mill will not be using any of the substances subject to the Guidelines for the reduction of dyes released from pulp and paper mill starting (year/month/day) ________________.

checkbox Our mill currently uses at least one of the substances subject to the Guidelines for the reduction of dyes released from pulp and paper mill and we plan to comply with the Guidelines.

checkbox Our mill does not plan to comply with the Guidelines for the reduction of dyes released from pulp and paper mill.

_________________________________

Operator name (print)

_________________________________

Operator title

_________________________________

Telephone

_________________________________

Email

_________________________________

Operator signature

_________________________________

Date of signature

Please return this form to

Director
Forest Products and Fisheries Act Division
Environment Canada
351 Saint-Joseph Boulevard, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3
Email: MAPBAP@ec.gc.ca

Appendix 5: Conformity Evaluation Form of the Guidelines for the Reduction of Dyes Released from Pulp and Paper Mills

This form may be used as a template to show conformance to section 6 “Report” of the Guidelines.

Name and civic address of the mill:

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

Period covered by the report: from ___________________ to ___________________

Conformity evaluation of the substances subject to the Guidelines:

Name of the substance

CAS No.

Amount used (kg)

Retention in final paper product (see footnote 6)

Solids removal efficiency by the wastewater primary treatment system

Containment plan in place (yes/no)

Environmental release (yes/no). If yes, specify the amount (kg of the substance).

             
             
             

I declare this report to be accurate and complete.

_________________________________

Operator name (print)

_________________________________

Operator title

_________________________________

Telephone

_________________________________

Email

_________________________________

Operator signature

_________________________________

Date of signature

Please return this form to

Director
Forest Products and Fisheries Act Division
Environment Canada
351 Saint-Joseph Boulevard, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3
Email: MAPBAP@ec.gc.ca

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Ministerial Condition No. 17312

Ministerial Condition

[Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999]

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information pertaining to the substance benzene, 1,1′-(1-Methylethylidene)bis[3,5-dibromo-4-(2,3-dibromopropoxy)-, Chemical Abstracts Service No. 21850-44-2, under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

And whereas the ministers suspect that the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

The Minister of the Environment, pursuant to paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, hereby permits the manufacture or import of the substance in accordance with the conditions of the following annex.

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Conditions

[Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999]

1. The following definitions apply in these ministerial conditions:

“notifier” means the person who has, on July 24, 2013, provided to the Minister of the Environment the prescribed information concerning the substance, in accordance with subsection 81(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

“substance” means the substance benzene, 1,1′-(1-Methylethylidene)bis[3,5-dibromo-4-(2,3dibromopropoxy)-, Chemical Abstracts Service No. 21850-44-2.

“waste” includes effluents resulting from rinsing transport vessels and containers that contained the substance.

2. The notifier may manufacture or import the substance in accordance with the present ministerial conditions.

Restriction

3. The notifier may manufacture or import the substance to use it only as a flame retardant additive in polymer matrices in

  • (a) electrical equipment;

  • (b) airbags;

  • (c) automotive textiles; or

  • (d) flex-duct insulation.

4. The notifier may also transfer its physical possession or control to a person who will use it only as described in item 3.

5. At least 120 days prior to beginning the manufacture of the substance in Canada, the notifier shall inform the Minister of the Environment, in writing, and provide the following information:

  • (a) the information specified in paragraph 7(a) of Schedule 4 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);

  • (b) the address of the manufacturing facility within Canada;

  • (c) the information specified in paragraphs 8(a) to (d), item 9 and paragraph 10(b) of Schedule 5 to those Regulations;

  • (d) a brief description of the manufacturing process that details the reactants used, reaction stoichiometry, batch or continuous nature of the process, and scale of the process;

  • (e) a flow diagram of the manufacturing process that includes features such as process tanks, holding tanks and distillation towers; and

  • (f) a brief description of the major steps in manufacturing operations, the chemical conversions, the points of entry of all reactants and the points of release of the substance, and the processes to eliminate environmental release.

Handling and Disposal of the Substance

6. The notifier or the person to whom the substance has been transferred must

  • (a) thoroughly rinse any containers or transportation vessels that contained the substance and dispose of rinsates in accordance with subparagraph (b)(i) or (ii); and

  • (b) destroy or dispose of any waste, any containers and any transportation vessels that contained the substance and that are not rinsed in accordance with paragraph (a) in the following manner:

    • (i) incinerate them in accordance with the laws of the jurisdiction where the disposal facility is located; or

    • (ii) deposit them in a secure landfill in accordance with the laws of the jurisdiction where the landfill is located.

