ARCHIVED — Vol. 147, No. 30 — July 27, 2013

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 17116

Significant New Activity Notice

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information in respect of the substance, acetamide, N,N′-(ethenylmethylsilylene)bis[N-ethyl-, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 87855-59-2, under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that subsection 81(4) of that Act applies to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information Requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

  1. In relation to the substance, acetamide, N,N′-(ethenylmethylsilylene)bis[N-ethyl-, a significant new activity is the use of the substance in Canada in a quantity greater than 1 000 kg per calendar year in consumer products as defined in section 2 of the Canada Consumer Products Safety Act when it is in an unreacted form.
  2. The following information must be provided to the Minister at least 90 days before the commencement of each proposed significant new activity:
    • (a) a description of the proposed significant new activity in relation to the substance;

    • (b) the information specified in Schedule 4 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);

    • (c) the information specified in paragraphs 8(f), 8(g) and 10(a) of Schedule 5 to those Regulations;

    • (d) the anticipated annual quantity of the substance to be used in relation to the significant new activity;

    • (e) the identification of every government department or government agency, either outside or within Canada, to which the person proposing the significant new activity has provided information regarding the use of the substance and, if known, the department’s or agency’s file number and if any, the outcome of the department’s or agency’s assessment and risk management actions in relation to the substance imposed by the department or agency;

    • (f) the test data and a test report from a 90-day subchronic dermal toxicity study in respect of the substance, conducted according to the methodology described in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Test Guideline No. 411 titled Subchronic Dermal Toxicity: 90-Day Study. The examination of the tissues should include the weight and histopathology of all major organs as well as reproductive organs (male and female), with special emphasis on testes, epididymides, stages of spermatogenesis and histopathology of interstitial testicular cell structure, thyroid, thymus, adrenals and bone marrow. Hormone levels (testosterone, estrogen, thyroid hormone levels) should be measured; and

    • (g) all other information or test data in respect of the substance that are in the possession of the person proposing the significant new activity, or to which they have access, and that are relevant to determining whether the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic.
  3. The test data and the test report described in paragraph 2(f) must be in conformity with the practices described in the OECD Principles of Good Laboratory Practice (Principles of GLP) set out in Annex 2 of the Decision of the Council Concerning the Mutual Acceptance of Data in the Assessment of Chemicals adopted on May 12, 1981, and where both the Test Guideline and Principles of GLP are current at the time the test data are developed.
  4. The above information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Significant New Activity Notice.)

A Significant New Activity Notice is a legal instrument issued by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. The Significant New Activity Notice sets out the appropriate information that must be provided to the Minister for assessment prior to the commencement of a new activity as described in the Notice.

Substances that are not listed on the Domestic Substances List can be manufactured or imported only by the person who has met the requirements set out in section 81 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. Under section 86 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, in circumstances where a Significant New Activity Notice is issued for a new substance, it is the responsibility of every person who transfers the physical possession or control of the substance to notify all persons to whom the possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and of the obligation to notify the Minister of the Environment of any new activity and all other information as described in the Notice. It is the responsibility of the users of the substance to be aware of and comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and to submit a Significant New Activity notification to the Minister prior to the commencement of a significant new activity associated with the substance. However, as mentioned in subsection 81(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, a Significant New Activity notification is not required when the proposed new activity is regulated under an act or regulations listed on Schedule 2 to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

A Significant New Activity Notice does not constitute an endorsement from Environment Canada or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

[30-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of two gas oil substances specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas two gas oils (the “substances”) annexed hereby are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on the substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to take no further action on these substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Final Screening Assessment of the Two Gas Oils Listed Below

The Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of the following industry-restricted gas oils:

CAS RN (see footnote a)

DSL (see footnote b) name

64741-59-9

Distillates (petroleum), light catalytic cracked

64741-82-8

Distillates (petroleum), light thermal cracked

These substances were identified as high priorities for action during the categorization of substances on the Domestic Substances List (DSL), as they were determined to present the “greatest potential for exposure” to individuals in Canada, and were considered to present a high hazard to human health. These substances met the ecological categorization criteria for persistence or bioaccumulation potential and inherent toxicity to aquatic organisms. These substances were included in the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach (PSSA) because they are related to the petroleum sector and are considered to be of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products or Biological materials (UVCBs).

