ARCHIVED — Vol. 147, No. 11 — March 16, 2013

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2012-66-12-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Whereas, pursuant to subsections 66(1) and (3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote a), the Minister of the Environment has added the substances referred to in the annexed Order to the Domestic Substances List (see footnote b);

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 66(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote c), makes the annexed Order 2012-66-12-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, March 4, 2013

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

ORDER 2012-66-12-02 AMENDING THE NON-DOMESTIC SUBSTANCES LIST

AMENDMENT

1. Part Ⅰ of the Non-domestic Substances List (see footnote 1) is amended by deleting the following:

  • 176487-46-0
  • 176487-47-1
  • 176487-48-2
  • 176487-49-3

COMING INTO FORCE

2. This Order comes into force on the day on which Order 2012-66-12-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List comes into force.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2012-87-12-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Whereas, pursuant to subsections 87(1) and (5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote d), the Minister of the Environment has added the substances referred to in the annexed Order to the Domestic Substances List (see footnote e);

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsections 87(1) and (5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (see footnote f), makes the annexed Order 2012-87-12-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, March 4, 2013

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

ORDER 2012-87-12-02 AMENDING THE NON-DOMESTIC SUBSTANCES LIST

AMENDMENT

1. Part Ⅰ of the Non-domestic Substances List (see footnote 2) is amended by deleting the following:

  • 124343-14-2
  • 208852-57-7

COMING INTO FORCE

2. This Order comes into force on the day on which Order 2012-87-12-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List comes into force.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 17097

Significant New Activity Notice

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information in respect of the substance cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that subsection 81(4) of that Act applies with respect to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

PETER KENT
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information Requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

  1. In relation to the substance cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified, a significant new activity is

    • (a) any use where the substance is engineered to contain particles of particle size ranging from 1 to 100 nanometres in one or more dimensions, in a quantity greater than 100 kg per calendar year other than for a use described in paragraph (b); or

    • (b) the use as an ink additive in commercial or industrial settings where the substance is engineered to contain particles of particle size ranging from 1 to 100 nanometres in one or more dimensions, in a quantity greater than 1 000 kg per calendar year.

  2. The following information must be provided to the Minister at least 90 days before the commencement of the proposed significant new activity:

    • (a) a description of the significant new activity in relation to the substance;

    • (b) the analytical information to determine the primary and secondary particle size of the substance;

    • (c) the analytical information to determine the chemical composition and structure of the substance;

    • (d) a brief description of the manufacturing process that details precursors of the substance, reaction stoichiometry, nature (batch or continuous) and scale of the process;

    • (e) the anticipated annual quantity of the substance to be used in relation to the significant new activity;

    • (f) if known, the three sites in Canada where the greatest quantity of the substance, in relation to the significant new activity, is anticipated to be used or processed and the estimated quantity by site;

    • (g) the identification of every other government agencies, either outside or within Canada, that the person proposing the significant new activity has notified of the use of the substance and, if known, the agency’s file number, the outcome of the assessment and, if any, the risk management actions in relation to the substance imposed by those agencies;

    • (h) all other information or test data in respect of the substance that are in the possession of the person proposing the significant new activity, or to which they have access, and that are relevant to determining whether the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic;

    • (i) for a significant new activity described in paragraph 1(a), the information specified in items 2 and 8 of Schedule 5 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);

    • (j) for a significant new activity described in paragraph 1(a), involving the use of the substance in consumer products as defined in section 2 of the Canada Consumer Products Safety Act, in addition to the information required under paragraphs 2(a) to (i):

      • (i) the information describing the agglomeration and aggregation state, shape, surface area and surface charge of the substance,

      • (ii) the information specified in items 3 and 7 of Schedule 5 to those Regulations,

      • (iii) the information specified in items 2, 9, and 10 of Schedule 6 to those Regulations,

      • (iv) the test data and a test report on the subchronic inhalation toxicity of the substance, including a satellite (reversibility) study, conducted according to the methodology described in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Test Guideline No. 413 titled Subchronic Inhalation Toxicity: 90-day study,

      • (v) the test data and a test report on bronchoalveolar lavage conducted immediately following the last exposure and recovery in the subchronic inhalation toxicity test required in subparagraph (iv), conducted according to the methodology described in the OECD Series on Testing and Assessment, No. 125, titled Guidance Document on Histopathology for Inhalation Toxicity Studies, Supporting TG 412 (Subacute Inhalation Toxicity: 28-Day Study) and TG 413 (Subchronic Inhalation Toxicity: 90-Day Study),

