EXTRA Vol. 147, No. 4

Canada Gazette

Part Ⅰ

OTTAWA, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS

HOUSE OF COMMONS

Report of the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for the Province of Ontario — 2012

On Monday, September 16, 2013, I received a certified copy of the Report of the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for the Province of Ontario, transmitted to me by the Chief Electoral Officer for tabling in the House of Commons, pursuant to subsection 23(2) of the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act.

Parliament having been prorogued on Friday, September 13, 2013, and the certified copy of the Report having consequently been received between two sessions of Parliament, it is my duty as Speaker of the House of Commons, pursuant to subsection 21(2) of the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act, to forthwith cause the copy of the said Report to be published in the Canada Gazette.

Ottawa, September 18, 2013

HON. ANDREW SCHEER, M.P.
Speaker of the House of Commons
House of Commons
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0A6

Foreword

The Report of the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for the Province of Ontario (the “Report”) was completed following public consultations, and submitted to the Chief Electoral Officer on February 14, 2013.

The Report was tabled in the House of Commons and referred to the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs (the “Standing Committee”) on February 25, 2013. The Standing Committee received objections from 47 members of Parliament concerning names and boundaries of electoral districts, boundaries only, or names of electoral districts only.

In accordance with subsection 22(3) of the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act, the report of the Standing Committee, the objections, the minutes of proceedings, the evidence presented to the Standing Committee, and the Report of the Commission were referred back to the Commission for consideration of the objections.

The initial version of the Report is included in this Final Report in its entirety, although minor adjustments have been made to the description of certain electoral districts. These adjustments have no impact on boundaries or population.

The new section titled Addendum — Disposition of Objections and Amendments to the Report provides two minor corrections as well as the Commission’s consideration and disposition of objections by members of Parliament. After consideration of those objections, the following changes are made to the Report:

  1. The first sentence of the sixth paragraph on page 9 of this Report is amended to read as follows: “The electoral district of KENORA is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted to include that part of Ojibways of Onigaming First Nation (Sabaskong Bay 35C) currently located within the boundaries of the electoral district of Thunder Bay—Rainy River.”
  2. The first sentence of the seventh paragraph on page 9 of this Report is amended to read as follows: “The electoral district of THUNDER BAY—RAINY RIVER is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted to accommodate the transfer of that part of Ojibways of Onigaming First Nation (Sabaskong Bay 35C) currently located within its boundaries to the electoral district of Kenora.”
  3. The first sentence of the fourth full paragraph on page 34 of this Report is amended to read as follows: “The electoral district of LANARK—FRONTENAC is composed of the following: Lanark County; Frontenac County, excluding the Township of Frontenac Islands; and that part of the City of Kingston lying north of Highway 401.”
  4. The first sentence of the eighth paragraph on page 15 of this Report is amended to read as follows: “The electoral district of HALDIMAND—NORFOLK is composed of the Counties of Haldimand and Norfolk.”
  5. The electoral district of Oakville South is renamed OAKVILLE.
  6. The electoral district of Ancaster is renamed HAMILTON WEST—ANCASTER—DUNDAS.
  7. The electoral district of Barrie—Oro—Springwater is renamed BARRIE—SPRINGWATER—ORO-MEDONTE.
  8. The area bounded by Hurontario Street, the municipal boundary, the Orangeville-Brampton Railway and Wanless Drive is reassigned from the electoral district of BRAMPTON WEST to the electoral district of BRAMPTON NORTH.
  9. The electoral district of Mississauga East—Cooksville is renamed MISSISSAUGA—COOKSVILLE.
  10. The electoral district of Mississauga North is renamed MISSISSAUGA—MALTON.
  11. The electoral district of Mississauga South is renamed MISSISSAUGA—LAKESHORE.
  12. The electoral district of Mississauga West—Streetsville is renamed MISSISSAUGA—STREETSVILLE.
  13. The electoral district of Vaughan—Thornhill—Markham is renamed THORNHILL.
  14. The electoral district of Aurora—Richmond Hill is renamed AURORA—OAK RIDGES—RICHMOND HILL.
  15. The area bounded by Moore Avenue to the west, the Moore Park Ravine to the south, the rail line to the east and Bayview Avenue to the north is reassigned from the electoral district of UNIVERSITY—ROSEDALE to the electoral district of DON VALLEY WEST.
  16. The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH—AGINCOURT is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying east of Midland Avenue, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough North.
  17. The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying east of McCowan Road and north of Lawrence Avenue East, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough—Guildwood; plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough Southwest lying north of Eglinton Avenue East.
  18. The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH SOUTHWEST is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying north of Eglinton Avenue East, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough Centre; plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough—Guildwood bounded on the north by Eglinton Avenue East and on the east by Markham Road.
  19. The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH NORTH is composed of the following: that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough—Rouge River lying west of Neilson Road and Morningside Avenue to the power line, then west of the Rouge River; plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough—Agincourt lying east of Midland Avenue.
  20. The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH—GUILDWOOD is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying east of Morningside Avenue, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough East; less that part lying south of Eglinton Avenue East and west of Markham Road, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough Southwest; plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough Centre lying east of McCowan Road and north of Lawrence Avenue East.
  21. The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH EAST is bounded as follows: on the north by Steeles Avenue East; on the east by the municipal boundary of the City of Toronto; on the south by Lake Ontario; and on the west by Morningside Avenue north to Highway 401 as far as Neilson Road, north on Neilson Road to Morningside Avenue as far as the power line, east along the power line to the Rouge River, and then north along the Rouge River to Steeles Avenue East.
  22. The electoral district of Scarborough East is renamed SCARBOROUGH—ROUGE PARK.
  23. The electoral district of Renfrew—Pembroke is renamed RENFREW—NIPISSING—PEMBROKE.
  24. The electoral district of Oshawa—Durham is renamed DURHAM.

These adjustments are reflected in the accompanying Amendments to the Schedules and Amended Maps sections.

In all other respects, the Commission’s Report of February 14, 2013 is unaltered.

REPORT
(as of February 14, 2013)

Introduction

Since 2001, the population of Ontario has increased from 11.41 million to 12.85 million. After applying a constitutional formula to the population revealed in the 2011 Census, the Chief Electoral Officer determined that there should be 338 electoral districts represented in the House of Commons, 121 of which were allocated to Ontario. That is an increase of 15 electoral districts for the province.

The Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for Ontario (the “Commission”) was established on February 21, 2012. The Commission is an independent body responsible for readjusting electoral boundaries in the province after the completion of the decennial census. The Chairperson, appointed by the Chief Justice of Ontario, is the Honourable Mr. Justice George Valin of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice. The other members of the Commission, appointed by the Speaker of the House of Commons, are Mr. Douglas Colbourne, former chair of the Ontario Municipal Board, and Dr. Leslie A. Pal, Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy and Administration at Carleton University.

Mr. Tamer Yassa, an Elections Canada geography specialist, provided invaluable professional assistance to the Commission throughout its extensive work. The Commission is also indebted to Ms. Beverly Hayter, the Commission Secretary, whose dedication and efforts far exceeded simple administrative support.

The Commission prepared a Proposal dated July 30, 2012 describing the names and boundaries of the 121 electoral districts in Ontario. The Proposal was published as a supplement to the Canada Gazette on September 8, 2012. An insert outlining the process for making public presentations, and specifying the locations and dates for the public hearings, was placed in the Toronto Star, L’Express and Le Droit on September 4 and 8, 2012. A notice of the publication of the Proposal was also placed in all Ontario daily newspapers and in 264 weekly newspapers. In addition, Internet banner advertisements appeared on 13 top portals and news sites.

The Commission held 31 public hearings across the province, from October 9 until November 21, 2012, in the following municipalities: Kenora, Thunder Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Sudbury, New Liskeard, North Bay, Barrie, Richmond Hill, Windsor, London, Cambridge, Hamilton, Niagara Falls, Oakville, Mississauga, Brampton, Ottawa, Kingston, Belleville, Cobourg, Oshawa and Toronto.

The Commission received 1,078 submissions, 509 of which were made at public hearings (many of the presenters also provided written submissions) and an additional 569 of which were in written form only. It also received countless emails, faxes and petitions from persons supporting a particular position. The Commission found both the oral and written submissions to be extremely informative and helpful, and wishes to thank all those citizens and organizations for making the effort to participate in the process of determining fair and reasonable boundaries for the electoral districts in the province.

Overall Approach

Section 15 of the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act (the “Act”) states that the federal electoral boundaries commission shall be governed by several rules. The primary rule for constructing electoral boundaries is that the population of each electoral district shall be as close as reasonably possible to the electoral quota for the province. The quota is established by dividing the census population by the number of electoral districts allocated to the province. The quota for electoral districts in Ontario is 106,213.

Other rules for constructing electoral boundaries relate to community of interest; community of identity; historical patterns; and a manageable geographic size for electoral districts in sparsely populated, rural or northern regions of the province. The Commission may depart from the strict population rule when it believes such a departure is necessary to respect any of these other rules. However, variance from the population equality rule is limited to 25% (plus or minus), except in extraordinary circumstances. The upper limit of deviation from the quota in Ontario is 132,766, and the lower limit is 79,660. The term “extraordinary circumstances” is not defined in the Act.

Section 3 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees the right to vote to every citizen of Canada. In a decision released in 1991, commonly referred to as “Carter”, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the Charter right to vote guarantees the right to “effective representation”, not the right to equality of voting power. The Supreme Court noted that relative parity of voting power is a prime condition of effective representation. However, the Court also noted that, while the value of a citizen’s vote should not be unduly diluted, effective representation often cannot be achieved without taking into account such “countervailing factors” as “geography, community history, community interests and minority representation”. The Court stated that any of those factors can justify departure from absolute voter parity because effective representation “best serves the interests of a free and democratic society”. It follows that, if the Commission determines it is necessary or desirable to deviate from equality of voting power in order to achieve effective representation, it has the discretion to do so within the limits of the Act.

During the past decade, the primary demographic trends in Ontario have been a slight population decrease in the north and a significant increase in the south, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area. Before redistribution, 25 electoral districts exceeded the allowable 25% variance from the provincial quota. Of those, two had populations that were smaller than the allowable variance from the quota, and 23 had populations in excess of the maximum allowable variance. The populations of Ontario’s electoral districts varied in size from 55,977 (Kenora) to 228,997 (Oak Ridges—Markham).

These population changes, and the requirement to establish 15 new electoral districts in the province, resulted in substantial adjustments to the boundaries of existing electoral districts. However, where existing boundaries could be retained, the Commission did so.

Any change to one boundary of an electoral district has an inherent effect on at least one adjoining electoral district, and often more. The Commission endeavoured to respect the integrity of the boundaries of First Nation communities. It also endeavoured to respect the integrity of linguistic communities, and received several persuasive recommendations to that effect from Francophone communities in Eastern and Northern Ontario.

The Commission also tried within reason to respect the boundaries of those municipalities whose populations are consistent with the provincial quota, but this was not always possible. In Southern and Eastern Ontario, representatives of county and regional governments strongly urged the Commission to respect their boundaries. The Commission was less successful in satisfying those requests; the demographics of those parts of the province often involve concentrated urban populations surrounded by sparsely populated rural areas, making it extremely difficult to configure electoral districts that meet the quota.

Numerous submissions throughout the process referred to residential development that has occurred or been approved since the census was completed, and urged the Commission to consider future population growth as a factor when determining acceptable population levels for electoral districts. The Act does not explicitly list such forecasts as a rule for drawing electoral boundaries.

The Commission has endeavoured to respond to concerns that some of the proposed electoral districts divided communities of interest, ignored historical boundaries, or were of unmanageable size. The Commission was not able to incorporate all recommended changes because they conflicted with demands in neighbouring electoral districts or resulted in unacceptable population variances. However, the Commission did make a substantial number of changes to the electoral districts from those outlined in its Proposal. In addition to creating 15 new electoral districts, the Commission has changed the names, boundaries, or both, of all but 22 of the electoral districts in the province.

Reasoning and Outcome by Region
NORTHERN ONTARIO

According to the 2011 Census, the population of Northern Ontario is 832,014, a slight decrease from the 2001 Census. Northern Ontario occupies a land mass that is 87.77% of the total area of the province. The region currently has 10 electoral districts. If the provincial quota were strictly applied, it would have only eight.

During public hearings conducted in Northern Ontario, the Commission received submissions urging it to establish a separate population quota for that region in order to preserve a minimum of 10 electoral districts. As noted in its Proposal, although the Commission is independent, it is nevertheless governed by the provisions of the Act and is not entitled to ignore those provisions. The Commission is of the view that it does not have jurisdiction to establish a lower population quota for Northern Ontario, and that any changes to the legislation in that regard are matters for Parliament to determine.

The Commission did decide to exercise its discretion to respect the key principle of effective electoral representation. Given its vast geographic size, the Commission believes that Northern Ontario requires a minimum of 10 electoral districts in order for citizens of the region to have effective representation. This decision is consistent with the provisions of the Act that permit the Commission to look beyond the provincial quota and consider manageable geographic size for sparsely populated, rural or northern regions.

The Act permits deviation beyond the maximum allowable variance of 25% above or below the provincial quota in extraordinary circumstances. The electoral district of Kenora is geographically the largest in the province and one of the largest in Canada. Its census population is 55,977, a variance of 47.30% below the provincial quota. In accordance with the decision of its predecessor, the Commission continues to believe that it is appropriate to apply the extraordinary circumstances rule in the Act to the electoral district of Kenora.

At some of the hearings held in Northern Ontario, the Commission received submissions recommending that it apply the extraordinary circumstances rule in the Act to other electoral districts in the North. The Commission disagrees.

While the Commission is willing to recognize that electoral districts in Northern Ontario will have smaller populations than other Ontario electoral districts, it falls that after applying the extraordinary circumstances rule to the electoral district of Kenora, there is sufficient population in the balance of Northern Ontario to create nine electoral districts that are within the maximum allowable negative variance. The decision for Kenora is consistent with the emphasis in the Act on manageable geographic size for sparsely populated, rural or northern regions, and there is no need to make further use of the extraordinary circumstances rule.

The work of the previous commission in Ontario revealed an inherent flaw in the procedure outlined in the Act for preparing a proposal, conducting public hearings, and submitting a report. In 2003, Northern Ontario had 11 electoral districts. The previous commission determined that the number of electoral districts in the region should be reduced by one. Its proposal eliminated the electoral district of Nickel Belt and established boundaries for 10 electoral districts in the region.

However, as a result of submissions received at public hearings, the previous commission decided to retain the electoral district of Nickel Belt and to eliminate the electoral district of Timiskaming—Cochrane. It also substantially altered the proposed boundaries for the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay. The result was that the City of Temiskaming Shores found itself within the boundaries of an electoral district named Nipissing—Timiskaming, and the communities along Highway 11 from the Town of Smooth Rock Falls to west of the Town of Hearst were removed from the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay and placed within the boundaries of an electoral district named Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing. This happened without any notice to these communities. The procedure did not afford them an opportunity to appear at a public hearing or to make written submissions before the report was submitted to the House of Commons.

This Commission holds the view that those communities were effectively denied due process. They were not afforded the opportunity to consider or advise the previous commission of their views on the extent, if any, to which they had a community of interest with or historical attachment to other communities in the electoral districts to which they were ultimately assigned.

As well, the previous commission had inadvertently divided the Nipissing 10 First Nation between the electoral districts of Nickel Belt and Nipissing—Timiskaming.

When the Commission began drafting its Proposal as it related to Northern Ontario, it had already received correspondence from the municipal association representing the communities along Highway 11 from the Town of Smooth Rock Falls to west of the Town of Hearst. This correspondence deplored the decision in the 2003 redistribution, advised that the Highway 11 communities had no community of interest with the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing, and requested that the communities be reassigned to the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay.

The Commission began its work in Northern Ontario by proposing that the boundaries of the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay be adjusted to include the communities along Highway 11 from the Town of Smooth Rock Falls to west of the Town of Hearst. The census population of the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing was 74,828, which was 29.55% below the provincial quota. The reassignment of the communities along the Highway 11 corridor further reduced the population in that electoral district. In order to address that population deficiency, the Commission proposed substantial adjustments to the electoral district of Nickel Belt. It extended the boundaries of the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing easterly to include most of the electoral district of Nickel Belt lying west, south and east of the City of Sudbury, south of Highway 17. It proposed to rename that electoral district Algoma—Manitoulin—Killarney.

That adjustment resulted in a population deficiency in the electoral district of Nickel Belt. The Commission proposed to address that deficiency by extending the boundaries of the electoral district of Nickel Belt east and north into the electoral district of Nipissing—Timiskaming to include that part of the electoral district lying north of Highway 64. The Commission believed there were communities of interest in agriculture and language among those communities that would have been included in the revised boundaries of the proposed electoral district of Nickel Belt—Timiskaming.

In turn, that adjustment resulted in a population deficiency in the electoral district of Nipissing—Timiskaming. The Commission proposed to address that deficiency by adjusting the boundary of the northeast part of the electoral district of Parry Sound—Muskoka by moving that boundary to the west and reassigning that area to the proposed electoral district of Nipissing.

In addition to the electoral district of Kenora, the boundary adjustments proposed for Northern Ontario resulted in the region maintaining nine other electoral districts, each of which had a population within the maximum negative variance permitted by the Act.

The Commission’s proposals for Northern Ontario began to unravel at the public hearings. In Sudbury, the Commission heard that, in fact, there was no community of interest in agriculture between the area of Nipissing—Timiskaming lying north of Highway 64 and the electoral district of Nickel Belt. There was strong opposition to the reassignment of a substantial part of the electoral district of Nickel Belt to the proposed electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Killarney.

In New Liskeard, the Commission learned that the City of Temiskaming Shores did not feel that it had a community of interest with the electoral district of Nickel Belt. While its preferred community of interest lay with the Town of Kirkland Lake and other communities to the north, the City acknowledged that the population of the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay was already too large to accommodate it. Its preferred community of interest therefore lay with the electoral district of Nipissing—Timiskaming.

The Member of Parliament for Timmins—James Bay submitted that the community of interest among farmers and people associated with agriculture in the farming area west and north of the City of Temiskaming Shores flowed north along Highway 11, and that there was no community of interest with people involved in agriculture in the electoral district of Nickel Belt. The Member also expressed concern about the ability to serve constituents effectively if the communities along Highway 11 from the Town of Smooth Rock Falls to west of the Town of Hearst were included in the electoral district. This was the first hint of what the Commission considers to be inappropriate involvement by a Member of Parliament in the electoral redistribution process.

In North Bay, the Commission learned that the communities from the northeast part of the electoral district of Parry Sound—Muskoka had no community of interest with the City of North Bay or with the proposed electoral district of Nipissing. The arguments presented on behalf of those communities were persuasive.

The Member of Parliament for Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing requested that the Commission retain the current boundaries of that electoral district or, if necessary, invoke the extraordinary circumstances rule in the Act to accommodate a population below the maximum negative variance from the provincial quota. When informed of the written submission from the municipal association representing the Highway 11 communities, which requested a transfer of its communities to the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay, the Member advised the Commission to expect correspondence from the association expressing a contrary request. The Commission did receive such a letter a few days following the hearing in North Bay. However, the wording of that letter strongly suggests yet more inappropriate involvement by a Member of Parliament in the electoral redistribution process.

The Commission had proposed that the Township of Lake of the Woods be removed from the electoral district of Thunder Bay—Rainy River and be included in the electoral district of Kenora. That proposal was based on the assumption that the First Nation communities located within the township had a stronger community of interest with Kenora than with Thunder Bay or Fort Frances. The Commission learned at the public hearing in Kenora that its assumption was mistaken because of the significant travel distance between the township and the City of Kenora.

The advice received at those public hearings, combined with the inappropriate involvement of at least two Members of Parliament, persuaded the Commission to conclude that the status quo, with a few minor boundary adjustments, is the best solution it can achieve for Northern Ontario.

The boundaries of the electoral district of KENORA remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 55,977, which is 47.30% below the provincial quota. The Commission has determined that the extraordinary circumstances rule applies to this electoral district.

The boundaries of the electoral district of THUNDER BAY—RAINY RIVER remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 82,984, which is 21.87% below the provincial quota.

The Commission was persuaded by numerous submissions that the Township of Manitouwadge has a stronger community of interest with the electoral district of Thunder Bay—Superior North than with the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing.

The electoral district of THUNDER BAY—SUPERIOR NORTH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, plus the Township of Manitouwadge and that part of the current electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing lying north of Highway 17 in Thunder Bay, Unorganized. It has a population of 82,827, which is 22.02% below the provincial quota.

The current electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing has a census population of 74,828, which is 29.55% below the provincial quota. Significant adjustments were required to increase the population of this electoral district to an acceptable level. The Commission prepared a revised Proposal for the electoral district of Sault Ste. Marie which would see a number of communities transferred from it to the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing to make up that population shortfall. The Commission then held a public hearing in Sault Ste. Marie in order to give the public an opportunity to comment on the revised Proposal. Not surprisingly, all persons who spoke, with the exception of one, were opposed to the revised Proposal. Presenters suggested that, if the Commission needed to find more population, it should be taken from the Sudbury area.

For the reasons outlined earlier in this Report, that option was no longer possible. As part of its decision to retain 10 electoral districts for Northern Ontario, and after accepting a population for the electoral district of Kenora that is substantially below the maximum negative variance permitted by the Act, the Commission was determined to create nine additional electoral districts, each with a population falling within the maximum allowable negative variance. It therefore concluded that the only feasible place to locate the necessary population was in the electoral district of Sault Ste. Marie. The Commission believes that the communities it selected have some community of interest with other similar-sized communities along Highway 17 in the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing.

The electoral district of ALGOMA—MANITOULIN—KAPUSKASING is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less the Township of Manitouwadge and that part of Thunder Bay, Unorganized lying north of Highway 17, assigned to the electoral district of Thunder Bay—Superior North; plus the Townships of Macdonald, Meredith and Aberdeen Additional, Laird, Tarbutt and Tarbutt Additional, Johnson, St. Joseph, Jocelyn, Hilton, and Plummer Additional, the Village of Hilton Beach, the Town of Bruce Mines, and the geographic Township of Aberdeen, formerly part of the electoral district of Sault Ste. Marie; and plus a part of Sudbury, Unorganized, North Part, lying north of the geographic Townships of Silk, Horwood, Hardiman, and Regan, and west of the geographic Township of Crothers, formerly part of the electoral district of Nickel Belt. It has a population of 79,801, which is 24.87% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SAULT STE. MARIE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less the Townships of Macdonald, Meredith and Aberdeen Additional, Laird, Tarbutt and Tarbutt Additional, Johnson, St. Joseph, Jocelyn, Hilton, and Plummer Additional, the Village of Hilton Beach, the Town of Bruce Mines, and the geographic Township of Aberdeen, assigned to the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing. It has a population of 82,052, which is 22.75% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of NICKEL BELT is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: slightly adjusted along the northern boundary of the electoral district of Sudbury; less that part of Nipissing 10 First Nation, assigned to the electoral district of Nipissing—Timiskaming; less that part of Sudbury, Unorganized, North Part assigned to the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing; and less the northwest part of Timiskaming, Unorganized, West Part, assigned to the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay. It has a population of 90,962, which is 14.36% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SUDBURY is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted in two locations along its northern boundary. It has a population of 92,048, which is 13.34% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of TIMMINS—JAMES BAY is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus the northwest part of Timiskaming, Unorganized, West Part, formerly part of the electoral district of Nickel Belt; and plus the Townships of Hudson and Harris as well as that part of Timiskaming, Unorganized, West Part lying west of the westerly boundary of the City of Temiskaming Shores and north of the northern boundaries of the Township of Coleman and the geographic Townships of Kittson, Dane, and Leo, formerly part of the electoral district of Nipissing—Timiskaming. It has a population of 83,104, which is 21.76% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of NIPISSING—TIMISKAMING is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of Nipissing 10 First Nation formerly part of the electoral district of Nickel Belt; less the Townships of Hudson and Harris as well as that part of Timiskaming, Unorganized, West Part lying west of the westerly boundary of the City of Temiskaming Shores and north of the northern boundaries of the Township of Coleman and the geographic Townships of Kittson, Dane, and Leo, assigned to the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay. It has a population of 90,996, which is 14.33% below the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of PARRY SOUND—MUSKOKA remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 91,263, which is 14.08% below the provincial quota.

SOUTHWESTERN ONTARIO
Windsor and Chatham-Kent

The total population in this area is 465,958, warranting four electoral districts. In order to adjust population in the electoral district of Essex, and in response to requests to return the rural area of the electoral district of Windsor—Tecumseh to the electoral district of Essex, the Commission proposed to assign that part of the electoral district of Windsor—Tecumseh south of Highway 401 to the largely rural electoral district of Essex. In addition, the Commission proposed that the easterly portion of the Town of Lakeshore be assigned to the electoral district of Chatham-Kent—Essex.

Notwithstanding the proposed changes, the electoral district of Essex remained one of the most populated in the province. The recommendations made at the public hearing held in Windsor were to leave the boundaries of the electoral districts of Windsor West and Windsor—Tecumseh unchanged. The overwhelming sentiment expressed at the public hearing and in written submissions was that residents of this region strongly preferred community of interest over population equality. The Commission has been persuaded by these arguments.

The electoral district of WINDSOR WEST is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted along the northerly boundary of the airport. It has a population of 118,973, which is 12.01% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of WINDSOR—TECUMSEH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted along the northerly boundary of the airport. It has a population of 115,528, which is 8.77% above the provincial quota.

The Commission proposed to transfer Pelee Island to the current electoral district of Chatham-Kent—Essex (renamed Chatham-Kent in the Proposal) from the electoral district of Essex. No concerns were raised to that change, but recommendations were made to include the Municipality of Leamington in the name of the electoral district, as that area represents one third of the electoral district’s population.

In order to adjust population between the revised electoral districts of Essex and Chatham-Kent, the Commission has decided to assign that part of the Town of Lakeshore lying east of Rochester Townline Road to the current electoral district of Chatham-Kent—Essex, and to change the name of that electoral district to Chatham-Kent—Leamington.

The electoral district of ESSEX is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part of the Town of Lakeshore lying east of Rochester Townline Road, assigned to the current electoral district of Chatham-Kent—Essex. It has a population of 120,477, which is 13.43% above the provincial quota.

The Commission has made a minor adjustment to the boundaries at the northeast corner of the former City of Chatham, in order to merge the small pocket of urban development situated in the electoral district of Lambton—Kent—Middlesex with the adjoining urban development in the former City of Chatham.

The electoral district of CHATHAM-KENT—LEAMINGTON (formerly named Chatham-Kent—Essex) is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of Essex lying east of Rochester Townline Road; plus a part of the current electoral district of Lambton—Kent—Middlesex lying northeast of the former City of Chatham; and plus the Township of Pelee, formerly part of the electoral district of Essex. It has a population of 111,866, which is 5.32% above the provincial quota.

Sarnia

The boundaries of the electoral district of SARNIA—LAMBTON remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 106,293, which is 0.08% above the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of HURON—BRUCE remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 104,842, which is 1.29% below the provincial quota.

London, Oxford, Elgin and Middlesex

The City of London and adjacent areas have a population of 679,136, warranting six electoral districts. In its Proposal, the Commission adjusted the population of the three electoral districts within the City of London.

At the public hearing held in London, submissions with respect to the City focused on the communities of Old South and White Oaks, though recommendations were divided. The Commission accepts that the urban portion of White Oaks currently in the electoral district of Elgin—Middlesex—London should be assigned to the electoral district of London—Fanshawe in order to consolidate that urban community. As well, it accepts that the community of Old South should be within one electoral district.

Those decisions required further adjustments to the boundaries of the electoral districts within the City of London.

The electoral district of LONDON WEST is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying east of Wonderland Road North, north of the Thames River and the rail line, assigned to the electoral district of London North Centre. It has a population of 119,090, which is 12.12% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of LONDON NORTH CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of London West lying east of Wonderland Road North, north of the Thames River and the rail line; less that part lying east and south of the rail line, assigned to the electoral district of London—Fanshawe. It has a population of 118,079, which is 11.17% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of LONDON—FANSHAWE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of London North Centre lying east and south of the rail line; and plus that part of the current electoral district of Elgin—Middlesex—London lying east of Ernest Avenue and Meg Drive, north of Exeter Road and Highway 401 to the City of London boundary. It has a population of 119,334, which is 12.35% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of LAMBTON—KENT—MIDDLESEX is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less the urban area lying northeast of the former City of Chatham, assigned to the electoral district of Chatham-Kent—Leamington. It has a population of 105,919, which is 0.28% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of ELGIN—MIDDLESEX—LONDON is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying east of Ernest Avenue and Meg Drive, north of Exeter Road and Highway 401 to the City of London boundary, assigned to the electoral district of London—Fanshawe. It has a population of 110,109, which is 3.67% above the provincial quota.

The Commission has adjusted the boundaries of the electoral districts east of the electoral district of Oxford to accommodate and balance the significant population increases in the Kitchener, Waterloo, and Cambridge area. As a result, it was necessary to adjust the boundary between the electoral districts of Oxford and Brant.

The electoral district of OXFORD is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, plus that part of the current electoral district of Brant lying west of Etonia Road and East Quarter Townline Road. It has a population of 108,656, which is 2.30% above the provincial quota.

CENTRAL SOUTH ONTARIO
Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge, Brant, Brantford and Guelph

The Cities of Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge, Brant, and Brantford, the Township of North Dumfries, and surrounding areas, have a combined population of 644,198. This warrants an additional electoral district, for a total of six. The City of Waterloo has a population sufficient to establish an electoral district within its boundaries, while the City of Kitchener is too large and the City of Brant is too small.

In its Proposal, the Commission stated that the population of the City of Cambridge was sufficient to establish an electoral district within its municipal boundaries.

The proposal for this area hinged on the creation of a new electoral district composed of part of the City of Kitchener, the whole of the Township of North Dumfries, and part of the City of Brant. Submissions from residents and public officials from all three areas were resoundingly opposed to the boundaries of the proposed new electoral district.

Following the first public hearing in Cambridge, the Commission concluded that the Cities of Brantford and Brant, and the First Nations of Six Nations and New Credit, constitute a unique community of interest that works best in a single electoral district, notwithstanding the high population.

The Commission was advised that an additional electoral district was not required in this area. This advice was reinforced by submissions from public officials and residents of the electoral district of Perth—Wellington, who argued that the communities in their electoral district located west of the Kitchener-Waterloo area have a stronger community of interest with the Townships of Wilmot and Wellesley than with the Townships of Mapleton, Minto, and Wellington North.

