Vol. 147, No. 27 — July 6, 2013

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substance — 1-Propene (propene), CAS (see footnote 1) RN 115-07-1 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas propene is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act,1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on the substance pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to take no further action on the substance at this time.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www. chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

KAREN LLOYD
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Propene

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 1-Propene, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 11507-1. 1-Propene (henceforth referred to as propene) was identified as a priority for screening assessment as it was considered to pose the “greatest potential for exposure” (GPE) of individuals in Canada.

Propene is a naturally occurring gas that is emitted from many plants, and is a component in natural gas and in gases emitted by volcanoes, and also results from incomplete biomass combustion. Propene is primarily used as a monomer for the production of polypropylene, a plastic. It can also serve as an intermediate to make many other plastics, as a fuel additive, as a fragrance or as a perfume ingredient. Based on submissions made under section 71 of CEPA 1999, companies reported manufacturing a total of 930 000 tonnes of propene in Canada in 2000, mostly by the petrochemical industry. During the same year, over 10 000 tonnes of propene were reported as imported into Canada.

The National Pollutant Release Inventory reported that in 2009 a total of 404 tonnes of propene were released in Canada. There is an overall declining trend in reported releases from 1994 to 2009, due in part to closures of several chemical manufacturing facilities in 2008 and 2009.

Automobiles manufactured prior to 1992 are estimated to be a major source of propene in air. In 2005, these automobiles constituted 14% of all Canadian light-duty vehicles on the road but they contributed 76% of all propene releases from these vehicles. However, the amount of all volatile organic compounds, including propene, released by automobiles has been declining due to improved efficiency of automotive engines and the continual removal of older vehicles from usage.

Propene has been detected in outdoor, indoor and personal air. It has not been reported in surface water, drinking water, soil, sediment, consumer products or foodstuffs in Canada. Propene has been identified as a combustion by-product in cigarette smoke.

Environment

Based on its physical and chemical properties and modelled data, propene does not meet the criteria for persistence or bioaccumulation potential as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA 1999. Propene does not appear to cause harmful effects to terrestrial plants or small mammals even when they are exposed to very high concentrations in air. No studies have been found on potential effects of propene on aquatic organisms.

Releases of propene to the environment occur almost exclusively to air. Based on a conservative risk quotient analysis, air concentrations of propene in Canada are not expected to cause harmful effects to small mammals and terrestrial plants.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment, there is low risk of harm to organisms or the broader integrity of the environment from this substance. It is proposed to conclude that this substance does not meet the criteria under paragraphs 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Human health

Propene had been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as “not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans (Group 3)” on the basis of inadequate evidence of carcinogenicity. The animal and human health effects database for propene did not demonstrate evidence of carcinogenicity and the available information on genotoxicity indicates that propene is not likely to be genotoxic. With respect to non-cancer effects, the lowest observed adverse effect concentration (LOAEC) for chronic exposures was 5 000 ppm (8 600 mg/m3), based on significantly increased incidence of squamous metaplasia and inflammation in the nasal cavities of rats exposed for two years. Margins of exposure between effect levels and upper-bounding estimates of exposure are considered adequate to address uncertainties related to health effects and exposure.

On the basis of the adequacy of the margins between the upper-bounding estimates of exposure and the critical effect level for chronic exposure, it is proposed to conclude that propene does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

Based on available information for environmental and human health considerations, it is proposed to conclude that propene does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft Screening Assessment for this substance is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substance — 2-Propanone (acetone), CAS (see footnote 2) RN 67-64-1 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas acetone is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on the substance pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to take no further action on the substance at this time.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www. chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

KAREN LLOYD
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Acetone

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act,1999 (CEPA 1999), the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of acetone (Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 67-64-1). Acetone was identified as a priority for assessment on the basis of “greatest potential” for human exposure.

Acetone has both natural and anthropogenic sources. It is produced by thermal combustion, such as from forest fires; it is an oxidation product of natural humic substances; and it is excreted as a metabolic by-product from many organisms, including mammals, plants and microorganisms. Important anthropogenic sources of acetone in air include chemical manufacturing, solvent use, petroleum production, automobile emissions, tobacco smoke, wood burning, pulping, refuse, plastics combustion and off-gassing from landfill sites. Anthropogenic sources of acetone emissions to the aquatic environment include wastewater discharges from industries and leaching from industrial and municipal landfills.