      • (vi) the analytical information to determine the primary and secondary particle size of the test substance as administered in the health and ecological toxicity tests required under subparagraphs 2(j)(ii) to (v), and

      • (vii) the information describing the agglomeration and aggregation state, shape, surface area and surface charge of the test substance as administered in the health and ecological toxicity tests required under subparagraphs 2(j)(ii) to (v); and
    • (k) for a significant new activity described in paragraph 1(b):

      • (i) the information describing the agglomeration and aggregation state, shape, surface area and surface charge of the substance,

      • (ii) the test data and a test report from a soil toxicity study in respect of the substance, conducted according to the methodology described in the OECD Test Guideline No. 207 titled Earthworm, Acute Toxicity Tests, and

      • (iii) the test data and a test report from a sediment toxicity study in respect of the substance, conducted according to the methodology described in the OECD Test Guideline No. 225 titled Sediment-Water Lumbriculus Toxicity Testing Using Spiked Sediment.

  3. The test data and the test reports described in subparagraphs 2(j)(iv) and (v) and subparagraphs 2(k)(ii) and (iii) must be in conformity with the practices described in the OECD Principles of Good Laboratory Practice (Principles of GLP) set out in Annex 2 of the Decision of the Council Concerning the Mutual Acceptance of Data in the Assessment of Chemicals, adopted on May 12, 1981, and where the Test Guideline, Guidance Document and Principles of GLP are current at the time the test data are developed.

  4. The above information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Significant New Activity Notice.)

A Significant New Activity Notice is a legal instrument issued by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. The Significant New Activity Notice sets out the appropriate information that must be provided to the Minister for assessment prior to the commencement of a new activity as described in the Notice.

Substances that are not listed on the Domestic Substances List can be manufactured or imported only by the person who has met the requirements set out in section 81 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. Under section 86 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, in circumstances where a Significant New Activity Notice is issued for a new substance, it is the responsibility of every person who transfers the physical possession or control of the substance to notify all persons to whom the possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and of the obligation to notify the Minister of the Environment of any new activity and all other information as described in the Notice. It is the responsibility of the users of the substance to be aware of and comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and to submit a Significant New Activity notification to the Minister prior to the commencement of a significant new activity associated with the substance. However, as mentioned in subsection 81(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, a Significant New Activity notification is not required when the proposed new activity is regulated under an act or regulations listed on Schedule 2 to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

A Significant New Activity Notice does not constitute an endorsement from Environment Canada or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

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DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND INTERNATIONAL TRADE

CONSULTATIONS ON A PLURILATERAL INTERNATIONAL SERVICES AGREEMENT

The Government of Canada is seeking the views of Canadians on the negotiation of a plurilateral international services agreement among a group of World Trade Organization (WTO) members. The current participants in these discussions with Canada are Australia, the United States, the European Union, New Zealand, Korea, Mexico, Chile, Colombia, Chinese Taipei, Japan, Hong Kong (China), Norway, Switzerland, Pakistan, Israel, Peru, Costa Rica, Turkey, Panama and Iceland. However, other interested WTO members could potentially join the negotiations, and a finished agreement would also be open for accession to other WTO members.

This notice is part of the Government of Canada’s domestic consultation process with business, citizen-based organizations and individual Canadians, as well as with provincial and territorial governments, to obtain advice and views to help outline the parameters of a potential plurilateral international services agreement.

Background

Canada has been participating in the WTO’s General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) negotiations — which are part of the Doha Round negotiations — since 2000, based on extensive Canadian stakeholder consultations on all sectors and all WTO members. In early 2012, a group of WTO members who share a strong interest in services started discussing new approaches to advance the liberalization of trade in services while the Doha Round is at an impasse. Discussions have revealed that the members of this group are willing to pursue an ambitious agreement on trade in services amongst themselves, as permitted under the GATS rules. These discussions gained momentum during the fall of 2012, and negotiations are expected to start in early 2013. While 21 WTO members are currently involved in this initiative, there is general agreement to remain welcoming to other WTO members that wish to join and that share the objectives of the group.