The Commission also received submissions recommending that the Townships of Mapleton, Minto, Wellington North, and Woolwich be assigned to the electoral district of Wellington—Halton Hills, and that the Town of Halton Hills be assigned to an electoral district in Halton Region.

Supported by such advice, the Commission developed a revised Proposal which removed one electoral district from the Kitchener-Waterloo area and reassigned it to Halton Region.

The Commission conducted a second public hearing in Cambridge. Despite reflecting the advice received at the first hearing, the revised Proposal had little support. As a result, the Commission reverted to its original Proposal, with adjustments to distribute population more equitably.

The Commission decided to maintain the boundaries of the electoral district of Perth—Wellington because it is a largely rural, agricultural electoral district, and does not have any significant community of interest with the Townships of Wellesley and Wilmot. Their communities of interest are more closely associated with the Cities of Kitchener and Waterloo. The typical rural-urban tension does not exist in this region because of close socio-economic ties between the communities.

The Commission learned during the second public hearing that the preferred community of interest of the Township of North Dumfries was with the City of Cambridge. The Commission also learned of a community of interest between the southern portion of the City of Kitchener and that part of the City of Cambridge lying north of Highway 401 (formerly the Town of Hespeler).

The electoral district of Wellington—Halton Hills completely surrounds the electoral district of Guelph. The boundaries of the electoral district of Guelph are the city’s municipal boundaries. Its current population is 121,688. The population of the electoral district of Wellington—Halton Hills is 115,880. While the populations of both electoral districts are high, they cannot be adjusted without unreasonably interfering with municipal boundaries.

The boundaries of the electoral district of PERTH—WELLINGTON remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 104,912, which is 1.22% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of KITCHENER—CONESTOGA is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying east of Fischer-Hallman Road, assigned to the new electoral district of Kitchener South—Hespeler; plus those parts of the current electoral districts of Kitchener—Waterloo and Kitchener Centre lying south of University Avenue West, east of Trussler Road, north of Conestoga Parkway, and west of Fischer-Hallman Road. It has a population of 93,827, which is 11.66% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of WATERLOO (formerly named Kitchener—Waterloo) is composed of the City of Waterloo, plus that part of the City of Kitchener lying north of the rail line and east of Conestoga Parkway. It has a population of 103,192, which is 2.84% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of KITCHENER CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the City of Kitchener lying east of Fischer-Hallman Road, north of the rail line, and west of Conestoga Parkway; less that part of the current electoral district lying west of Fischer-Hallman Road, assigned to the electoral district of Kitchener—Conestoga; and less that part lying southeast of Fairway Road North and Woolner Drive to Zeller Drive, assigned to the new electoral district of Kitchener South—Hespeler. It has a population of 102,433, which is 3.56% below the provincial quota.

The population of the City of Cambridge is 126,748. In its Proposal, the Commission endeavoured to respect the integrity of the City’s municipal boundaries by using them to create a single electoral district. However, in order to balance populations in the electoral districts lying to the south of the Cities of Kitchener and Waterloo, and to accommodate communities of interest expressed at the second public hearing, the Commission has decided to create an electoral district composed of a part of the City of Kitchener and that part of the City of Cambridge lying north of Highway 401.

The electoral district of KITCHENER SOUTH—HESPELER is composed of the following: that part of the City of Cambridge lying north of Highway 401 (Hespeler); plus that part of the current electoral district of Kitchener—Conestoga lying east of Fischer-Hallman Road; and plus that part of the current electoral district of Kitchener Centre lying southeast of Fairway Road North and Woolner Drive to Zeller Drive. It has a population of 97,673, which is 8.04% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of CAMBRIDGE is composed of the following: that part of the City of Cambridge lying south of Highway 401 (Preston and Galt); plus the Township of North Dumfries; and plus that part of the City of Brant lying north of Paris Plains Church Road, Scenic Drive, and Howell Road. It has a population of 111,693, which is 5.16% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BRANT is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part of the City of Brant lying north of Paris Plains Church Road, Scenic Drive, and Howell Road, assigned to the electoral district of Cambridge; and less that part of the City of Brant lying west of Etonia Road and East Quarter Townline Road, assigned to the electoral district of Oxford. It has a population of 132,443, which is 24.70% above the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of HALDIMAND—NORFOLK remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 108,051, which is 1.73% above the provincial quota.

Following the second public hearing in Cambridge, the Commission decided not to eliminate the electoral district of Kitchener—Conestoga. That decision was reinforced by submissions at a second public hearing in Oakville, where the Commission learned that the Town of Halton Hills has a stronger community of interest with communities in the electoral district of Wellington—Halton Hills than with those in an electoral district in Halton Region.

While the municipal council of the Town of Halton Hills supported the Commission’s revised Proposal to include the Town in a new electoral district with part of the Town of Milton, the municipal council of the Town of Milton unanimously rejected that proposal.

The boundaries of the electoral district of WELLINGTON—HALTON HILLS remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 115,880, which is 9.10% above the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of GUELPH remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 121,688, which is 14.57% above the provincial quota.

HALTON, HAMILTON AND NIAGARA
Burlington, Oakville and Halton

Halton Region, which includes the Town of Halton Hills, has a population of 501,669. The previous commission assigned the Town of Halton Hills to the electoral district of Wellington—Halton Hills, a primarily rural electoral district. Initially, the Commission proposed to leave the boundaries of that electoral district unchanged. This resulted in a population of 442,661 for the balance of Halton Region, warranting one additional electoral district for a total of four, with populations on the high side of the provincial quota.

The Commission held a public hearing in Oakville, where it received submissions that caused it to re-examine Halton Region. The Commission prepared a revised Proposal for the Region that included the Town of Halton Hills. The new total population was sufficient to allocate five electoral districts to Halton Region. However, in order to draw acceptable boundaries for all five electoral districts, the Commission had to divide the Town of Milton into its older and more recently developed areas for assignment to separate electoral districts.

The Commission held a further public hearing in Oakville to discuss the revised Proposal. Public reaction was significant. As noted above, with the exception of the municipal council of the Town of Halton Hills, there was virtually no support for the revised Proposal.

The Commission believes that its initial Proposal, with some minor adjustments, offers the best solution for the area. It involves the creation of one new electoral district in Halton Region, for a total of four. As stated earlier, the Commission determined that the boundaries of the electoral district of Wellington—Halton Hills should remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order.

The boundaries of the electoral district of OAKVILLE SOUTH (formerly named Oakville) remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 119,649, which is 12.65% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of OAKVILLE NORTH—BURLINGTON (formerly part of the electoral district of Halton) is composed of the balance of the City of Oakville, plus that part of the City of Burlington lying east of Highway 407 and not included in the electoral district of Burlington. It has a population of 114,378, which is 7.69% above the provincial quota.

That decision responds to the objections and concerns of Burlington residents who stated that their community of interest and identity was with urban Burlington, that they had no community of interest with the Town of Milton, and that they preferred inclusion in an urban electoral district over correspondence with the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BURLINGTON is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, plus that part of the City of Burlington lying southeast of Dundas Street, west of Highway 407 and north of Guelph Line. It has a population of 120,569, which is 13.52% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MILTON (formerly part of the electoral district of Halton) is composed of the Town of Milton, plus that part of the City of Burlington lying northwest of Dundas Street and Highway 407. It has a population of 88,065, which is 17.09% below the provincial quota.

Hamilton

The City of Hamilton has a population of 519,949, warranting one additional electoral district for a total of five. Initially, the Commission proposed a new electoral district named Ancaster. It was composed of the urban area that included the communities of Ancaster, Dundas and Westdale, plus parts of the electoral districts of Hamilton Centre and Hamilton Mountain.

The Commission also proposed a primarily rural electoral district to be called Waterdown—Glanbrook. With the population of the electoral district of Hamilton Mountain being too high, the Commission drew its southern boundary along Rymal Road to balance population. The result was that about 7,200 people, whose community of interest had always been with the urban electoral district of Hamilton Mountain, were assigned to the proposed rural electoral district of Waterdown—Glanbrook.

The Commission held two days of public hearings in Hamilton and heard significant objections to the proposed electoral district of Ancaster. The Commission was told that residents of the parts of the electoral districts of Hamilton Centre and Hamilton Mountain assigned to the proposed electoral district have no community of interest or identity with the communities of Ancaster, Dundas and Westdale. Urban residents of the area lying south of Rymal Road also objected to the Proposal assigning them to a rural electoral district.

In response to those objections and concerns, the Commission prepared a revised Proposal for the City of Hamilton that substantially changed the electoral boundaries of all five proposed electoral districts. The Commission held a further public hearing in Hamilton to discuss the revised Proposal. There was substantial public reaction and objection to the proposed boundary revisions. The Commission learned that the parts of the electoral districts of Hamilton Centre and Hamilton Mountain originally assigned to the proposed electoral district of Ancaster in fact do have a significant community of interest and identity with the communities of Ancaster, Dundas and Westdale.

The Commission concluded that the approach it set out in its initial Proposal, with a few minor adjustments, was the best solution for the City of Hamilton. The Commission was not able to accommodate the preference of residents south of Rymal Road to be in an urban electoral district. However, they do constitute a significant community in the rural electoral district to which they have been assigned.

The electoral district of ANCASTER (formerly part of the electoral district of Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale) is composed of the following: those parts of the communities of Ancaster, Dundas and Westdale lying south of the rail line and north of the electric power transmission line, bordered on the east by the electoral districts of Burlington, Hamilton Centre, and Hamilton Mountain, and on the west by Highway 52 North and Trinity Road; plus that part of the current electoral district of Hamilton Centre lying south of the Niagara Escarpment; and plus that part of the current electoral district of Hamilton Mountain lying west of Garth Street and north of Rymal Road West. It has a population of 109,535, which is 3.13% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of FLAMBOROUGH—GLANBROOK (formerly part of the electoral districts of Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale and Niagara West—Glanbrook) is composed of the current electoral district of Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale, adjusted as follows: less that part assigned to the electoral district of Ancaster; plus that part of the City of Hamilton assigned to the current electoral district of Niagara West—Glanbrook; and plus that part of the current electoral district of Hamilton Mountain lying south of Rymal Road. It has a population of 97,081, which is 8.60% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of HAMILTON CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying south of the Niagara Escarpment, assigned to the new electoral district of Ancaster; plus that part of the current electoral district of Hamilton East—Stoney Creek lying west of Kenilworth Avenue and south of Burlington Street East. It has a population of 101,932, which is 4.03% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of HAMILTON MOUNTAIN is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying west of Garth Street and north of Rymal Road West, assigned to the new electoral district of Ancaster; and less that part lying south of Rymal Road, assigned to the electoral district of Flamborough—Glanbrook. It has a population of 103,615, which is 2.45% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of HAMILTON EAST—STONEY CREEK is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying west of Kenilworth Avenue and south of Burlington Street East, assigned to the electoral district of Hamilton Centre. It has a population of 107,786, which is 1.48% above the provincial quota.

Niagara

Niagara Region has a population of 431,346, warranting four electoral districts. With the census population of the electoral district of Niagara Falls being 128,357, the Commission endeavoured to balance population in the region more evenly. It proposed electoral districts aligned on an east–west axis rather than on a north–south axis. The Town of Fort Erie was assigned to an electoral district that included the Cities of Welland and Port Colborne and the Township of Wainfleet.

The Commission held a public hearing in Niagara Falls. It received numerous submissions suggesting that the City of Niagara Falls and the Towns of Fort Erie and Niagara-on-the-Lake, despite their combined high population, have a unique community of interest. They form a border with the United States along the Niagara River and, as a consequence, share numerous services and issues. The common thread of the submissions was that this unique community of interest should override concern for population equality. The Commission agrees.

The Commission also received persuasive submissions that the Cities of Port Colborne, Welland and Thorold all had a community of interest linked to the Welland Canal, thus calling for an electoral district with a north–south axis.

The Commission heard submissions suggesting that the area of St. Catharines known as Merritton has a significant community of interest with the City of Thorold and other communities in the current electoral district of Welland. The Commission does not find those submissions persuasive.

The Commission also received submissions from residents of the community of Dunnville, which is located near the southeastern boundary of the electoral district of Haldimand—Norfolk, requesting that their area be added to an electoral district in Niagara Region. The Commission does not find those submissions persuasive. Dunnville is located within Haldimand County, not within Niagara Region. One consistent message the Commission received throughout the seven weeks of public hearings was that, wherever possible, it should not interfere with county or regional boundaries.

The boundaries of the electoral district of NIAGARA FALLS remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 128,357, which is 20.85% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of NIAGARA CENTRE (formerly part of the electoral district of Welland) is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less the Township of Wainfleet, and less that part of the City of St. Catharines lying west of First Louth Street, Highway 406, Third Louth Street and Courtleigh Road, both assigned to the electoral district of Niagara West. It has a population of 105,860, which is 0.33% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of NIAGARA WEST (formerly part of the electoral district of Niagara West—Glanbrook) is composed of the Towns of Grimsby, Lincoln and Pelham, the Townships of West Lincoln and Wainfleet, and that part of the City of St. Catharines lying west of First Louth Street, Highway 406, Third Louth Street and Courtleigh Road. It has a population of 86,533, which is 18.53% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of ST. CATHARINES is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying west of First Louth Street, Highway 406, Third Louth Street and Courtleigh Road. It has a population of 110,596, which is 4.13% above the provincial quota.

GEORGIAN BAY, BARRIE AND SIMCOE

The Georgian Bay and Simcoe area has a population of 741,871, warranting one additional electoral district for a total of seven. During the past 10 years, the population of the City of Barrie has increased dramatically, and this growth is expected to continue. The population is too high for one electoral district. When formulating its Proposal, the Commission’s options were to divide the city on an east–west axis, using Highway 400 as a boundary, or on a north–south axis, using a municipal street as a boundary. At the time of preparing its Proposal, the north–south option seemed more reasonable. In its Proposal, the Commission divided the City of Barrie along Dunlop Street and added rural areas to both of the resulting Barrie electoral districts.

The incorporation of rural areas into those two electoral districts required some population adjustments in other electoral districts. The population of the electoral district of Simcoe—Grey was high. To adjust it, the Commission proposed that the Town of The Blue Mountains, which lies entirely within Grey County, be transferred from the electoral district of Simcoe—Grey to the electoral district of Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound. The Commission next proposed that the Township of Mulmur be transferred from the electoral district of Dufferin—Caledon to the electoral district of Simcoe—Grey. Finally, the Commission proposed that the Township of Springwater be transferred from the electoral district of Simcoe—Grey to the proposed electoral district of Barrie North.

The population of the electoral district of Simcoe North was also high. To adjust it, the Commission proposed that the Township of Oro-Medonte be transferred from that electoral district to the proposed electoral district of Barrie North.

To balance populations elsewhere, the Commission added the Town of Innisfil to the proposed electoral district of Barrie South and the north half of the Township of Uxbridge from Durham Region to the electoral district of York—Simcoe.

At the public hearing held in Barrie, the Commission heard persuasive objections to its proposal to adjust population by crossing county lines, notably in assigning the Township of Mulmur and the north half of the Township of Uxbridge to electoral districts beyond their county boundaries.

Furthermore, the Commission learned that, although the Town of The Blue Mountains lies within the boundaries of Grey County, its community of interest is strongly and significantly with the Town of Collingwood and other communities in the electoral district of Simcoe—Grey. It has no significant community of interest or identity with communities in Grey County.

The Commission also learned that residents of the area lying northeast of 9 Line in the Township of Oro-Medonte have a much greater community of interest with communities in the electoral district of Simcoe North than with communities in the proposed electoral district of Barrie North.

The Commission received submissions at the public hearing recommending the creation of one completely urban Barrie electoral district, and a second Barrie electoral district composed of the balance of urban Barrie plus the rural area surrounding the city to the north, west and south. The Commission also heard submissions objecting to that recommendation. It was clear to the Commission that the Town of Innisfil has developed a significant community of interest with the south part of the City of Barrie, and that it does not have any community of interest with the rural areas west and north of the City of Barrie.

There was one common thread of opinion at the public hearing in Barrie and in written submissions received with respect to the Georgian Bay and Simcoe area: people are significantly more concerned about community of interest and historical attachment than correspondence with the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of BRUCE—GREY—OWEN SOUND remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 106,475, which is 0.25% above the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of DUFFERIN—CALEDON remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 116,341, which is 9.54% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SIMCOE—GREY is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less the Township of Springwater, assigned to the new electoral district of Barrie—Oro—Springwater. It has a population of 116,307, which is 9.50% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SIMCOE NORTH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part of the Township of Oro-Medonte lying southwest of 9 Line and Moonstone Road East, assigned to the new electoral district of Barrie—Oro—Springwater. It has a population of 108,672, which is 2.32% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BARRIE—ORO—SPRINGWATER is composed of the following: that part of the current electoral district of Barrie lying north of Dunlop Street West and Tiffin Street; plus the Township of Springwater, formerly part of the electoral district of Simcoe—Grey; and plus that part of the Township of Oro-Medonte lying southwest of 9 Line and Moonstone Road East, formerly part of the electoral district of Simcoe North. It has a population of 97,876, which is 7.85% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BARRIE—INNISFIL is composed of the following: that part of the current electoral district of Barrie lying south of Dunlop Street West and Tiffin Street; plus the Town of Innisfil, formerly part of the electoral district of York—Simcoe. It has a population of 101,584, which is 4.36% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of YORK—SIMCOE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less the Town of Innisfil, assigned to the electoral district of Barrie—Innisfil; and less that part of the Town of East Gwillimbury lying south of Green Lane and west of Highway 404, assigned to the electoral district of Newmarket—Aurora. It has a population of 94,616, which is 10.92% below the provincial quota.

BRAMPTON AND MISSISSAUGA

The combined population of the Cities of Brampton and Mississauga is 1,237,354, warranting three additional electoral districts for a total of 11. The Commission assigned two of the new electoral districts to the City of Brampton, and one to the City of Mississauga. It proposed substantial boundary changes because of significant population shifts and growth in the last decade, but managed to respect municipal boundaries.

The Commission held public hearings in both cities. The public was generally supportive of the Commission’s Proposal, but there were several suggestions for changes to respect historical attachment, communities of interest, patterns of service provision, and the location of local landmarks. In particular, there were significant concerns about the Commission’s Proposal, which divided the community of Malton, and questions about whether that community should be assigned to an electoral district in the City of Brampton or in the City of Mississauga. The Commission decided that the community should not be divided and that it should be located in an electoral district in the City of Mississauga. This decision reflects the Commission’s desire to respect municipal boundaries wherever possible. The result, however, is that the populations of electoral districts in the City of Mississauga are high.

Several residents expressed concerns that the Proposal divided the historical core of the City of Brampton as well as the community of Heart Lake in the northern portion of the electoral district of Brampton West. Addressing those concerns required changes to the boundaries of other Brampton electoral districts to balance population.

With respect to the City of Mississauga, the majority of submissions accepted the Commission’s Proposal, but suggested small boundary changes that would better reflect communities of interest. There were several suggestions to use ward boundaries and various natural boundaries as guides for designing electoral districts. The Commission gave these exhaustive consideration, but could not accommodate them all because they would have created insurmountable problems in balancing population.

Submissions at the hearing pointed out that the Commission’s proposed boundaries had split the historic community of Cooksville as well as the core of the City of Mississauga. The Commission has redrawn boundaries in both areas in response to those concerns.

Brampton

The electoral district of BRAMPTON WEST is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying south of Embleton Road, Queen Street West to McLaughlin Road, and Williams Parkway West, assigned to the new electoral district of Brampton South. It has a population of 108,368, which is 2.03% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BRAMPTON SOUTH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of Brampton West lying south of Embleton Road, Queen Street West to McLaughlin Road, and Williams Parkway West; plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Brampton South lying north of the City of Brampton municipal boundary and west of Hurontario Street. It has a population of 107,364, which is 1.08% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BRAMPTON NORTH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order for the current electoral district of Brampton—Springdale, adjusted as follows: less that part lying south of Bovaird Drive East to Highway 410 and Williams Parkway East, assigned to the new electoral district of Brampton Centre; less that part lying east of Bramalea Road and north of Sandalwood Parkway East, assigned to the electoral district of Brampton East; plus that part of the current electoral district of Bramalea—Gore—Malton lying west of Torbram Road and north of Williams Parkway East. It has a population of 105,345, which is 0.82% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BRAMPTON CENTRE is composed of the following: that part of the current electoral district of Brampton—Springdale lying south of Bovaird Drive East to Highway 410 and Williams Parkway East; plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Brampton South lying north of the City of Brampton municipal boundary and east of Hurontario Street; and plus that part of the current electoral district of Bramalea—Gore—Malton lying west of Torbram Road, south of Williams Parkway East, and north of the municipal boundary. It has a population of 103,122, which is 2.91% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BRAMPTON EAST is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order for the current electoral district of Bramalea—Gore—Malton, adjusted as follows: less that part lying south of the City of Brampton municipal boundary, assigned to the electoral district of Mississauga North; less that part lying west of Torbram Road and south of Williams Parkway East, assigned to the new electoral district of Brampton Centre; less that part lying west of Torbram Road, north of Williams Parkway East and south of Bovaird Drive East, assigned to the electoral district of Brampton North; plus that part of the current electoral district of Brampton—Springdale lying east of Bramalea Road and north of Sandalwood Parkway East. It has a population of 99,712, which is 6.12% below the provincial quota.

Mississauga

The electoral district of MISSISSAUGA WEST—STREETSVILLE (formerly named Mississauga—Streetsville) is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying east of the Credit River and Creditview Road to Bristol Road West, assigned to the electoral district of Mississauga North; less that part lying east of Creditview Road and south of Bristol Road West, assigned to the new electoral district of Mississauga Centre; plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Brampton South lying north of Highway 401 and west of Mavis Road. It has a population of 118,757, which is 11.81% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MISSISSAUGA—ERIN MILLS is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order for the current electoral district of Mississauga—Erindale, adjusted as follows: less that part lying east of the Credit River and northwest of Dundas Street West, assigned to the new electoral district of Mississauga Centre; and less that part lying southeast of Dundas Street West, assigned to the electoral district of Mississauga South. It has a population of 117,199, which is 10.34% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MISSISSAUGA CENTRE is composed of the following: that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Erindale lying east of the Credit River and northwest of Dundas Street West; plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Streetsville lying south of Bristol Road West and east of Creditview Road; plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Brampton South lying south of Bristol Road West to Fairwind Drive and Eglinton Avenue West to Hurontario Street; and plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga East—Cooksville lying north and west of Central Parkway. It has a population of 118,756, which is 11.81% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MISSISSAUGA SOUTH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Erindale lying southeast of Dundas Street West. It has a population of 118,893, which is 11.94% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MISSISSAUGA NORTH is bounded as follows: on the north and on the east by the boundaries of the City of Mississauga; on the south by Eglinton Avenue and Highway 403 to Hurontario Street, Eglinton Avenue West to Fairwind Drive, and Bristol Road West to Creditview Road; and on the west by Creditview Road and the Credit River to Highway 401, and Mavis Road. It has a population of 118,046, which is 11.14% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MISSISSAUGA EAST—COOKSVILLE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying north and west of Central Parkway, assigned to the new electoral district of Mississauga Centre; plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Brampton South lying southeast of Eglinton Avenue and Highway 403. It has a population of 121,792, which is 14.67% above the provincial quota.

YORK

The population of York County, excepting that part of the county lying within the electoral district of York—Simcoe, is 965,985. This warrants three additional electoral districts, for a total of nine. The challenge to create three new electoral districts within York County was significant. The objective of maintaining the integrity of municipal boundaries was not totally achievable.

The population of the Town of Newmarket (79,978) is not sufficient to support an electoral district. The same observation applies to the Town of Aurora (53,203). On the other hand, the population of the Town of Richmond Hill (185,541) is too large for a single electoral district.

When drawing boundaries for three new electoral districts in this region, the Commission was unable to maintain an electoral district solely within the boundaries of the former Town of Thornhill, a significant historical community centered around Yonge Street immediately north of the City of Toronto. In 1971, the provincial government established the City of Vaughan, whose southeastern boundary is Yonge Street, and the Town of Markham, whose southwestern boundary is Yonge Street, with the consequence that the legal entity of the Town of Thornhill ceased to exist. However, people residing in that area continue to enjoy a strong community of interest.

The Commission conducted two days of public hearings in Richmond Hill. There was strong opposition to dividing the Town of Aurora along Wellington Street. The municipal council of the Town of Aurora further objected to the use of that street as a boundary because it would divide the heart of the downtown.

Some advocates for keeping the Towns of Newmarket and Aurora whole suggested attaching parts of the Township of King and the Town of Whitchurch-Stouffville to each municipality in order to create electoral districts with acceptable population variances from the provincial quota. However, besides the issue of an urban-rural split in the two suggested electoral districts, there remained the problem of how to divide the Town of Richmond Hill into two electoral districts with acceptable population variances.

The Commission also heard submissions that opposed the creation of mixed urban-rural electoral districts out of fear that the views and issues championed by urban residents would dominate and override those of rural residents.

The Commission received submissions expressing concern about the proposed southern boundary between the electoral districts of Aurora—Richmond Hill and Richmond Hill, which divided the core of the older part of the Town of Richmond Hill.

The Commission also received submissions from residents of the historical community of Thornhill, strongly urging the retention of an electoral district named Thornhill to encompass all of that community, including the part east of Bayview Avenue and west of Highway 404. The Commission endeavoured to draw electoral boundaries that would achieve that result, but the effect on the populations of adjacent electoral districts made it impossible.

The Commission also received submissions expressing concern that the boundaries in the Proposal divided each of the communities of Milliken Mills and Markham Village.

Newmarket, Aurora and Richmond Hill

The combined population of the Towns of Newmarket, Aurora and Richmond Hill, as well as that part of the Town of Markham lying north of Highway 407, west of Highway 404 and east of Bayview Avenue, is 323,171. This warrants the creation of three urban electoral districts, each with a population equivalent to the provincial quota.

The Commission tried, without success, to establish a boundary other than Wellington Street to separate the proposed electoral districts of Newmarket—Aurora and Aurora—Richmond Hill. The Commission was unable to find a feasible combination of streets and natural boundaries that could provide the required population balance.

The Commission considered, but ultimately rejected, the suggestion that the Town of Aurora be divided on an east–west axis. That suggestion made it impossible to balance population adequately in adjacent electoral districts.

Similarly, the Commission considered, but ultimately rejected, the suggestion to create an electoral district composed of the whole of the Town of Aurora and the north part of the Town of Richmond Hill. That proposal would have resulted in an electoral district to the north composed of the Town of Newmarket and parts of the Township of King, the Town of Whitchurch-Stouffville, or both – an urban-rural mix that the Commission considered undesirable in light of other submissions received.

The Commission was able to redraw the boundaries between the electoral districts of Aurora—Richmond Hill and Richmond Hill to avoid dividing the core of the older part of the Town of Richmond Hill.

In the Town of East Gwillimbury (part of the electoral district of York—Simcoe), there is a small urban area, having a population of 1,008, lying immediately to the north of the northern boundary of the Town of Newmarket whose community of interest is with the latter town.

The electoral district of NEWMARKET—AURORA is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part of the Town of Aurora lying south of Wellington Street, assigned to the new electoral district of Aurora—Richmond Hill; plus that part of the electoral district of York—Simcoe lying south of Green Lane and west of Highway 404. It has a population of 109,457, which is 3.05% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of AURORA—RICHMOND HILL (formerly part of the electoral district of Oak Ridges—Markham) is composed of the following: that part of the Town of Aurora lying south of Wellington Street; and that part of the Town of Richmond Hill lying north of a line drawn along Elgin Mills Road to Bayview Avenue, a creek from Bayview Avenue to Shirley Drive, and Major Mackenzie Drive East to the town limit. It has a population of 106,064, which is 0.14% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of RICHMOND HILL is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying north of Elgin Mills Road West, and less that part lying north of a line drawn along Elgin Mills Road East to Bayview Avenue, a creek from Bayview Avenue to Shirley Drive, and Major Mackenzie Drive East to the town limit, both assigned to the new electoral district of Aurora—Richmond Hill; plus that part of the current electoral district of Thornhill lying east of Bayview Avenue and north of Highway 407. It has a population of 108,658, which is 2.30% above the provincial quota.

Vaughan

The combined population of that part of the Township of King not included in the electoral district of York—Simcoe (18,617), that part of the Town of Markham lying west of Bayview Avenue (18,194) and the City of Vaughan (288,301) is 325,122, warranting three electoral districts.

The electoral district of KING—VAUGHAN (formerly part of the electoral districts of Oak Ridges—Markham and Vaughan) is composed of that part of the Township of King lying south of Davis Drive West and Highway 9, and that part of the City of Vaughan lying north of Major Mackenzie Drive to Highway 400 and north of Rutherford Road. It has a population of 109,235, which is 2.85% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of VAUGHAN—WOODBRIDGE (formerly part of the electoral district of Vaughan) is composed of that part of the City of Vaughan lying south of Major Mackenzie Drive and west of Highway 400. It has a population of 105,450, which is 0.72% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of VAUGHAN—THORNHILL—MARKHAM (formerly named Thornhill) is composed of that part of the City of Vaughan lying south of Rutherford Road and east of Highway 400, plus that part of the Town of Markham lying west of Bayview Avenue. It has a population of 110,427, which is 3.97% above the provincial quota.

Markham

The combined population of the Town of Whitchurch-Stouffville (37,628) and the part of the Town of Markham (279,066) not assigned to the electoral districts of Richmond Hill and Vaughan—Thornhill—Markham is 316,694, warranting three electoral districts. The Commission has revised the boundaries in its Proposal to address the concerns about having divided each of the communities of Milliken Mills and Markham Village.

The electoral district of MARKHAM—THORNHILL (formerly part of the electoral districts of Markham—Unionville and Thornhill) is composed of that part of the Town of Markham lying east of Bayview Avenue, south of Highway 407, and west of the Rouge River. It has a population of 102,221, which is 3.76% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MARKHAM—UNIONVILLE is composed of that part of the Town of Markham lying west of Highway 48 to 16th Avenue, west of McCowan Road to Highway 407, north of Highway 407, and east of Highway 404. It has a population of 104,693, which is 1.43% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MARKHAM—STOUFFVILLE (formerly part of the electoral districts of Oak Ridges—Markham and Markham—Unionville) is composed of the following: the Town of Whitchurch-Stouffville; plus that part of the town of Markham lying east of Highway 48 to 16th Avenue, east of McCowan Road to Highway 407, and east of the Rouge River. It has a population of 109,780, which is 3.36% above the provincial quota.