Environmental Release

7. Where any release of the substance to the environment occurs, the person who has the physical possession or control of the substance shall immediately take all measures necessary to prevent any further release and to limit the dispersion of the substance. Furthermore, the person shall, as soon as possible in the circumstances, inform the Minister of the Environment by contacting an enforcement officer designated under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

Record-keeping Requirements

8. (1) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records, with any documentation supporting the validity of the information contained in these records, indicating

  • (a) the use of the substance;

  • (b) the quantity of the substance that the notifier manufactures, imports, purchases, sells and uses;

  • (c) the name and address of each person to whom the notifier transfers the physical possession or control of the substance; and

  • (d) the name and address of the person in Canada who has destroyed or disposed of waste, containers or transportation vessels for the notifier and the method used to do so.

(2) The notifier shall maintain the electronic or paper records mentioned in subsection (1) at the notifier’s principal place of business in Canada, or at the principal place of business in Canada of a representative of that person, for a period of at least five years after they are made.

Other Requirements

9. The notifier shall inform any person to whom they transfer the possession or control of the substance, in writing, of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. The notifier shall obtain, prior to the transfer, written confirmation from this person that they were informed of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. This written confirmation shall be maintained at the notifier’s principal place of business in Canada, or at the principal place of business in Canada of a representative of that person, for a period of at least five years from the day it was received.

Coming into Force

10. These ministerial conditions come into force on November 18, 2013.

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of substances — Phenol, 4,4′-(1-methylethylidene) bis[2,6-dibromo- (tetrabromobisphenol A, CAS RN 79-94-7) and two derivative substances, Ethanol, 2,2′-[(1-methylethylidene)bis[(2,6-dibromo-4,1-phenylene)oxy]]bis (tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether), CAS RN 4162-45-2) and Benzene, 1,1′-(1-methylethylidene)bis[3,5-dibromo-4-(2-propenyloxy)- (tetrabromobisphenol A bis(allyl ether), CAS RN 25327-89-3) — specified on the Domestic Substances List [subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999]

Whereas tetrabromobisphenol A, tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) and tetrabromobisphenol A bis(allyl ether) are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the Screening Assessment Report conducted on tetrabromobisphenol A, tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) and tetrabromobisphenol A bis(allyl ether) pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that tetrabromobisphenol A, tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) and tetrabromobisphenol A bis(allyl ether) do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to take no further action on the substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment
RONA AMBROSE
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Screening Assessment Report on Tetrabromobisphenol A, Tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) and Tetrabromobisphenol A bis(allyl ether)

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Phenol, 4,4′-(1-methylethylidene) bis[2,6-dibromo-, commonly known as tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (see footnote 7) [CAS RN] 79-94-7) and two derivative substances — Ethanol, 2,2′-[(1-methylethylidene)bis[(2,6-dibromo-4,1-phenylene)oxy]]bis, commonly known as TBBPA bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) [CAS RN 4162-45-2] and Benzene, 1,1′(1-methylethylidene)bis[3,5-dibromo-4-(2-propenyloxy)-, also called TBBPA bis(allyl ether) [CAS RN 25327-89-3]. These substances were identified in the categorization of the Domestic Substances List (DSL) as priorities for screening assessment as they met the criteria for persistence and inherent toxicity to non-human organisms. TBBPA was determined to present an intermediate potential for exposure to individuals in Canada.

Globally, TBBPA and its derivatives are predominantly anthropogenic, and TBBPA is the highest selling brominated flame retardant, with world market production over 120 000 tonnes in 2001 and over 170 000 tonnes in 2004, and future production will likely increase. TBBPA is incorporated into polymers as a reactive or additive flame retardant for use in flame-retarded epoxy and polycarbonate resins and, to a lesser extent, in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resins and phenolic resins. A major usage of flame-retarded epoxy resins containing TBBPA is in rigid epoxy-laminated printed circuit boards; other uses include glass-reinforced construction panels, motor housings and terminal boards. Applications of flame-retarded polycarbonate resins include communications and electronics equipment, appliances, transportation devices, sports and recreation equipment, lighting fixtures and signs. ABS resins containing TBBPA are used in automotive parts, pipes and fittings, refrigerators and other appliances, business machines and telephones. TBBPA is also used in the production of derivative substances which are used in specialty or niche applications. TBBPA bis(allyl ether) is a reactive and additive flame retardant used in expanded polystyrene foams and adhesives. TBBPA bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) is used as an additive flame retardant in engineering polymers, epoxy resins, thermoset and thermoplastic polyesters, polyurethane, laminates for electronic circuit boards, and adhesives and coatings.