For Canada, services are an important and growing part of our economy. Canada’s firms are active around the world in industries ranging from mining to the financial sector to information technology. For instance, Canada is the fourth largest exporter of engineering services in the world. Although Canada is already a significant services exporter in several sectors, it has much potential to grow. As the vast majority of services firms are small or medium enterprises (SMEs), a stable and predictable global trade environment is necessary for them to pursue new markets. A plurilateral international services agreement will complement other initiatives that the Government of Canada is taking to open up markets and potentially provide more market access and legal stability where markets are already open but not subject to trade agreements. However, these negotiations will not force Canada to take commitments in any area where it chooses to retain policy flexibility (e.g. public services).

Submissions by interested parties

While extensive consultations on Canada’s services interests and priorities were conducted in the context of the WTO Doha negotiations, new consultations are needed to update and adapt the Canadian position to this new initiative. Therefore, the Government is embarking on a public consultation process to give all interested stakeholders an early opportunity to provide input on a potential plurilateral international services agreement. In this context, we welcome advice and views on any priorities and objectives relating to this initiative. This includes the following:

  • The identification of services sectors, activities and markets of export interest among WTO members for Canadian service providers and measures that restrict or otherwise affect market access for Canadian service providers.
  • Any barriers or experiences regarding the different modes of supply of services as defined in the WTO:
    • Identification of barriers to the temporary entry and stay of business persons faced by Canadian service providers in WTO member markets, such as impediments to entering or working in a country on a temporary basis, including licensing, certification, work permits and other work authorization requirements.
    • Identification of investment barriers faced by Canadian service providers in foreign countries, including restrictions imposed on foreign ownership or entry to market, questions of transparency of regulation, performance requirements (e.g. local content requirements, use of local labour and services), and any other impediments or barriers.
    • Experiences regarding barriers to the cross-border trade in services faced by Canadian service providers in other WTO members, such as licensing or residency requirements.
  • Other barriers (e.g. availability and transparency of information) when selling or attempting to sell services to governments of WTO members.

Examples of services sectors in the WTO include information and communication technology (ICT) services, transportation, financial services, professional services, environmental services and energy services.

All interested parties are invited to submit their views by April 30, 2013. Please be advised that any information received as a result of this consultation will be considered as public information, unless explicitly stated otherwise. Submissions should include

  • the contributor’s name and address and, if applicable, his or her organization, institution or business;
  • the specific issues being addressed; and
  • precise information on the rationale for the positions taken, including any significant impact it may have on Canada’s domestic or foreign interests.

Contributions can be sent by email to TMSconsultation@international.gc.ca, by fax to 613-944-0058 or by mail to Trade Negotiations Consultations (PISA), Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, Trade in Services Division (TMS), Lester B. Pearson Building, 125 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0G2.

Additional information

Additional information on Canada’s relationship with the countries participating to this initiative can be found at the following address: www.tradecommissioner.gc.ca/eng/trade-offices.jsp.

For more information on WTO members, the GATS and the various services sectors, please consult the WTO Web site: www.wto.org.

March 16, 2013

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DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND INTERNATIONAL TRADE

CUSTOMS TARIFF

Proposed amendments to Chapter D (Rules of Origin) and Annex D-01 (Specific Rules of Origin) of the Canada-Chile Free Trade Agreement — Domestic consultations

The purpose of this notice is to seek views from interested parties regarding the above-noted proposed amendments to the Canada-Chile Free Trade Agreement (CCFTA).

The proposed amendments to the CCFTA serve to modernize certain provisions of Chapter D (Rules of Origin) so that they are consistent with Canada’s more recent free trade agreements (FTAs); amend certain product-specific rules of origin (PSROs) so that they are aligned with 2007 and 2012 changes to the Harmonized System (i.e. HS2007 and HS2012); and liberalize other PSROs so as to facilitate production processes and trade between Canada and Chile. The complete Schedule of proposed amendments can be found on the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Web site through the following link: www.international.gc.ca/trade-agreements-accords-commerciaux/agr-acc/chile-chili/hs-2012.aspx?lang=eng.

With respect to Chapter D (Rules of Origin), amendments of note include (i) Article D-02 (Regional Value Content), which allows motor vehicle producers to use either the Transaction Value or Net Cost method to calculate the Regional Value Content of their good; (ii) Article D-04 (Accumulation), which allows for cross-cumulation with other non-parties with which both Canada and Chile have an FTA, under certain conditions to be determined by Canada, Chile and the non-party; (iii) Article D-15 (Sets or Assortments of Goods); and (iv) Article 17 (Definitions).