CITY OF TORONTO

The population of the City of Toronto is 2,615,060, warranting two additional electoral districts for a total of 25. When assigning the new electoral districts, the Commission looked at population in four areas within the city’s boundaries: the former Cities of Etobicoke and Scarborough, and the areas above and below Highway 401. The analysis confirmed that one new electoral district should be assigned to the area above Highway 401, and the second to the area below Highway 401.

The Commission conducted two days of public hearings in Toronto, where it heard and received more than 100 submissions each day. The focus of the submissions was on communities of interest. With a few exceptions, there was little concern expressed for balanced population or correspondence with the provincial quota.

Etobicoke

The area comprising the former City of Etobicoke is bounded as follows: on the west and north by the municipal boundaries of the City of Toronto; on the south by Lake Ontario; and on the east by the Humber River, which is a significant natural boundary. The population of that area is 347,948, warranting three electoral districts with populations that are high.

In its Proposal, the Commission attempted to balance population between the three electoral districts. It received written submissions objecting to the boundaries between the electoral districts of Etobicoke North and Etobicoke Centre, but does not find those objections persuasive.

The electoral district of ETOBICOKE NORTH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, plus that part of the current electoral district of Etobicoke Centre lying west of Martin Grove Road, and north of Eglinton Avenue West and Highway 427. It has a population of 117,601, which is 10.72% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of ETOBICOKE CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying west of Martin Grove Road, and north of Eglinton Avenue and Highway 427, assigned to the electoral district of Etobicoke North; plus that part of the current electoral district of Etobicoke—Lakeshore lying west of Kipling Avenue and north of Bloor Street West. It has a population of 114,910, which is 8.19% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of ETOBICOKE—LAKESHORE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying west of Kipling Avenue and north of Bloor Street West, assigned to the electoral district of Etobicoke Centre. It has a population of 115,437, which is 8.68% above the provincial quota.

Above Highway 401

The population of that part of the City of Toronto lying north of Highway 401 is 421,228, warranting one additional electoral district for a total of four. The Commission decided to use Highway 401 as a southern boundary for those four electoral districts.

The boundaries of the electoral district of YORK WEST remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 108,198, which is 1.87% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of YORK CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying east of Bathurst Street and north of the electric power transmission line, assigned to the electoral district of Willowdale. It has a population of 100,277, which is 5.59% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of WILLOWDALE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of York Centre lying east of Bathurst Street and north of the electric power transmission line; less that part lying east of Bayview Avenue, assigned to the new electoral district of Don Valley North. It has a population of 109,680, which is 3.26% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of DON VALLEY NORTH is composed of that part of the current electoral district of Willowdale lying east of Bayview Avenue, and that part of the current electoral district of Don Valley East lying north of Highway 401. It has a population of 103,073, which is 2.96% below the provincial quota.

Below Highway 401

The population of that part of the City of Toronto lying south of Highway 401 is 1,220,186, warranting one additional electoral district for a total of 12. At the public hearings in Toronto, the Commission received submissions urging that the following communities of interest remain intact and fall within the electoral districts to which they have been historically attached: the Annex, Seaton Village, the University of Toronto, Bedford Park, the community centred at Church Street and Wellesley Street, the Silverthorne area and Thorncliffe Park.

The population of the electoral district of York South—Weston is high. In its Proposal, the Commission attempted to balance population by assigning the part of that electoral district lying west of the rail line to the electoral district of Eglinton—Lawrence. In turn, to balance population there, the Commission next proposed to transfer the area known as Bedford Park to the electoral district of Don Valley West. As a result of submissions received at the public hearings, the Commission is convinced that residents of that part of the electoral district of York South—Weston in question do not have a community of interest with the electoral district of Eglinton—Lawrence. It is therefore unnecessary to assign the Bedford Park area to the electoral district of Don Valley West.

In a further attempt to balance population, the Commission proposed that part of the Silverthorne area be transferred from the electoral district of York South—Weston to the electoral district of Davenport. That proposal also met with serious opposition at the public hearings. Notwithstanding the high population in the electoral district of York South—Weston, the Commission is convinced that any attempt to balance population would negatively affect communities of interest within that electoral district.

The Commission received several submissions requesting that a significant part of the electoral district of St. Paul’s be assigned to the electoral district of Eglinton—Lawrence. Given that the population of the electoral district of Eglinton—Lawrence is already above the provincial quota, the Commission is unable to accommodate this request.

In another attempt to balance population, the Commission proposed to assign a part of the electoral district of Davenport to the electoral district of St. Paul’s. There were serious objections to that proposal in terms of its negative impact on communities of interest.

In drafting its Proposal, the Commission found that the population of the electoral district of Trinity—Spadina was high, while that of the neighbouring electoral district of St. Paul’s was low. In an attempt to balance population, the Commission proposed to assign the areas lying north of Bloor Street, known as Seaton Village and the Annex, to the electoral district of St. Paul’s. This also met with strenuous objections.

Residents of Seaton Village and the Annex argued that their community of interest is with the University of Toronto. The Commission received submissions that the University and its surrounding community should be included in one electoral district.

As a consequence of the significant opposition to the proposed boundary changes, the proposed new electoral district of Mount Pleasant was no longer viable. In response to the submissions at the public hearings, the Commission has instead created a new electoral district named University—Rosedale.

Other submissions dealt with population expansion from condominiums in the city centre and the waterfront. There were a range of suggestions, from creating a single electoral district for the condominiums to attaching the condominium development to the electoral district of Toronto Centre. The Commission closely examined all possibilities arising from those submissions, but none proved feasible with respect to balancing population.

In light of adjustments made after the hearings, the population of the electoral district of Trinity—Spadina remained high. The Commission determined that the best solution to adjust that population was to create a new electoral district named University—Rosedale, which would encompass in part the north portion of the current electoral district of Trinity—Spadina, and to assign the waterfront area of the current electoral district of Toronto Centre to an electoral district that includes the balance of the current electoral district of Trinity—Spadina.

Finally, in its Proposal, the Commission had divided the community centred at the intersection of Church Street and Wellesley Street. It has redrawn the boundaries to correct that oversight. Likewise, the Commission’s Proposal had divided the community of Thorncliffe Park. It has corrected that oversight as well.

The boundaries of the electoral district of YORK SOUTH—WESTON remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 116,606, which is 9.79% above the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of PARKDALE—HIGH PARK remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 105,103, which is 1.05% below the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of DAVENPORT remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 102,360, which is 3.63% below the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of EGLINTON—LAWRENCE remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 113,150, which is 6.53% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of ST. PAUL’S is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying east of Mount Pleasant Road, assigned to the electoral district of Don Valley West. It has a population of 103,983, which is 2.10% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of UNIVERSITY—ROSEDALE is composed of the following: that part of the current electoral district of Trinity—Spadina lying north of Dundas Street West; plus that part of the current electoral district of Toronto Centre lying west of Bay Street, north of Charles Street to Bloor Street East to Sherbourne Street, and north of Rosedale Valley Road; plus that part of the current electoral district of Don Valley West lying southwest of Bayview Avenue and south of Moore Avenue. It has a population of 99,566, which is 6.26% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SPADINA—FORT YORK (formerly named Trinity—Spadina) is composed of that part of the current electoral district of Trinity—Spadina lying south of Dundas Street West, adjusted as follows: less that part lying south of Dundas Street West, east of Bay Street and north of Front Street, assigned to the electoral district of Toronto Centre; plus that part of the current electoral district of Toronto Centre lying south of The Esplanade and Mill Street. It has a population of 82,480, which is 22.34% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of TORONTO CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of Trinity—Spadina lying south of Dundas Street West, east of Bay Street and north of Front Street; less that part lying south of The Esplanade and Mill Street, assigned to the electoral district of Spadina—Fort York; and less that part lying west of Bay Street, north of Charles Street to Bloor Street East to Sherbourne Street, and north of Rosedale Valley Road, assigned to the new electoral district of University—Rosedale. It has a population of 93,971, which is 11.53% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of DON VALLEY WEST is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of St. Paul’s lying east of Mount Pleasant Road; less that part lying east of Leslie Street, the Don River West Branch, and Don Mills Road, assigned to the electoral district of Don Valley East; and less that part lying southwest of Bayview Avenue and south of Moore Avenue, assigned to the new electoral district of University—Rosedale. It has a population of 98,859, which is 6.92% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of DON VALLEY EAST is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying north of Highway 401; plus that part of the current electoral district of Don Valley West lying east of Leslie Street, the Don River West Branch, and Don Mills Road. It has a population of 93,007, which is 12.43% below the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of TORONTO—DANFORTH remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 104,017, which is 2.07% below the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of BEACHES—EAST YORK remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 107,084, which is 0.82% above the provincial quota.

Scarborough

The area within the limits of the former City of Scarborough has a population of 625,698. The Commission’s approach to the Scarborough area was to respect the former city boundary, and to treat this area, and its six electoral districts, as an historical community. As a result, the Commission assigned the Pickering portion of the current electoral district of Pickering—Scarborough East to an electoral district in Durham Region.

Following this decision, the Commission made adjustments within the former City of Scarborough to balance population. At the public hearings, the Commission learned that these adjustments split the communities of Morningside Heights and Malvern. There were also objections to losing the designation of Rouge River, which many considered to be historically significant, and to creating an electoral district in the east of the region that crossed Highway 401. Many presentations argued for a more natural north–south orientation for electoral districts in this region. Finally, the Commission was advised that, if the boundaries of an electoral district had to cross Highway 401, it was preferable that this occur in the more mature and developed western portion of the Scarborough area.

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH—AGINCOURT is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying south of Finch Avenue East and west of the rail line, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough—Wexford; plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough—Rouge River lying west of Middlefield Road to the electric power transmission line, and west of McCowan Road to Highway 401. It has a population of 101,411, which is 4.52% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH—WEXFORD is composed of that part of the electoral district of Scarborough—Agincourt lying south of Finch Avenue East and west of the rail line, plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough Centre lying west of the rail line. It has a population of 101,840, which is 4.12% below the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of SCARBOROUGH SOUTHWEST remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 108,693, which is 2.33% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH—ROUGE (formerly named Scarborough—Rouge River) is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying west of Middlefield Road to the electric power transmission line, and west of McCowan Road to Highway 401, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough—Agincourt; plus that part of the current electoral district of Pickering—Scarborough East lying north of Highway 401 and west of the City of Toronto municipal boundary. It has a population of 102,270, which is 3.71% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying west of the rail line, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough—Wexford; plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough—Guildwood lying west of Highland Creek and West Highland Creek to Scarborough Golf Club Road, and north of the rail line. It has a population of 111,503, which is 4.98% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH EAST (formerly Pickering—Scarborough East) is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part of the City of Pickering lying east of the City of Toronto municipal boundary, assigned to the electoral district of Pickering—Uxbridge; less that part lying north of Highway 401, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough—Rouge; plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough—Guildwood lying east of Highland Creek and West Highland Creek to Scarborough Golf Club Road, and north of the rail line. It has a population of 99,981, which is 5.87% below the provincial quota.

EASTERN ONTARIO
Ottawa

The City of Ottawa has a population of 883,391, warranting one additional electoral district for a total of eight. The Commission proposed minor changes to several electoral districts in relation to municipal boundaries that have not existed since amalgamation in 2001.

At the public hearings, the Commission received a recommendation to assign to the electoral district of Ottawa—Orléans those parts of the community of Carlsbad Springs currently in the electoral districts of Nepean—Carleton and Glengarry—Prescott—Russell because of the community of interest among Francophone residents there.

The boundary changes to include Carlsbad Springs in the electoral district of Ottawa—Orléans affect the northeast boundary of the current electoral district of Nepean—Carleton in equivalent fashion.

The Commission was also asked to change the northwest boundary of the proposed electoral district of Nepean—Carleton slightly to include the Scotiabank Place area, which has always been clearly identified with Kanata, in the proposed electoral district of Kanata—Carleton.

The population of the electoral district of Ottawa South is high. The Commission considered reassigning that part lying south of Hunt Club Road and east of the Transitway to the proposed electoral district of Nepean—Carleton with a view to balancing population in those two electoral districts. In the end, the Commission declined to do so because it believes the residents of that area have a significant community of interest with and historical attachment to the residents immediately to the north.

The Commission received persuasive submissions that the community of interest of the Town of Mississippi Mills was with communities in Lanark County, and not with an electoral district more closely associated with the City of Ottawa.

The electoral district of OTTAWA—ORLÉANS is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of Nepean—Carleton lying east of Ramsayville Road and north of Mitch Owens Road; plus that part of the current electoral district of Glengarry—Prescott—Russell lying west of Tenth Line Road, Carlsbad Lane and Frontier Road between Wall Road and Devine Road; plus that part of the current electoral district of Glengarry—Prescott—Russell lying west of Frank Kenny Road and Ted Kelly Lane to the Ottawa River and north of Wall Road; less that part lying northwest of Regional Road 174 from St. Joseph Boulevard to Blair Road, assigned to the electoral district of Ottawa—Vanier. It has a population of 119,247, which is 12.27% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of RIDEAU—CARLETON (formerly named Nepean—Carleton) is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of Carleton—Mississippi Mills lying south of Highway 7 and Highway 417 to Huntmar Drive, south of Maple Grove Road to the Carp River, and west of the Carp River and Terry Fox Drive; less that part lying north of Brophy Drive and Bankfield Road, and west of the Rideau River, assigned to the new electoral district of Nepean; and less that part lying east of Ramsayville Road and north of Mitch Owens Road, assigned to the electoral district of Ottawa—Orléans. It has a population of 89,522, which is 15.71% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of KANATA—CARLETON (formerly part of the electoral district of Carleton—Mississippi Mills) is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less the Town of Mississippi Mills, assigned to the electoral district of Lanark—Frontenac; and less that part lying south of Highway 7 and Highway 417 to Huntmar Drive, south of Maple Grove Road to the Carp River, and west of the Carp River and Terry Fox Drive, assigned to the electoral district of Rideau—Carleton. It has a population of 100,846, which is 5.05% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of OTTAWA WEST—NEPEAN is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted along Baseline Road and Fisher Avenue. It has a population of 111,881, which is 5.34% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of NEPEAN (formerly part of the electoral district of Nepean—Carleton) is bounded as follows: on the north by the southern boundary of the electoral district of Ottawa West—Nepean; on the east by the Rideau River; on the south by Brophy Drive and Bankfield Road; and on the west by Eagleson Road to Hope Side Road to Richmond Road. It has a population of 104,775, which is 1.35% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of OTTAWA CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted along Baseline Road and Fisher Avenue. It has a population of 113,619, which is 6.97% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of OTTAWA SOUTH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted along the Rideau River. It has a population of 121,894, which is 14.76% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of OTTAWA—VANIER is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, plus that part of the current electoral district of Ottawa—Orléans lying northwest of Regional Road 174 from St. Joseph Boulevard to Blair Road. It has a population of 110,999, which is 4.51% above the provincial quota.

Eastern Ontario Outside of Ottawa

The Commission’s original treatment of the balance of Eastern Ontario was influenced by two factors: the substantial growth in population along Lake Ontario, and the existing configuration of north–south electoral districts that mixed urban and rural areas. Its Proposal attempted to realign a number of electoral districts on an east–west axis.

The Commission received substantial criticism that its approach severed communities of interest, divided and combined parts of counties, and ignored an historical attachment that runs along north–south lines despite the mixing of rural and urban areas. In particular, the Commission heard strong criticism of its proposed electoral districts of Lanark—Frontenac—Hastings, Belleville—Napanee—Frontenac and Prince Edward— Quinte West, and the effect on the current electoral district of Northumberland—Quinte West. The strongest criticism focused on the division of counties.

The first rule in the Act is population equality. Another rule is community of interest. The submissions at the hearings made it clear that the public generally gives community of interest significantly greater weight than an impersonal numerical quota. This was particularly true in Eastern Ontario, where the counties were founded as part of the creation of Upper Canada in the late 18th century. The message from the hearings in this part of the province was clear: keep communities of interest together as much as possible, and respect county boundaries as much as possible, even if that might result in significant variances from the provincial quota.

Accordingly, the Commission has decided to revise the boundaries in its Proposal for this area with a view to keeping counties as unified as possible, taking into account other historical communities of interest and respecting the population quota as much as possible within those constraints. This results in substantial changes to the boundaries for electoral districts southwest of Ottawa.

The population of the current electoral district of Kingston and the Islands is 125,227. In its Proposal, the Commission maintained the boundaries of that electoral district despite the high population. That decision was influenced by the proposed boundaries for adjoining electoral districts. As a result of persuasive objections at the public hearings to revisit those boundaries, the Commission made significant changes that require an adjustment to the electoral district of Kingston and the Islands to balance population.

The Commission is of the view that, for residents of the northwest part of the electoral district of Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, community of interest lies with the City of Pembroke and the County of Renfrew, not with the City of North Bay or the District of Nipissing. Therefore, there is no longer any need to refer to Nipissing in the name of that electoral district.

The electoral district of GLENGARRY—PRESCOTT—RUSSELL is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying west of Frank Kenny Road and Ted Kelly Lane to the Ottawa River as well as north of Wall Road, and less that part lying west of Tenth Line Road, Carlsbad Lane, and Frontier Road between Wall Road and Devine Road, both assigned to the electoral district of Ottawa—Orléans. It has a population of 106,240, which is 0.03% above the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of STORMONT—DUNDAS—SOUTH GLENGARRY remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 100,913, which is 4.99% below the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of LEEDS—GRENVILLE remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 99,306, which is 6.50% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of LANARK—FRONTENAC is composed of Lanark County and Frontenac County, excluding the Township of Frontenac Islands and that part of the City of Kingston lying north of Highway 401. It has a population of 98,409, which is 7.35% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of KINGSTON AND THE ISLANDS is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part of the City of Kingston lying north of Highway 401. It has a population of 116,996, which is 10.15% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of HASTINGS—LENNOX AND ADDINGTON is composed of Lennox and Addington County, Hastings County, and that part of the City of Belleville lying north of Highway 401. It has a population of 92,528, which is 12.88% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BAY OF QUINTE is composed of the City of Quinte West, plus that part of the City of Belleville lying south of Highway 401, and plus the City of Prince Edward. It has a population of 109,488, which is 3.08% above the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of RENFREW—PEMBROKE (formerly named Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke) remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 102,537, which is 3.46% below the provincial quota.

HALIBURTON, PETERBOROUGH AND NORTHUMBERLAND

The changes made to the Proposal for Eastern Ontario outside of Ottawa have implications for the Haliburton, Peterborough and Northumberland area. In addition, the Commission heard several criticisms of its Proposal at the public hearings. It was argued that the Cities of Prince Edward and Belleville share a significant community of interest. There was strong opposition to the Commission’s division of Northumberland County; residents also opposed the removal of “Northumberland” from the name of an electoral district, since it had been one of the original 19 founding counties in Upper Canada. The Commission received advice at its public hearings on changes that would largely preserve most of the existing electoral districts without unduly affecting communities of interest.

The electoral district of HALIBURTON—KAWARTHA LAKES—BROCK is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less the Townships of Galway-Cavendish and Harvey, and North Kawartha, assigned to the electoral district of Peterborough. It has a population of 110,182, which is 3.74% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of PETERBOROUGH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less the Townships of Otonabee-South Monaghan and Asphodel-Norwood, assigned to the electoral district of Northumberland—Pine Ridge; plus the Townships of Galway-Cavendish and Harvey, and North Kawartha, formerly part of the electoral district of Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock. It has a population of 115,269, which is 8.53% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of NORTHUMBERLAND—PINE RIDGE is composed of Northumberland County, the Townships of Otonabee-South Monaghan and Asphodel-Norwood, and that part of the Municipality of Clarington lying east of Darlington-Manvers Townline, Darlington-Clarke Townline and Regional 42 Road. It has a population of 107,840, which is 1.53% above the provincial quota.

DURHAM REGION

The Commission’s decision to revise its Proposal for electoral districts in Eastern Ontario outside Ottawa, and in the Haliburton, Peterborough and Northumberland area, also affected Durham Region. There were strong requests at the public hearings to keep Durham Region and the communities within it whole. Residents of the region expressed the sentiment that community of interest was substantially more important to them than correspondence with the provincial quota. There was also criticism of the way that the Commission had divided the Municipality of Clarington among three electoral districts, combined the City of Pickering with a portion of the Town of Whitby, and drawn the boundaries in the City of Oshawa.

As a result of changes made to adjacent electoral districts to the east, the Commission has been largely successful in its endeavours to keep Durham Region whole. The exceptions were the assignment of the Township of Brock to the electoral district of Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, and the assignment of part of the Municipality of Clarington to the electoral district of Northumberland—Pine Ridge.

The population of the balance of Durham Region is 582,132. This warrants five electoral districts, some of which have high populations. With the ripple effect of changes in Eastern Ontario, and in response to criticisms and suggestions at the public hearings, the Commission realigned those five electoral districts and renamed two of them. It was impossible to keep the Municipality of Clarington whole.

The electoral district of OSHAWA—DURHAM is composed of the following: that part of the Municipality of Clarington lying west of Regional 42 Road, Darlington-Clarke Townline, and Darlington-Manvers Townline; plus the Township of Scugog; and plus that part of the City of Oshawa lying north of Taunton Road. It has a population of 115,395, which is 8.64% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of OSHAWA is composed of that part of the City of Oshawa lying south of Taunton Road. It has a population of 125,771, which is 18.41% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of WHITBY is composed of the Town of Whitby. It has a population of 122,022, which is 14.88% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of AJAX is composed of the Town of Ajax. It has a population of 109,600, which is 3.19% above the provincial quota.

In its Proposal, the Commission had divided the Township of Uxbridge between two electoral districts. The changes made in the rest of Durham Region permit the whole of the Township to be assigned to a single electoral district.

The electoral district of PICKERING—UXBRIDGE is composed of the City of Pickering, plus the Township of Uxbridge. It has a population of 109,344, which is 2.95% above the provincial quota.

Conclusion

The Commission received its mandate on February 21, 2012. Since that date, it has been engaged for 104 days in reviewing its mandate, drafting its Proposal, conducting public hearings, deliberating on submissions received, and preparing its Report, often working long hours and through weekends.

The Commission’s challenge in the redistribution process for Ontario was far greater than that faced in any other province. The Commission had to create 15 new electoral districts. That number exceeds the total number of electoral districts in each of six other provinces. Beyond that, Ontario has 43 more electoral districts than Quebec, 79 more than British Columbia, and 87 more than Alberta. Those were the only provinces, other than Ontario, which were allocated additional electoral districts.

The Commission was cognizant of projected population growth, and established electoral districts in the Kitchener, Hamilton, Niagara, Milton, Brampton, Barrie, Toronto and Ottawa regions of the province that provided some flexibility for such growth.

The province of Ontario has the highest population of any province in Canada. It is geographically large, and culturally and linguistically diverse. The growth in population has occurred primarily in the large urban and suburban centres. When readjusting electoral boundaries to reflect that demographic trend, the Commission endeavoured to protect the democratic rights of people who reside in rural and northern regions of the province.

When drawing the electoral boundaries for the 121 electoral districts in the province, the Commission was mindful of its statutory obligation to establish electoral districts with populations as close to the provincial quota as reasonably possible, tempered by the obligation in section 15 of the Act to take into account communities of interest, communities of identity, historical patterns and manageable geographic size. It also received advice from hundreds of citizens and organizations across the province. Virtually all of that advice urged the Commission to draw boundaries based primarily on community identity and history, and not primarily on the provincial quota.

The Commission is grateful for that advice, and is satisfied that it has balanced its statutory obligations with the views of the people of Ontario in striving for the goal of effective representation for all citizens of the province.

The legal descriptions of the electoral districts and the resulting maps are attached to this report.

Dated at Toronto, Ontario, this 14th day of February, 2013.

THE HONOURABLE MR. JUSTICE GEORGE T. VALIN
Chairperson

DOUGLAS COLBOURNE
Member

DR. LESLIE A. PAL
Member

CERTIFIED copy of the Report of the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for Ontario.

BEVERLY HAYTER
Commission Secretary

SCHEDULES
(as of February 14, 2013)

Schedule A — Federal Representation 2013

Final Report

Province: Ontario

Population: 12,851,821 2011

Provincial Quota: 106,213

Federal Electoral District

Population
2011

Variance from
Quota (%)

Ajax

109,600

3.19

Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing

79,801

–24.87

Ancaster

109,535

3.13

Aurora—Richmond Hill

106,064

–0.14

Barrie—Innisfil

101,584

–4.36

Barrie—Oro—Springwater

97,876

–7.85

Bay of Quinte

109,488

3.08

Beaches—East York

107,084

0.82

Brampton Centre

103,122

–2.91

Brampton East

99,712

–6.12

Brampton North

105,345

–0.82

Brampton South

107,364

1.08

Brampton West

108,368

2.03

Brant

132,443

24.70

Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound

106,475

0.25

Burlington

120,569

13.52

Cambridge

111,693

5.16

Chatham-Kent—Leamington

111,866

5.32

Davenport

102,360

–3.63

Don Valley East

93,007

–12.43

Don Valley North

103,073

–2.96

Don Valley West

98,859

–6.92

Dufferin—Caledon

116,341

9.54

Eglinton—Lawrence

113,150

6.53

Elgin—Middlesex—London

110,109

3.67

Essex

120,477

13.43

Etobicoke Centre

114,910

8.19

Etobicoke—Lakeshore

115,437

8.68

Etobicoke North

117,601

10.72

Flamborough—Glanbrook

97,081

–8.60

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell

106,240

0.03

Guelph

121,688

14.57

Haldimand—Norfolk

108,051

1.73

Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock

110,182

3.74

Hamilton Centre

101,932

–4.03

Hamilton East—Stoney Creek

107,786

1.48

Hamilton Mountain

103,615

–2.45

Hastings—Lennox and Addington

92,528

–12.88

Huron—Bruce

104,842

–1.29

Kanata—Carleton

100,846

–5.05

Kenora

55,977

–47.30

King—Vaughan

109,235

2.85

Kingston and the Islands

116,996

10.15

Kitchener Centre

102,433

–3.56

Kitchener—Conestoga

93,827

–11.66

Kitchener South—Hespeler

97,673

–8.04

Lambton—Kent—Middlesex

105,919

–0.28

Lanark—Frontenac

98,409

–7.35

Leeds—Grenville

99,306

–6.50

London—Fanshawe

119,334

12.35

London North Centre

118,079

11.17

London West

119,090

12.12

Markham—Stouffville

109,780

3.36

Markham—Thornhill

102,221

–3.76

Markham—Unionville

104,693

–1.43

Milton

88,065

–17.09

Mississauga Centre

118,756

11.81

Mississauga East—Cooksville

121,792

14.67

Mississauga—Erin Mills

117,199

10.34

Mississauga North

118,046

11.14

Mississauga South

118,893

11.94

Mississauga West—Streetsville

118,757

11.81

Nepean

104,775

–1.35

Newmarket—Aurora

109,457

3.05

Niagara Centre

105,860

–0.33

Niagara Falls

128,357

20.85

Niagara West

86,533

–18.53

Nickel Belt

90,962

–14.36

Nipissing—Timiskaming

90,996

–14.33

Northumberland—Pine Ridge

107,840

1.53

Oakville North—Burlington

114,378

7.69

Oakville South

119,649

12.65

Oshawa

125,771

18.41

Oshawa—Durham

115,395

8.64

Ottawa Centre

113,619

6.97

Ottawa—Orléans

119,247

12.27

Ottawa South

121,894

14.76

Ottawa—Vanier

110,999

4.51

Ottawa West—Nepean

111,881

5.34

Oxford

108,656

2.30

Parkdale—High Park

105,103

–1.05

Parry Sound—Muskoka

91,263

–14.08

Perth—Wellington

104,912

–1.22

Peterborough

115,269

8.53

Pickering—Uxbridge

109,344

2.95

Renfrew—Pembroke

102,537

–3.46

Richmond Hill

108,658

2.30

Rideau—Carleton

89,522

–15.71

St. Catharines

110,596

4.13

St. Paul’s

103,983

–2.10

Sarnia—Lambton

106,293

0.07

Sault Ste. Marie

82,052

–22.75

Scarborough—Agincourt

101,411

–4.52

Scarborough Centre

111,503

4.98

Scarborough East

99,981

–5.87

Scarborough—Rouge

102,270

–3.71

Scarborough Southwest

108,693

2.33

Scarborough—Wexford

101,840

–4.12

Simcoe—Grey

116,307

9.50

Simcoe North

108,672

2.32

Spadina—Fort York

82,480

–22.34

Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry

100,913

–4.99

Sudbury

92,048

–13.34

Thunder Bay—Rainy River

82,984

–21.87

Thunder Bay—Superior North

82,827

–22.02

Timmins—James Bay

83,104

–21.76

Toronto Centre

93,971

–11.53

Toronto—Danforth

104,017

–2.07

University—Rosedale

99,566

–6.26

Vaughan—Thornhill—Markham

110,427

3.97

Vaughan—Woodbridge

105,450

–0.72

Waterloo

103,192

–2.84

Wellington—Halton Hills

115,880

9.10

Whitby

122,022

14.88

Willowdale

109,680

3.26

Windsor—Tecumseh

115,528

8.77

Windsor West

118,973

12.01

York Centre

100,277

–5.59

York—Simcoe

94,616

–10.92

York South—Weston

116,606

9.79

York West

108,198

1.87

Population of Ontario

12,851,821

 

Schedule B — Boundaries and Names of Electoral Districts

There shall be in the Province of Ontario one hundred and twenty-one (121) electoral districts, named and described as follows, each of which shall return one member.

In the following descriptions:

  • (a) reference to “roads”, “electric power transmission lines”, “water features” and “railways” signifies their centre line unless otherwise described;
  • (b) reference to a “township” signifies a township that has its own local administration;
  • (c) reference to a “geographic township” signifies a township without local administration;
  • (d) all cities, towns, villages and Indian reserves lying within the perimeter of the electoral district are included unless otherwise described;
  • (e) wherever a word or expression is used to denote a territorial division, such word or expression shall indicate the territorial division as it existed or was delimited on the first day of January, 2011;
  • (f) the translation of the terms “street”, “avenue” and “boulevard” follows Treasury Board standards. The translation of all other public thoroughfare designations is based on commonly used terms but has no official recognition;
  • (g) all coordinates are in reference to the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83).

The population figure of each electoral district is derived from the 2011 decennial census.

Ajax

(Population: 109,600)

(Map 3)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Durham comprised of the Town of Ajax.

Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing

(Population: 79,801)

(Map 1)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the Territorial District of Algoma, excepting that part described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the international boundary between Canada and the United States of America with the southeasterly corner of the Territorial District of Thunder Bay; thence N45°00′E in a straight line to the intersection of the northern shoreline of Lake Superior with the northerly boundary of the geographic Township of Peever; thence easterly along the northerly boundary of the geographic townships of Peever and Home to the Montreal River; thence generally easterly along said river to the easterly limit of the Territorial District of Algoma; thence southerly and easterly along the limit of said territorial district to the easterly boundary of the geographic Township of Bracci; thence southerly along said boundary and the easterly boundary of the geographic townships of Gaudry, Nahwegezhic, Lamming, Hughes, Curtis, Gillmor and McMahon to the northerly boundary of the geographic Township of Aberdeen; thence westerly along said boundary to the northerly limit of the Township of MacDonald, Meredith and Aberdeen Additional; thence generally westerly along said limit to the international boundary between Canada and the United States of America; thence generally westerly and northwesterly along said boundary to the point of commencement;
  • (b) the Territorial District of Manitoulin;
  • (c) those parts of the Territorial District of Sudbury comprised of:
    • (i) that part described as follows: commencing at the northwestern corner of the geographic Township of Acheson; thence easterly along the northerly boundary of the geographic townships of Acheson, Venturi and Ermatinger to the northeastern corner of the geographic Township of Ermatinger; thence southerly along the easterly boundary of the geographic townships of Ermatinger and Totten to the westerly limit of the City of Greater Sudbury; thence generally southerly along said limit to the northeastern corner of the geographic Township of Roosevelt; thence southerly along the easterly boundary of said geographic township to its southerly boundary; thence westerly along the southerly limits of the townships of Roosevelt and Curtin to the southerly limit of said territorial district; thence generally westerly and northerly along the limits of said territorial district to the point of commencement;
    • (ii) that part lying westerly and northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the southeastern corner of the geographic Township of Edighoffer; thence northerly along the easterly boundary of the geographic townships of Edighoffer, Burr, Singapore, Shipley, Blamey, Cunningham, Swayze, Rollo, Biggs and Pinogami to the southerly boundary of the geographic Township of Ivanhoe; thence easterly along said boundary and the southerly boundary of the geographic townships of Keith, Penhorwood and Kenogaming to the southeastern corner of the geographic Township of Kenogaming; thence northerly along the easterly boundary of said geographic township to the northerly limit of said territorial district;
  • (d) that part of the Territorial District of Thunder Bay lying southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the easterly limit of said territorial district with the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway No. 17); thence generally westerly along said highway to longitude 86°00′W; thence southerly along said longitude to the White River; thence generally westerly along said river to the northern shoreline of Lake Superior; thence S45°00′W in a straight line to the international boundary between Canada and the United States of America; and
  • (e) that part of the Territorial District of Cochrane described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said territorial district with the northwestern corner of the geographic Township of Boyce; thence easterly along the northerly boundary of the geographic townships of Boyce, Shuel, Mulloy, Fintry, Auden, Rogers, Fushimi, Bannerman, Ritchie, Mulvey, Goldwin, Sweet, Hillmer, McKnight, Boyle, Mowbray, Howells, Sheldon, Pinard and Mewhinney to the northeastern corner of the geographic Township of Mewhinney; thence southerly along the easterly boundary of the geographic townships of Mewhinney, Bourassa, Tolmie, Menapia, Beniah, Colquhoun and Calder to the northerly boundary of the geographic Township of Ottaway; thence westerly along the northerly boundary of said geographic township to its northwestern corner; thence southerly along the westerly boundary of the geographic townships of Ottaway, Beck, Lucas and Prosser to the southwestern corner of the geographic Township of Prosser; thence westerly along the southerly boundary of the geographic townships of Carnegie, Reid, Thorburn, Moberly, Aitken, Poulett, Watson and Lisgar to the southwesterly limit of said territorial district; thence generally northwesterly along said limit to the point of commencement.
Ancaster

(Population: 109,535)

(Map 12)

Consisting of that part of the City of Hamilton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said city with Highway No. 403; thence southwesterly along said highway to the Canadian National Railway; thence generally westerly along said railway to Highway No. 52 North; thence generally southerly along said highway and Trinity Road to the electric power transmission line situated northerly of Book Road West; thence generally easterly along said transmission line to Glancaster Road; thence northerly along said road to Garner Road East; thence easterly along said road and Rymal Road West to Garth Street; thence northerly along said street to Lincoln M. Alexander Parkway; thence easterly along said parkway to West 5th Street; thence northerly along said street to James Mountain Road; thence generally northeasterly along said road to the Niagara Escarpment; thence generally westerly along said escarpment to the electric power transmission line situated westerly of Chateau Court; thence northerly along said transmission line to Highway No. 403; thence generally northeasterly along said highway to the Desjardins Canal; thence easterly along said canal and continuing due east in Hamilton Harbour to the northerly production of Queen Street North; thence northerly in a straight line along said production to the northerly limit of said city; thence generally westerly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Aurora—Richmond Hill

(Population: 106,064)

(Map 21)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of York comprised of:

  • (a) that part of the Town of Aurora lying southerly of Wellington Street West and Wellington Street East; and
  • (b) that part of the Town of Richmond Hill lying northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said town with Elgin Mills Road West; thence easterly along said road and Elgin Mills Road East to Bayview Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to the unnamed creek situated northerly of Taylor Mills Drive North; thence generally easterly along said creek to Shirley Drive; thence generally southerly along said drive to Major Mackenzie Drive East; thence easterly along said drive to the easterly limit of said town.
Barrie—Innisfil

(Population: 101,584)

(Map 5)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the County of Simcoe comprised of the Town of Innisfil; and
  • (b) that part of the City of Barrie lying southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said city with Dunlop Street West; thence northeasterly along said street to Tiffin Street; thence southeasterly and easterly along said street to Lakeshore Drive; thence northeasterly in a straight line to the easterly limit of said city (at the intersection of the southerly limit of the Township of Oro-Medonte with the northerly limit of the Town of Innisfil).
Barrie—Oro—Springwater

(Population: 97,876)

(Map 5)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the County of Simcoe comprised of:
    • (i) the Township of Springwater;
    • (ii) that part of the Township of Oro-Medonte lying southwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said township with 9 Line North; thence southeasterly along said line to Moonstone Road East; thence northeasterly along said road to 9 Line North; thence generally southeasterly along said line to Horseshoe Valley Road East; thence northeasterly along said road to 9 Line North; thence southeasterly along said line, its intermittent production, 9 Line South and its southeasterly production to the southerly limit of said township; and
  • (b) that part of the City of Barrie lying northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said city with Dunlop Street West; thence northeasterly along said street to Tiffin Street; thence southeasterly and easterly along said street to Lakeshore Drive; thence northeasterly in a straight line to the easterly limit of said city (at the intersection of the southerly limit of the Township of Oro-Medonte with the northerly limit of the Town of Innisfil).
Bay of Quinte

(Population: 109,488)

(Map 6)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the City of Prince Edward;
  • (b) the City of Quinte West; and
  • (c) that part of the City of Belleville lying southerly of Highway No. 401.
Beaches—East York

(Population: 107,084)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Victoria Park Avenue with Sunrise Avenue; thence westerly along Sunrise Avenue and its production to the Don River East Branch; thence generally southwesterly along said branch to Taylor Creek; thence generally easterly along said creek to the northeasterly production of Coxwell Boulevard; thence southwesterly along said production and Coxwell Boulevard to Coxwell Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to Lake Shore Boulevard East; thence in a straight line on a bearing of 210° to Ashbridge’s Bay; thence generally southerly along said bay to its southerly extremity; thence due south to the southerly limit of the City of Toronto; thence generally northeasterly along said limit to the southerly production of Victoria Park Avenue; thence northerly along said production and Victoria Park Avenue to the point of commencement.

Brampton Centre

(Population: 103,122)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Brampton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southeasterly limit of said city with Hurontario Street; thence northwesterly along said street to Steeles Avenue East; thence northeasterly along said avenue to Kennedy Road South; thence northwesterly along said road and Kennedy Road North to Vodden Street East; thence southwesterly along said street to Main Street North; thence northwesterly along said street to Bovaird Drive East; thence northeasterly along said drive to Highway No. 410; thence southeasterly along said highway to Williams Parkway East; thence northeasterly along said parkway to Torbram Road; thence southeasterly along said road to the southeasterly limit of said city; thence generally southwesterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Brampton East

(Population: 99,712)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Brampton lying northeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said city with Bramalea Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Sandalwood Parkway East; thence northeasterly along said parkway to Torbram Road; thence southeasterly along said road to the southeasterly limit of said city.

Brampton North

(Population: 105,345)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Brampton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said city with Bramalea Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Sandalwood Parkway East; thence northeasterly along said parkway to Torbram Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Williams Parkway East; thence southwesterly along said parkway to Highway No. 410; thence northwesterly along said highway to Bovaird Drive East; thence southwesterly along said drive to Hurontario Street; thence northwesterly along said street to the northwesterly limit of said city; thence generally northeasterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Brampton South

(Population: 107,364)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Brampton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southwesterly limit of said city with Embleton Road; thence generally northeasterly along said road to Mississauga Road; thence northwesterly along said road to Queen Street West; thence northeasterly along said street to McLaughlin Road North; thence northwesterly along said road to Williams Parkway West; thence northeasterly along said parkway to Main Street North; thence southeasterly along said street to Vodden Street East; thence northeasterly along said street to Kennedy Road North; thence southeasterly along said road and Kennedy Road South to Steeles Avenue East; thence southwesterly along said avenue to Hurontario Street; thence southeasterly along said street to the southeasterly limit of said city; thence generally southwesterly and northwesterly along the southeasterly and southwesterly limits of said city to the point of commencement.

Brampton West

(Population: 108,368)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Brampton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said city with Hurontario Street; thence southeasterly along said street and Main Street North to Williams Parkway West; thence southwesterly along said parkway to McLaughlin Road North; thence southeasterly along said road to Queen Street West; thence southwesterly along said street to Mississauga Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Embleton Road; thence generally southwesterly along said road to the southwesterly limit of said city; thence northwesterly and generally northeasterly along the southwesterly and northwesterly limits of said city to the point of commencement.

Brant

(Population: 132,443)

(Map 8)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the City of Brantford; and
  • (b) that part of the County of Brant lying easterly of Etonia Road and East Quarter Townline Road and lying southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said county with Paris Plains Church Road; thence easterly along said road, its production to Scenic Drive, Scenic Drive and Howell Road to the easterly limit of said county; including Six Nations Indian Reserve No. 40 and New Credit Indian Reserve No. 40A.
Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound

(Population: 106,475)

(Map 2)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the County of Bruce comprised of:
    • (i) the municipalities of Arran-Elderslie and Northern Bruce Peninsula;
    • (ii) the Town of South Bruce Peninsula;
    • (iii) Neyaashiinigmiing Indian Reserve No. 27 and Saugeen Indian Reserve No. 29; and
  • (b) the County of Grey, excepting the Town of The Blue Mountains.
Burlington

(Population: 120,569)

(Map 9)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Halton comprised of that part of the City of Burlington lying southeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of said city with Queen Elizabeth Way; thence southwesterly along Queen Elizabeth Way to Walkers Line; thence northwesterly along said line to Upper Middle Road; thence southwesterly along said road to Guelph Line; thence northwesterly along said line to Highway No. 407; thence northerly along said highway to Dundas Street; thence southwesterly along said street to the southwesterly limit of said city.

Cambridge

(Population: 111,693)

(Map 10)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo comprised of:
    • (i) that part of the City of Cambridge lying southerly of Highway No. 401;
    • (ii) the Township of North Dumfries; and
  • (b) that part of the County of Brant lying northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said county with Paris Plains Church Road; thence easterly along said road, its production to Scenic Drive, Scenic Drive and Howell Road to the easterly limit of said county.
Chatham-Kent—Leamington

(Population: 111,866)

(Map 3)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Municipality of Chatham-Kent comprised of:
    • (i) that part lying southeasterly of the Thames River;
    • (ii) that part lying northwesterly of the Thames River, described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the Thames River with the southeasterly production of Bear Line Road; thence northwesterly along said production and Bear Line Road to Gregory Drive West; thence northeasterly along said drive to the northeasterly boundary of Lot 23, Concession 2, East Division of the geographic Township of Dover; thence northwesterly along said boundary and the northeasterly boundary of Lot 1, Concession Baldoon Street East of the geographic Township of Dover to the northwesterly boundary of said lot; thence northeasterly along the northeasterly production of said boundary to the northeasterly boundary of Lot 4, Concession 3 of the geographic Township of Chatham; thence southeasterly along said boundary to the northwesterly boundary of Lot 5, Concession 2 of the geographic Township of Chatham; thence southwesterly along said boundary to the southwesterly boundary of Lot 5, Concession 2 of the geographic Township of Chatham; thence southeasterly along said boundary to the Thames River; thence generally southwesterly along said river to the point of commencement;
  • (b) that part of the County of Essex comprised of:
    • (i) the Municipality of Leamington;
    • (ii) the Township of Pelee;
    • (iii) that part of the Town of Lakeshore lying easterly of Rochester Townline Road and its production to the northerly limit of said town; and
  • (c) Moravian Indian Reserve No. 47.
Davenport

(Population: 102,360)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Eglinton Avenue West with Dufferin Street; thence southerly along said street to Rogers Road; thence easterly along said road to Oakwood Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to Holland Park Avenue; thence easterly along said avenue to Winona Drive; thence generally southerly along said drive to Davenport Road; thence westerly along said road to Ossington Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to Dundas Street West; thence westerly along said street to Dovercourt Road; thence southerly along said road and its production to the GO Transit Railway; thence generally northwesterly along said railway to the southerly production of Keele Street; thence northerly along said production and Keele Street to Lavender Road; thence easterly along said road to Old Weston Road; thence northwesterly along said road to Rogers Road; thence easterly along said road to the GO Transit Railway situated easterly of Blackthom Avenue; thence northerly along said railway to Eglinton Avenue West; thence easterly along said avenue to the point of commencement.

Don Valley East

(Population: 93,007)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Highway No. 401 with Victoria Park Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to Sunrise Avenue; thence westerly along said avenue and its production to the Don River East Branch; thence generally southwesterly along said branch to Don Mills Road; thence northerly along said road to Overlea Boulevard; thence southwesterly along said boulevard to the Don River West Branch; thence generally northwesterly along said branch to Eglinton Avenue East; thence easterly along said avenue to Leslie Street; thence generally northerly along said street to Highway No. 401; thence easterly along said highway to the point of commencement.

Don Valley North

(Population: 103,073)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said city with Bayview Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to Highway No. 401; thence easterly along said highway to Victoria Park Avenue; thence northerly along said avenue to the northerly limit of said city; thence westerly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Don Valley West

(Population: 98,859)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Highway No. 401 with Leslie Street; thence generally southerly along said street to Eglinton Avenue East; thence westerly along said avenue to the Don River West Branch; thence generally southeasterly along said branch to Overlea Boulevard; thence easterly along said boulevard to Don Mills Road; thence southerly along said road to the Don River East Branch; thence generally southwesterly along said branch and the Don River to Pottery Road; thence northwesterly and southwesterly along said road to Bayview Avenue; thence generally northerly and northwesterly along said avenue to Moore Avenue; thence westerly along said avenue to the southerly boundary of the Mount Pleasant Cemetery; thence generally westerly along said boundary to Mount Pleasant Road; thence northerly along said road to Broadway Avenue; thence westerly along said avenue to Yonge Street; thence northerly along said street to Highway No. 401; thence northeasterly and easterly along said highway to the point of commencement.

Dufferin—Caledon

(Population: 116,341)

(Map 3)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the County of Dufferin; and
  • (b) that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of the Town of Caledon.
Eglinton—Lawrence

(Population: 113,150)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the GO Transit Railway situated westerly of Caledonia Road with Highway No. 401; thence easterly and northeasterly along said highway to Yonge Street; thence southerly along said street to Eglinton Avenue West; thence westerly along said avenue to the GO Transit Railway situated westerly of Croham Road; thence northerly along said railway to the point of commencement.

Elgin—Middlesex—London

(Population: 110,109)

(Map 14)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the County of Elgin;
  • (b) that part of the County of Middlesex comprised of the Municipality of Thames Centre;
  • (c) the City of St. Thomas; and
  • (d) that part of the City of London lying southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said city with Dingman Creek; thence generally easterly along said creek to the westerly production of Southdale Road West; thence easterly along said production, Southdale Road West and Southdale Road East to White Oak Road; thence southerly along said road to Exeter Road; thence easterly and northeasterly along said road to Highway No. 401; thence northeasterly and easterly along said highway to the easterly limit of said city.
Essex

(Population: 120,477)

(Map 3)

Consisting of that part of the County of Essex comprised of:

  • (a) the towns of Amherstburg, Essex, Kingsville and LaSalle; and
  • (b) that part of the Town of Lakeshore lying westerly of Rochester Townline Road and its production to the northerly limit of said town.
Etobicoke Centre

(Population: 114,910)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said city with Highway No. 401; thence easterly along said highway to Highway No. 427; thence easterly along said highway and Eglinton Avenue West to Martin Grove Road; thence northerly along said road to Dixon Road; thence easterly along said road and its easterly production to the Humber River; thence generally southeasterly along said river to Dundas Street West; thence southwesterly along said street to the Canadian Pacific Railway; thence southerly along said railway to Mimico Creek; thence generally northwesterly along said creek to Kipling Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to Bloor Street West; thence westerly along said street to Highway No. 427; thence southerly along said highway to Dundas Street West; thence westerly along said street to the westerly limit of said city; thence generally northwesterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore

(Population: 115,437)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the Humber River with Dundas Street West; thence southwesterly along said street to the Canadian Pacific Railway; thence southerly along said railway to Mimico Creek; thence generally northwesterly along said creek to Kipling Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to Bloor Street West; thence westerly along said street to Highway No. 427; thence southerly along said highway to Dundas Street West; thence westerly along said street to the westerly limit of the City of Toronto; thence generally southerly and northeasterly along the westerly and southerly limits of said city to the southeasterly production of the Humber River; thence generally northwesterly along said production and the Humber River to the point of commencement.

Etobicoke North

(Population: 117,601)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said city with the Humber River; thence generally southerly along said river to the easterly production of Dixon Road; thence westerly along said production and Dixon Road to Martin Grove Road; thence southerly along said road to Eglinton Avenue West; thence westerly along said avenue and Highway No. 427 to Highway No. 401; thence southwesterly along said highway to the westerly limit of the City of Toronto; thence northerly and easterly along the westerly and northerly limits of said city to the point of commencement.

Flamborough—Glanbrook

(Population: 97,081)

(Map 12)

Consisting of that part of the City of Hamilton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the easterly limit of said city with the Niagara Escarpment; thence generally westerly along said escarpment to Redhill Creek; thence westerly along said creek to Mountain Brow Boulevard; thence southerly along said boulevard to Arbour Road; thence generally southerly along said road, its intermittent production, Anchor Road and its southerly production to the intersection of Rymal Road East with Glover Road; thence westerly along Rymal Road East, Rymal Road West and Garner Road East to Glancaster Road; thence southerly along said road to the electric power transmission line situated northerly of Grassyplain Drive; thence generally westerly along said transmission line to Trinity Road; thence generally northerly along said road and Highway No. 52 North to the Canadian National Railway; thence generally easterly along said railway to Highway No. 403; thence northeasterly along said highway to the northerly limit of said city; thence northwesterly, generally northeasterly, northwesterly, generally southwesterly, generally southeasterly and generally northerly along the northerly, westerly, southerly and easterly limits of said city to the point of commencement.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell

(Population: 106,240)

(Map 16)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the United Counties of Prescott and Russell;
  • (b) that part of the United Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry comprised of the Township of North Glengarry; and
  • (c) that part of the City of Ottawa lying easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the interprovincial boundary between Ontario and Quebec with the northwesterly production of Ted Kelly Lane; thence southeasterly along said production, Ted Kelly Lane and Frank Kenny Road to Innes Road; thence southwesterly along said road to Frank Kenny Road; thence generally southeasterly along said road to Wall Road; thence generally southwesterly along said road to Tenth Line Road; thence southeasterly along said road, its southeasterly production, Carlsbad Lane, its southeasterly production and Frontier Road to Devine Road; thence southwesterly along said road to Boundary Road; thence southeasterly along said road to the southeasterly limit of said city (Burton Road).
Guelph

(Population: 121,688)

(Map 3)

Consisting of the City of Guelph.

Haldimand—Norfolk

(Population: 108,051)

(Map 3)

Consisting of the counties of Haldimand and Norfolk.

Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock

(Population: 110,182)

(Map 4)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the County of Haliburton;
  • (b) that part of the County of Peterborough comprised of the Township of Cavan-Monaghan;
  • (c) the City of Kawartha Lakes; and
  • (d) that part of the Regional Municipality of Durham comprised of the Township of Brock.
Hamilton Centre

(Population: 101,932)

(Map 12)

Consisting of that part of the City of Hamilton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of James Mountain Road with the Niagara Escarpment; thence generally westerly along said escarpment to the electric power transmission line situated westerly of Chateau Court; thence northerly along said transmission line to Highway No. 403; thence generally northeasterly along said highway to the Desjardins Canal; thence easterly along said canal and continuing due east in Hamilton Harbour to the northerly production of Queen Street North; thence northerly in a straight line along said production to the northerly limit of said city; thence generally northeasterly, southeasterly and northeasterly along said limit to the northerly production of Ottawa Street North; thence southerly along said production and Ottawa Street North to Burlington Street East; thence easterly along said street to Kenilworth Avenue North; thence southerly along said avenue and Kenilworth Avenue South to Lawrence Road; thence westerly along said road to the southerly production of Keswick Court; thence southerly along said production to the Niagara Escarpment; thence generally westerly along said escarpment to the point of commencement.

Hamilton East—Stoney Creek

(Population: 107,786)

(Map 12)

Consisting of that part of the City of Hamilton lying northerly of the Niagara Escarpment and easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of said escarpment with the southerly production of Keswick Court; thence northerly along said production to Lawrence Road; thence easterly along said road to Kenilworth Avenue South; thence northerly along said avenue and Kenilworth Avenue North to Burlington Street East; thence westerly along said street to Ottawa Street North; thence northerly along said street and its northerly production to the northerly limit of said city.

Hamilton Mountain

(Population: 103,615)

(Map 12)

Consisting of that part of the City of Hamilton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the Niagara Escarpment with Redhill Creek; thence westerly along said creek to Mountain Brow Boulevard; thence southerly along said boulevard to Arbour Road; thence generally southerly along said road, its intermittent production, Anchor Road and its southerly production to the intersection of Rymal Road East with Glover Road; thence westerly along Rymal Road East and Rymal Road West to Garth Street; thence northerly along said street to Lincoln M. Alexander Parkway; thence easterly along said parkway to West 5th Street; thence northerly along said street to James Mountain Road; thence generally northeasterly along said road to the Niagara Escarpment; thence generally easterly and generally southerly along said escarpment to the point of commencement.

Hastings—Lennox and Addington

(Population: 92,528)

(Map 6)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the County of Hastings;
  • (b) the County of Lennox and Addington; and
  • (c) that part of the City of Belleville lying northerly of Highway No. 401.
Huron—Bruce

(Population: 104,842)

(Map 3)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the County of Huron; and
  • (b) that part of the County of Bruce comprised of: the Town of Saugeen Shores; the Township of Huron-Kinloss; the municipalities of Brockton, Kincardine and South Bruce.
Kanata—Carleton

(Population: 100,846)

(Map 16)

Consisting of that part of the City of Ottawa described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said city with Highway No. 7; thence generally northeasterly along said highway to Highway No. 417; thence northeasterly along said highway to Huntmar Drive; thence southeasterly along said drive to Maple Grove Road; thence northeasterly along said road to the Carp River; thence generally southeasterly along said river to the southwesterly production of Spearman Lane; thence northeasterly along said production to Terry Fox Drive; thence generally southeasterly along said drive to Hope Side Road; thence northeasterly along said road to Richmond Road; thence northerly along said road to West Hunt Club Road; thence northwesterly in a straight line to the intersection of Haanel Drive with Robertson Road; thence southwesterly along said road to Eagleson Road; thence generally northwesterly along said road, March Road, Herzberg Road and March Valley Road (Fourth Line) to Riddell Drive; thence northeasterly along said drive and its northeasterly production to the interprovincial boundary between Ontario and Quebec; thence generally westerly along said boundary to the northerly limit of said city; thence generally southwesterly and generally southeasterly along the northerly and westerly limits of said city to the point of commencement.

Kenora

(Population: 55,977)

(Map 1)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Territorial District of Kenora lying westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the northeast corner of the most northerly point of the Territorial District of Thunder Bay (at Albany River); thence due north to the northerly boundary of the Province of Ontario; and
  • (b) that part of the Territorial District of Thunder Bay lying northerly and westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said territorial district with the 6th Base Line; thence easterly along said base line to the southeast corner of the geographic Township of Bertrand; thence northerly along the easterly boundary of the geographic townships of Bertrand, McLaurin, Furlonge, Fletcher and Bulmer to the northeast corner of the geographic Township of Bulmer; thence due north to the northerly limit of said territorial district (east of Highway No. 599).
King—Vaughan

(Population: 109,235)

(Map 21)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of York comprised of:

  • (a) that part of the Township of King lying southerly of Highway No. 9 and Davis Drive West; and
  • (b) that part of the City of Vaughan lying northerly and easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said city with Major Mackenzie Drive; thence easterly along said drive to Huntington Road; thence southerly along said road to Major Mackenzie Drive; thence generally easterly along said drive to Humber Bridge Trail; thence easterly along said trail and its easterly production to Old Major Mackenzie Drive; thence easterly and southeasterly along said drive to Major Mackenzie Drive; thence northeasterly and easterly along said drive to Highway No. 400; thence southerly along said highway to Rutherford Road; thence easterly along said road to the easterly limit of said city.
Kingston and the Islands

(Population: 116,996)

(Map 13)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the County of Frontenac comprised of the Township of Frontenac Islands; and
  • (b) that part of the City of Kingston lying southerly of Highway No. 401.
Kitchener Centre

(Population: 102,433)

(Map 10)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo comprised of that part of the City of Kitchener described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Conestoga Parkway with Fischer-Hallman Road; thence generally northwesterly along said road to the northerly limit of said city; thence generally northeasterly along said limit to Conestoga Parkway; thence easterly and southeasterly along said parkway to the Canadian National Railway; thence northeasterly along said railway to the easterly limit of said city; thence generally southeasterly along said limit (Grand River) to the southeasterly production of Zeller Drive; thence northwesterly along said production and Zeller Drive to Woolner Drive; thence generally southwesterly along said drive, Fairway Road North and Fairway Road South to Highway No. 8; thence northwesterly along said highway to Conestoga Parkway; thence generally westerly along said parkway to the point of commencement.

Kitchener—Conestoga

(Population: 93,827)

(Map 3)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo comprised of:

  • (a) the townships of Wellesley, Wilmot and Woolwich; and
  • (b) that part of the City of Kitchener lying westerly of Fischer-Hallman Road.
Kitchener South—Hespeler

(Population: 97,673)

(Map 10)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo comprised of:

  • (a) that part of the City of Cambridge lying northerly of Highway No. 401; and
  • (b) that part of the City of Kitchener lying easterly and southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southerly limit of said city with Fischer-Hallman Road; thence generally northerly along said road to Conestoga Parkway; thence generally northeasterly along said parkway to Highway No. 8; thence southeasterly along said highway to Fairway Road South; thence generally northeasterly along said road, Fairway Road North and Woolner Drive to Zeller Drive; thence southeasterly along said drive and its southeasterly production to the easterly limit of said city (Grand River).
Lambton—Kent—Middlesex

(Population: 105,919)

(Map 3)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the County of Lambton comprised of:
    • (i) the municipalities of Brooke-Alvinston and Lambton Shores;
    • (ii) the townships of Dawn-Euphemia and Warwick;
    • (iii) Kettle Point Indian Reserve No. 44 and Walpole Island Indian Reserve No. 46;
  • (b) that part of the Municipality of Chatham-Kent lying northwesterly of the Thames River, excepting that part of said municipality described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the Thames River with the southeasterly production of Bear Line Road; thence northwesterly along said production and Bear Line Road to Gregory Drive West; thence northeasterly along said drive to the northeasterly boundary of Lot 23, Concession 2, East Division of the geographic Township of Dover; thence northwesterly along said boundary and the northeasterly boundary of Lot 1, Concession Baldoon Street East of the geographic Township of Dover to the northwesterly boundary of said lot; thence northeasterly along the northeasterly production of said boundary to the northeasterly boundary of Lot 4, Concession 3 of the geographic Township of Chatham; thence southeasterly along said boundary to the northwesterly boundary of Lot 5, Concession 2 of the geographic Township of Chatham; thence southwesterly along said boundary to the southwesterly boundary of Lot 5, Concession 2 of the geographic Township of Chatham; thence southeasterly along said boundary to the Thames River; thence generally southwesterly along said river to the point of commencement; and
  • (c) the County of Middlesex, excepting the Municipality of Thames Centre.
Lanark—Frontenac

(Population: 98,409)

(Map 13)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the County of Lanark;
  • (b) the Town of Smiths Falls;
  • (c) that part of the County of Frontenac comprised of the townships of Central Frontenac, North Frontenac and South Frontenac; and
  • (d) that part of the City of Kingston lying northerly of Highway No. 401.
Leeds—Grenville

(Population: 99,306)

(Map 4)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the United Counties of Leeds and Grenville;
  • (b) the City of Brockville; and
  • (c) the towns of Gananoque and Prescott.
London—Fanshawe

(Population: 119,334)

(Map 14)

Consisting of that part of the City of London described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said city with Highbury Avenue North; thence southerly along said avenue to the Canadian National Railway situated southerly of Brydges Street; thence westerly, southwesterly and southeasterly along said railway to Commissioners Road East; thence westerly along said road to Wharncliffe Road South; thence southerly along said road to Southdale Road East; thence easterly along said road to White Oak Road; thence southerly along said road to Exeter Road; thence easterly and northeasterly along said road to Highway No. 401; thence northeasterly and easterly along said highway to the easterly limit of said city; thence generally northerly, northwesterly and westerly along the easterly and northerly limits of said city to the point of commencement.

London North Centre

(Population: 118,079)

(Map 14)

Consisting of that part of the City of London described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said city with Highbury Avenue North; thence southerly along said avenue to the Canadian National Railway situated southerly of Brydges Street; thence westerly, southwesterly and southeasterly along said railway to the Thames River (South Branch); thence generally westerly along said river to the Canadian National Railway; thence westerly along said railway to the Thames River; thence generally southwesterly along said river to Wonderland Road South; thence generally northerly along said road and Wonderland Road North to the northerly limit of said city; thence northeasterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

London West

(Population: 119,090)

(Map 14)

Consisting of that part of the City of London described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said city with Dingman Creek; thence generally easterly along said creek to the westerly production of Southdale Road West; thence easterly along said production and Southdale Road West to Wharncliffe Road South; thence northerly along said road to Commissioners Road East; thence easterly along said road to the Canadian National Railway; thence northwesterly along said railway to the Thames River (South Branch); thence generally westerly along said river to the Canadian National Railway; thence westerly along said railway to the Thames River; thence generally southwesterly along said river to Wonderland Road South; thence generally northerly along said road and Wonderland Road North to the northerly limit of said city; thence generally southwesterly along the northerly and westerly limits of said city to the point of commencement.