Results from an industry survey conducted for the year 2000 indicated that, although TBBPA was not manufactured in Canada in that year, between 100 and 1 000 tonnes were imported into Canada, including TBBPA in mixtures and products. Recent estimates suggest TBBPA imports into Canada remain in the 100 to 1 000 tonne range, including pure TBBPA, unreacted TBBPA in printed wire boards, and additive TBBPA in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and high impact polystyrene (HIPS) products. It is estimated that current import of TBBPA bis(allyl ether) to Canada is now in the range of 100 to 1 000 tonnes. However, there is no recent evidence that pure TBBPA bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) is imported into Canada.

Environment

The substance TBBPA is characterized by low to moderate water solubility, low vapour pressure, and a moderately high octanol/water partition coefficient which is dependent on ionization state and responsive to pH. When released into the environment, TBBPA will likely distribute into sediment and soil, binding to the organic fraction of particulate matter and to the lipid fraction of biota. Few measured data are available on the two TBBPA derivative substances; however, predictions based on modelled data suggest these substances have properties that can be related to and extrapolated from TBBPA.

Based on the empirical and modelled data, TBBPA meets the persistence criteria in water, soil, sediment and air as defined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations under CEPA 1999. Although the substance will degrade by processes of anaerobic and aerobic biodegradation, complete transformation in the environment has not been established. Its measured presence in remote Arctic regions suggests that the substance may be capable of being transported from its source to remote areas. TBBPA has been shown to degrade under anaerobic conditions to form bisphenol A. Bisphenol A has been determined to meet the criteria defined in section 64 of CEPA 1999. Based on the modelled data, TBBPA bis(allyl ether) and TBBPA bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) also meet persistence criteria for soil, water and sediment as defined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations, but they do not meet the criterion for air.

Empirical and modelled data indicate that TBBPA may accumulate to some degree in the tissues of biota, but does not meet the criteria for bioaccumulation as defined in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. Modelled data indicate that TBBPA bis(allyl ether) and TBBPA bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) also do not meet the bioaccumulation criteria.

The substance TBBPA is hazardous to a variety of aquatic organisms, with adverse effects on survival, reproduction and development at very low concentrations. Recent research suggests that TBBPA may be capable of disrupting normal functioning of the thyroid system in amphibians and fish, and enhancing immune system activity in marine bivalves. Modelled ecotoxicity endpoint concentrations for TBBPA bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) are similar to those predicted for TBBPA. For TBBPA bis(allyl ether), although most predicted aquatic ecotoxicity endpoints result in no effects at saturation, chronic toxicity is predicted at very low concentrations in the range of its water solubility.

Combustion of TBBPA under certain conditions may lead to the formation of brominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans. Small amounts of these compounds have been detected as impurities in TBBPA. These products are analogues of polychlorinated dibenzofurans and dibenzo-p-dioxins, two substances listed on Schedule 1 of CEPA 1999.

It is expected that TBBPA and TBBPA bis(allyl ether) may be released to the Canadian environment as a result of industrial processing activities, although there are very few measurements of these substances in the Canadian environment. TBBPA has been measured in all environmental media, with the highest concentrations being found in samples from urban and industrial areas. Generic industrial scenarios for the aquatic environment (which considered any available site information, including potential quantities of each substance used) were developed separately for each substance to provide estimates of exposure. Risk quotient analyses, integrating conservative estimates of exposure with ecotoxicity information, were performed for the aquatic, sediment and terrestrial compartments for TBBPA and TBBPA bis(allyl ether). These analyses showed that risk to organisms in Canada are unlikely.

A risk quotient analysis for TBBPA bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) was not conducted given its apparent lack of usage in Canada; the derivative substance may be considered to have low exposure potential and, therefore, to present a negligible risk to the Canadian environment.

Based on the information available, there is currently low risk of harm to organisms or the broader integrity of the environment from TBBPA, TBBPA bis(allyl ether) and TBBPA bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether). It is therefore concluded that TBBPA, TBBPA bis(allyl ether) and TBBPA bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) do not meet the criteria set out in paragraph 64(a) or 64(b) of CEPA 1999, as these substances are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Human health

Known sources of general population exposure to TBBPA are anthropogenic and include environmental media (ambient air, water, soil, sediment) and household dust, indoor air, human breast milk, food and products treated with TBBPA for its flame retardant properties. While most TBBPA is covalently bound within products, small quantities of the unreacted substance are available for migration and may be a potential source of exposure. Although the volatilization of TBBPA is low, there exists potential for offgassing from its presence in electronic components that become heated during operation as well as dust accumulated from those products.