With respect to Annex D-01 (Specific Rules of Origin), amendments are proposed so as to modify certain PSROs to reflect changes resulting from the World Customs Organization’s (WCO) amendments to the nomenclature of the Harmonized System that came into force on January 1, 2007 (HS2007), and January 1, 2012 (HS2012). The WCO amends the Harmonized System approximately every five years to take into account changes in technology and trade patterns that require the creation or deletion of tariff codes. In addition, amendments are proposed which would liberalize PSROs for some chemicals and chemical products, plastics, base metals, and machinery and mechanical appliances. These proposed amendments were developed in response to requests from producers for more liberal CCFTA rules of origin or to align the CCFTA rules of origin with the rules of origin under Canada’s more recent FTAs.

Background

The CCFTA rules of origin are used to determine which goods are eligible for CCFTA tariff preferences.

As instructed by the Director General of the General Directorate of International Economic Affairs of Chile, and Canada’s Deputy Minister of International Trade, at the seventh meeting of the Canada-Chile Free Trade Commission on April 22, 2009, the Parties have negotiated amendments to Chapter D (Rules of Origin) and Annex D-01 (Specific Rules of Origin) to modernize certain provisions and specific rules of origin, and to further liberalize trade between the Parties. The joint minutes of this meeting can be found on the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Web site at www.international.gc.ca/trade-agreements-accords-commerciaux/agr-acc/chile-chili/7.aspx?lang=en&view=d.

Based on industry submissions and in consultation with industry representatives, the proposed amendments were developed jointly by the governments of Canada and Chile. The governments will review any further public comments resulting from these domestic consultations to determine whether the CCFTA amendments will be implemented as proposed or if further changes are necessary.

Submissions

Interested parties wishing to comment on the proposed amendments should submit their views in writing by April 14, 2013. In developing comments on the proposed amendments, interested parties should focus on the impact that such measures would have on the products of interest to them.

Address for submissions

Submissions should be sent by mail, fax or email to the following: CCFTA Rules of Origin, Tariffs and Goods Market Access Division, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, 111 Sussex Drive, 4th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0G2, 613-992-6002 (fax), tpg@international.gc.ca (email).

Related inquiries can be directed to Ms. Lynne Cameron, Tariffs and Goods Market Access Division, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, 613-943-8188 (telephone).

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Proposed guideline for benzene in residential indoor air

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of a proposed qualitative guideline for benzene in residential indoor air, to be cited as “Guidance for Benzene in Residential Indoor Air.”

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of Health written comments on the proposed guidance. All written comments are to be made publicly available to all interested parties. All comments, requests for copies of the full science assessment, and information requests must cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Water, Air and Climate Change Bureau, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue W, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9, 613-957-1876 (telephone), 613-948-8482 (fax), air@hc-sc. gc.ca (email).

February 26, 2013

KAREN LLOYD
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

PROPOSED GUIDANCE FOR BENZENE IN RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AIR

Background

Benzene is a volatile organic compound (VOC) with a relatively high vapour pressure, moderate-to-high water solubility, and low octanol/water partition coefficient, that is released primarily to air. It has been identified by Health Canada as a priority indoor air contaminant following consultations with provincial and territorial health departments, as well as with key stakeholders in industrial and environmental organizations.

Exposure

Exposure of the general Canadian population to benzene is attributed predominantly to indoor air by inhalation because indoor levels generally exceed those outside, and time spent indoors is typically greater than time spent outdoors. Other routes of exposure (ingestion and dermal absorption) contribute minimally to total benzene intake (Health Canada, 2009). In studies by Health Canada, the median concentrations of benzene measured in Canadian residences ranges from 0.5 to 2.2 µg/m3 (Health Canada, 2012; Health Canada, 2010a; Health Canada, 2010b; Héroux et al., 2008). Indoor levels are approximately threefold higher in homes with attached garages compared to those in homes with detached garages or without garages. Median outdoor concentrations are usually less than 1 µg/m3. The ratio of indoor/outdoor levels (I/O) ranges from 1.5 to 2.4 (median) and remains above 1 at the twenty-fifth percentile, suggesting a significant contribution of indoor sources in almost all homes.