Markham—Stouffville

(Population: 109,780)

(Map 21)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of York comprised of:

  • (a) the Town of Whitchurch-Stouffville; and
  • (b) that part of the Town of Markham lying easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said town with Highway No. 48; thence southerly along said highway to 16th Avenue; thence westerly along said avenue to McCowan Road; thence southerly along said road to Highway No. 407; thence easterly along said highway to the Rouge River; thence generally southeasterly along said river to the southerly limit of said town.
Markham—Thornhill

(Population: 102,221)

(Map 21)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of York comprised of that part of the Town of Markham described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southerly limit of said town with Bayview Avenue; thence generally northerly along said avenue to Highway No. 407; thence easterly along said highway to the Rouge River; thence generally southeasterly along said river to the southerly limit of said town; thence westerly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Markham—Unionville

(Population: 104,693)

(Map 21)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of York comprised of that part of the Town of Markham described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Highway No. 404 with Highway No. 407; thence easterly along Highway No. 407 to McCowan Road; thence northerly along said road to 16th Avenue; thence easterly along said avenue to Highway No. 48; thence northerly along said highway to the northerly limit of said town; thence westerly along said limit to Highway No. 404; thence southerly along said highway to the point of commencement.

Milton

(Population: 88,065)

(Map 9)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Halton comprised of:

  • (a) the Town of Milton; and
  • (b) that part of the City of Burlington lying northwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of said city with Highway No. 407; thence generally southwesterly along said highway to Dundas Street; thence southwesterly along said street to the southwesterly limit of said city.
Mississauga Centre

(Population: 118,756)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Mississauga described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Eglinton Avenue West with Hurontario Street; thence southeasterly along said street to Highway No. 403; thence northeasterly along said highway to Central Parkway East; thence southeasterly and southwesterly along said parkway and Central Parkway West to Mavis Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Dundas Street West; thence southwesterly along said street to the Credit River; thence generally northwesterly along said river to Eglinton Avenue West; thence northeasterly along said avenue to Creditview Road; thence northwesterly along said road to Bristol Road West; thence generally northeasterly along said road to Fairwind Drive; thence generally easterly along said drive to Eglinton Avenue West; thence northeasterly along said avenue to the point of commencement.

Mississauga East—Cooksville

(Population: 121,792)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Mississauga described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of said city with Queensway East; thence southwesterly along Queensway East and Queensway West to Mavis Road; thence northwesterly along said road to Central Parkway West; thence northeasterly and northwesterly along said parkway and Central Parkway East to Highway No. 403; thence northeasterly and northwesterly along said highway to Eglinton Avenue East; thence northeasterly along said avenue to the northeasterly limit of said city; thence generally southeasterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Mississauga—Erin Mills

(Population: 117,199)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Mississauga described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southwesterly limit of said city with Britannia Road West; thence northeasterly along said road to Erin Mills Parkway; thence southeasterly along said parkway to Eglinton Avenue West; thence northeasterly along said avenue to the Credit River; thence generally southeasterly along said river to Dundas Street West; thence southwesterly along said street to the southwesterly limit of said city; thence northwesterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Mississauga North

(Population: 118,046)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Mississauga described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said city with Mavis Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Highway No. 401; thence southwesterly along said highway to the Credit River; thence southeasterly, generally northeasterly and generally southerly along said river to Creditview Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Bristol Road West; thence generally northeasterly along said road to Fairwind Drive; thence generally easterly along said drive to Eglinton Avenue West; thence northeasterly along said avenue to Hurontario Street; thence southeasterly along said street to Highway No. 403; thence northeasterly and northwesterly along said highway to Eglinton Avenue East; thence northeasterly along said avenue to the northeasterly limit of said city; thence northeasterly, northwesterly and generally southwesterly along the northeasterly and northwesterly limits of said city to the point of commencement.

Mississauga South

(Population: 118,893)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Mississauga lying southeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of said city with Queensway East; thence southwesterly along Queensway East and Queensway West to Mavis Road; thence northwesterly along said road to Dundas Street West; thence southwesterly along said street to the southwesterly limit of said city.

Mississauga West—Streetsville

(Population: 118,757)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Mississauga described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southwesterly limit of said city with Britannia Road West; thence northeasterly along said road to Erin Mills Parkway; thence southeasterly along said parkway to Eglinton Avenue West; thence northeasterly along said avenue to Creditview Road; thence northwesterly along said road to the Credit River; thence generally northerly, generally southwesterly and northwesterly along said river to Highway No. 401; thence northeasterly along said highway to Mavis Road; thence northwesterly along said road to the northwesterly limit of said city; thence generally southwesterly and southeasterly along the northwesterly and southwesterly limits of the City of Mississauga to the point of commencement.

Nepean

(Population: 104,775)

(Map 16)

Consisting of that part of the City of Ottawa described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Richmond Road with Highway No. 417; thence southwesterly along said highway to March Road; thence southeasterly along said road and Eagleson Road to Robertson Road; thence northeasterly along said road to Haanel Drive; thence southeasterly in a straight line to the intersection of West Hunt Club Road with Richmond Road; thence southerly along Richmond Road to Hope Side Road; thence southwesterly along said road to Eagleson Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Brophy Drive; thence northeasterly along said drive, Bankfield Road and its northeasterly production to the Rideau River (westerly of Long Island); thence northwesterly and generally northerly along said river (westerly of Long Island and Nicolls Island) to West Hunt Club Road; thence westerly, northwesterly and southwesterly along said road to Merivale Road; thence northwesterly along said road to the Canadian National Railway; thence westerly along said railway to Richmond Road; thence northerly along said road to the point of commencement.

Newmarket—Aurora

(Population: 109,457)

(Map 21)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of York comprised of:

  • (a) the Town of Newmarket;
  • (b) that part of the Town of Aurora lying northerly of Wellington Street West and Wellington Street East; and
  • (c) that part of the Town of East Gwillimbury lying southerly of Green Lane West and Green Lane East and westerly of Highway No. 404.
Niagara Centre

(Population: 105,860)

(Map 17)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Niagara comprised of:

  • (a) the cities of Port Colborne, Thorold and Welland; and
  • (b) that part of the City of St. Catharines lying southerly and easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the easterly limit of said city with Glendale Avenue; thence generally southwesterly along said avenue to Merritt Street; thence southeasterly along said street to Glendale Avenue; thence generally westerly along said avenue to Twelve Mile Creek; thence generally northerly along said creek to St. Paul Crescent; thence generally southwesterly along said crescent to St. Paul Street West (Regional Road No. 81); thence generally westerly along said street to First Louth Street; thence southerly along said street to the southerly limit of said city.
Niagara Falls

(Population: 128,357)

(Map 3)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Niagara comprised of: the City of Niagara Falls; the towns of Fort Erie and Niagara-on-the-Lake.

Niagara West

(Population: 86,533)

(Map 17)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Niagara comprised of:

  • (a) the towns of Grimsby, Lincoln and Pelham;
  • (b) the townships of West Lincoln and Wainfleet; and
  • (c) that part of the City of St. Catharines lying westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said city with the production of Courtleigh Road; thence southerly along said production, Courtleigh Road, and Third Louth Street to Queen Elizabeth Way; thence easterly along Queen Elizabeth Way to Highway No. 406; thence generally southerly along said highway to First Louth Street; thence southerly along said street to the southerly limit of said city.
Nickel Belt

(Population: 90,962)

(Map 11)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Territorial District of Nipissing comprised of the Municipality of West Nipissing, excepting Nipissing Indian Reserve No. 10;
  • (b) the City of Greater Sudbury, excepting that part described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Highway No. 17 with Highway No. 69; thence generally westerly and northwesterly along Highway No. 69 and Highway No. 46 (Regent Street) to Long Lake Road (Regional Road No. 80); thence southerly along said road to the southerly boundary of the geographic Township of McKim; thence westerly along said boundary to the easterly shoreline of Kelly Lake; thence generally southwesterly along said shoreline to the easterly boundary of the geographic Township of Waters; thence southerly along said boundary and the easterly boundary of the geographic Township of Eden to the southerly limit of said city; thence generally westerly and generally northerly along the southerly and westerly limits of said city to the northerly boundary of Concession 3 of the geographic Township of Fairbank; thence easterly along said boundary and the northerly boundary of Concession 3 of the geographic Township of Creighton-Davis to the westerly boundary of the geographic Township of Snider; thence northerly along said boundary to the northerly boundary of Concession 4 of said geographic township; thence easterly along said boundary to the westerly boundary of the geographic Township of McKim; thence northerly along said boundary to the northwestern corner of said geographic township; thence easterly along the northerly boundary of the geographic townships of McKim and Neelon to the easterly boundary of Lot 7 of the geographic Township of Neelon; thence southerly along said boundary and the easterly boundary of Lot 7 of the geographic Township of Dill to Highway No. 69; thence generally westerly along said highway to the point of commencement; and
  • (c) the Territorial District of Sudbury, excepting:
    • (i) that part described as follows: commencing at the northwestern corner of the geographic Township of Acheson; thence easterly along the northerly boundary of the geographic townships of Acheson, Venturi and Ermatinger to the northeastern corner of the geographic Township of Ermatinger; thence southerly along the easterly boundary of the geographic townships of Ermatinger and Totten to the westerly limit of the City of Greater Sudbury; thence generally southerly along said limit to the northeastern corner of the geographic Township of Roosevelt; thence southerly along the easterly boundary of said geographic township to its southerly boundary; then westerly along the southerly limits of the townships of Roosevelt and Curtin to the southerly limit of said territorial district; thence generally westerly and northerly along the southerly and westerly limits of said territorial district to the point of commencement;
    • (ii) that part lying westerly and northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the southeastern corner of the geographic Township of Edighoffer; thence northerly along the easterly boundary of the geographic townships of Edighoffer, Burr, Singapore, Shipley, Blamey, Cunningham, Swayze, Rollo, Biggs and Pinogami to the southerly boundary of the geographic Township of Ivanhoe; thence easterly along said boundary and the southerly boundary of the geographic townships of Keith, Penhorwood and Kenogaming to the southeastern corner of the geographic Township of Kenogaming; thence northerly along the easterly boundary of said geographic township to the northerly limit of said territorial district.
Nipissing—Timiskaming

(Population: 90,996)

(Map 2)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the Territorial District of Nipissing, including Nipissing Indian Reserve No. 10, excepting:
    • (i) that part of the Territorial District of Nipissing lying southerly and easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the northeast corner of the geographic Township of Deacon; thence westerly and southerly along the northerly and westerly boundaries of said geographic township to the northeast corner of the geographic Township of Lister; thence westerly, southerly and easterly along the northerly, westerly and southerly boundaries of said geographic township to the northwest corner of the geographic Township of Anglin; thence southerly along the westerly boundary of the geographic townships of Anglin, Dickson and Preston to the northerly boundary of the geographic Township of Airy; thence westerly along said boundary to the northeast corner of the County of Haliburton;
    • (ii) the Municipality of West Nipissing;
  • (b) that part of the Territorial District of Parry Sound comprised of: the municipalities of Callander and Powassan; the Township of Nipissing; and
  • (c) that part of the Territorial District of Timiskaming lying southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the easterly limit of said territorial district with the southerly limit of the Township of Harris; thence northwesterly and northerly along the southerly and westerly limits of said township to the northerly limit of the City of Temiskaming Shores; thence westerly and southerly along the northerly and westerly limits of said city to the northerly limit of the Township of Coleman; thence westerly along said limit to the easterly shoreline of the Montreal River; thence northwesterly along said shoreline to the northerly boundary of the geographic Township of Kittson; thence westerly along said boundary and the northerly boundary of the geographic townships of Dane and Leo to the northwestern corner of the geographic Township of Leo; thence southerly along the westerly boundary of said geographic township to the southerly limit of said territorial district.
Northumberland—Pine Ridge

(Population: 107,840)

(Map 4)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the County of Northumberland;
  • (b) that part of the County of Peterborough comprised of the townships of Asphodel-Norwood and Otonabee-South Monaghan; and
  • (c) that part of the Regional Municipality of Durham comprised of that part of the Corporation of the Municipality of Clarington lying easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southerly limit of said municipality with the production of Cobbledick Road; thence northerly along said production and Cobbledick Road to Highway No. 401; thence westerly along said highway to the production of Darlington-Clarke Townline (Regional Road No. 42); thence northerly along said production, Darlington-Clarke Townline and its intermittent production to Concession Road 10; thence generally westerly along said road to Regional Road No. 20; thence generally northerly along said road to Darlington-Manvers Townline; thence generally northerly along said townline to the northerly limit of said municipality.
Oakville North—Burlington

(Population: 114,378)

(Map 9)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Halton comprised of:

  • (a) that part of the Town of Oakville lying northwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of said town with Dundas Street East; thence southwesterly along said street to Eighth Line; thence southeasterly along said line to Upper Middle Road East; thence southwesterly along said road, Upper Middle Road West and its production to the southwesterly limit of said town; and
  • (b) that part of the City of Burlington described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of said city with Highway No. 407; thence generally southwesterly along said highway to Guelph Line; thence southeasterly along said line to Upper Middle Road; thence northeasterly along said road to Walkers Line; thence southeasterly along said line to Queen Elizabeth Way; thence northeasterly along Queen Elizabeth Way to the northeasterly limit of said city; thence northwesterly along said limit to the point of commencement.
Oakville South

(Population: 119,649)

(Map 9)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Halton comprised of that part of the Town of Oakville lying southeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of said town with Dundas Street East; thence southwesterly along said street to Eighth Line; thence southeasterly along said line to Upper Middle Road East; thence southwesterly along said road, Upper Middle Road West and its production to the southwesterly limit of said town.

Oshawa

(Population: 125,771)

(Map 15)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Durham comprised of that part of the City of Oshawa lying southerly of Taunton Road West and Taunton Road East.

Oshawa—Durham

(Population: 115,395)

(Map 15)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Durham comprised of:

  • (a) that part of the City of Oshawa lying northerly of Taunton Road West and Taunton Road East;
  • (b) the Township of Scugog; and
  • (c) that part of the Corporation of the Municipality of Clarington lying westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southerly limit of said municipality with the production of Cobbledick Road; thence northerly along said production and Cobbledick Road to Highway No. 401; thence westerly along said highway to the production of Darlington-Clarke Townline (Regional Road No. 42); thence northerly along said production, Darlington-Clarke Townline and its intermittent production to Concession Road 10; thence generally westerly along said road to Regional Road No. 20; thence generally northerly along said road to Darlington-Manvers Townline; thence generally northerly along said townline to the northerly limit of said municipality.
Ottawa Centre

(Population: 113,619)

(Map 16)

Consisting of that part of the City of Ottawa described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the interprovincial boundary between Ontario and Quebec with a line running N45°00′W from the mouth of the Rideau Canal; thence S45°00′E along said line to the mouth of the Rideau Canal; thence generally southeasterly along said canal to the northeasterly production of Frank Street; thence northeasterly along said production to the intersection of Greenfield Avenue with Nicholas Street; thence southeasterly along Nicholas Street to Highway No. 417; thence easterly along said highway to the Rideau River; thence generally southerly along said river to the easterly production of Borden Side Road; thence westerly along said production to Prince of Wales Drive; thence southerly along said drive to Fisher Avenue; thence northwesterly along said avenue to Baseline Road; thence southwesterly along said road to Merivale Road; thence northerly along said road to Carling Avenue; thence southwesterly along said avenue to Highway No. 417; thence southwesterly along said highway to Maitland Avenue; thence generally northwesterly along said avenue, Sherbourne Road and its northwesterly production to Richmond Road; thence N30°00′W in a straight line to the interprovincial boundary between Ontario and Quebec; thence northeasterly along said boundary to the point of commencement.

Ottawa—Orléans

(Population: 119,247)

(Map 16)

Consisting of that part of the City of Ottawa described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Frontier Road with Devine Road; thence southwesterly along Devine Road to Boundary Road; thence northwesterly along said road to Mitch Owens Road; thence southwesterly along said road to Ramsayville Road; thence generally northwesterly along said road to Highway No. 417; thence generally northwesterly along said highway to the abandoned Canadian Pacific Railway; thence easterly along said railway for approximately 300 metres to the electric power transmission line situated easterly of Cyrville Road; thence northwesterly along said transmission line to Innes Road; thence northeasterly along said road to Blair Road; thence northwesterly along said road to Regional Road No. 174; thence northeasterly along said regional road to Green’s Creek; thence generally northerly along said creek to the south shore of the Ottawa River; thence northwesterly in a straight line to the interprovincial boundary between Ontario and Quebec; thence northeasterly along said boundary to its intersection with the northwesterly production of Ted Kelly Lane; thence southeasterly along said production, Ted Kelly Lane and Frank Kenny Road to Innes Road; thence southwesterly along said road to Frank Kenny Road; thence generally southeasterly along said road to Wall Road; thence generally southwesterly along said road to Tenth Line Road; thence southeasterly along said road, its southerly production and Carlsbad Lane to Russell Road; thence easterly along said road to Carlsbad Lane; thence southerly along said lane and Frontier Road to the point of commencement.

Ottawa South

(Population: 121,894)

(Map 16)

Consisting of that part of the City of Ottawa described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the Rideau River with Highway No. 417; thence generally easterly and generally southeasterly along said highway to the northeasterly production of Blake Road; thence southwesterly along said production and Blake Road to Russell Road; thence southwesterly in a straight line to the intersection of Hunt Club Road with Hawthorne Road; thence southwesterly along Hunt Club Road to Conroy Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Davidson Road; thence southwesterly along said road and Lester Road to the Canadian Pacific Railway; thence southeasterly along said railway and its southeasterly production to Leitrim Road; thence southwesterly along said road to Limebank Road; thence northwesterly along said road and Riverside Drive to Hunt Club Road; thence westerly along said road and West Hunt Club Road to the Rideau River; thence generally northerly along said river to the point of commencement.

Ottawa—Vanier

(Population: 110,999)

(Map 16)

Consisting of that part of the City of Ottawa described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the interprovincial boundary between Ontario and Quebec with a line running N45°00′W from the mouth of the Rideau Canal; thence S45°00′E along said line to the mouth of the Rideau Canal; thence generally southeasterly along said canal to the northeasterly production of Frank Street; thence northeasterly along said production to the intersection of Greenfield Avenue with Nicholas Street; thence southeasterly along Nicholas Street to Highway No. 417; thence generally easterly along said highway to the abandoned Canadian Pacific Railway; thence easterly along said railway for approximately 300 metres to the electric power transmission line situated easterly of Cyrville Road; thence northwesterly along said transmission line to Innes Road; thence northeasterly along said road to Blair Road; thence northwesterly along said road to Regional Road No. 174; thence northeasterly along said regional road to Green’s Creek; thence generally northerly along said creek to the south shore of the Ottawa River; thence northwesterly in a straight line to the interprovincial boundary between Ontario and Quebec; thence generally westerly along said boundary to the point of commencement.

Ottawa West—Nepean

(Population: 111,881)

(Map 16)

Consisting of that part of the City of Ottawa described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the interprovincial boundary between Ontario and Quebec with a line running N30°00′W from the intersection of the northwesterly production of Sherbourne Road with Richmond Road; thence S30°00′E to the intersection of said production with Richmond Road; thence generally southeasterly along said production, Sherbourne Road and Maitland Avenue to Highway No. 417; thence northeasterly along said highway to Carling Avenue; thence generally northeasterly along said avenue to Merivale Road; thence generally southerly along said road to Baseline Road; thence northeasterly along said road to Fisher Avenue; thence southeasterly along said avenue to Prince of Wales Drive; thence northerly along said drive to Borden Side Road; thence easterly along the easterly production of said road to the Rideau River; thence generally southerly along said river to West Hunt Club Road; thence westerly, northwesterly and southwesterly along said road to Merivale Road; thence northwesterly along said road to the Canadian National Railway; thence westerly along said railway to Richmond Road; thence northerly along said road to Highway No. 417; thence southwesterly along said highway to March Road; thence northwesterly along said road, Herzberg Road and March Valley Road (Fourth Line) to Riddell Drive; thence northeasterly along said drive and its production to the interprovincial boundary between Ontario and Quebec; thence southeasterly and northeasterly along said boundary to the point of commencement.

Oxford

(Population: 108,656)

(Map 8)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the County of Oxford; and
  • (b) that part of the County of Brant lying westerly of Etonia Road and East Quarter Townline Road.
Parkdale—High Park

(Population: 105,103)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the Humber River with the Canadian Pacific Railway; thence easterly along said railway to the GO Transit Railway situated easterly of Old Weston Road; thence southeasterly along said railway to Queen Street West; thence westerly along said street to Dufferin Street; thence southerly along said street to the F. G. Gardiner Expressway; thence westerly along said expressway to the southerly production of Spencer Avenue; thence southerly along said production to the southerly limit of said city; thence generally westerly along said limit to the southeasterly production of the Humber River; thence generally northwesterly along said production and the Humber River to the point of commencement.

Parry Sound—Muskoka

(Population: 91,263)

(Map 2)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the District Municipality of Muskoka; and
  • (b) the Territorial District of Parry Sound, excepting: the municipalities of Callander and Powassan; the Township of Nipissing.
Perth—Wellington

(Population: 104,912)

(Map 3)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the County of Perth;
  • (b) the City of Stratford;
  • (c) the Town of St. Marys; and
  • (d) that part of the County of Wellington comprised of: the Town of Minto; the townships of Mapleton and Wellington North.
Peterborough

(Population: 115,269)

(Map 4)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the City of Peterborough; and
  • (b) that part of the County of Peterborough comprised of: the townships of Douro-Dummer, Galway-Cavendish and Harvey, Havelock-Belmont-Methuen, North Kawartha and Smith-Ennismore-Lakefield; Curve Lake First Nation Indian Reserve No. 35.
Pickering—Uxbridge

(Population: 109,344)

(Map 3)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Durham comprised of: the City of Pickering; the Township of Uxbridge.

Renfrew—Pembroke

(Population: 102,537)

(Map 2)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the County of Renfrew;
  • (b) the City of Pembroke; and
  • (c) that part of the Territorial District of Nipissing lying southerly and easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the northeast corner of the geographic Township of Deacon; thence westerly and southerly along the northerly and westerly boundaries of said geographic township to the northeast corner of the geographic Township of Lister; thence westerly, southerly and easterly along the northerly, westerly and southerly boundaries of said geographic township to the northwest corner of the geographic Township of Anglin; thence southerly along the westerly boundary of the geographic townships of Anglin, Dickson and Preston to the northerly boundary of the geographic Township of Airy; thence westerly along said boundary to the northeast corner of the County of Haliburton.
Richmond Hill

(Population: 108,658)

(Map 21)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of York comprised of:

  • (a) that part of the Town of Richmond Hill lying southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said town with Elgin Mills Road West; thence easterly along said road and Elgin Mills Road East to Bayview Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to the unnamed creek situated northerly of Taylor Mills Drive North; thence generally easterly along said creek to Shirley Drive; thence generally southerly along said drive to Major Mackenzie Drive East; thence easterly along said drive to the easterly limit of said town; and
  • (b) that part of the Town of Markham lying easterly of Bayview Avenue, northerly of Highway No. 407 and westerly of Highway No. 404.
Rideau—Carleton

(Population: 89,522)

(Map 16)

Consisting of that part of the City of Ottawa described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said city with Highway No. 7; thence generally northeasterly along said highway to Highway No. 417; thence northeasterly along said highway to Huntmar Drive; thence southeasterly along said drive to Maple Grove Road; thence northeasterly along said road to the Carp River; thence generally southeasterly along said river to the southwesterly production of Spearman Lane; thence northeasterly along said production to Terry Fox Drive; thence generally southeasterly along said drive to Eagleson Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Brophy Drive; thence northeasterly along said drive, Bankfield Road and its northeasterly production to the Rideau River (westerly of Long Island); thence northwesterly and generally northerly along said river (westerly of Long Island and Nicolls Island) to West Hunt Club Road; thence easterly along said road and Hunt Club Road to Riverside Drive; thence generally southerly along said drive and Limebank Road to Leitrim Road; thence northeasterly along said road to the southeasterly production of the Canadian Pacific Railway; thence northwesterly along said production and the Canadian Pacific Railway to Lester Road; thence northeasterly along said road and Davidson Road to Conroy Road; thence northwesterly along said road to Hunt Club Road; thence northeasterly along said road to Hawthorne Road; thence northeasterly in a straight line to the intersection of Russell Road with Blake Road; thence northeasterly along Blake Road and its northeasterly production to Highway No. 417; thence generally southeasterly along said highway to Ramsayville Road; thence southerly and southeasterly along said road to Mitch Owens Road; thence northeasterly along said road to Boundary Road; thence southeasterly along said road to the easterly limit of said city; thence southeasterly, generally southwesterly and generally northwesterly along the easterly, southerly and westerly limits of said city to the point of commencement.

St. Catharines

(Population: 110,596)

(Map 17)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Niagara comprised of that part of the City of St. Catharines lying northerly and easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the easterly limit of said city with Glendale Avenue; thence southwesterly along said avenue to Merritt Street; thence southeasterly along said street to Glendale Avenue; thence generally westerly along said avenue to Twelve Mile Creek; thence generally northerly along said creek to St. Paul Crescent; thence generally southwesterly along said crescent to St. Paul Street West (Regional Road No. 81); thence generally westerly along said street to First Louth Street; thence northerly along said street to Highway No. 406; thence generally northerly along said highway to Queen Elizabeth Way; thence westerly along Queen Elizabeth Way to Third Louth Street; thence northerly along said street, Courtleigh Road and its northerly production to the northerly limit of said city.

St. Paul’s

(Population: 103,983)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Eglinton Avenue West and Dufferin Street; thence southerly along Dufferin Street to Rogers Road; thence easterly along said road to Oakwood Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to Holland Park Avenue; thence easterly along said avenue to Winona Drive; thence generally southerly along said drive to Davenport Road; thence westerly along said road to Ossington Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to the Canadian Pacific Railway; thence generally easterly along said railway to Yonge Street; thence northerly along said street to Jackes Avenue; thence easterly along said avenue to the westerly boundary of the Rosehill Reservoir; thence northerly along said boundary to Rosehill Avenue; thence easterly along said avenue and its easterly production to the Don River Tributary situated easterly of Avoca Avenue; thence generally northwesterly along said tributary and its northwesterly production to the southerly boundary of the Mount Pleasant Cemetery; thence generally easterly along said boundary to Mount Pleasant Road; thence northerly along said road to Broadway Avenue; thence westerly along said avenue to Yonge Street; thence southerly along said street to Eglinton Avenue West; thence westerly along said avenue to the point of commencement.

Sarnia—Lambton

(Population: 106,293)

(Map 3)

Consisting of that part of the County of Lambton comprised of: the City of Sarnia; the towns of Petrolia and Plympton-Wyoming; the villages of Oil Springs and Point Edward; the townships of Enniskillen and St. Clair; Sarnia Indian Reserve No. 45.

Sault Ste. Marie

(Population: 82,052)

(Map 1)

Consisting of that part of the Territorial District of Algoma described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the international boundary between Canada and the United States of America with the southeasterly corner of the Territorial District of Thunder Bay; thence N45°00′E in a straight line to the intersection of the northern shoreline of Lake Superior with the northerly boundary of the geographic Township of Peever; thence easterly along the northerly boundary of the geographic townships of Peever and Home to the Montreal River; thence generally easterly along said river to the easterly limit of the Territorial District of Algoma; thence southerly and easterly along the limit of said territorial district to the easterly boundary of the geographic Township of Bracci; thence southerly along said boundary and the easterly boundary of the geographic townships of Gaudry, Nahwegezhic, Lamming, Hughes, Curtis, Gillmor and McMahon to the northerly boundary of the geographic Township of Aberdeen; thence westerly along said boundary to the northerly limit of the Township of MacDonald, Meredith and Aberdeen Additional; thence generally westerly along said limit to the international boundary between Canada and the United States of America; thence generally westerly and northwesterly along said boundary to the point of commencement.

Scarborough—Agincourt

(Population: 101,411)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said city with Middlefield Road; thence southerly along said road to the electric power transmission line situated southerly of McNicoll Avenue; thence westerly along said transmission line to McCowan Road; thence generally southerly along said road to Highway No. 401; thence westerly along said highway to the Canadian National–GO Transit Railway; thence northerly along said railway to Finch Avenue East; thence westerly along said avenue to Victoria Park Avenue; thence northerly along said avenue to the northerly limit of the City of Toronto; thence easterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Scarborough Centre

(Population: 111,503)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the GO Transit Railway with Highway No. 401; thence generally easterly along said highway to the Highland Creek; thence generally southeasterly along said creek to the West Highland Creek; thence generally southwesterly along said creek to Scarborough Golf Club Road; thence southerly along said road to the Canadian National–GO Transit Railway; thence southwesterly along said railway to Eglinton Avenue East; thence westerly along said avenue to the Canadian National–GO Transit Railway; thence northerly along said railway to the point of commencement.

Scarborough East

(Population: 99,981)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Highway No. 401 with the easterly limit of said city; thence generally southeasterly and southwesterly along the easterly and southerly limits of said city to the southeasterly production of the Bellamy Ravine Creek; thence generally northwesterly along said production and the Bellamy Ravine Creek to Kingston Road; thence northeasterly along said road to Bellamy Road South; thence northerly along said road and its northerly production to Eglinton Avenue East; thence westerly along said avenue to the Canadian National–GO Transit Railway; thence northeasterly along said railway to Scarborough Golf Club Road; thence northerly along said road to the West Highland Creek; thence generally northeasterly along said creek to the Highland Creek; thence generally northwesterly along said creek to Highway No. 401; thence generally easterly along said highway to the point of commencement.

Scarborough—Rouge

(Population: 102,270)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Middlefield Road with the northerly limit of said city; thence easterly, southerly and generally southeasterly along the northerly and easterly limits of said city to Highway No. 401; thence generally westerly along said highway to McCowan Road; thence generally northerly along said road to the electric power transmission line situated southerly of McNicoll Avenue; thence easterly along said transmission line to Middlefield Road; thence northerly along said road to the point of commencement.