In Canada, the highest derived upper-bounding estimate of exposure was for breast-fed infants. Hazard characterization of TBBPA was based primarily upon the assessment of the European Union, with more recent data taken into consideration. The critical effect for the characterization of risk to human health is liver toxicity observed in female offspring of mice following exposure to TBBPA in a reproductive toxicity study.

Based on the comparison of upper-bounding estimated intake of TBBPA for breast-fed infants and the critical effect for the characterization of risk to human health, it is considered that the resulting margins of exposure are adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

Sources of exposure for the two derivatives, TBBPA bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) and TBBPA bis(allyl ether), are also anthropogenic and include the same sources as that of TBBPA since the derivatives are used in the same manner. TBBPA bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) is an additive flame retardant and TBBPA bis(allyl ether) can be used as a reactive or additive flame retardant. When used in additive form, these substances are more likely to migrate out of the product and become a potential source of exposure. In the case of pure TBBPA bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether), given there is no confirmed use in Canada, any human exposure would likely result from the use of products containing this substance rather than the pure substance itself. Although data is limited to quantify the potential for migration of the derivatives and upper-bounding estimates of intake have not been derived, there is potential for exposure to both TBBPA and the two derivatives.

An upper-bounding estimated intake for TBBPA was derived which is expected to take into consideration any additional contribution to intake from the two derivatives. Similarly, the critical effect for the characterization of risk to human health was considered to represent hazard potential for TBBPA and the two derivatives. It is considered that the resulting margins of exposure are adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases for TBBPA and the two derivatives.

Based on the information in this screening assessment, it is concluded that TBBPA, TBBPA bis(allyl ether), and TBBPA bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) are not entering the environment in quantities or concentrations or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health; therefore, they do not meet the criteria set out in paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999.

Conclusion

Based on available information for environmental and human health considerations, it is concluded that tetrabromobisphenol A, tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) and tetrabromobisphenol A bis(allyl ether) do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

Although there is currently limited exposure in Canada to TBBPA and its concentrations currently in the environment are not indicative of harm to organisms in Canada, there may be concerns if new activities were to occur, including increased volume of manufacture, import or use, which may result in increased exposure to organisms in Canada. Therefore, options on how best to monitor changes in the use of this substance will be investigated, such as adding it to the National Pollutant Release Inventory and/or amending the Domestic Substances List to indicate that the Significant New Activity provisions apply with respect to this substance. Consequently new activities pertaining to the use, manufacture, or import would be notified and would undergo an ecological and human health risk assessment.

The screening assessment report conducted on tetrabromobisphenol A, tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) and tetrabromobisphenol A bis(allyl ether) is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www. chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE

CANADA–HONG KONG TAX AGREEMENT ACT, 2013

CANADA–POLAND TAX CONVENTION ACT, 2013

CANADA–SERBIA TAX CONVENTION ACT, 2013

TAX CONVENTIONS IMPLEMENTATION ACT, 2013

Coming into force of instruments

Notice is hereby given of the following:

  • (a) the entry into force on October 29, 2013, of the CanadaHong Kong Tax Agreement and its Protocol, which were signed on November 11, 2012, and were implemented in Canadian law by the Canada–Hong Kong Tax Agreement Act, 2013;

  • (b) the entry into force on October 30, 2013, of the CanadaPoland Tax Convention and its Protocol, which were signed on May 14, 2012, and were implemented in Canadian law by the Canada–Poland Tax Convention Act, 2013;

  • (c) the entry into force on October 31, 2013, of the CanadaSerbia Tax Convention and its Protocol, which were signed on April 27, 2012, and were implemented in Canadian law by the Canada–Serbia Tax Convention Act, 2013; and

  • (d) the entry into force on October 31, 2013, of the agreement concerning the interpretation of article 25 of the Convention Between the Government of Canada and the Swiss Federal Council for the Avoidance of Double Taxation with Respect to Taxes on Income and on Capital, done at Berne on 5 May 1997, as amended by the Protocol done at Berne on 22 October 2010, which agreement was done by an exchange of diplomatic notes completed on July 23, 2012, and was implemented in Canadian law by Part 6 of the Tax Conventions Implementation Act, 2013.

November 19, 2013

JAMES M. FLAHERTY
Minister of Finance

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Application for surrender of charter

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of subsection 32(2) of the Canada Corporations Act, an application for surrender of charter was received from

File No.

Name of Company

Received

444899-5

Chinese Traditional Culture Study Center

17/10/2013

446822-8

MCOUAT FAMILY FOUNDATION
FONDATION FAMILIALE MCOUAT

09/10/2013

789659-0

QUEEN’S INTERNATIONAL CONSULTING

15/11/2013

November 21, 2013

MARCIE GIROUARD
Director
For the Minister of Industry

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Supplementary letters patent

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of the Canada Corporations Act, supplementary letters patent have been issued to

File No.