More than half of Canadian single-family homes have an attached garage. Attached garages, when present, are the major indoor source of benzene in homes because vehicle exhaust and evaporative emissions from gas-powered equipment and stored solvents in garages can enter a home (Héroux et al., 2010; Héroux et al., 2008; Jia, Batterman and Godwin, 2008; Batterman, Jia and Hatzivasilis, 2007). Smoking is also a significant contributor to indoor benzene levels (Héroux et al., 2010; Héroux et al., 2008).

The known sources could not account for all benzene measured in studies and there may be other unidentified sources in homes. Some non-smoking homes without attached garages may have indoor benzene levels similar to those in homes with attached garages. While benzene has been detected in building materials, emission rates have generally been low (< 4 µg m-2 h-1) with few exceptions (e.g. adhesives and caulking) [Choi et al., 2010; Won et al., 2005; Yu and Crump, 1998; U.S. EPA, 1992; Wallace, Pellizzari and Leaderer, 1987]. Few household or consumer products have reported benzene content (Kwon et al., 2008; Kwon et al., 2007; Sack et al., 1992; U.S. EPA, 1992; Wallace, Pellizzari and Leaderer, 1987) and, in the majority of studies, benzene was not associated with household products or activities (Missia et al., 2010; Héroux et al., 2008; Jia, Batterman and Godwin, 2008; Jia, D’Souza and Batterman, 2008; Park and Ikeda, 2006; Brown, 2002; Ilgen et al., 2001; Kim, Harrad and Harrison, 2001). Therefore, a more systematic approach to identifying other sources of benzene indoors is warranted.

Another potential indoor source of benzene would be vapour intrusion if the groundwater or soil underlying the house are contaminated. In addition, if benzene is present in the domestic water supply, volatilization from water during bathing or showering or while water is running from faucets may occur. The Health Canada drinking water guideline has been developed to account for all exposure pathways (ingestion, inhalation, dermal absorption); thus, if a water supply complies with the drinking water guideline regarding benzene content, the health risk of such exposure would be negligible.

Health effects

Human exposure to benzene has been linked to dizziness, tremors, nausea, vomiting, headache, and drowsiness after minutes of exposure to high levels in the range of 700 to 3 000 ppm (2 240 to 9 600 mg/m3). Effects after subchronic to chronic exposures as low as < 1 ppm (< 3.2 mg/m3) include progressive deterioration in hematopoietic function, including bone marrow damage, changes in circulating blood cells and altered immune response (ATSDR, 2007).

Benzene is classified as a carcinogen (U.S. EPA, 1998; Environment Canada and Health and Welfare Canada, 1993; IARC, 1987). Benzene affects the blood-forming system at low levels of occupational exposure < 1 ppm (3.2 mg/m3), and there is no evidence of a threshold. Chronic exposure to benzene has been shown to cause leukemia, a cancer of the blood or bone marrow, in occupationally exposed workers; and leukemia and lymphomas in laboratory rats and mice (Health Canada, 2009; OEHHA, 2001; Hayes et al., 1997; Rinsky, Young and Smith, 1981). The carcinogenic mode of action for benzene is not well understood; however, a series of important biological events progressing from metabolism to development of leukemia has been proposed (Meek and Klaunig, 2010).

Health Canada and other organizations have characterized the cancer risk associated with exposure to benzene in air (Health Canada, 1996; OEHHA, 2001; U.S. EPA, 2000). All of these values can be expressed as an increased risk of leukemia over a lifetime. The basis for these values is epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed individuals. The derivation of any reference value requires careful consideration of many factors and the adoption of several assumptions. Differences in these key inputs are reflected in the range of published toxicological reference values for benzene. However, considering the uncertainties identified with extrapolation of risks associated with exposures at occupational levels to lower, environmentally relevant concentrations, the shape of the dose-response curve and the mode of action of benzene-associated leukemia, these reference concentration values are within a similar band of uncertainty.

From the cancer risk analyses by Health Canada (1996), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA, 2000) and the California Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA, 2001), the concentrations associated with a 1 × 10-6 (one in one million) risk of leukemia range from 0.06 µg/m3 (from the most justifiable unit risk identified by OEHHA [2001]) to 0.45 µg/m3 (the upper bound of the range presented by U.S. EPA [2000]). Guidance on benzene levels indoors has been developed by the World Health Organization (WHO, 2010) and European Commission (2005). Both of these organizations suggest that benzene levels indoors should be minimized as much as possible, and neither organization has developed a numerical guideline value for benzene levels indoors.