These gas oils are a group of complex combinations of petroleum hydrocarbons that serve as blending stocks in the production of fuels that are used in diesel engines and for both industrial and domestic heating. Some of the blended products may also be used as solvents. The composition and physical-chemical properties of gas oils vary with the sources of the crude oil or bitumen and the processing steps involved. The substance bearing Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. (CAS RN) 64741-59-9 is a light, catalytically cracked petroleum distillate with a typical boiling point range of 179°–382°C and is a complex combination of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, mainly in the carbon range of C9–C25. The substance bearing CAS RN 64741-82-8 is a complex combination of aromatic, aliphatic and cycloalkane hydrocarbons, mainly in the carbon range of C10–C22, with a typical boiling point range of 160°–370°C. In order to predict the overall behaviour of these complex substances for the purposes of assessing the potential for ecological effects, representative structures have been selected from each chemical class in the substances.

Both substances considered in this screening assessment have been identified as industry-restricted (i.e. they are a subset of gas oils that may leave a petroleum-sector facility and may be transported to other industrial facilities). According to information submitted under section 71 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), and other sources of information, these gas oils are transported from petroleum facilities to other industrial facilities by ship and by truck; therefore, exposure of the environment is possible.

Based on the comparison of levels expected to cause harm to organisms with estimated exposure levels and on other information, these gas oils have a low risk of harm to aquatic life due to spills in the relatively confined waters around a loading wharf. The estimated frequency of spills of sufficient volume to be of concern to the environment during ship loading is less than one incident per year; for truck loading, close to zero incidents of concern per year are expected, given the low volumes transported.

Based on the information on the frequency and magnitude of spills presented in this screening assessment, there is low risk of harm to organisms or the broader integrity of the environment from these substances. It is concluded that the industry-restricted gas oils (CAS RNs 64741-59-9 and 64741-82-8) do not meet the criteria under paragraphs 64(a) or 64(b) of CEPA 1999 as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

A critical effect for the initial categorization of industry-restricted gas oil substances was carcinogenicity, based primarily on classifications by international agencies. Several cancer studies conducted in laboratory animals resulted in the development of skin tumours following repeated dermal application of the substance bearing CAS RN 64741-59-9. Industry-restricted gas oils demonstrated genotoxicity in in vivo and in vitro assays but do not appear to affect reproduction or development in laboratory animals when applied dermally. There are no carcinogenicity studies by the inhalation route to inform the carcinogenic potential of these substances in the general population following inhalation exposure. Information on additional gas oil substances in the PSSA that are similar from a processing and physical-chemical perspective was considered for characterization of human health effects.

There is potential limited general population exposure via inhalation of ambient air containing gas oil vapours due to evaporative emissions during transportation. A comparison of critical inhalation effect levels and upper-bounding estimates of exposure by the inhalation route results in margins of exposure which are considered adequate to address uncertainties related to health effects and exposure. General population exposure to industry-restricted gas oils via the dermal and oral routes is not expected; therefore, risk to human health from these routes of exposure is not expected.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that the industry-restricted gas oils (CAS RNs 64741-59-9 and 64741-82-8) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

Based on the information available, it is concluded that the industry-restricted gas oils (CAS RNs 64741-59-9 and 64741-82-8) do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The screening assessment report is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[30-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of five heavy fuel oil substances specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the five heavy fuel oils (the “substances”) annexed hereby are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on the substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to take no further action on these substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Final Screening Assessment of the Five Heavy Fuel Oils Listed Below

The Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of the following industry-restricted heavy fuel oils (HFOs):

CAS RN (see footnote c)

DSL (see footnote d) name

64741-75-9

Residues (petroleum), hydrocracked

68783-08-4

Gas oils (petroleum), heavy atmospheric

70592-76-6

Distillates (petroleum), intermediate vacuum

70592-77-7

Distillates (petroleum), light vacuum

70592-78-8

Distillates (petroleum), vacuum

These substances were identified as high priorities for action during the categorization of substances on the Domestic Substances List (DSL), as they were determined to present the “greatest potential” or intermediate potential for exposure to individuals in Canada, and were considered to present a high hazard to human health. These substances met the ecological categorization criteria for persistence or bioaccumulation potential and inherent toxicity to aquatic organisms. These substances were included in the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach (PSSA) because they are related to the petroleum sector and are considered to be of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products or Biological materials (UVCBs).

These HFOs are a group of complex combinations of petroleum hydrocarbons that serve as blending stocks in final heavy fuel products or as intermediate products of distillation or residue derived from refinery distillation or cracking units. The final fuel products usually consist of a blend of HFOs, as well as higher-quality hydrocarbons as diluents. The HFOs considered in this assessment are complex combinations composed of aromatic, aliphatic and cycloalkane hydrocarbons with carbon ranges spanning C7–C50 and a typical boiling point range of 121°–600°C. In order to predict the overall behaviour of these complex substances for the purposes of assessing the potential for ecological effects, representative structures have been selected from each chemical class in the substances.