Name of Company

Date of S.L.P.

455362-4

BANGLADESH CENTRE AND COMMUNITY SERVICES

10/09/2013

452166-8

BestCure Foundation

20/09/2013

337840-3

Brant Community Foundation

10/10/2013

452973-1

MASTOCYTOSIS SOCIETY CANADA
SOCIETE CANADIENNE DE LA MASTOCYTOSE

21/10/2013

November 21, 2013

MARCIE GIROUARD
Director
For the Minister of Industry

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Supplementary letters patent — Name change

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of the Canada Corporations Act, supplementary letters patent have been issued to

File No.

Old Name of Company

New Name of Company

Date of S.L.P.

369491-7

Association Québécoise du Lymphoedème/ Lymphedema Association of Québec

Association québécoise du lymphoedème (1999) / Lymphedema Association of Quebec (1999)

08/10/2013

439164-1

THE BRIAN K. MCWILLIAMS FOUNDATION

CHC Life Foundation

16/10/2013

073558-2

THE LONDON DISTRICT SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY FAIR INC.

Youth Science London

22/10/2013

November 21, 2013

MARCIE GIROUARD
Director
For the Minister of Industry

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY ACT

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-024-13 — Release of Radio Systems Policy RP-008, Policy Framework for Fixed-Satellite Service (FSS) and Broadcasting-Satellite Service (BSS), Issue 3, and Client Procedures Circular CPC-2-6-02, Licensing of Space Stations, Issue 3 (Provisional), and Lifting of the Moratorium on New Licence Applications for FSS and BSS in Canada

The purpose of this notice is to announce the release of RP-008, Policy Framework for Fixed-Satellite Service (FSS) and Broadcasting-Satellite Service (BSS), Issue 3, which has been broadened to include BSS, and CPC-2-6-02, Licensing of Space Stations, Issue 3. Both documents have been revised to reflect the results of Industry Canada’s consultation on satellite licensing, announced on November 5, 2013, through notice SMSE-006-13, Decisions on the Licensing Framework for Fixed-Satellite Service (FSS) and Broadcasting-Satellite Service (BSS), Implications for Other Satellite Services in Canada, and Revised Fee Proposal, published in the Canada Gazette. The use of both documents will become mandatory on January 6, 2014.

All satellite operators should note that the revised CPC-2-6-02 applies to all satellite licensing, including the mobile-satellite service, the amateur-satellite service and the space science satellite service. In some cases, this document introduces changes to existing processes. CPC-2-6-02, Issue 3, will be provisional for six months, to allow Industry Canada to gather feedback from applicants on any necessary clarifications or improvements to the document once it is in use.

In order to allow time for the industry to examine the new procedures prior to submitting applications, the moratorium on FSS and BSS licensing, which was imposed through notice SMSE-015-12, Moratorium on New Licence Applications for Fixed-Satellite Service (FSS) and Broadcasting-Satellite Service (BSS) in Canada, published in the Canada Gazette, remains in effect for the time being. The moratorium will, however, be lifted at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time on January 6, 2014. (see footnote 8) Any applications received during the first five minutes after the moratorium is lifted will be considered to have been received simultaneously. After the first five minutes, the permanent procedures will apply, as defined in CPC-2-6-02.

In the interim, Industry Canada will hold an information session with the FSS and BSS operators who are subject to the current moratorium, as well as FSS and BSS stakeholders, on November 29, 2013, from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., in Room 949A, 235 Queen Street, to answer questions. Questions should be submitted in advance, by November 26, 2013, and should be sent to satellitelicences@ic.gc.ca. Within the week following the information session, each interested operator will be permitted to submit a single mock application and the Department will provide feedback on whether the application meets the new assessment criteria, as well as feedback on how to address any deficiencies therein.

A second information session will be held later in January 2014 for all other satellite service operators and stakeholders who were not subject to the licensing moratorium. To request further information on either session, please send an email to satellitelicences@ic.gc.ca.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html. Printed copies of the Canada Gazette can be ordered by telephoning the sales counter of Publishing and Depository Services at 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

November 20, 2013

MARC DUPUIS
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following persons of the Sûreté du Québec as fingerprint examiners:

Brigitte Bédard

Pierre Bergeron

Pascal Bernier

Charles Camiré

Marco Cloutier

Michel Coté

Christian Coulombe

Carol De Champlain

Denis Desjardins

Robert Fortin

Patrick Gaucher

Caroline Jean

Marc Lacombe

Jacques Lafrance

Sylvain Larouche

Gérald Lemay

Jean-Olivier Lemay

Steven Montembeault

Pierre Pelletier

André Voyer

Ottawa, November 18, 2013

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Law Enforcement and Policing Branch