The real cancer risk from benzene in most Canadian homes, while not always negligible, is uncertain. Environmental levels are at least three orders of magnitude lower (in µg/m3 range) than the occupational exposure levels in the key studies (in mg/m3 range), and conservative assumptions were used when extrapolating from the risks based on high exposures. However, the uncertainty associated with the estimation of cancer risk at environmental exposure levels may be reduced when a clear mode of action of benzene toxicity in humans is established and applied to better estimate the dose-response relationship at low exposures.

Guidance

The range of estimates of carcinogenic risks of benzene indicates that there may be a low but non-negligible risk at indoor exposure levels. On this basis, from a practical perspective, Health Canada has opted to use a qualitative approach, recommending that individuals take actions to reduce exposure to benzene indoors as much as possible. Measures to control known indoor sources may reduce benzene concentrations such that the risk to residents is very low. As further sources are identified and effective control measures developed, Health Canada will incorporate additional recommendations on reducing benzene levels in its communications to health and building professionals and the public.

While all indoor sources of benzene in Canadian homes could not be characterized, addressing the strongest predictors identified is likely to have the most significant impact on indoor levels. Exposure reduction strategies should be targeted towards these primary sources of benzene indoors over which homeowners have control, namely attached garages and indoor smoking. Indoor benzene levels may be minimized by

  • Preventing leaks from an attached garage to the house;
  • Making sure that there is an appropriate seal between the home and the garage, particularly for any door that connects the two. This can be achieved by providing an appropriate air barrier and a sealed door between the garage and house and drywalling shared walls between the garage and house. These actions will also reduce the air exchange between the home and the garage;
  • Installing an exhaust fan in an attached garage;
  • Not idling vehicles in an attached garage;
  • Not starting gas-powered equipment in an attached garage; and
  • Not smoking inside the home or the garage.

Where possible, removing gas-powered equipment, tools and solvents, gasoline-powered tools or engines from garages, since most small engines do not have emission controls on evaporative releases, may also be considered.

While there is some evidence (CMHC, 2004; Ilgen et al., 2001) to support a reduction in indoor benzene levels originating from attached garages following these exposure reduction strategies, further research is required to understand which mitigation measures are the most technically feasible and cost-effective at reducing the migration of benzene from attached garages indoors. As well, research is needed into the predictors of elevated benzene in homes with detached garages or without garages.

References
  • ATSDR. (2007) “Toxicological Profile for Benzene.” Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA, 1–438. Available at www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/tp. asp?id=40&tid=14.

  • Batterman, S., Jia, C. and Hatzivasilis, G. (2007) “Migration of volatile organic compounds from attached garages to residences: A major exposure source.” Environmental research, 104(2), 224–240.

  • Brown, S. K. (2002) “Volatile organic pollutants in new and established buildings in Melbourne, Australia.” Indoor air, 12(1), 55–63.

  • Choi, D. H., Kang, D. H., Kim, S. S., Yeo, M. S. and Kim, K. W. (2010) “The impact of a non-adhesive floating installation method on emissions and indoor concentrations of VOCs.” Indoor and Built Environment, 19(4), 435–443.

  • CMHC. (2004) “Garage Performance Testing. Technical Series 04-108.” Research Highlight. Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation.

  • Environment Canada and Health and Welfare Canada. (1993) “Canadian Environmental Protection Act. Priority Substances List Assessment Report: Benzene.” Minister of Supply and Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. Available at www.hc-sc.gc. ca/ewh-semt/alt_formats/hecs-sesc/pdf/pubs/contaminants/psl1-lsp1/benzene/benzene-eng.pdf.

  • Hayes, R. B., Yin, S. N., Dosemeci, M., Li, G. L., Wacholder, S., Travis, L. B., Li, C. Y., Rothman, N., Hoover, R. N. and Linet, M. S. (1997) “Benzene and the dose-related incidence of hematologic neoplasms in China.” Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 89(14), 1065–1071.