Scarborough Southwest

(Population: 108,693)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Victoria Park Avenue with the electric power transmission line situated northerly of Craigton Drive; thence northeasterly along said transmission line to the Canadian National–GO Transit Railway; thence southerly along said railway to Eglinton Avenue East; thence easterly along said avenue to the northerly production of Bellamy Road South; thence southerly along said production and Bellamy Road South to Kingston Road; thence southwesterly along Kingston Road to the Bellamy Ravine Creek; thence generally southeasterly along said creek and its southeasterly production to the southerly limit of said city; thence southwesterly along said limit to the southerly production of Victoria Park Avenue; thence generally northerly along said production and Victoria Park Avenue to the point of commencement.

Scarborough—Wexford

(Population: 101,840)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Victoria Park Avenue with Finch Avenue East; thence easterly along said avenue to the Canadian National–GO Transit Railway; thence southerly along said railway to the electric power transmission line situated southerly of Jenkinson Way; thence southwesterly along said transmission line to Victoria Park Avenue; thence northerly along said avenue to the point of commencement.

Simcoe—Grey

(Population: 116,307)

(Map 3)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the County of Simcoe comprised of: the towns of Collingwood, New Tecumseth and Wasaga Beach; the townships of Adjala-Tosorontio, Clearview and Essa; and
  • (b) that part of the County of Grey comprised of the Town of The Blue Mountains.
Simcoe North

(Population: 108,672)

(Map 2)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the County of Simcoe comprised of:
    • (i) the townships of Ramara, Severn, Tay and Tiny;
    • (ii) the towns of Midland and Penetanguishene;
    • (iii) Christian Island Indian Reserve No. 30, Christian Island Indian Reserve No. 30A and Mnjikaning First Nation (Rama First Nation) Indian Reserve No. 32;
    • (iv) that part of the Township of Oro-Medonte lying northeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said township with 9 Line North; thence southeasterly along said line to Moonstone Road East; thence northeasterly along said road to 9 Line North; thence generally southeasterly along said line to Horseshoe Valley Road East; thence northeasterly along said road to 9 Line North; thence southeasterly along said line, its intermittent production, 9 Line South and its southeasterly production to the southerly limit of said township; and
  • (b) the City of Orillia.
Spadina—Fort York

(Population: 82,480)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Ossington Avenue with Dundas Street West; thence generally easterly along said street to Bay Street; thence generally southerly along said street to Front Street West; thence generally northeasterly along said street to Yonge Street; thence southerly along said street to The Esplanade; thence generally easterly along The Esplanade to Berkeley Street; thence easterly in a straight line to the intersection of Mill Street with Parliament Street; thence easterly along Mill Street and its easterly production to the Don River; thence southerly along said river to the Keating Channel; thence southwesterly along said channel and its production to the southerly production of Parliament Street; thence southerly in a straight line to the southerly extremity of the Eastern Channel of Toronto Harbour; thence southwesterly in a straight line to the southerly corner of the City of Toronto, said corner being situated southerly of the Outer Harbour East Headland (Tommy Thompson Park); thence generally westerly along the southerly limit of said city to the southerly production of Spencer Avenue; thence northerly along said production to the F. G. Gardiner Expressway; thence easterly along said expressway to Dufferin Street; thence northerly along said street to Queen Street West; thence easterly along said street to the GO Transit Railway; thence generally easterly along said railway to the southerly production of Dovercourt Road; thence northerly along said production and Dovercourt Road to Dundas Street West; thence easterly along said street to the point of commencement.

Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry

(Population: 100,913)

(Map 4)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the United Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry, excepting the Township of North Glengarry;
  • (b) the City of Cornwall; and
  • (c) Akwesasne (Part) Indian Reserve No. 59.
Sudbury

(Population: 92,048)

(Map 11)

Consisting of that part of the City of Greater Sudbury described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Highway No. 17 with Highway No. 69; thence generally westerly and northwesterly along Highway No. 69 and Highway No. 46 (Regent Street) to Long Lake Road (Regional Road No. 80); thence southerly along said road to the southerly boundary of the geographic Township of McKim; thence westerly along said boundary to the easterly shoreline of Kelly Lake; thence generally southwesterly along said shoreline to the easterly boundary of the geographic Township of Waters; thence southerly along said boundary and the easterly boundary of the geographic Township of Eden to the southerly limit of said city; thence generally westerly and generally northerly along the southerly and westerly limits of said city to the northerly boundary of Concession 3 of the geographic Township of Fairbank; thence easterly along said boundary and the northerly boundary of Concession 3 of the geographic Township of Creighton-Davis to the westerly boundary of the geographic Township of Snider; thence northerly along said boundary to the northerly boundary of Concession 4 of said geographic township; thence easterly along said boundary to the westerly boundary of the geographic Township of McKim; thence northerly along said boundary to the northwestern corner of said geographic township; thence easterly along the northerly boundary of the geographic townships of McKim and Neelon to the easterly boundary of Lot 7 of the geographic Township of Neelon; thence southerly along said boundary and the easterly boundary of Lot 7 of the geographic Township of Dill to Highway No. 69; thence generally westerly along said highway to the point of commencement.

Thunder Bay—Rainy River

(Population: 82,984)

(Map 18)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Territorial District of Thunder Bay lying southerly and westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said territoral district with the 6th Base Line; thence easterly along said base line to longitude 90°00′W; thence southerly along said longitude to its most southerly intersection with the Dog River; thence generally southeasterly along said river, Taman Lake, the Dog River and the western shoreline of Dog Lake to the northerly boundary of the geographic Township of Fowler; thence westerly, southerly and easterly along the northerly, westerly and southerly boundaries of said geographic township to the Kaministiquia River; thence generally southerly along said river, Little Dog Lake and the Kaministiquia River to the northerly limit of the Municipality of Oliver Paipoonge; thence easterly, southerly and easterly along the northerly and easterly limits of said municipality to the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway No. 11, Highway No. 17); thence easterly along said highway, Harbour Expressway, Main Street and its easterly production to the easterly limit of the City of Thunder Bay; thence southwesterly, easterly and southerly along said limit to the northeast corner of the Municipality of Neebing situated easterly of Welcome Islands; thence S45°00′E to the international boundary between Canada and the United States of America; and
  • (b) the Territorial District of Rainy River.
Thunder Bay—Superior North

(Population: 82,827)

(Map 18)

Consisting of the Territorial District of Thunder Bay, excepting:

  • (a) that part lying westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said territorial district with a line running due north from the northeast corner of the geographic Township of Bulmer; thence due south to the northeast corner of said geographic township; thence southerly along the easterly boundary of the geographic townships of Bulmer, Fletcher, Furlonge, McLaurin and Bertrand to the 6th Base Line; thence easterly along said base line to longitude 90°00′W; thence southerly along said longitude to its most southerly intersection with the Dog River; thence generally southeasterly along said river, Taman Lake, the Dog River and the western shoreline of Dog Lake to the northerly boundary of the geographic Township of Fowler; thence westerly, southerly and easterly along the northerly, westerly and southerly boundaries of said geographic township to the Kaministiquia River; thence generally southerly along said river, Little Dog Lake and the Kaministiquia River to the northerly limit of the Municipality of Oliver Paipoonge; thence easterly along said limit to the westerly limit of the City of Thunder Bay; thence southerly and easterly along said limit to the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway No. 11, Highway No. 17); thence easterly along said highway, Harbour Expressway, Main Street and its easterly production to the easterly limit of the City of Thunder Bay; thence southwesterly, easterly and southerly along said limit to the northeast corner of the Municipality of Neebing situated easterly of Welcome Islands; thence S45°00′E to the international boundary between Canada and the United States of America; and
  • (b) that part lying southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the easterly limit of said territorial district with the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway No. 17); thence generally westerly along said highway to longitude 86°00′W; thence southerly along said longitude to the White River; thence generally westerly along said river to the northern shoreline of Lake Superior; thence S45°00′W to the international boundary between Canada and the United States of America.
Timmins—James Bay

(Population: 83,104)

(Map 1)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Territorial District of Kenora lying easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the northeast corner of the most northerly point of the Territorial District of Thunder Bay (at Albany River); thence due north to the northerly boundary of the Province of Ontario;
  • (b) the Territorial District of Cochrane, excepting that part described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said territorial district with the northwest corner of the geographic Township of Boyce; thence easterly along the northerly boundary of the geographic townships of Boyce, Shuel, Mulloy, Fintry, Auden, Rogers, Fushimi, Bannerman, Ritchie, Mulvey, Goldwin, Sweet, Hillmer, McKnight, Boyle, Mowbray, Howells, Sheldon, Pinard and Mewhinney to the northeast corner of the geographic Township of Mewhinney; thence southerly along the easterly boundary of the geographic townships of Mewhinney, Bourassa, Tolmie, Menapia, Beniah, Colquhoun and Calder to the northerly boundary of the geographic Township of Ottaway; thence westerly along said boundary to the northwest corner of the geographic Township of Ottaway; thence southerly along the westerly boundary of the geographic townships of Ottaway, Beck, Lucas and Prosser to the southwest corner of the geographic Township of Prosser; thence westerly along the southerly boundary of the geographic townships of Carnegie, Reid, Thorburn, Moberly, Aitken, Poulett, Watson and Lisgar to the southwesterly limit of said territorial district; thence generally northwesterly along said limit to the point of commencement; and
  • (c) that part of the Territorial District of Timiskaming lying northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the easterly limit of said territorial district with the southerly limit of the Township of Harris; thence northwesterly and northerly along the southerly and westerly limits of said township to the southerly limit of the Township of Harley; thence westerly along said limit to the westerly limit of the City of Temiskaming Shores; thence southerly along said limit to the northerly limit of the Township of Coleman; thence westerly along said limit to the easterly shoreline of the Montreal River; thence northwesterly along said shoreline to the southerly boundary of the geographic Township of Barr; thence westerly along said boundary and the southerly boundary of the geographic townships of Klock and Van Nostrand to the easterly boundary of the geographic Township of Rorke; thence southerly along said boundary to the southerly limit of said territorial district.
Toronto Centre

(Population: 93,971)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Sherbourne Street North with Bloor Street East; thence northerly along Sherbourne Street North to Rosedale Valley Road; thence generally easterly along said road and its production to the Don River; thence generally southerly along said river to the easterly production of Mill Street; thence westerly along said production and Mill Street to Parliament Street; thence westerly in a straight line to the intersection of The Esplanade with Berkeley Street; thence generally westerly along The Esplanade to Yonge Street; thence northerly along said street to Front Street West; thence generally southwesterly along said street to Bay Street; thence northerly along said street to Dundas Street West; thence easterly along said street to Yonge Street; thence northerly along said street to College Street; thence westerly along said street to Bay Street; thence northerly along said street to Charles Street West; thence easterly along said street to Yonge Street; thence southerly along said street to Charles Street East; thence easterly along said street to Mount Pleasant Road; thence generally northeasterly along said road to Bloor Street East; thence easterly along said street to the point of commencement.

Toronto—Danforth

(Population: 104,017)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southerly limit of said city with a line drawn due south from the southerly extremity of Ashbridge’s Bay; thence due north along said line to the extremity of Ashbridge’s Bay; thence generally northerly along said bay to its intersection with a straight line drawn on a bearing of 210° from the intersection of Coxwell Avenue with Lake Shore Boulevard East; thence in a straight line on a bearing of 30° to said intersection; thence northerly along Coxwell Avenue to Coxwell Boulevard; thence northeasterly along said boulevard and its production to Taylor Creek; thence generally westerly along said creek and the Don River East Branch to the Don River; thence generally westerly and generally southerly along said river to the Keating Channel; thence westerly along said channel and its production to the southerly production of Parliament Street; thence southerly in a straight line to the southerly extremity of the Eastern Channel of Toronto Harbour; thence southerly in a straight line to the southerly corner of the City of Toronto, said corner being situated southerly of the Outer Harbour East Headland (Tommy Thompson Park); thence generally northeasterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

University—Rosedale

(Population: 99,566)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of College Street with Bay Street; thence northerly along Bay Street to Charles Street West; thence easterly along said street to Yonge Street; thence southerly along said street to Charles Street East; thence easterly along said street to Mount Pleasant Road; thence northerly along said road to Bloor Street East; thence easterly along said street to Sherbourne Street North; thence northerly along said street to Rosedale Valley Road; thence generally easterly along said road and its production to the Don River; thence generally northerly along said river to Pottery Road; thence northwesterly and southwesterly along said road to Bayview Avenue; thence generally northerly and northwesterly along said avenue to Moore Avenue; thence westerly along said avenue to the southerly boundary of the Mount Pleasant Cemetery; thence generally westerly along said boundary to the northwesterly production of the Don River Tributary situated easterly of Avoca Avenue; thence generally southeasterly along said production and said tributary to the easterly production of Rosehill Avenue; thence westerly along said production and Rosehill Avenue to the westerly boundary of the Rosehill Reservoir; thence southerly along said boundary to Jackes Avenue; thence westerly along said avenue to Yonge Street; thence southerly along said street to the Canadian Pacific Railway; thence generally westerly along said railway to Ossington Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to Dundas Street West; thence generally easterly along said street to Yonge Street; thence northerly along said street to College Street; thence westerly along said street to the point of commencement.

Vaughan—Thornhill—Markham

(Population: 110,427)

(Map 21)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of York comprised of:

  • (a) that part of the City of Vaughan lying easterly of Highway No. 400 and southerly of Rutherford Road; and
  • (b) that part of the Town of Markham lying westerly of Bayview Avenue.
Vaughan—Woodbridge

(Population: 105,450)

(Map 21)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of York comprised of that part of the City of Vaughan lying southerly and westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said city with Major Mackenzie Drive; thence easterly along said drive to Huntington Road; thence southerly along said road to Major Mackenzie Drive; thence generally easterly along said drive to Humber Bridge Trail; thence easterly along said trail and its easterly production to Old Major Mackenzie Drive; thence easterly and southeasterly along said drive to Major Mackenzie Drive; thence northeasterly and easterly along said drive to Highway No. 400; thence southerly along said highway to the southerly limit of said city.

Waterloo

(Population: 103,192)

(Map 10)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo comprised of:

  • (a) the City of Waterloo; and
  • (b) that part of the City of Kitchener lying northerly of the Canadian National Railway and northeasterly of Conestoga Parkway.
Wellington—Halton Hills

(Population: 115,880)

(Map 3)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the County of Wellington comprised of: the townships of Centre Wellington, Guelph/Eramosa and Puslinch; the Town of Erin; and
  • (b) that part of the Regional Municipality of Halton comprised of the Town of Halton Hills.
Whitby

(Population: 122,022)

(Map 3)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Durham comprised of the Town of Whitby.

Willowdale

(Population: 109,680)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said city with Bayview Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to Highway No. 401; thence generally southwesterly along said highway to the Don River West Branch; thence generally northwesterly along said branch to Bathurst Street; thence northerly along said street to the northerly limit of said city; thence easterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Windsor—Tecumseh

(Population: 115,528)

(Map 20)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the County of Essex comprised of the Town of Tecumseh; and
  • (b) that part of the City of Windsor lying easterly and northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the international boundary between Canada and the United States of America with the northwesterly production of Langlois Avenue; thence southeasterly along said production and Langlois Avenue to Tecumseh Road East; thence easterly along said road to Pillette Road; thence southeasterly along said road and its intermittent productions to the northerly boundary of the Windsor International Airport; thence generally southwesterly along said boundary to the Canadian National Railway; thence southerly along said railway to the southerly limit of said city.
Windsor West

(Population: 118,973)

(Map 20)

Consisting of that part of the City of Windsor lying westerly and southerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the international boundary between Canada and the United States of America with the northwesterly production of Langlois Avenue; thence southeasterly along said production and Langlois Avenue to Tecumseh Road East; thence easterly along said road to Pillette Road; thence southeasterly along said road and its intermittent productions to the northerly limit of the Windsor International Airport; thence generally southwesterly along said limit to the Canadian National Railway; thence southerly along said railway to the southerly limit of said city.

York Centre

(Population: 100,277)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said city with Keele Street; thence southerly along said street to Grandravine Drive; thence generally westerly along said drive to Black Creek; thence generally southeasterly along said creek to Sheppard Avenue West; thence westerly along said avenue to Jane Street; thence southerly along said street to Highway No. 401; thence easterly and northeasterly along said highway to the Don River West Branch; thence generally northwesterly along said branch to Bathurst Street; thence northerly along said street to the northerly limit of said city; thence westerly along said limit to the point of commencement.

York—Simcoe

(Population: 94,616)

(Map 21)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Regional Municipality of York comprised of:
    • (i) the Town of Georgina;
    • (ii) the Town of East Gwillimbury, excepting that part lying southerly of Green Lane West and Green Lane East and westerly of Highway No. 404;
    • (iii) that part of the Township of King lying northerly of Highway No. 9 and Davis Drive West;
  • (b) Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation Indian Reserve; and
  • (c) that part of the County of Simcoe comprised of the Town of Bradford West Gwillimbury.
York South—Weston

(Population: 116,606)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the Humber River with Highway No. 401; thence easterly along said highway to the GO Transit Railway situated easterly of Connie Street; thence southerly along said railway to Rogers Road; thence westerly along said road to Old Weston Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Lavender Road; thence westerly along said road to Keele Street; thence southerly along said street and its southerly production to the GO Transit Railway; thence southeasterly along said railway to the Canadian Pacific Railway; thence generally westerly along said railway to the Humber River; thence generally northerly along said river to the point of commencement.

York West

(Population: 108,198)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said city with Keele Street; thence southerly along said street to Grandravine Drive; thence generally westerly along said drive to Black Creek; thence generally southeasterly along said creek to Sheppard Avenue West; thence westerly along said avenue to Jane Street; thence southerly along said street to Highway No. 401; thence westerly along said highway to the Humber River; thence generally northwesterly along said river to the northerly limit of said city; thence easterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Maps (as of February 14, 2013)

ADDENDUM — DISPOSITION OF OBJECTIONS AND AMENDMENTS TO THE REPORT

Introduction

The Report of the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for the Province of Ontario (the “Report”) was tabled in the House of Commons on February 25, 2013.

Forty-seven members of Parliament filed objections with the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs (the “Standing Committee”) concerning names and boundaries of electoral districts, boundaries only, or names of electoral districts only.

On June 12, 2013, the Standing Committee transmitted to the Chief Electoral Officer, through the Speaker of the House of Commons, its Sixty-First Report together with the relevant minutes of proceedings and evidence, and the objections to the Report.

The Commission has considered the objections according to and in the order of the geographic regions listed in its Report:

  1. Northern Ontario
  2. Central South Ontario
  3. Halton, Hamilton and Niagara
  4. Georgian Bay, Barrie and Simcoe
  5. Brampton and Mississauga
  6. York
  7. City of Toronto
  8. Eastern Ontario
  9. Haliburton, Peterborough, Northumberland and Durham

Clarification of Report Dated February 14, 2013

Shortly after delivering its Report on February 14, 2013, the Commission realized that it required clarification in two respects.

First, the Commission’s intent throughout the redistribution process has been to maintain the boundaries of First Nation communities wholly within the boundaries of a single electoral district. The previous commission inadvertently established a boundary between the electoral districts of Kenora and Thunder Bay—Rainy River that divided part of the Ojibways of Onigaming First Nation (Sabaskong Bay 35C) between those two electoral districts.

In its Report, the Commission stated that the boundaries of the electoral districts of Kenora and Thunder Bay—Rainy River remained unchanged from the 2003 representation order. For the reason stated, those boundary descriptions were incorrect.

Accordingly, the first sentence of the sixth paragraph on page 9 of this Report is amended to read as follows: “The electoral district of KENORA is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted to include that part of Ojibways of Onigaming First Nation (Sabaskong Bay 35C) currently located within the boundaries of the electoral district of Thunder Bay—Rainy River.”

Correspondingly, the first sentence of the seventh paragraph on page 9 of this Report is amended to read as follows: “The electoral district of THUNDER BAY—RAINY RIVER is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted to accommodate the transfer of that part of Ojibways of Onigaming First Nation (Sabaskong Bay 35C) currently located within its boundaries to the electoral district of Kenora.”

These amendments do not result in any changes in population for either electoral district.

Second, in order to avoid any misinterpretation of the Commission’s intentions regarding the boundaries of the electoral district of Lanark—Frontenac, the first sentence of the fourth full paragraph on page 34 of this Report is amended to read as follows: “The electoral district of LANARK—FRONTENAC is composed of the following: Lanark County; Frontenac County, excluding the Township of Frontenac Islands; and that part of the City of Kingston lying north of Highway 401.”

This amendment does not result in any changes in boundaries or population.

Objections

NORTHERN ONTARIO

In addition to reporting on objections by members of Parliament and making related recommendations, the Standing Committee made a number of comments regarding Northern Ontario to which the Commission feels obliged to respond.

The Standing Committee commented on limits imposed by the Commission’s decision to award 10 electoral districts to Northern Ontario when strict adherence to the provincial quota would result in only eight electoral districts in that region. It expressed concern about whether the Commission had appropriately considered community of interest, ease of service by members of Parliament, and constituents’ access to their member. The Standing Committee advocated that the Commission invoke the extraordinary circumstances rule for more than one electoral district in the region because there is nothing in the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act (the “Act”) that precludes such a decision. It stated that the creation of a second electoral district in Northern Ontario with a population in excess of 25% below the provincial quota would have no implications for representation by population in any other part of the province.

In response, the Commission notes that the primary rule in the Act governing the establishment of electoral boundaries is population equality, i.e. that the province be divided into electoral districts with populations as close to the provincial quota as reasonably possible. The Act also instructs the Commission that it may depart from the goal of population equality where it feels that it is necessary or desirable to do so in order to respect communities of interest, communities of identity, or the historical pattern of electoral districts, or to maintain a manageable geographic size in sparsely populated, rural or northern regions of the province. However, if the Commission departs from the population equality rule, the Act requires it to “make every effort to ensure” that, except in extraordinary circumstances, the deviation does not exceed 25% above or below the provincial quota.

In its Report, the Commission made it abundantly clear that, after applying the extraordinary circumstances rule to the electoral district of Kenora, there was sufficient population in the balance of Northern Ontario to justify nine other electoral districts, each having populations that fall within the maximum deviation of 25% below the provincial quota. A strict application of the population equality rule would have resulted in two fewer electoral districts in Northern Ontario, thereby elevating concerns about community of interest, historical patterns and manageable geographic size even further.

It is not correct to suggest that the creation of a second northern electoral district in excess of 25% below the provincial quota would have no implications for population equality in other parts of Ontario. Any departure from the maximum deviations permitted in the Act must be reasoned, principled, and truly extraordinary.

The Commission’s decision to establish 10 electoral districts in Northern Ontario effectively increased the deviation above the provincial quota for the remaining 111 electoral districts in the province. The rules set out in the Act are unambiguous. Having regard to those rules, the Commission remains convinced that, for the purposes of this Final Report, there is no need to make further use of the extraordinary circumstances rule in Northern Ontario.

The Standing Committee also chose to comment on the Commission’s concern expressed in its Report about inappropriate involvement by members of Parliament in the electoral redistribution process. The Standing Committee stated that its review of the Report and the evidence before it compelled a conclusion that “nothing inappropriate had been done” by any member of Parliament.

The Commission respectfully disagrees.

Prior to releasing its Proposal for boundaries and names of electoral districts in July 2012, the Commission had received a letter from the President of the Northeastern Ontario Municipal Association (“NEOMA”) that deplored the manner in which communities along Highway 11 from Smooth Rock Falls to the west had been reassigned by the previous commission in 2003 from the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay to the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing without notice or opportunity to object. The letter also expressed the view that those communities had virtually no community of interest with any other communities in the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing. In that letter, the President of NEOMA implored the Commission to reassign the communities along Highway 11 West to the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay.

That request was central to the Proposal the Commission developed for Northern Ontario. The Commission honoured that request, and included the Highway 11 West communities in a proposed electoral district to be named Timmins—Cochrane—James Bay. At the public hearing held in New Liskeard on October 15, 2012, when asked if he was aware of NEOMA’s letter to the Commission and its contents, the Member of Parliament for Timmins—James Bay informed the Commission that, because of budget constraints, he could not properly service the people in those communities, and that the Member of Parliament for Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing was willing to do so. When asked by the Commission Chair if he was aware of the sentiments expressed to the Commission in NEOMA’s letter, the Member of Parliament for Timmins—James Bay stated: “I am. Actually I would say that that might not necessarily be the case.”

At the public hearing held in North Bay on October 16, 2012, the Member of Parliament for Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing told the Commission that, because the Member of Parliament for Timmins—James Bay had established offices in Timmins and Kirkland Lake, and because budget constraints precluded the establishment of any additional offices in that electoral district, people in the communities represented by NEOMA would have to go to Timmins to see their member of Parliament. She asked the Commission for more time to present the views from those communities with respect to the proposed boundaries. When asked if she was aware of the letter the Commission had received from NEOMA, the Member of Parliament for Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing indicated that she was aware of it, that she had since “had a chat with them”, that she knew additional information would be forthcoming, and, by inference, that she could serve the people of those communities better than the Member of Parliament for Timmins—James Bay. She concluded her presentation with a request that the Commission give the Highway 11 West communities an opportunity to reconsider their position.

By letter dated October 23, 2012, the President of NEOMA informed the Commission that, “as a result of more information received”, NEOMA had altered its position and requested the Commission to reconsider the size of the proposed electoral district of Timmins—Cochrane—James Bay (which it considered to be too large) or to maintain the status quo. Prior to that letter, the Commission had no indication from NEOMA, or from any of its member communities, that they were not content with the Proposal as it related to the electoral district to which they were assigned.

By letter dated October 25, 2012, the Member of Parliament for Timmins—James Bay informed the Commission that, given the choice between being moved into a much larger electoral district of Timmins—Cochrane—James Bay or maintaining the status quo, the member communities of NEOMA chose the status quo. By letter dated October 29, 2012, the Member of Parliament for Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing also informed the Commission of the NEOMA resolution supporting the status quo. She stated in the letter: “Many of the mayors are very concerned that the increased size of the proposed riding will limit the influence of their communities and more importantly would limit the ability of any MP to provide a continuum of appropriate accessibility to their constituents.”

The first indication the Commission had of any concern about its Proposal was expressed by the Members of Parliament who made submissions at the public hearings in New Liskeard and North Bay. Having regard to the chronology of events, and the comments made by the Members of Parliament at those public hearings, the Commission does not consider the letter from NEOMA dated October 23, 2012 to be either a coincidence or something with which those Members of Parliament had no involvement.

The Commission’s view of what transpired is confirmed in the letters it received from the two Members of Parliament. In addition, their evasive answers to simple questions from the Commission suggest they were more deeply involved in NEOMA’s reversal than they chose to admit. While members of Parliament are certainly entitled to participate in public consultation in the electoral boundaries readjustment process, they should be mindful of the risk that overly enthusiastic participation may shade into manipulation.

Sault Ste. Marie and Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing

Mr. Bryan Hayes, Member of Parliament for Sault Ste. Marie, objected to the reassignment of one village, one town, one geographic township, and eight townships from his electoral district to the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing. He submitted that the Commission’s decision to remove those communities from the electoral district he represents ignores the rules in the Act requiring the Commission to respect communities of interest or identity and the historical pattern of an electoral district. Mr. Hayes wished to maintain the status quo for his electoral district and advocated that the Commission invoke the extraordinary circumstances provision of the Act to address the deficient population that would result in the adjacent electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

The Commission stated above its position that it would not be appropriate and, indeed, that there is no need to invoke the extraordinary circumstances provision set out in the Act for any northern electoral district other than Kenora. The Commission also notes that arguments based on community of interest and historical pattern do not favour the position Mr. Hayes advanced. Rather, they support the Commission’s decision to assign those communities to the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing. Prior to the 2003 representation order, all the affected communities were assigned to the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin. That large, substantially rural electoral district surrounded the electoral district of Sault Ste. Marie, and included most of the communities along Highway 17 and the coast of Georgian Bay, currently assigned to the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral district of Sault Ste. Marie as set out in its Report.

Nipissing—Timiskaming and Timmins—James Bay

Mr. Jay Aspin, Member of Parliament for Nipissing—Timiskaming, objected to the alteration of the boundary between the electoral districts of Nipissing—Timiskaming and Timmins—James Bay. In its Report, the Commission reassigned the Townships of Hudson and Harris, as well as that part of Timiskaming, Unorganized, West Part lying west of the westerly boundary of the City of Temiskaming Shores and north of the northern boundary of the Township of Coleman, from the electoral district of Nipissing—Timiskaming to the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay. Mr. Aspin’s objection was based on the community of interest that the residents of the area share with the City of Temiskaming Shores. He told the Standing Committee that those communities have always been aligned with the Highway 11 corridor located in the electoral district of Nipissing—Timiskaming.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

The area in question is largely agricultural. At the public hearing conducted in New Liskeard on October 15, 2012, the Member of Parliament for Timmins—James Bay argued that the community of interest in agriculture flowed in a northerly direction from the City of Temiskaming Shores. Other presenters at that hearing confirmed that opinion. The Commission found those submissions persuasive.

In addition, Mr. Aspin overstated the historical alignment of those communities along the Highway 11 corridor with the electoral district of Nipissing—Timiskaming. Prior to the 2003 representation order, the electoral district of Nipissing—Timiskaming did not exist. The communities in question were located within the boundaries of the electoral district of Timiskaming—Cochrane. They had no association or community of interest with any community within what was then the electoral district of Nipissing.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral district of Nipissing—Timiskaming asset out in its Report.

CENTRAL SOUTH ONTARIO

The census population of the Cities of Kitchener, Waterloo and Cambridge is 541,739, warranting the creation of five electoral districts. The populations of each of the Cities of Waterloo and Cambridge are sufficient to create electoral districts within their boundaries. However, following its second hearing in Cambridge, the Commission learned about a preferred community of interest that the Township of North Dumfries had with the City of Cambridge, and a community of interest between the southern part of the City of Kitchener and that part of the City of Cambridge lying north of Highway 401 (formerly the Town of Hespeler). As a result, the Commission attempted to balance population by combining part of the Township of North Dumfries with the southern part of the City of Cambridge. Joining the Hespeler area of Cambridge with the southern portion of the City of Kitchener responded to the expressed communities of interest.

The Standing Committee received two objections requesting changes in boundaries.

Kitchener Centre and Kitchener South—Hespeler

Mr. Stephen Woodworth, Member of Parliament for Kitchener Centre, objected to the boundary between the electoral districts of Kitchener Centre and Kitchener South—Hespeler. His proposal would reassign 2,671 people from Kitchener South—Hespeler to Kitchener Centre.