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following persons of the Sûreté du Québec as fingerprint examiners:

Lucien Lemay

Jean-Pierre Roy

Martin J. Veilleux

Richard Mathieu

Ottawa, November 18, 2013

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Law Enforcement and Policing Branch

[48-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA SHIPPING ACT, 2001

Western Canada Marine Response Corporation

Notice of an amendment to the fees charged by Western Canada Marine Response Corporation pursuant to an arrangement required by subsections 167(1) and 168(1) of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001

Description

Western Canada Marine Response Corporation (WCMRC) currently is a certified response organization pursuant to section 169 of the Act in respect of a rated capability of 10 000 tonnes and a geographic area covering the waters bordering British Columbia (including the shorelines associated with such waters) and excluding waters north of 60° north latitude.

Definitions

1. In this notice of fees,

“Act” means the Canada Shipping Act, 2001. (Loi)

“asphalt” means a derivate of oil that is commercially described as road or paving asphalt or unblended roofers flux, that has a specific gravity equal to or greater than one, that is solid at 15 degrees Celsius and that sinks to the bottom as a solid when immersed in water. (asphalte)

“BOCF” means bulk oil cargo fee. [droits sur les produits pétroliers en vrac (DPPV)]

“CALF” means capital asset/loan fee. [droits d’immobilisations et d’emprunt (DIE)]

“oil handling facility” means an oil handling facility that is prescribed pursuant to the Act and is located in WCMRC’s geographic area. (installation de manutention d’hydrocarbures)

“ship (bulk oil)” means a ship that is constructed or adapted primarily to carry bulk oil in its cargo spaces. [navire (avec produits pétroliers en vrac)]

Registration Fees

2. The registration fees that are payable to WCMRC in relation to an arrangement required by subsections 167(1) and 168(1) of the Act are the registration fees set out in Part Ⅰ of this notice.

PART I

3. In relation to an arrangement with WCMRC, the total registration fee payable by a prescribed oil handling facility shall be determined as set out in section 5 of this Part.

4. In relation to an arrangement with WCMRC, the total registration fee payable by a ship shall be determined as set out in section 6 of this Part.

5. The registration fee applicable in respect of the annual membership fees is six hundred and twenty dollars and zero cents ($620.00) per prescribed oil handling facility, plus all applicable taxes, from January 1, 2012.

6. The registration fee applicable in respect of the annual membership fees is six hundred and twenty dollars and zero cents ($620.00) per ship, plus all applicable taxes from January 1, 2012.

Bulk Oil Cargo Fees

7. The bulk oil cargo fees that are payable to WCMRC in relation to an arrangement required by subsections 167(1) and 168(1) of the Act are the bulk oil cargo fees set out in Part Ⅱ of this notice.

PART II

8. This part applies to the loading and unloading of oil within WCMRC’s Geographic Area of Response (GAR).

9. In relation to an arrangement with WCMRC, the total BOCF payable by a prescribed oil handling facility shall be determined by multiplying the total number of tonnes of bulk oil unloaded (and in the case of bulk oil intended for international destinations and destinations north of 60° north latitude loaded at the prescribed oil handling facility) by the BOCF per tonne for each type of oil set out in sections 7 and 8 of this Part.

10. In relation to an arrangement with WCMRC, the total BOCF payable by a ship (bulk oil) shall be determined,

  • (a) in the case of bulk oil loaded onto the ship (bulk oil) and intended for international destinations and destinations north of 60° north latitude, by multiplying the total number of tonnes of bulk oil loaded at an oil handling facility that is within WCMRC’s geographic area, and that does not have an arrangement with WCMRC, by the BOCF per tonne for each type of oil set out in sections 7 and 8 of this Part;

  • (b) in the case of bulk oil unloaded from the ship (bulk oil), by multiplying the total number of tonnes of bulk oil unloaded at an oil handling facility that is within WCMRC’s geographic area, and that does not have an arrangement with WCMRC, by the BOCF per tonne for each type of oil set out in sections 7 and 8 of this Part;

  • (c) in the case of bulk oil loaded onto the ship (bulk oil) outside WCMRC’s geographic area which is transferred within WCMRC’s geographic area to another ship for use as fuel by such ship, by multiplying the total number of tonnes of bulk oil transferred by the BOCF per tonne for each type of oil set out in sections 7 and 8 of this Part; and

  • (d) in the case of bulk oil received by the ship (bulk oil) within WCMRC’s geographic area from another ship as cargo where such bulk oil is intended for international destinations and destinations north of 60° north latitude, by multiplying the total number of tonnes of bulk oil received by the BOCF per tonne for each type of oil set out in sections 11 and 12 of this Part.