The HFOs considered in this screening assessment have been identified as industry-restricted (i.e. they are a subset of HFOs that may leave a petroleum sector facility and be transported to other industrial facilities). According to information submitted under section 71 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), and other sources of information, these HFOs are transported in large volumes from refinery or upgrader facilities to other industrial facilities by pipelines, ships, trains and trucks; therefore, exposure of the environment is expected.

Based on results of comparison of levels expected to cause harm to organisms with estimated exposure levels and the relatively low expected frequency of spills to water and soil during loading/unloading and transport operations, these five HFOs have a low risk of harm to aquatic or soil organisms.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment on the frequency and magnitude of spills, there is low risk of harm to organisms or the broader integrity of the environment from these substances. It is concluded that the industry-restricted HFOs (CAS RNs 64741-75-9, 68783-08-4, 70592-76-6, 70592-77-7 and 70592-78-8) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or 64(b) of CEPA 1999 as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

A critical effect for the initial categorization of industry-restricted HFO substances was carcinogenicity, based primarily on classifications by international agencies. Several cancer studies conducted on laboratory animals resulted in the development of skin tumours following repeated dermal application of HFO substances. HFOs demonstrated genotoxicity in in vivo and in vitro assays and may also adversely affect reproduction and development in laboratory animals when applied dermally. There are no carcinogenicity studies by the inhalation route to inform the carcinogenic potential of these substances in the general population following inhalation exposure. Information on additional HFO substances in the PSSA that are similar from a processing and physical-chemical perspective was considered for characterization of human health effects.

General population exposure to industry-restricted HFOs results primarily from inhalation of ambient air containing HFO vapours due to evaporative emissions during transportation. Due to the relatively low volatility of the HFO substances, as defined by their physical-chemical properties, evaporative emissions into the air are expected to be minimal. The margins between the upper-bounding estimate of exposure, the maximum air concentration of HFOs (1.28 µg/m3), and the critical inhalation effect levels are considered to be highly conservative and adequately protective to account for uncertainties related to health effects and exposure. The likelihood of inhalation exposure of the general population is considered to be low; thus, the risk to human health is likewise considered to be low. General population exposure to industry-restricted HFOs via the oral and dermal routes is not expected; therefore, risk to human health from the industry-restricted HFOs via these routes is not expected.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that the industry-restricted HFOs (CAS RNs 64741-75-9, 68783-08-4, 70592-76-6, 70592-77-7 and 70592-78-8) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

Based on the information available, it is concluded that the industry-restricted HFOs (CAS RNs 64741-75-9, 68783-08-4, 70592-76-6, 70592-77-7 and 70592-78-8) do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The screening assessment report is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[30-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of three low boiling point naphtha substances specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas three low boiling point naphthas (the “substances”) annexed hereby are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on the substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to take no further action on these substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment
LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Final Screening Assessment of the
Three Low Boiling Point Naphthas Listed Below

The Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of the following industry-restricted low boiling point naphthas (LBPNs):

CAS RN (see footnote e)

DSL (see footnote f) name

64741-42-0

Naphtha (petroleum), full-range straight-run

64741-69-1

Naphtha (petroleum), light hydrocracked

64741-78-2

Naphtha (petroleum), heavy hydrocracked

These substances were identified as high priorities for action during the categorization of substances on the Domestic Substances List (DSL), as they were determined to present the “greatest potential” or intermediate potential for exposure to individuals in Canada, and were considered to present a high hazard to human health. These substances met the ecological categorization criteria for persistence or bioaccumulation potential and inherent toxicity to aquatic organisms. These substances were included in the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach (PSSA) because they are related to the petroleum sector and are considered to be of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products or Biological materials (UVCBs).

These LBPNs are complex combinations of petroleum hydrocarbons that serve as blending constituents in final gasoline products, as intermediate products of distillation or as residues derived from distillation or extraction units. The final fuel products usually consist of a combination of LBPNs, as well as high-quality hydrocarbons that have been produced from refinery or upgrader facilities. In order to predict the overall behaviour of these complex substances for the purposes of assessing the potential for ecological effects, representative structures have been selected from each chemical class in the substances.

The LBPNs considered in this screening assessment (CAS RNs 64741-42-0, 64741-69-1 and 64741-78-2) have been identified as industry-restricted (i.e. they are a subset of LBPNs that may leave a petroleum sector facility and be transported to other industrial facilities). According to information submitted under section 71 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) and other sources of information, these LBPNs are transported from petroleum sector facilities to other industrial facilities by ship and truck.