Acetone is used as a formulating solvent for a variety of paints, inks, resins, varnishes, lacquers, surface coatings, paint removers and automotive care products. The greatest applications of acetone globally are its use as a solvent and for the production of methyl methacrylate and bisphenol A. In 2010, total global production of acetone was estimated to be 5.5 million tonnes.

In Canada, acetone is employed for a variety of uses, including use as an industrial and laboratory solvent, as a cleaner and degreaser, and in paints, dyes, adhesives and coatings. Acetone may be used in Canada in food, food packaging, pharmaceuticals, natural health products, veterinary drugs, cosmetics and pest control products.

Based on the results of a survey conducted under section 71 of CEPA 1999 for the year 2000, approximately 1 000 tonnes of acetone was manufactured in Canada as a by-product of industrial processes, and 15 000 tonnes of acetone were imported into Canada, at a concentration higher than 1%. However, a facility that accounted for 98% of Canadian acetone production in the year 2000 stopped manufacturing it in 2002.

Acetone was included in the Canada-wide National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) until 1998. In 1998, facilities across Canada reported on-site environmental releases totalling approximately 3 570 tonnes, mostly to air. Since 2009, facilities located in the province of Ontario must again report acetone releases to the NPRI. In 2009, total releases of acetone in Ontario were 1 039 tonnes (mainly to air), compared with 1 379 tonnes in 1998.

Acetone has been measured in ambient and indoor air, and drinking water in Canada, and in the United States and elsewhere in surface water, groundwater, food, and soil. Acetone has been identified in numerous products and building materials, as well as in cigarettes and tobacco smoke. Acetone is produced endogenously in the body and has been measured in the blood of individuals living in the United States.

Environment

Acetone has an estimated tropospheric half-life of 22 to 23 days and is predicted to be subject to long-range atmospheric transport (>5 000 km); therefore, it is persistent in air according to criteria specified in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA 1999. It will biodegrade in soil and water and is therefore not persistent in these media. Acetone is not expected to bioaccumulate in organisms, based on empirical as well as modelled data. Based on empirical data, acetone at low concentrations is not hazardous to aquatic organisms, terrestrial plants or mammals.

Based on Level III fugacity modelling of the substance’s fate in the environment, acetone tends to stay mainly (>74%) in the compartment to which it is released. This is especially true when acetone is released to water (>99% remains in water).

For the ecological portion of this screening assessment, the predicted environmental concentrations in air and surface water did not exceed concentrations associated with effects, even when using very conservative scenarios.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment, there is low risk of harm to organisms or the broader integrity of the environment from this substance. It is proposed to conclude that acetone does not meet the criteria under paragraphs 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Human health

Consideration of the available information indicates that acetone is not likely to be genotoxic or carcinogenic. Critical health effects associated with repeated exposure to acetone are considered to be hematological changes and kidney effects. The general population of Canada has daily exposure to acetone from environmental media, food and acetone-containing products that are used frequently. The margins of exposure between critical effect levels and the upper-bounding total daily intake estimates are considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

No critical health effects were identified for the characterization of risk from instances of acute exposure that are expected to occur from occasional, intermittent use of certain products containing acetone. Effects at exposure levels associated with such uses were considered mild, transient and reversible in nature; therefore, they were not considered adverse.

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that acetone does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

Based on available information for environmental and human health considerations, it is proposed to conclude that acetone does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft Screening Assessment for this substance is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of results of investigations and recommendations for a substance — 1,1-Biphenyl (biphenyl), CAS (see footnote 3) RN 92-52-4— specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on biphenyl pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Ministers of the Environment and of Health propose to take no further action on the substance at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

KAREN LLOYD
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Biphenyl

Pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 1,1′-Biphenyl, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 92-52-4. 1,1′-Biphenyl (henceforth referred to as biphenyl) was considered as a priority for assessment based on human health concerns.

Results from a survey conducted under the authority of section 71 of CEPA 1999 for the year 2000 indicated that biphenyl was not manufactured in Canada, although 10 000 to 100 000 kg of biphenyl were imported into Canada. In Canada, biphenyl is mainly used in the chemical industry as an intermediate in the production of heat transfer fluids. Based on available scientific and technical literature, biphenyl has also been used as a dye carrier for textiles, in copying paper, as a solvent in chemical and petrochemical industries and as a fungistat in packaging for citrus fruits. Also, biphenyl has been detected in coal tar–derived creosotes, which have a wide application as a weather proofing agent in wood. Until the mid 1970s, biphenyl was used principally as an intermediate in the production of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); however, this use has since ceased with the prohibition of PCBs.