11. The BOCF applicable in respect of oil (other than asphalt) is

  • (a) an amended fee of fifty-eight and five-tenths cents ($0.585) per tonne, plus all applicable taxes from January 1, 2014.

12. The BOCF applicable in respect of asphalt is

  • (a) an amended fee of twenty-six and nine-tenths cents ($0.269) per tonne, plus all applicable taxes from January 1, 2014.

Capital Asset Loan Fees

13. The capital asset/loan fees that are payable to WCMRC in relation to an arrangement required by subsections 167(1) and 168(1) of the Act are the capital asset/loan fees set out in Part Ⅲ of this notice.

PART III

14. The capital asset/loan fee (CALF) is determined according to the following:

  • (a) on the basis of cost per tonne;

  • (b) by multiplying a capital asset/loan fee rate (“CALFR”) by the applicable quantity of bulk oil loaded or unloaded within WCMRC’s Geographic Area of Response (“GAR”), and where applicable, bulk oil cargo transferred between ships within WCMRC’s GAR;

  • (c) by dividing the forecast annual Funds Required for Capital Purchases (1) of WCMRC, plus the provision for tax (2) by the forecast Annual Volume (3) of bulk oil cargo to be loaded or unloaded within WCMRC’s GAR (4);

  • (d) Funds Required for Capital Purchases (1) = Annual Capital Budget plus the annual principal bank loan repayment, less amortization of capital assets (excluding amortization of assets purchased previously with the BOCF);

  • (e) Provision for tax (2) = (Funds Required for Capital Purchases less amortization of capital assets purchased previously with the BOCF) multiplied by the applicable rate of tax;

  • (f) Annual Volume (3) = Total volume of bulk oil cargo unloaded plus total volume of bulk oil loaded for international destinations and north of 60° north latitude within WCMRC’s GAR and, where applicable, bulk oil cargo transferred between ships within WCMRC’s GAR; and

  • (g) GAR (4) = Geographic area of response for which WCMRC is certified to operate.

15. The CALFR calculated by the above formula is applicable to all products except asphalt. The CALFR for asphalt is 50% of the rate for all other products.

16. The CALF applicable in respect of asphalt is

  • (a) an amended fee of zero cents ($0.000) per tonne, from January 1, 2014.

17. The CALF applicable in respect of other products is

  • (a) an amended fee of zero cents ($0.000) per tonne, from January 1, 2014.

Interested persons may, within 30 days after the date of publication of this notice, file notices of objection that contain the reasons for the objection to the Manager of Environmental Response, Marine Safety, Operations and Environmental Programs, Transport Canada, Place de Ville, Tower C, 10th Floor, 330 Sparks Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N8, 613-990-5913 (telephone), 613-993-8196 (fax), sean.payne@tc.gc.ca (email). All such representations must cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, the name of the response organization submitting the list of proposed amended fees, and the date of publication of the notice of proposed amended fees.

October 30, 2013

MARK JOHNCOX, CA

[48-1-o]

NOTICE OF VACANCY

OFFICE OF THE PRIVACY COMMISSIONER OF CANADA

Privacy commissioner (full-time position)

Salary: $295,500
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
(until relocated to Gatineau, Quebec, in February 2014)

The mission of the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada is to protect and promote the privacy rights of individuals. The Office oversees compliance with both the Privacy Act, which covers the personal information-handling practices of federal government departments and agencies, and the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA), Canada’s private sector privacy law, along with some aspects of Canada’s anti-spam law.

As an Agent of Parliament, the Privacy Commissioner reports directly to the House of Commons and the Senate. The Commissioner’s powers to further the privacy rights of Canadians include investigating complaints, conducting audits and pursuing court action under the Privacy Act and PIPEDA, publicly reporting on the personal information-handling practices of public and private sector organizations, undertaking and publishing research related to the protection of personal information, and promoting public awareness and understanding of privacy issues. The Commissioner works independently of the Government to investigate complaints from individuals with respect to the federal public sector and the private sector.

The ideal candidate should possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study, or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and/or experience. A degree in law would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate would have management experience at the senior executive level in a private or public sector organization, including managing human and financial resources. Experience working on and rendering decisions on complex, sensitive issues, preferably in areas related to privacy (data protection, security, cyberspace, technology, etc.) is desired. He or she would also have experience in the interpretation and application of legislation, regulations and policies. Experience dealing with government, preferably with senior government officials, as well as stakeholders and the media, is sought.