Based on results of comparison of levels expected to cause harm to organisms with estimated exposure levels, releases to soil from loading, unloading and transport may cause harm to terrestrial organisms. However, given the conditions of such releases and the overall low frequency of spills to land, the risk of harm to the environment from these spills is low. As well, there is a low risk of harm to terrestrial organisms from releases of LBPNs to air from ship and truck loading. As there were no recorded spills to marine waters during transport, these LBPNs have a low risk of harm to aquatic organisms.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment on the frequency and magnitude of spills, there is low risk of harm to organisms or the broader integrity of the environment from these substances. It is concluded that the three industry-restricted LBPNs (CAS RNs 64741-42-0, 64741-69-1 and 64741-78-2) do not meet the criteria under paragraphs 64(a) or 64(b) of CEPA 1999 as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

A critical effect for the initial categorization of industry-restricted LBPNs was carcinogenicity, based primarily on classifications by international agencies. Additionally, benzene, a component of LBPNs, has been identified by Health Canada and several international regulatory agencies as a carcinogen. In addition to LBPN-specific data, benzene was selected as a high-hazard component of LBPNs to characterize potential exposure and risk to the general population from evaporative emissions of LBPNs. Several studies also confirmed skin tumour development in mice following repeated dermal application of LBPNs. LBPNs demonstrated limited evidence of genotoxicity in in vivo and in vitro assays, as well as limited potential to adversely affect reproduction and development. Information on additional LBPNs in the PSSA that are similar from a processing and a physical-chemical perspective was considered for characterization of human health effects.

The physical-chemical properties of LBPNs indicate that these substances contain highly volatile components. Potential exposure to the industry-restricted LBPNs for individuals in proximity to shipping and trucking corridors results primarily from inhalation of vapours in ambient air due to evaporative emissions during transportation. The margins between the upper-bounding estimates of exposure to maximum air concentrations of total volatile organic compounds (VOCs) or benzene, based on the aromatic fraction of the LBPNs, and the critical inhalation effect levels are considered to be conservative and adequately protective to account for uncertainties related to health effects and exposure. General population exposure to industry-restricted LBPNs via the dermal and oral routes is not expected; therefore, risk to human health from the industry-restricted LBPNs via these routes is not expected.

Based on information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that the industry-restricted LBPNs (CAS RNs 64741-42-0, 64741-69-1 and 64741-78-2) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

Based on the information available, it is concluded that the industry-restricted LBPNs (CAS RNs 64741-42-0, 64741-69-1 and 64741-78-2) do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The screening assessment report is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[30-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Application for surrender of charter

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of subsection 32(2) of the Canada Corporations Act, an application for surrender of charter was received from

File No.

Name of Company

Received

248571-1

ALPHA CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES, INC.

13/06/2013

July 18, 2013

MARCIE GIROUARD
Director
For the Minister of Industry

[30-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Supplementary letters patent

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of the Canada Corporations Act, supplementary letters patent have been issued to

File No.

Name of Company

Date of S.L.P.

053109-0

KARATE CANADA/KARATÉ CANADA

02/04/2013

July 18, 2013

MARCIE GIROUARD
Director
For the Minister of Industry

[30-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Supplementary letters patent — Name change

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of the Canada Corporations Act, supplementary letters patent have been issued to

File No.

Old Name of Company

New Name of Company

Date of S.L.P.

789716-2

CANACCORD FOUNDATION

CANACCORD GENUITY FOUNDATION

03/06/2013

105925-4

CANADIAN WINDOW AND DOOR MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION
L’ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE DES MANUFACTURIERS DE FENETRE ET PORTE

Fenestration Canada

20/06/2013

434596-7

Multi-nation Missionary Foundation

Multi-nation Missions Foundation

21/05/2013

July 18, 2013

MARCIE GIROUARD
Director
For the Minister of Industry

[30-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following persons of the Durham Regional Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

Desiree Hamid
Chris Oerlemans

Ottawa, July 11, 2013

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Law Enforcement and Policing Branch

[30-1-o]

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BANK ACT

Equitable Bank — Order to commence and carry on business

Notice is hereby given of the issuance, pursuant to subsection 48(3) of the Bank Act, of an order to commence and carry on business authorizing Equitable Bank to commence and carry on business, effective July 1, 2013.

July 2, 2013

JULIE DICKSON
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

[30-1-o]

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

INSURANCE COMPANIES ACT

Axa Art Insurance Corporation — Order to insure in Canada risks

Notice is hereby given of the issuance, pursuant to section 574(1) of the Insurance Companies Act, of an order to insure in Canada risks, effective June 12, 2013, permitting Axa Art Insurance Corporation to insure risks falling within the class of property insurance.

July 3, 2013

JULIE DICKSON
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

[30-1-o]

  • Footnote a
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote b
    DSL: Domestic Substances List
  • Footnote c
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote d
    DSL: Domestic Substances List
  • Footnote e
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote f
    DSL: Domestic Substances List