Biphenyl occurs from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Biphenyl is found naturally in coal tar, crude oil and natural gas. The primarily anthropogenic sources are incomplete combustion of biomass, coal, oil, and fossil fuels, as well as burning of waste in incinerators and burning of agricultural waste. Other emissions also include motor vehicle exhaust, emissions from residential and industrial heating devices and cigarette smoke.

Biphenyl is expected to be found throughout Canada given its numerous natural and anthropogenic sources. Industrial uses of biphenyl could result in releases to surface waters. Biphenyl is not routinely monitored by Canadian provincial or federal regulatory agencies. Water concentrations have been measured primarily from municipal drinking water supplies. No reports presenting concentration data for biphenyl in Canadian soil were found. Biphenyl was measured in sediment samples collected between the early 1980s and 1990. Because of the age of the samples and in order to fill data gaps, environmental concentrations in air, water, and soil were also estimated by models using National Pollutant Release Inventory data for 2008.

Environment

Based on experimental and modelled data, biphenyl is not persistent in air, water, soil, and sediment according to the criteria in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations under CEPA 1999. Biphenyl does not meet the criteria for bioaccumulation as specified in those Regulations. Based on experimental acute and chronic toxicity studies for aquatic and terrestrial species at different trophic levels, biphenyl has the potential to harm aquatic organisms at low concentrations.

For this screening assessment, conservative exposure scenarios were selected in which industrial operations (users of biphenyl) discharge biphenyl into air, water, soil, and sediment. The predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) in air, soil, water, and sediment were below predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) of biphenyl calculated for terrestrial, aquatic, and benthic organisms, respectively.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms or the broader integrity of the environment from this substance. It is therefore proposed to conclude that biphenyl does not meet the criteria under paragraphs 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Human health

The general population exposure to biphenyl from environmental media and food is estimated to be low. Exposure from consumer products is not expected to be of concern.

Long-term dietary exposure to biphenyl has been reported to cause tumours of the urinary bladder in male rats and hepatocellular adenoma or carcinoma in female mice. The critical non-cancer effects for biphenyl include histopathological changes in the urinary bladder and/or kidney in rat or mice. Investigations of the genotoxicity potential of biphenyl in several in vivo and in vitro studies have provided mixed results.

Available information indicates that long-term high-dose exposure to biphenyl causes the induction of bladder tumours in male rats by a non-genotoxic mechanism or mechanical irritation secondary to the formation of bladder calculi. Similarly, biphenyl-induced hepatocarcinogenicity in female mice has been attributed to the induction of peroxisome proliferation, which also reflects a non-genotoxic mechanism and may not be a relevant mode of action for humans.

The margins of exposure between critical effect levels and the upper-bounding total daily intake estimates are considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that biphenyl does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

Based on available information for environmental and human health considerations, it is proposed to conclude that biphenyl does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft Screening Assessment for this substance is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF INDIAN AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT

CANADA PETROLEUM RESOURCES ACT

Amendment to the 2012-2013 Call for Bids for Exploration Licences in the Central Mackenzie Valley

The Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development hereby advises that the 2012-2013 Call for Bids for Exploration Licences in the Central Mackenzie Valley, as published in Part Ⅰ of the Canada Gazette on May 18, 2013, is amended by the removal of parcel CMV2013-02. This parcel is withdrawn due to a technical mapping error. Bids may be presented for parcel CMV2013-01 as well as parcels CMV2013-03 to CMV2013-07 inclusively. The Call for Bids map has been amended to reflect this change.

The terms and conditions of the 2012-2013 Call for Bids for Exploration Licences in the Central Mackenzie Valley remain unchanged.

For more information on the rights issuance process or the resource management regime, please contact Rights Administration, Northern Petroleum Resources Directorate, Northern Petroleum and Mineral Resources Branch, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4, 819-953-2087 (telephone), 819-953-5828 (fax), Rights@aandc.gc.ca (email), www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/nth/og/index-eng.asp (Web site).

June 26, 2013

BERNARD VALCOURT, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indian Affairs and
Northern Development

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-017-13 — Release of new standard RSS-238

Notice is hereby given by Industry Canada that the following standard comes into force immediately:

  • Radio Standards Specification RSS-238, Issue 1: Shipborne Radar in the 2900-3100 MHz and 9225-9500 MHz Bands, which sets out the certification requirements for shipborne radar operating in the maritime radionavigation service bands 2900-3100 MHz and 9225-9500 MHz.