The ideal candidate would have knowledge of the principles of the Privacy Act and PIPEDA as well as the mandate, roles, responsibilities and accountabilities of the Privacy Commissioner. Knowledge of the role of an Agent of Parliament and its relationship with Parliament and the Government, as well as knowledge of the Canadian government, including its policies, practices and decision-making frameworks, are desired. The candidate would have knowledge of the global nature of privacy and data protection. Knowledge of privacy regimes in other jurisdictions — provincial, territorial, national and international — would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate would possess superior leadership skills in managing a team of people and championing privacy interests in an ever-changing environment, and the ability to develop and maintain effective relationships with a broad range of stakeholders that include the private sector; policy makers at all levels of government, nationally and internationally; the media and civil society. The ability to interpret relevant statutes, regulations and policies, and analyze complex situations in order to make equitable and timely decisions and recommendations, while anticipating their short- and long-term consequences, is desired. The candidate would also have the ability to think strategically, anticipate trends and act to influence the policy development process. He or she would have superior communication skills, both written and oral, and the ability to act as a spokesperson on privacy issues in dealing with Parliament, the Government, the media, the general public and other organizations at both a national and international level.

To achieve the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada’s objectives and carry out its mandate, the Privacy Commissioner would possess strong professional ethics, sound judgement, objectivity and diplomacy. A person of integrity, he or she would possess superior interpersonal skills, tact and discretion.

Proficiency in both official languages is required.

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada’s head office is currently located in Ottawa, Ontario, but will be relocating to Gatineau, Quebec, in February 2014; therefore, the successful candidate must reside in or be willing to relocate to the Ottawa-Gatineau area or to a location that is within reasonable commuting distance.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/index.asp?lang=eng.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a confidential report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at www.ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada and its activities can be found on the Web site at www.priv.gc.ca.

For more information, please contact Michelle Richard or Paul Marshall at 613-742-3217 or paul.marshall@odgersberndtson.ca.

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

[48-1-o]

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

INSURANCE COMPANIES ACT

Ironshore Insurance Ltd. — Order to insure in Canada risks

Notice is hereby given of the issuance, pursuant to subsection 574(1) of the Insurance Companies Act, of an order to insure in Canada risks, effective October 3, 2013, permitting Ironshore Insurance Ltd., under the name, in English, Ironshore Insurance Ltd., and, in French, Les Assurances Ironshore, to insure in Canada risks falling within the classes of accident and sickness insurance, boiler and machinery insurance, credit insurance, fidelity insurance, legal expenses insurance, liability insurance and property insurance.

November 4, 2013

JULIE DICKSON
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

[48-1-o]

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

INSURANCE COMPANIES ACT

Northbridge General Insurance Corporation and Northbridge Indemnity Insurance Corporation — Letters patent of amalgamation and order to commence and carry on business

Notice is hereby given of the issuance

  • pursuant to subsection 251(1) of the Insurance Companies Act, of letters patent amalgamating and continuing Northbridge General Insurance Corporation and Northbridge Indemnity Insurance Corporation as one company under the name, in English, Northbridge General Insurance Corporation and, in French, Société d’assurance générale Northbridge, effective January 1, 2014; and

  • pursuant to subsection 52(4) of the Insurance Companies Act, of an order authorizing Northbridge General Insurance Corporation and, in French, Société d’assurance générale Northbridge, to commence and carry on business, and to insure risks falling within the classes of accident and sickness insurance, aircraft insurance, automobile insurance, boiler and machinery insurance, credit insurance, credit protection insurance, fidelity insurance, hail insurance, liability insurance, property insurance, and surety insurance, effective January 1, 2014.

November 11, 2013

JULIE DICKSON
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

[48-1-o]

  • Footnote 1
    CAS Registry Number is a registered trademark of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 2
    See Appendix 4: Operator declaration form on the implementation of the Guidelines for the reduction of dyes released from pulp and paper mills.
  • Footnote 3
    See Appendix 5: Conformity evaluation form of the Guidelines for the reduction of dyes released from pulp and paper mills.
  • Footnote 4
    A method for determining dye retention on fibres is shown in Appendix 3.
  • Footnote 5
    The calculation of the solids removal efficiency by the primary treatment system is shown in Appendix 2.
  • Footnote 6
    If the method used to measure dye retention differs from the Appendix 3 method, include a copy of the method used with the report.
  • Footnote 7
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number is the property of the American Chemical Society; any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 8
    Operators of FSS and BSS should note that, if necessary, the moratorium could be extended if there is a delay in providing the above-mentioned feedback to all parties. If the moratorium is extended, an additional notice will be published.