He argued that this would maintain the unity of the area’s established neighbourhoods within the electoral district of Kitchener Centre, while placing the undeveloped and developing areas in the electoral district of Kitchener South—Hespeler.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

The Commission finds no merit in the objection. The boundaries Mr. Woodworth proposed are streets in strictly residential neighbourhoods. The major roads the Commission selected are superior boundaries.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of Kitchener Centre and Kitchener South—Hespeler asset out in its Report.

Cambridge and Kitchener South—Hespeler

Mr. Gary Goodyear, Member of Parliament for Cambridge, objected to the boundary between the electoral districts of Cambridge and Kitchener South—Hespeler. He proposed to reassign the former Town of Hespeler to the electoral district of Cambridge. This would increase the population of the electoral district of Cambridge to 136,648 (28.65% above the provincial quota). The population of the electoral district of Kitchener South—Hespeler would decrease to 72,718 (31.45% below the provincial quota).

Mr. Goodyear argued that, by dividing the City of Cambridge, the Report aggravates historic tensions among the communities of Hespeler, Galt, and Preston (amalgamated as the City of Cambridge in 1973). He further argued that time and effort has been expended to overcome resistance to the amalgamation, and that his proposal was manageable.

The Standing Committee made no recommendation.

The Act permits deviation beyond the maximum allowable variance of 25% above or below the provincial quota in extraordinary circumstances. To accommodate Mr. Goodyear’s proposal, the Commission would have to apply the extraordinary circumstances rule to both electoral districts – something this Commission is not prepared to do. There is population available to create electoral districts within reasonable and permissible variations from the provincial quota.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of Cambridge and Kitchener South—Hespeler as set out in its Report.

Haldimand—Norfolk and Brant

Ms. Diane Finley, Member of Parliament for Haldimand—Norfolk, objected to a part of the boundary between the electoral districts of Haldimand—Norfolk and Brant. Her objection invited the Commission to respect the boundary between the Counties of Brant and Haldimand.

The Standing Committee supported the objection and invited the Commission to clarify the boundary.

In its Report, the Commission stated that the boundaries of the electoral district of Haldimand—Norfolk remained unchanged. The Commission had also endeavoured to maintain the integrity of the boundaries of First Nation communities. However, the Commission was not aware that, subsequent to 2003, a small portion of land on the border between the Counties of Haldimand and Brant was transferred to the jurisdiction of Brant County.

To the extent that the objection requests clarification, the Commission accepts the objection. The first sentence of the eighth paragraph on page 15 of this Report is amended to read as follows: “The electoral district of HALDIMAND—NORFOLK is composed of the Counties of Haldimand and Norfolk.”

HALTON, HAMILTON AND NIAGARA

The census population of the City of Hamilton is 519,949. In its Report, the Commission established five electoral districts located entirely within the City boundaries. In its Sixty-First Report, the Standing Committee indicated that it had received a letter signed by five Members of Parliament: Mr. Dean Allison (Niagara West—Glanbrook); Ms. Chris Charlton (Hamilton Mountain); Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre); Mr. Wayne Marston (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek); and Mr. David Sweet (Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale). The letter supported the boundaries of the electoral districts within the City of Hamilton as set out in the Report.

The Standing Committee did not support any changes to the boundaries of those electoral districts set out in the Report.

The census population of Niagara Region is 431,346 and therefore justified the creation of four electoral districts. The Commission stated in its Report that, wherever possible, it endeavoured to respect the integrity of municipal boundaries when establishing electoral districts.

With respect to Niagara Region, the Commission received two objections requesting boundary changes and two objections requesting name changes.

St. Catharines, Niagara West and Niagara Centre

Mr. Dean Allison, Member of Parliament for Niagara West—Glanbrook, and Mr. Rick Dykstra, Member of Parliament for St. Catharines, objected to the boundaries set out in the Report for the electoral districts in the Niagara Peninsula. Both argued that the communities of interest in the Niagara Peninsula would be best represented by retaining the current electoral boundaries. In the alternative, they argued that the boundaries set out in the Commission’s Proposal better protected the communities of interest than the boundaries set out in the Report.

Mr. Allison’s objection contained two proposals. First, he proposed that the Commission maintain the boundaries of the current electoral districts in the Niagara Peninsula, including the electoral district of Niagara West—Glanbrook. Second, he proposed that the Commission establish electoral districts in Niagara Region in the manner set out in the Proposal.

The Standing Committee made no recommendations with respect to the objection.

Mr. Allison’s first proposal stands in contradiction to the letter that he signed which supported the Report’s establishment of five electoral districts entirely within the boundaries of the City of Hamilton.

Regarding Mr. Allison’s second proposal, the Commission had attempted to establish electoral boundaries in Niagara Region on an east–west axis in its own Proposal. Historically, the boundaries of the electoral districts in that Region have been aligned on a north–south axis. At the public hearing held in Niagara Falls, there was substantial opposition to the Proposal. The Commission was persuaded that communities of interest and historical attachment favoured the establishment of electoral boundaries on a north–south axis.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral district of Niagara West as set out in its Report.

Mr. Dykstra objected to portions of the City of St. Catharines being assigned to three electoral districts. He argued that the City represents a clear community of interest with common concerns.

The Standing Committee made no recommendations with respect to the objection.

The Commission’s goal has been to respect the integrity of municipal boundaries wherever possible. Given the census population, that goal was not achievable in Niagara Region. The Commission notes that the boundaries set out in the 2003 representation order divided the City of St. Catharines into two electoral districts.

The census population of the current electoral district of St. Catharines is 112,015. The Report reassigned 1,419 people from a rural area of the electoral district of St. Catharines to the largely rural electoral district of Niagara West. Its boundaries are otherwise unchanged from the 2003 representation order. The Commission’s Proposal had involved a far more significant change to electoral boundaries relating to the City of St. Catharines, but met with strong opposition at the public hearing and in written submissions.

The Commission acknowledges that the City of St. Catharines will now have representation in three distinct electoral districts. Not everyone sees that as a weakness. St. Catharines is the municipality with the largest population in the region. Previous commissions, and this Commission, have determined that it is the logical place in the region to attempt to balance population, bearing in mind existing communities of interest and historical attachments.

Even if the Commission were to agree with Mr. Dykstra’s objection and retain the boundaries of the current electoral district of St. Catharines, the City would still be divided among three electoral districts.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral district of St. Catharines asset out in its Report.

Change of Name: Oakville South

Mr. Terence Young, Member of Parliament for Oakville, objected to the name of the electoral district of Oakville South. He proposed the name Oakville.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

The Commission is persuaded by the objection, since the boundaries of the electoral district remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order.

The electoral district of Oakville South is renamed OAKVILLE.

Change of Name: Ancaster

Mr. David Sweet, Member of Parliament for Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale, objected to the name of the electoral district of Ancaster. He proposed the name Ancaster—Dundas—West Hamilton. He argued that it would be more appropriate to include the names of three historically distinct communities in the name of the electoral district.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

While the Commission generally is not in favour of names of electoral districts that include more than one historical community, it is persuaded by the substance of the argument. However, it does not agree with the name Mr. Sweet proposed. The names of the other three urban electoral districts located within the City of Hamilton begin with the name Hamilton. The Commission believes that all four should begin in the same fashion.

The electoral district of Ancaster is renamed HAMILTON WEST—ANCASTER—DUNDAS.

Georgian Bay, Barrie and Simcoe

The Standing Committee received two objections from members of Parliament representing electoral districts in this region.

York—Simcoe and Barrie—Innisfil

Mr. Peter Van Loan, Member of Parliament for York—Simcoe, objected to a part of the boundary between the electoral districts of York—Simcoe and Barrie—Innisfil. He proposed that the boundary in the Report (the municipal boundary of the Town of Innisfil) be shifted north to 4 Line (also known as Killarney Beach Road). If implemented, that change would reassign 4,707 people from the electoral district of Barrie—Innisfil to the electoral district of York—Simcoe. Mr. Van Loan argued that the community of interest of those people lay with communities to the south.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

There were a number of presentations at the public hearing in Barrie regarding the Town of Innisfil, including one similar to Mr. Van Loan’s objection. However, the prevailing opinion expressed in all other presentations favoured a boundary that included the whole of the Town of Innisfil within an electoral district associated with part of the City of Barrie. Those presentations were consistent with the theme the Commission developed in its Report, namely that, wherever possible, it would strive to maintain the integrity of municipal boundaries.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of York—Simcoe and Barrie—Innisfil asset out in its Report.

Change of Name: Barrie—Oro—Springwater

Mr. Bruce Stanton, Member of Parliament for Simcoe North, objected to the name of the electoral district of Barrie—Oro—Springwater. He proposed that the name be changed to include the historical community of the Township of Medonte.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

The Commission accepts the objection. The electoral district of Barrie—Oro—Springwater is renamed BARRIE—SPRINGWATER—ORO-MEDONTE.

Brampton and Mississauga

The Standing Committee received two objections from members of Parliament representing electoral districts in the City of Brampton, and five objections from members of Parliament representing electoral districts in the City of Mississauga.

Brampton North, Brampton South, Brampton West and Brampton East

Mr. Parm Gill, Member of Parliament for Brampton—Springdale, objected to the boundaries of the electoral districts of Brampton North, Brampton West, and Brampton East.

Mr. Gill’s objection concerns two boundaries.

First, he argued that the Commission’s use of Hurontario Street as a boundary divided the community of Snelgrove. He proposed that the community be kept whole. His proposal would reassign 6,606 people from the electoral district of Brampton West to the electoral district of Brampton North.

Second, he argued that the neighbourhood bounded by Sandalwood Parkway, Bramalea Road, Torbram Road, and Bovaird Drive (15,590 people) had a community of interest with adjacent neighbourhoods in the electoral district of Brampton East. He proposed that it be reassigned from the electoral district of Brampton North to the electoral district of Brampton East.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

The Commission finds Mr. Gill’s first proposal persuasive. The Commission accepts that the community of interest of the community of Snelgrove lies with the electoral district of Brampton North.

Accordingly, the area bounded by Hurontario Street, the municipal boundary, the Orangeville-Brampton Railway and Wanless Drive is reassigned from the electoral district of BRAMPTON WEST to the electoral district of BRAMPTON NORTH.

The Commission is not persuaded by Mr. Gill’s second proposal. It would result in a population of 115,302 for the electoral district of Brampton East, an area identified at the public hearings as having the greatest potential for future growth in the City of Brampton.

The Commission therefore rejects the balance of the objection and, with the exception of the adjustment of boundaries to reassign the community of Snelgrove, retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of Brampton North and Brampton East as set out in its Report.

Mr. Kyle Seeback, Member of Parliament for Brampton West, objected to the inclusion of the area known as Northwood Park (5,692 people) in the electoral district of Brampton West. He argued that the area is historically linked with the downtown core of Brampton for shopping and entertainment. For that reason, he argued that the area should be reassigned from the electoral district of Brampton West to the electoral district of Brampton South.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

The Commission is not persuaded by the objection. Mr. Seeback’s proposal fails to consider the community of interest of that part of Northwood Park lying north of Flowertown Avenue to the rail line.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of Brampton West and Brampton South as set out in its Report.

Mississauga East—Cooksville, Mississauga North, Mississauga Centre and Mississauga—Erin Mills

Mr. Wladyslaw Lizon, Member of Parliament for Mississauga East—Cooksville, objected to the boundaries of the electoral districts of Mississauga East—Cooksville, Mississauga North, and Mississauga Centre.

He argued that the redevelopment that has occurred at the intersection of Hurontario Street and Dundas Street has obliterated the heart of the historical community of Cooksville to the extent that it no longer has an identity similar to other historical villages within the City of Mississauga.

His proposal realigned the three electoral districts to maintain what he described as communities of interest of similar neighbourhoods developed in the same era.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

At the public hearing, the Commission learned that its Proposal had split the historical community of Cooksville as well as the core of the City of Mississauga. The Commission accepted the advice it received; its Report responds to that advice.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of Mississauga East—Cooksville, Mississauga North and Mississauga Centre as set out in its Report.

Mississauga—Erin Mills and Mississauga Centre

Mr. Bob Dechert, Member of Parliament for Mississauga—Erindale, objected to part of the boundary between the electoral districts of Mississauga—Erin Mills and Mississauga Centre. He proposed to move that boundary further east from the Credit River to Erindale Station Road. He argued that this would consolidate a community of identity based on similar homes (in terms of size, value, and age) and demographics, which historically had been kept within one electoral district.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

In its Report, the Commission endeavoured to use, wherever possible, major physical features or roads as boundaries. In the case of the City of Mississauga, the Credit River is a major boundary. With respect to Mr. Dechert’s objection, there is a significant public park and greenbelt area located immediately to the north of and adjacent to the River. In the view of the Commission, his proposed use of Erindale Station Road as a boundary would have a far greater negative impact on community of interest than the use of the Credit River.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of Mississauga—Erin Mills and Mississauga Centre as set out in its Report.

Change of Name: Mississauga East—Cooksville, Mississauga North, Mississauga South and Mississauga West—Streetsville

Mr. Wladyslaw Lizon, Member of Parliament for Mississauga East—Cooksville, objected to the name of the electoral district of Mississauga East—Cooksville. He proposed the name Mississauga East. For the reasons stated in his boundary change objection, he argued there was no longer any justification for reference to Cooksville in the name of the electoral district.

Ms. Eve Adams, Member of Parliament for Mississauga—Brampton South, objected to the name of the electoral district of Mississauga North. She proposed the name Mississauga—Britannia—Malton. She argued that the name would recognize the history and role of the former communities of Malton and Britannia in the Canadian war effort during World War II.

Ms. Stella Ambler, Member of Parliament for Mississauga South, objected to the name of the electoral district of Mississauga South. She proposed the name Mississauga—Lakeshore. She argued that the name would reflect the importance of the shore of Lake Ontario as a defining feature of the community.

Mr. Brad Butt, Member of Parliament for Mississauga—Streetsville, objected to the name of the electoral district of Mississauga West—Streetsville. He proposed the name Mississauga—Streetsville. He argued that the names of electoral districts in this area generally do not refer to compass points, but rather to names of neighbourhoods.

The Standing Committee supported the objections of Ms. Adams, Ms. Ambler and Mr. Butt, and gave qualified support to Mr. Lizon’s objection, contingent on the Commission’s approval of the boundary changes he requested.

The Commission is persuaded by Mr. Butt’s argument that the names of electoral districts in the City of Mississauga do not require compass points, and preferably should contain a reference to an historical community. The Commission rejects Mr. Lizon’s objection to the continued reference to the historical community of Cooksville in the name of the electoral district he represents. With regard to Ms. Adams’ objection, the Commission thinks it is unnecessary to refer to more than one historical community in the name of any electoral district in the City of Mississauga. The Commission accepts Ms. Ambler’s objection.

The electoral district of Mississauga East—Cooksville is renamed MISSISSAUGA—COOKSVILLE.

The electoral district of Mississauga North is renamed MISSISSAUGA—MALTON.

The electoral district of Mississauga South is renamed MISSISSAUGA—LAKESHORE.

The electoral district of Mississauga West—Streetsville is renamed MISSISSAUGA—STREETSVILLE.

York

The Standing Committee did not receive any objections to the electoral boundaries set out in the Report for the nine electoral districts in the York region. It did, however, receive three objections requesting name changes.

Change of Name: Vaughan—Thornhill—Markham

Mr. Peter Kent, Member of Parliament for Thornhill, objected to the name of the electoral district of Vaughan—Thornhill—Markham. He proposed the name Thornhill. He argued that the name would recognize the strong historical contribution that the Thornhill community had made to the York region. Mr. Kent informed the Standing Committee that the city councils of both Vaughan and Markham supported the proposed name.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

The Commission finds the objection persuasive. The electoral district of Vaughan—Thornhill—Markham is renamed THORNHILL.

Change of Name: Aurora—Richmond Hill

Mr. Costas Menegakis, Member of Parliament for Richmond Hill, objected to the name of the electoral district of Aurora—Richmond Hill. He proposed the name Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill. He argued that the Oak Ridges community should be included in the name of that electoral district to reflect geographic and historical realities, as well as to assert its unique and distinct identity.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

The Commission finds the objection persuasive. The electoral district of Aurora—Richmond Hill is renamed AURORA—OAK RIDGES—RICHMOND HILL.

Change of Name: Markham—Stouffville

Mr. Paul Calandra, Member of Parliament for Oak Ridges—Markham, objected to the name of the electoral district of Markham—Stouffville. He proposed the name Markham—Stouffville—Rouge Valley. He argued that the name would reflect in a more comprehensive manner the geographic composition of the electoral district, and recognize the national ecological significance of the Rouge Valley watershed. The City of Markham supported the proposed name.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

The Commission notes that it has used the term “Rouge” when naming the adjoining electoral district of Scarborough—Rouge and it is concerned that using all or part of the same name has the potential to confuse electors. In addition, the Rouge River Valley runs through the centre of the electoral district of Scarborough—Rouge, while it marks the territory of the electoral district of Markham—Stouffville to a far lesser extent.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection.

CITY OF TORONTO
York Centre and Willowdale

Mr. Mark Adler, Member of Parliament for York Centre, objected to part of the boundary between the electoral districts of York Centre and Willowdale. His proposal would move part of the easterly boundary of the electoral district of York Centre further east to the residential streets of Cactus Avenue, Peckham Avenue, and Grantbrook Street. He argued that the Bathurst Street boundary used by the Commission divided Jewish and Russian-speaking communities.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

In its Report, the Commission endeavoured to balance population moving across the north portion of the City of Toronto, using Highway 401 as the southern boundary. Mr. Adler’s eastern boundary would return only a part of the area included in the current electoral district of York Centre. While his proposed boundary would bring the populations of both electoral districts closer to the provincial quota, the Commission is not persuaded that the proposed boundary is as effective as the major thoroughfare of Bathurst Street.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of York Centre and Willowdale as set out in its Report.

University—Rosedale, Spadina—Fort York, Toronto Centre and St. Paul’s

Ms. Olivia Chow, Member of Parliament for Trinity—Spadina, objected to the boundaries of the electoral districts of University—Rosedale, Spadina—Fort York, Toronto Centre, and St. Paul’s. Her proposal would radically alter the boundaries of those electoral districts. The east–west configuration of the electoral districts of St. Paul’s and University—Rosedale would be replaced by a north–east configuration.

Ms. Chow argued that her proposed boundaries are based on communities of interest, such as the neighbourhoods of Forest Hill, Rosedale, and Casa Loma, with areas of high average and median household incomes to be grouped together in a proposed electoral district of St. Paul’s—Rosedale. She also argued that her proposal would better maintain Italian and Aboriginal communities of interest. She used Vaughan Road as a diagonal boundary for her proposed electoral districts of University—St. Clair and St. Paul’s—Rosedale.

Ms. Carolyn Bennett, Member of Parliament for St. Paul’s, made a written submission to the Standing Committee strongly objecting to Ms. Chow’s proposal, and supporting the electoral boundaries in the Report. She argued that the boundaries proposed by Ms. Chow would divide natural communities and had no public support. She also argued that it would be inappropriate to make such significant changes to electoral boundaries at this stage of the process, when public consultation can no longer take place.

The Standing Committee noted that Ms. Chow’s objection would cause the boundaries between these electoral districts to be “altered substantially”, and simply referred her objection to the Commission.

The Commission notes that Ms. Chow’s proposals do not resemble the proposals either she or others made at the public hearings in Toronto. The Commission agrees that such radical changes at this stage of the process are unacceptable.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of University—Rosedale, Spadina—Fort York, Toronto Centre, and St. Paul’s as set out in its Report.

Mr. Bob Rae, Member of Parliament for Toronto Centre, objected to the boundary between the electoral districts of Toronto Centre and Spadina—Fort York. He proposed to move the boundary of the electoral district of Toronto Centre south to encompass more of the community south of the St. Lawrence Market, and to eliminate what he argued was a split in the St. Lawrence Market community resulting from the boundaries in the Report.

To offset the deviation from the provincial quota created by his proposal, he proposed that the area west of Yonge Street to Bay Street, south from Dundas Street to Front Street be reassigned from the electoral district of Toronto Centre to the electoral district of Spadina—Fort York. He argued that the highly mobile population in this area would fit into either electoral district.

While acknowledging that Mr. Rae’s proposal attempted to maintain a community of interest, the Standing Committee noted that the resulting deviation of population in the electoral district of Spadina—Fort York would exceed permissible limits under the Act, short of a determination of extraordinary circumstances.

The Standing Committee did not support the objection.

The Commission notes that the historical St. Lawrence Market itself is wholly located within the same electoral district. The neighbourhood south of the Market and east to the Distillery District is still developing and evolving, and does not represent an historical community.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of Spadina—Fort York and Toronto Centre as set out in its Report.

Eglinton—Lawrence, St. Paul’s and York South—Weston

Mr. Joe Oliver, Member of Parliament for Eglinton—Lawrence, objected to the boundaries between the electoral districts of Eglinton—Lawrence, St. Paul’s, and York South—Weston. His proposal was based on uniting the Upper and Lower Village of Forest Hill.

Ms. Carolyn Bennett, Member of Parliament for St. Paul’s, opposed Mr. Oliver’s proposal, describing it as “drastic”. Mr. Mike Sullivan, Member of Parliament for York South—Weston, also questioned the existence of the community of interest for which Mr. Oliver advocated.

The Standing Committee did not support the objection.

Mr. Oliver’s proposal blatantly disregarded considerations of the effect on neighbouring electoral districts. The Standing Committee noted that his proposal would increase the population of the electoral district of York South—Weston to 38.87% above the provincial quota, increase the population of the electoral district of Eglinton—Lawrence to 28.84% above the provincial quota, and decrease the population of the electoral district of St. Paul’s to 53.49% below the provincial quota. To rectify those unacceptable deviations in population, the Commission would have to alter significantly the boundaries of adjacent electoral districts. The Commission is of the view that such radical changes at this stage of the process are unacceptable.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of Eglinton—Lawrence, St. Paul’s, and York South—Weston as set out in its Report.

Don Valley West and University—Rosedale

Mr. John Carmichael, Member of Parliament for Don Valley West, objected to the boundary between the electoral districts of Don Valley West and University—Rosedale.

He argued that the neighbourhoods of Bennington Heights and Governor’s Bridge have a community of interest with the electoral district of Don Valley West, as most of the residents travel to Leaside for their shopping, entertainment, sports, parks, schools and other public services. He suggested that the Moore Park Ravine represents a natural boundary separating those neighbourhoods from Rosedale.

Currently Bennington Heights is in the electoral district of Don Valley West, and Governor’s Bridge is in the electoral district of Toronto Centre. Mr. Bob Rae, Member of Parliament for Toronto Centre, observed that some residents of Governor’s Bridge identified themselves with Rosedale, but did not object in stronger terms.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

The Commission finds Mr. Carmichael’s objection as it relates to Bennington Heights persuasive. It accepts that the community of interest of that neighbourhood lies with the electoral district of Don Valley West.

Accordingly, the area bounded by Moore Avenue to the west, the Moore Park Ravine to the south, the rail line to the east, and Bayview Avenue to the north is reassigned from the electoral district of UNIVERSITY—ROSEDALE to the electoral district of DON VALLEY WEST.

However, the Commission is not persuaded that the Governor’s Bridge neighbourhood has a significant community of interest with that electoral district.

The Commission therefore rejects that part of the objection relating to Governor’s Bridge and, with the exception of the adjustment of boundaries to reassign the community of Bennington Heights, retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of University—Rosedale and Don Valley West as set out in its Report.

Change of Name: Don Valley East

Mr. Joe Daniel, Member of Parliament for Don Valley East, objected to the name of the electoral district of Don Valley East. He proposed the name Don Valley South. He argued that the name would reflect more accurately the new boundaries of the electoral district.

The Standing Committee supported his proposal.

The Commission observes that, while the electoral district is situated south of the electoral district of Don Valley North, it is also situated east of the electoral district of Don Valley West. The electoral district also contains the east branch of the Don River.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection.

Change of Name: University—Rosedale and St. Paul’s

Ms. Olivia Chow, Member of Parliament for Trinity—Spadina, objected to the boundaries of the electoral districts of University—Rosedale, Spadina—Fort York, Toronto Centre, and St. Paul’s. Based on that objection, she objected to the names of the electoral districts of University—Rosedale and St. Paul’s. She proposed the names St. Paul’s—Rosedale and University—St. Clair.

The Standing Committee supported her objection to change the names, contingent on the Commission’s decision to accept the boundary changes she proposed.

The Commission rejected the electoral boundary changes Ms. Chow proposed. It therefore rejects the objection to the names.

Scarborough

In 2003, the previous commission established five electoral districts situated entirely within the former City of Scarborough, and a sixth electoral district that was shared with the City of Pickering in the Durham area. With a census population of 625,698, the Scarborough area warrants six electoral districts.

In its Proposal, the Commission reassigned the Pickering portion of the current electoral district of Pickering—Scarborough East to the electoral district of Pickering—Uxbridge. This respected the integrity of the boundaries of the City of Pickering and the former City of Scarborough. The six electoral districts in the Proposal were only moderately changed from the current ones, with the exception of the electoral district of Scarborough East, which had run on a north–south axis and crossed Highway 401.

The Proposal was the subject of substantial criticism and some support at the public hearing in Toronto on November 14, 2012. The major concerns were the division of the communities of Malvern and Morningside Heights between two electoral districts, the failure to use Rouge River in an electoral district name, and the creation of an electoral district that crossed Highway 401.

Acting on the advice it received, the Commission made significant changes to the boundaries of the six electoral districts. These are reflected in its Report. The Commission would have preferred to conduct a second hearing for the area, as it did in Cambridge and Hamilton, for further public input. Unfortunately, time constraints imposed by the Act precluded that possibility.

The Standing Committee conducted a hearing on April 30, 2013. It appears from the evidence of that hearing that the members of Parliament for Scarborough were divided in their opinions on the merits of the boundaries set out in the Report.

Regrettably, the Member of Parliament for Scarborough—Agincourt made a comment in the media that the Commission had engaged in gerrymandering. Members of the Standing Committee asked him nine times whether he was prepared to withdraw that comment. He did not. The Member of Parliament for Scarborough—Guildwood also expressed the same opinion to the Standing Committee.

The Commission is deeply disappointed by those comments. They directly impugn its independence and integrity. The Commission worked diligently to maintain neutrality in the electoral boundaries readjustment process, as well as to respect submissions and opinions from the public. It is thankful that the Standing Committee endeavoured to encourage the Member of Parliament for Scarborough—Agincourt to withdraw those unwarranted remarks, and that it also formally dissociated itself from those remarks.

All six Members of Parliament from Scarborough filed objections to the Report. Two of them agreed with the Report: Mr. Dan Harris (Scarborough Southwest) and Ms. Rathika Sitsabaiesan (Scarborough—Rouge River). The remaining four objected to the boundaries of the electoral districts in Scarborough: Mr. Corneliu Chisu (Pickering—Scarborough East); Ms. Roxanne James (Scarborough Centre); Mr. Jim Karygiannis (Scarborough—Agincourt); and Mr. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood). Although their objections varied in some details, they essentially agreed with the boundaries established in the Proposal, except in relation to the Bendale community, South Cedarbrae, and the electoral district of Scarborough Southwest. They argued that the electoral boundaries for the area outlined in the Report significantly damaged numerous communities of interest.

The Standing Committee made no recommendation, and simply referred these objections to the Commission.

The Commission received several submissions at the public hearing on November 14, 2012 arguing that its Proposal divided the communities of Malvern and Morningside Heights. The effort to keep those communities together, while at the same time balancing population across Scarborough, created a domino effect that required the Commission to make significant boundary changes in its Report to five of the six electoral districts.

Having considered the objections of the Members of Parliament for the area, and notwithstanding the unwarranted and disrespectful comments of two of them, the Commission is persuaded that the electoral boundaries set out in its Proposal are more appropriate than those in the Report. It is clear that the attempt to reunite the communities of Malvern and Morningside Heights resulted in disruptions of numerous other communities of interest which are impossible to ignore.

The Commission therefore accepts the spirit of the objections made by Mr. Chisu, Ms. James, Mr. Karygiannis, and Mr. McKay. However, it rejects the proposals contained in the objections to reassign the Bendale community from the electoral district of Scarborough—Guildwood to the electoral district of Scarborough Centre, to reassign South Cedarbrae from the electoral district of Scarborough Centre to the electoral district of Scarborough—Guildwood, and to retain the current boundaries of the electoral district of Scarborough Southwest. The Commission is of the view that population is better balanced with the boundaries in its Proposal than it would be with those proposed readjustments.

The Commission therefore reverts to the electoral boundaries for Scarborough as set out in the Proposal.

Scarborough—Agincourt

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH—AGINCOURT is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying east of Midland Avenue, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough North.

Scarborough Centre

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying east of McCowan Road and north of Lawrence Avenue East, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough—Guildwood; plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough Southwest lying north of Eglinton Avenue East.

Scarborough Southwest

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH SOUTHWEST is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying north of Eglinton Avenue East, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough Centre; plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough—Guildwood bounded on the north by Eglinton Avenue East and on the east by Markham Road.

Scarborough North

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH NORTH is composed of the following: that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough—Rouge River lying west of Neilson Road and Morningside Avenue to the power line, then west of the Rouge River; plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough—Agincourt lying east of Midland Avenue.

Scarborough—Guildwood

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH—GUILDWOOD is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying east of Morningside Avenue, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough East; less that part lying south of Eglinton Avenue East and west of Markham Road, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough Southwest; plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough Centre lying east of McCowan Road and north of Lawrence Avenue East.

Scarborough East

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH EAST is bounded as follows: on the north by Steeles Avenue East; on the east by the municipal boundary of the City of Toronto; on the south by Lake Ontario; and on the west by Morningside Avenue north to Highway 401 as far as Neilson Road, north on Neilson Road to Morningside Avenue as far as the power line, east along the power line to the Rouge River, and then north along the Rouge River to Steeles Avenue East.

Change of Name: Scarborough East

Several members of Parliament from the Scarborough area objected to the name of the electoral district of Scarborough East. They proposed that the name include a reference to the Rouge River Valley or Rouge Park.

The Standing Committee referred the objection to the Commission.

It is clear that the Rouge River and Rouge Park are prominent landmarks in the electoral district.

The Commission therefore accepts the objection. The electoral district of Scarborough East is renamed SCARBOROUGH—ROUGE PARK.

EASTERN ONTARIO
Ottawa—Orléans and Rideau—Carleton

Mr. Royal Galipeau, Member of Parliament for Ottawa—Orléans, objected to a part of the boundary between the electoral districts of Ottawa—Orléans and Rideau—Carleton. He advocated a boundary change that would reassign 431 people from Rideau—Carleton to Ottawa—Orléans. His proposed boundary would be an extension of Devine Road to Ramsayville Road.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

In response to submissions made at the public hearings in Ottawa, the Commission endeavoured to include the village of Carlsbad Springs wholly within the electoral district of Ottawa—Orléans. That decision was based on the desire to include the community within that largely Francophone electoral district. Carlsbad Springs is not an incorporated municipality with defined boundaries. The boundaries in the Report correspond to the advice received at the public hearings.