RSS-238 (formerly RSS-138) is renumbered in accordance with the convention adopted for RSS documents that cover equipment subject to certification but exempt from licensing, and reflects recent changes in the technical requirements of the equipment.

General information

This document has been coordinated with industry through the Radio Advisory Board of Canada (RABC).

The Equipment and Radio Apparatus Standards Lists will be amended to reflect the above change.

Submitting comments

Interested parties are requested to provide their comments within 120 days of the date of publication of this notice in electronic format (Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF). For matters regarding an RSS, please contact the Manager, Radio Equipment Standards (res.nmr@ic.gc.ca), Industry Canada, 300 Slater Street, 19th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C8.

All submissions received by the close of the comment period will be posted on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html. Printed copies of the Canada Gazette can be ordered by telephoning the sales counter of Publishing and Depository Services at 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

June 14, 2013

MARC DUPUIS
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Hamilton Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Scott Collings

Ottawa, June 21, 2013

KATHY THOMPSON
Assistant Deputy Minister
Law Enforcement and Policing Branch

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NOTICE OF VACANCY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

Regional Member (Alberta/Northwest Territories) [full-time position]

Salary range: $139,900–$164,500
Location: Calgary, Alberta

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is an independent regulatory body, established under the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission Act. As a member of the Canadian Heritage Portfolio, the CRTC is responsible for regulating and supervising all aspects of the Canadian broadcasting system with a view to implementing the broadcasting policy set out in the Broadcasting Act. It also regulates telecommunications in Canada to implement the policy set out in the Telecommunications Act. In addition, the CRTC has responsibilities under Canada’s anti-spam legislation, which addresses the sending of commercial electronic messages (e.g. spam), among other things. The CRTC’s role is thus to maintain a delicate balance “in the public interest” between the cultural, social and economic goals of the legislation on broadcasting and telecommunications. The CRTC is accountable for its activities to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage.

The ideal candidate should possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study or a combination of equivalent education, job-related training and/or experience. Experience in providing advice on complex issues at a senior level is required. The ideal candidate should possess experience in either the broadcasting, telecommunications or digital media industries. Experience as a member or legal counsel within a quasi-judicial tribunal or experience appearing before a quasi-judicial tribunal would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate should possess knowledge of the legislative framework and mandate of the CRTC and other relevant federal legislation. Knowledge of the regulatory and technological environments in which the broadcasting, telecommunications and digital media sectors operate in Canada and abroad is required. The ideal candidate should have an understanding of international, social and economic trends; consumer interests; stakeholder concerns; the role of Government in formulating public policy; and how these relate to the CRTC. The ideal candidate should also have knowledge and understanding of the procedures and practices involved in conducting quasi-judicial hearings.

The ideal candidate must be able to interpret the provisions of various statutes, regulations, policies and other documents. The ability to render fair, equitable and timely decisions, while anticipating their short- and long-term consequences, in a rapidly evolving environment is required, as is the ability to develop effective working relationships and build consensus. The ideal candidate must be able to communicate effectively, in writing and orally, and to represent the CRTC, when required, with a wide range of stakeholders.

The ideal candidate must be a person of sound judgment, integrity and impartiality. The ideal candidate possesses and adheres to high ethical standards, and has superior interpersonal skills, tact and diplomacy.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

Pursuant to subsection 5(1) of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission Act, “a person is not eligible to be appointed or to continue as a member of the Commission if the person is not a Canadian citizen ordinarily resident in Canada or if, directly or indirectly, as owner, shareholder, director, officer, partner or otherwise, the person (a) is engaged in a telecommunications undertaking; or (b) has any pecuniary or proprietary interest in (i) a telecommunications undertaking, or (ii) the manufacture or distribution of telecommunication apparatus, except where the distribution is incidental to the general merchandising of goods by wholesale or retail.”

The successful candidate must reside in or be willing to relocate to Calgary, Alberta, or to a location within reasonable commuting distance, and be prepared to travel across Canada.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a confidential report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the organization and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/home-accueil.htm.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by July 26, 2013, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format (audio cassette, diskette, Braille, large print, etc.) upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

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  • Footnote 1
    The Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.

  • Footnote 2
    The Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.

  • Footnote 3
    The Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.