The Commission notes that Mr. Galipeau’s proposed boundary is not a natural boundary, street or highway. In addition, it would divide concession lots.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of Ottawa—Orléans and Rideau—Carleton as set out in its Report.

Change of Name: Ottawa—Orléans

Mr. Royal Galipeau, Member of Parliament for Ottawa—Orléans, objected to the name of the electoral district of Ottawa—Orléans. He proposed the name Orléans.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

Mr. Galipeau gave no reasons for the proposed change of name.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection.

Change of Name: Renfrew—Pembroke

Ms. Cheryl Gallant, Member of Parliament for Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, objected to the name of the electoral district of Renfrew—Pembroke. She argued that the boundaries of the electoral district had not been changed, and therefore the name should remain Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

The Commission finds the objection persuasive. The electoral district of Renfrew—Pembroke is renamed RENFREW—NIPISSING—PEMBROKE.

Change of Name: Rideau—Carleton

Mr. Pierre Poilievre, Member of Parliament for Nepean—Carleton, objected to the name of the electoral district of Rideau—Carleton. He proposed the name Carleton.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

The Commission is not persuaded. The Rideau River is a prominent natural feature of the electoral district, and forms part of its eastern boundary.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection.

Change of Name: Leeds—Grenville

Mr. Gordon Brown, Member of Parliament for Leeds—Grenville, objected to the name of the electoral district of Leeds—Grenville. He proposed the name Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes. His objection was based on the historical importance of the Thousand Islands and the Rideau Canal.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

The Commission is not persuaded. The boundaries of the electoral district were not changed in the Report.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection.

Kingston and the Islands, and Lanark—Frontenac

Mr. Scott Reid, Member of Parliament for Lanark—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington, objected to the boundary between the electoral districts of Lanark—Frontenac and Kingston and the Islands. Mr. Ted Hsu, Member of Parliament for Kingston and the Islands, objected to the boundaries of the electoral district of Kingston and the Islands.

Mr. Reid proposed that the part of the City of Kingston lying south of Highway 401 and east of the Cataraqui River be transferred from the electoral district of Kingston and the Islands to the electoral district of Lanark—Frontenac. His proposal would reassign 12,881 people, and keep the former Township of Pittsburgh within one electoral district.

The Standing Committee made no recommendation.

The Commission is not persuaded. The Township of Pittsburgh was amalgamated with the City of Kingston in 1998. The Commission is of the view that the community of interest of the urban development along the east shore of the Cataraqui River and the north shore of the St. Lawrence River aligns with the City of Kingston, and not with a primarily rural electoral district.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of Lanark—Frontenac and Kingston and the Islands as set out in its Report.

Mr. Hsu proposed that the current boundaries of the electoral district of Kingston and the Islands be retained. He argued that the City of Kingston has been represented within a single electoral district since Confederation, and should continue to be represented in that fashion to maintain its community of interest.

The Standing Committee made no recommendation.

The Commission is not persuaded. Mr. Hsu’s objection would have the effect of increasing the population of the electoral district of Kingston and the Islands to 125,227 (17.9% above the provincial quota) and decreasing the population of the electoral district of Lanark—Frontenac to 90,178 (15.1% below the provincial quota).

The population variance between the two electoral districts he proposes is unacceptable. The Commission is of the view that the boundaries set out in the Report more fairly balance population.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral district of Kingston and the Islands as set out in its Report.

Bay of Quinte, and Hastings—Lennox and Addington

Mr. Daryl Kramp, Member of Parliament for Prince Edward—Hastings, objected to the boundary between the electoral districts of Hastings—Lennox and Addington and Bay of Quinte.

First, he proposed that the part of the City of Belleville lying north of Highway 401 be reassigned from the electoral district of Hastings—Lennox and Addington to the electoral district of Bay of Quinte.

Second, he proposed to reassign the area south of Stirling, and east of Highway 14 and Wallbridge Loyalist Road to Highway 401, from the electoral district of Bay of Quinte to the electoral district of Hastings—Lennox and Addington.

The Standing Committee did not support the objection.

The Commission notes that Mr. Kramp acknowledged to the Standing Committee that both proposals presented challenges and would not be readily acceptable to either electoral district.

Mr. Kramp’s first proposal would increase the population of the electoral district of Bay of Quinte to 117,798 (10.91% above the provincial quota) and decrease the population of the electoral district of Hastings—Lennox and Addington to 84,218 (20.71% below the provincial quota). The Commission is of the view that this population variance between these two electoral districts is unacceptable.

His second proposal would divide the City of Quinte West. The Commission is not persuaded that there is any justification for interfering with the municipal boundaries of the City.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection, and retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of Hastings—Lennox and Addington and Bay of Quinte as set out in its Report.

Haliburton, Peterborough, Northumberland and Durham

Five Members of Parliament objected to electoral boundaries in this region: Mr. Erin O’Toole (Durham); Mr. Barry Devolin (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock); Mr. Rick Norlock (Northumberland—Quinte West); Mr. Colin Carrie (Oshawa); and Mr. Dean Del Mastro (Peterborough).

The Standing Committee noted that, while the five Members of Parliament made separate proposals, as a group they agreed with each other’s proposals.

The Municipality of Clarington is currently located within the electoral district of Durham. The Commission’s Report reassigned part of it to the electoral district of Northumberland—Pine Ridge. Mr. O’Toole’s proposal would keep it entirely within one electoral district.

Mr. O’Toole also supported Mr. Carrie’s request to keep as much as possible of the City of Oshawa and the campuses of the University of Ontario Institute of Technology with in the electoral district of Oshawa.

Mr. Norlock proposed two changes to the boundaries of the electoral district of Northumberland—Pine Ridge. First, like Mr. O’Toole, he argued that the Municipality of Clarington should be kept entirely within the electoral district of Durham—Oshawa. Second, he argued that the Township of Havelock-Belmont-Methuen, which the Report assigns to the electoral district of Peterborough, should be reassigned to the electoral district of Northumberland—Pine Ridge.

Mr. Devolin proposed two adjustments related to the electoral districts of Peterborough and Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock. First, he advocated the reassignment of the Township of Cavan-Monaghan from the electoral district of Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock to the electoral district of Peterborough. Second, he advocated the reassignment of the Townships of North Kawartha and of Galway-Cavendish and Harvey from the electoral district of Peterborough to the electoral district of Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock.

Mr. Del Mastro objected to the boundaries of the electoral district of Peterborough. First, he agreed with Mr. Norlock that the Township of Havelock-Belmont-Methuen should be reassigned from the electoral district of Peterborough to the electoral district of Northumberland—Pine Ridge. Second, he agreed with Mr. Devolin’s proposed boundary changes between the electoral districts of Peterborough and Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock.

The combined effect of these objections would result in the following population changes to the electoral districts of Oshawa, Oshawa—Durham, Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, Peterborough, and Northumberland—Pine Ridge:

  • the population of the electoral district of Oshawa would rise from 125,771 (18.41% above the provincial quota) to 132,330 (24.59% above the provincial quota);
  • the population of the electoral district of Oshawa—Durham would rise from 115,395 (8.64% above the provincial quota) to 123,698 (16.46% above the provincial quota);
  • the population of the electoral district of Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock would drop from 110,182 (3.74% above the provincial quota) to 108,975 (2.60% above the provincial quota);
  • the population of the electoral district of Peterborough would drop from 115,269 (8.53% above the provincial quota) to 111,953 (5.40% above the provincial quota); and
  • the population of the electoral district of Northumberland—Pine Ridge would drop from 107,840 (1.53% above the provincial quota) to 97,501 (8.20% below the provincial quota).

The Standing Committee supported the objections made by Mr. O’Toole, Mr. Devolin, Mr. Norlock, Mr. Carrie and Mr. Del Mastro. It noted that the resulting deviation in population for the electoral district of Oshawa would be high (24.59% above the provincial quota), but felt that the community of interest sufficiently justified it in the circumstances. The Standing Committee also stated that this was in line with the approach the Commission took for other regions and electoral districts in the province.

The central focus of the objections was to keep the whole of the Municipality of Clarington within a single electoral district. While the Commission endeavoured throughout its Report to respect and maintain the integrity of municipal boundaries, it was not feasible to do so in the case of the Municipality of Clarington. The Commission is of the view that several of the population deviations that result from the proposals for this region are unnecessary and unacceptable.

The Commission does not agree that the boundaries of the electoral district of Oshawa proposed in the objections are in line with the approach it took throughout the province.

The Commission therefore rejects all five objections, and retains the boundaries of the electoral districts of Oshawa, Oshawa—Durham, Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, Peterborough, and Northumberland—Pine Ridge as set out in its Report.

Change of Name: Peterborough

Mr. Dean Del Mastro, Member of Parliament for Peterborough, objected to the name of the electoral district of Peterborough. He proposed the name Peterborough—Kawartha Lakes. He argued that both the City of Peterborough and the City of Kawartha Lakes are located in the electoral district.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

This objection was based on Mr. Del Mastro’s proposed boundary changes, which the Commission rejected.

The Commission therefore rejects the objection to the name.

Change of Name: Oshawa—Durham

Mr. Erin O’Toole, Member of Parliament for Durham, objected to the name of the electoral district of Oshawa—Durham. He proposed the name Durham. He argued that naming one community in the electoral district and not others would exclude other important historical communities. He stated that the name Durham is inclusive of all communities in the riding. Mr. Colin Carrie, Member of Parliament for Oshawa, supported the name change.

The Standing Committee supported the objection.

The Commission finds the objection persuasive. The electoral district of Oshawa—Durham is renamed DURHAM.

Conclusion

With these changes and resulting amendments to the Report, the Commission’s work is now concluded. The following pages provide revised population numbers, descriptions, names, and maps of the electoral districts mentioned above.

Dated at Toronto, Ontario, this 31st day of July, 2013.

THE HONOURABLE MR. JUSTICE GEORGE T. VALIN
Chairperson

DOUGLAS COLBOURNE
Member

DR. LESLIE A. PAL
Member

CERTIFIED copy of the Report of the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for Ontario.

THE HONOURABLE MR. JUSTICE GEORGE T. VALIN
Chairperson

September 6, 2013

AMENDMENTS TO THE SCHEDULES

Schedule A — 2011 Census Populations of Electoral Districts
and Variance from Provincial Quota (see footnote 1)

Federal Electoral District

Population 2011

Variance from
Provincial Quota
of 106,213 (%)

Ajax

109,600

3.19

Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing

79,801

–24.87

Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill

106,064

–0.14

Barrie—Innisfil

101,584

–4.36

Barrie—Springwater—Oro-Medonte

97,876

–7.85

Bay of Quinte

109,488

3.08

Beaches—East York

107,084

0.82

Brampton Centre

103,122

–2.91

Brampton East

99,712

–6.12

Brampton North

111,951

5.40

Brampton South

107,364

1.08

Brampton West

101,762

–4.19

Brant

132,443

24.70

Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound

106,475

0.25

Burlington

120,569

13.52

Cambridge

111,693

5.16

Chatham-Kent—Leamington

111,866

5.32

Davenport

102,360

–3.63

Don Valley East

93,007

–12.43

Don Valley North

103,073

–2.96

Don Valley West

99,820

–6.02

Dufferin—Caledon

116,341

9.54

Durham

115,395

8.64

Eglinton—Lawrence

113,150

6.53

Elgin—Middlesex—London

110,109

3.67

Essex

120,477

13.43

Etobicoke Centre

114,910

8.19

Etobicoke—Lakeshore

115,437

8.68

Etobicoke North

117,601

10.72

Flamborough—Glanbrook

97,081

–8.60

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell

106,240

0.03

Guelph

121,688

14.57

Haldimand—Norfolk

108,051

1.73

Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock

110,182

3.74

Hamilton Centre

101,932

–4.03

Hamilton East—Stoney Creek

107,786

1.48

Hamilton Mountain

103,615

–2.45

Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas

109,535

3.13

Hastings—Lennox and Addington

92,528

–12.88

Huron—Bruce

104,842

–1.29

Kanata—Carleton

100,846

–5.05

Kenora

55,977

–47.30

King—Vaughan

109,235

2.85

Kingston and the Islands

116,996

10.15

Kitchener Centre

102,433

–3.56

Kitchener—Conestoga

93,827

–11.66

Kitchener South—Hespeler

97,673

–8.04

Lambton—Kent—Middlesex

105,919

–0.28

Lanark—Frontenac

98,409

–7.35

Leeds—Grenville

99,306

–6.50

London—Fanshawe

119,334

12.35

London North Centre

118,079

11.17

London West

119,090

12.12

Markham—Stouffville

109,780

3.36

Markham—Thornhill

102,221

–3.76

Markham—Unionville

104,693

–1.43

Milton

88,065

–17.09

Mississauga Centre

118,756

11.81

Mississauga—Cooksville

121,792

14.67

Mississauga—Erin Mills

117,199

10.34

Mississauga—Lakeshore

118,893

11.94

Mississauga—Malton

118,046

11.14

Mississauga—Streetsville

118,757

11.81

Nepean

104,775

–1.35

Newmarket—Aurora

109,457

3.05

Niagara Centre

105,860

–0.33

Niagara Falls

128,357

20.85

Niagara West

86,533

–18.53

Nickel Belt

90,962

–14.36

Nipissing—Timiskaming

90,996

–14.33

Northumberland—Pine Ridge

107,840

1.53

Oakville

119,649

12.65

Oakville North—Burlington

114,378

7.69

Oshawa

125,771

18.41

Ottawa Centre

113,619

6.97

Ottawa—Orléans

119,247

12.27

Ottawa South

121,894

14.76

Ottawa—Vanier

110,999

4.51

Ottawa West—Nepean

111,881

5.34

Oxford

108,656

2.30

Parkdale—High Park

105,103

–1.05

Parry Sound—Muskoka

91,263

–14.08

Perth—Wellington

104,912

–1.22

Peterborough

115,269

8.53

Pickering—Uxbridge

109,344

2.95

Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke

102,537

–3.46

Richmond Hill

108,658

2.30

Rideau—Carleton

89,522

–15.71

St. Catharines

110,596

4.13

St. Paul’s

103,983

–2.10

Sarnia—Lambton

106,293

0.08

Sault Ste. Marie

82,052

–22.75

Scarborough—Agincourt

104,499

–1.61

Scarborough Centre

108,826

2.46

Scarborough—Guildwood

101,914

–4.05

Scarborough North

101,080

–4.83

Scarborough—Rouge Park

102,646

–3.36

Scarborough Southwest

106,733

0.49

Simcoe—Grey

116,307

9.50

Simcoe North

108,672

2.32

Spadina—Fort York

82,480

–22.34

Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry

100,913

–4.99

Sudbury

92,048

–13.34

Thornhill

110,427

3.97

Thunder Bay—Rainy River

82,984

–21.87

Thunder Bay—Superior North

82,827

–22.02

Timmins—James Bay

83,104

–21.76

Toronto Centre

93,971

–11.53

Toronto—Danforth

104,017

–2.07

University—Rosedale

98,605

–7.16

Vaughan—Woodbridge

105,450

–0.72

Waterloo

103,192

–2.84

Wellington—Halton Hills

115,880

9.10

Whitby

122,022

14.88

Willowdale

109,680

3.26

Windsor—Tecumseh

115,528

8.77

Windsor West

118,973

12.01

York Centre

100,277

–5.59

York—Simcoe

94,616

–10.92

York South—Weston

116,606

9.79

York West

108,198

1.87

Population of Ontario

12,851,821

 

Schedule B — Boundaries and Names of Electoral Districts

Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill

(Population: 106,064)

(Map 21)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of York comprised of:

  • (a) that part of the Town of Aurora lying southerly of Wellington Street West and Wellington Street East; and
  • (b) that part of the Town of Richmond Hill lying northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said town with Elgin Mills Road West; thence easterly along said road and Elgin Mills Road East to Bayview Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to the unnamed creek situated northerly of Taylor Mills Drive North; thence generally easterly along said creek to Shirley Drive; thence generally southerly along said drive to Major Mackenzie Drive East; thence easterly along said drive to the easterly limit of said town.
Barrie—Springwater—Oro-Medonte

(Population: 97,876)

(Map 5)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the County of Simcoe comprised of:
    • (i) the Township of Springwater;
    • (ii) that part of the Township of Oro-Medonte lying southwesterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said township with 9 Line North; thence southeasterly along said line to Moonstone Road East; thence northeasterly along said road to 9 Line North; thence generally southeasterly along said line to Horseshoe Valley Road East; thence northeasterly along said road to 9 Line North; thence southeasterly along said line, its intermittent production, 9 Line South and its southeasterly production to the southerly limit of said township; and
  • (b) that part of the City of Barrie lying northerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said city with Dunlop Street West; thence northeasterly along said street to Tiffin Street; thence southeasterly and easterly along said street to Lakeshore Drive; thence northeasterly in a straight line to the easterly limit of said city (at the intersection of the southerly limit of the Township of Oro-Medonte with the northerly limit of the Town of Innisfil).
Brampton North

(Population: 111,951)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Brampton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said city with Bramalea Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Sandalwood Parkway East; thence northeasterly along said parkway to Torbram Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Williams Parkway East; thence southwesterly along said parkway to Highway No. 410; thence northwesterly along said highway to Bovaird Drive East; thence southwesterly along said drive to Hurontario Street; thence northwesterly along said street to Wanless Drive; thence southwesterly along said drive to the Orangeville-Brampton Railway; thence northwesterly along said railway to the northwesterly limit of said city; thence generally northeasterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Brampton West

(Population: 101,762)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Brampton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said city with the Orangeville-Brampton Railway; thence southeasterly along said railway to Wanless Drive; thence northeasterly along said drive to Hurontario Street; thence southeasterly along said street and Main Street North to Williams Parkway West; thence southwesterly along said parkway to McLaughlin Road North; thence southeasterly along said road to Queen Street West; thence southwesterly along said street to Mississauga Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Embleton Road; thence generally southwesterly along said road to the southwesterly limit of said city; thence northwesterly and generally northeasterly along the southwesterly and northwesterly limits of said city to the point of commencement.

Don Valley West

(Population: 99,820)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Highway No. 401 with Leslie Street; thence generally southerly along said street to Eglinton Avenue East; thence westerly along said avenue to the Don River West Branch; thence generally southeasterly along said branch to Overlea Boulevard; thence easterly along said boulevard to Don Mills Road; thence southerly along said road to the Don River East Branch; thence generally southwesterly along said branch and the Don River to Pottery Road; thence northwesterly and southwesterly along said road to Bayview Avenue; thence generally northerly and northwesterly along said avenue to the Canadian Pacific Railway situated northwesterly of Nesbitt Drive; thence southwesterly along said railway to the Beltline Trail situated in the Moore Park Ravine; thence generally northwesterly along said trail to the southerly boundary of the Mount Pleasant Cemetery; thence generally westerly along said boundary to Mount Pleasant Road; thence northerly along said road to Broadway Avenue; thence westerly along said avenue to Yonge Street; thence northerly along said street to Highway No. 401; thence northeasterly and easterly along said highway to the point of commencement.

Durham

(Population: 115,395)

(Map 15)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Durham comprised of:

  • (a) that part of the City of Oshawa lying northerly of Taunton Road West and Taunton Road East;
  • (b) the Township of Scugog; and
  • (c) that part of the Corporation of the Municipality of Clarington lying westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southerly limit of said municipality with the production of Cobbledick Road; thence northerly along said production and Cobbledick Road to Highway No. 401; thence westerly along said highway to the production of Darlington-Clarke Townline (Regional Road No. 42); thence northerly along said production, Darlington-Clarke Townline and its intermittent production to Concession Road 10; thence generally westerly along said road to Regional Road No. 20; thence generally northerly along said road to Darlington-Manvers Townline; thence generally northerly along said townline to the northerly limit of said municipality.
Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas

(Population: 109,535)

(Map 12)

Consisting of that part of the City of Hamilton described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said city with Highway No. 403; thence southwesterly along said highway to the Canadian National Railway; thence generally westerly along said railway to Highway No. 52 North; thence generally southerly along said highway and Trinity Road to the electric power transmission line situated northerly of Book Road West; thence generally easterly along said transmission line to Glancaster Road; thence northerly along said road to Garner Road East; thence easterly along said road and Rymal Road West to Garth Street; thence northerly along said street to Lincoln M. Alexander Parkway; thence easterly along said parkway to West 5th Street; thence northerly along said street to James Mountain Road; thence generally northeasterly along said road to the Niagara Escarpment; thence generally westerly along said escarpment to the electric power transmission line situated westerly of Chateau Court; thence northerly along said transmission line to Highway No. 403; thence generally northeasterly along said highway to the Desjardins Canal; thence easterly along said canal and continuing due east in Hamilton Harbour to the northerly production of Queen Street North; thence northerly in a straight line along said production to the northerly limit of said city; thence generally westerly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Kenora

(Population: 55,977)

(Map 1)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Territorial District of Kenora lying westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the northeast corner of the most northerly point of the Territorial District of Thunder Bay (at Albany River); thence due north to the northerly boundary of the Province of Ontario;
  • (b) that part of the Territorial District of Thunder Bay lying northerly and westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said territorial district with the 6th Base Line; thence easterly along said base line to the southeast corner of the geographic Township of Bertrand; thence northerly along the easterly boundary of the geographic townships of Bertrand, McLaurin, Furlonge, Fletcher and Bulmer to the northeast corner of the geographic Township of Bulmer; thence due north to the northerly limit of said territorial district (east of Highway No. 599); and
  • (c) that part of the Territorial District of Rainy River comprised of Sabaskong Bay (Part) Indian Reserve No. 35C.
Mississauga—Cooksville

(Population: 121,792)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Mississauga described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of said city with Queensway East; thence southwesterly along Queensway East and Queensway West to Mavis Road; thence northwesterly along said road to Central Parkway West; thence northeasterly and northwesterly along said parkway and Central Parkway East to Highway No. 403; thence northeasterly and northwesterly along said highway to Eglinton Avenue East; thence northeasterly along said avenue to the northeasterly limit of said city; thence generally southeasterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Mississauga—Lakeshore

(Population: 118,893)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Mississauga lying southeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of said city with Queensway East; thence southwesterly along Queensway East and Queensway West to Mavis Road; thence northwesterly along said road to Dundas Street West; thence southwesterly along said street to the southwesterly limit of said city.

Mississauga—Malton

(Population: 118,046)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Mississauga described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northwesterly limit of said city with Mavis Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Highway No. 401; thence southwesterly along said highway to the Credit River; thence southeasterly, generally northeasterly and generally southerly along said river to Credit view Road; thence southeasterly along said road to Bristol Road West; thence generally northeasterly along said road to Fairwind Drive; thence generally easterly along said drive to Eglinton Avenue West; thence northeasterly along said avenue to Hurontario Street; thence southeasterly along said street to Highway No. 403; thence northeasterly and northwesterly along said highway to Eglinton Avenue East; thence northeasterly along said avenue to the northeasterly limit of said city; thence northeasterly, northwesterly and generally southwesterly along the northeasterly and northwesterly limits of said city to the point of commencement.

Mississauga—Streetsville

(Population: 118,757)

(Map 7)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Peel comprised of that part of the City of Mississauga described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the southwesterly limit of said city with Britannia Road West; thence northeasterly along said road to Erin Mills Parkway; thence southeasterly along said parkway to Eglinton Avenue West; thence northeasterly along said avenue to Credit view Road; thence northwesterly along said road to the Credit River; thence generally northerly, generally southwesterly and northwesterly along said river to Highway No. 401; thence northeasterly along said highway to Mavis Road; thence northwesterly along said road to the northwesterly limit of said city; thence generally southwesterly and southeasterly along the northwesterly and southwesterly limits of the City of Mississauga to the point of commencement.

Oakville

(Population: 119,649)

(Map 9)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of Halton comprised of that part of the Town of Oakville lying southeasterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northeasterly limit of said town with Dundas Street East; thence southwesterly along said street to Eighth Line; thence southeasterly along said line to Upper Middle Road East; thence southwesterly along said road, Upper Middle Road West and its production to the southwesterly limit of said town.

Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke

(Population: 102,537)

(Map 2)

Consisting of:

  • (a) the County of Renfrew;
  • (b) the City of Pembroke; and
  • (c) that part of the Territorial District of Nipissing lying southerly and easterly of a line described as follows: commencing at the northeast corner of the geographic Township of Deacon; thence westerly and southerly along the northerly and westerly boundaries of said geographic township to the northeast corner of the geographic Township of Lister; thence westerly, southerly and easterly along the northerly, westerly and southerly boundaries of said geographic township to the northwest corner of the geographic Township of Anglin; thence southerly along the westerly boundary of the geographic townships of Anglin, Dickson and Preston to the northerly boundary of the geographic Township of Airy; thence westerly along said boundary to the northeast corner of the County of Haliburton.
Scarborough—Agincourt

(Population: 104,499)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said city with Midland Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to Highway No. 401; thence westerly along said highway to Victoria Park Avenue; thence northerly along said avenue to the northerly limit of the City of Toronto; thence easterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Scarborough Centre

(Population: 108,826)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Highway No. 401 with McCowan Road; thence southerly along said road to Lawrence Avenue East; thence easterly along said avenue to Bellamy Road North; thence generally southerly along said road and its southerly production to Eglinton Avenue East; thence westerly along said avenue to Victoria Park Avenue; thence northerly along said avenue to Highway No. 401; thence easterly along said highway to the point of commencement.

Scarborough—Guildwood

(Population: 101,914)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Highway No. 401 with Morningside Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue and its production to the southerly limit of said city; thence southwesterly along said limit to the southerly production of Markham Road; thence northerly along said production and Markham Road to Eglinton Avenue East; thence westerly along said avenue to the southerly production of Bellamy Road North; thence generally northerly along said production and Bellamy Road North to Lawrence Avenue East; thence westerly along said avenue to McCowan Road; thence northerly along said road to Highway No. 401; thence easterly along said highway to the point of commencement.

Scarborough North

(Population: 101,080)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the northerly limit of said city with the Rouge River; thence generally southerly along said river to the electric power transmission line; thence westerly along said transmission line to Morningside Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to Neilson Road; thence generally southerly along said road to Highway No. 401; thence westerly along said highway to Midland Avenue; thence northerly along said avenue to the northerly limit of said city; thence easterly along said limit to the point of commencement.

Scarborough—Rouge Park

(Population: 102,646)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the Rouge River with the northerly limit of said city; thence easterly, generally southerly and generally southwesterly along the northerly, easterly and southerly limits of said city to the southerly production of Morningside Avenue; thence northerly along said production and Morningside Avenue to Highway No. 401; thence westerly along said highway to Neilson Road; thence generally northerly along said road to Morningside Avenue; thence northerly along said avenue to the electric power transmission line; thence easterly along said transmission line to the Rouge River; thence generally northerly along said river to the point of commencement.

Scarborough Southwest

(Population: 106,733)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of Eglinton Avenue East and Markham Road; thence southerly along Markham Road and its southerly production to the southerly limit of said city; thence generally southwesterly along said limit to the southerly production of Victoria Park Avenue; thence generally northerly along said production and Victoria Park Avenue to Eglinton Avenue East; thence easterly along said avenue to the point of commencement.

Thornhill

(Population: 110,427)

(Map 21)

Consisting of that part of the Regional Municipality of York comprised of:

  • (a) that part of the City of Vaughan lying easterly of Highway No. 400 and southerly of Rutherford Road; and
  • (b) that part of the Town of Markham lying westerly of Bayview Avenue.
Thunder Bay—Rainy River

(Population: 82,984)

(Map 18)

Consisting of:

  • (a) that part of the Territorial District of Thunder Bay lying southerly and westerly of a line described as follows: commencing at the intersection of the westerly limit of said territorial district with the 6th Base Line; thence easterly along said base line to longitude 90°00′W; thence southerly along said longitude to its most southerly intersection with the Dog River; thence generally southeasterly along said river, Taman Lake, the Dog River and the western shoreline of Dog Lake to the northerly boundary of the geographic Township of Fowler; thence westerly, southerly and easterly along the northerly, westerly and southerly boundaries of said geographic township to the Kaministiquia River; thence generally southerly along said river, Little Dog Lake and the Kaministiquia River to the northerly limit of the Municipality of Oliver Paipoonge; thence easterly, southerly and easterly along the northerly and easterly limits of said municipality to the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway No. 11, Highway No. 17); thence easterly along said highway, Harbour Expressway, Main Street and its easterly production to the easterly limit of the City of Thunder Bay; thence southwesterly, easterly and southerly along said limit to the northeast corner of the Municipality of Neebing situated easterly of Welcome Islands; thence S45°00′E in a straight line to the international boundary between Canada and the United States of America; and
  • (b) the Territorial District of Rainy River, excepting Sabaskong Bay (Part) Indian Reserve No. 35C.
University—Rosedale

(Population: 98,605)

(Map 19)

Consisting of that part of the City of Toronto described as follows: commencing at the intersection of College Street with Bay Street; thence northerly along Bay Street to Charles Street West; thence easterly along said street to Yonge Street; thence southerly along said street to Charles Street East; thence easterly along said street to Mount Pleasant Road; thence northerly along said road to Bloor Street East; thence easterly along said street to Sherbourne Street North; thence northerly along said street to Rosedale Valley Road; thence generally easterly along said road and its production to the Don River; thence generally northerly along said river to Pottery Road; thence northwesterly and southwesterly along said road to Bayview Avenue; thence generally northerly and northwesterly along said avenue to the Canadian Pacific Railway situated northwesterly of Nesbitt Drive; thence southwesterly along said railway to the Beltline Trail situated in the Moore Park Ravine; thence generally northwesterly along said trail to the southerly boundary of the Mount Pleasant Cemetery; thence generally westerly along said boundary to the northwesterly production of the Don River Tributary situated easterly of Avoca Avenue; thence generally southeasterly along said production and said tributary to the easterly production of Rosehill Avenue; thence westerly along said production and Rosehill Avenue to the westerly boundary of the Rosehill Reservoir; thence southerly along said boundary to Jackes Avenue; thence westerly along said avenue to Yonge Street; thence southerly along said street to the Canadian Pacific Railway; thence generally westerly along said railway to Ossington Avenue; thence southerly along said avenue to Dundas Street West; thence generally easterly along said street to Yonge Street; thence northerly along said street to College Street; thence westerly along said street to the point of commencement.

Amended Maps

  • Footnote 1
    This schedule was titled “Federal Representation 2013” in the Report filed on February 14, 2013.