  • Health Canada. (2012) “Halifax Indoor Air Quality Study (2009): Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Data Summary.” Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

  • Health Canada. (2010a) “Regina Indoor Air Quality Study (2007): Data Summary for Volatile Organic Compound Sampling.” Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

  • Health Canada. (2010b) “Windsor Exposure Assessment Study (2005-2006): Data Summary for Volatile Organic Compound Sampling”, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

  • Health Canada. (2009) “Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality: Guideline Technical Document — Benzene.” Health Canada, Ottawa. Available at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/alt_ formats/hecs-sesc/pdf/pubs/water-eau/benzene/benzene-eng.pdf.

  • Health Canada. (1996) “Health-Based Tolerable Daily Intakes/ Concentrations and Tumorigenic Doses/Concentrations for Priority Substances.” Minister of Supply and Services Canada.

  • Héroux, M. È., Clark, N., Ryswyk, K. V., Mallick, R., Gilbert, N. L., Harrison, I., Rispler, K., Wang, D., Anastassopoulos, A., Guay, M., MacNeill, M. and Wheeler, A. J. (2010) “Predictors of Indoor Air Concentrations in Smoking and Non-Smoking Residences.” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 7, 3080–3099.

  • Héroux, M. È., Gauvin, D., Gilbert, N. L., Guay, M., Dupuis, G., Legris, M. and Lévesque, B. (2008) “Housing characteristics and indoor concentrations of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Quebec City, Canada.” Indoor and Built Environment, 17(2), 128–137.

  • IARC. (1987) “Benzene.” In: “Overall evaluations of carcinogenicity: An updating of IARC Monographs volumes 1-42.” IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of the Carcinogenic Risk of Chemicals to Man, Supplement 7, 120.

  • Ilgen, E., Levsen, K., Angerer, J., Schneider, P., Heinrich, J. and Wichmann, H.-E. (2001) “Aromatic hydrocarbons in the atmospheric environment. Part Ⅱ: Univariate and multivariate analysis and case studies of indoor concentrations.” Atmospheric Environment, 35(7), 1253–1264.

  • Jia, C., Batterman, S. and Godwin, C. (2008) “VOCs in industrial, urban and suburban neighborhoods, Part 2: Factors affecting indoor and outdoor concentrations.” Atmospheric Environment, 42(9), 2101–2116.

  • Jia, C., D’Souza, J. and Batterman, S. (2008) “Distributions of personal VOC exposures: A population-based analysis.” Environment international, 34(7), 922–931.

  • Kim, Y. M., Harrad, S. and Harrison, R. M. (2001) “Concentrations and sources of VOCs in urban domestic and public microenvironments.” Environmental Science and Technology, 35(6), 997–1004.

  • Kwon, K. D., Jo, W. K., Lim, H. J. and Jeong, W. S. (2008) “Volatile pollutants emitted from selected liquid household products.” Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 15(6), 521–526.

  • Kwon, K. D., Jo, W. K., Lim, H. J. and Jeong, W. S. (2007) “Characterization of emissions composition for selected household products available in Korea.” Journal of hazardous materials, 148(1-2), 192–198.

  • Meek, M. E. and Klaunig, J. E. (2010) “Proposed mode of action of benzene-induced leukemia: Interpreting available data and identifying critical data gaps for risk assessment.” Chemico-biological interactions, 184(1–2), 279–285.

  • Missia, D. A., Demetriou, E., Michael, N., Tolis, E. I. and Bartzis, J. G. (2010) “Indoor exposure from building materials: A field study.” Atmospheric Environment, 44(35), 4388–4395.

  • OEHHA. (2001) “Public health goal for benzene in drinking water.” Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento, CA. Available at www.oehha.ca.gov/water/phg/pdf/BenzeneFinPHG.pdf.

  • Park, J. S. and Ikeda, K. (2006) “Variations of formaldehyde and VOC levels during 3 years in new and older homes.” Indoor air, 16(2), 129–135.

  • Rinsky, R. A., Young, R. J. and Smith, A. B. (1981) “Leukemia in benzene workers.” American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 2(3), 217–245.

  • Sack, T. M., Steele, D. H., Hammerstrom, K. and Remmers, J. (1992) “A survey of household products for volatile organic compounds.” Atmospheric Environment — Part A, General Topics, 26 A(6), 1063–1070.

  • U.S. EPA. (2000) United States Environmental Protection Agency. Integrated Risk Information System. Benzene (CASRN 71-43-2). Last updated on 2010-03-16 (www.epa.gov/iris/subst/ 0276.htm#refinhal).

  • U.S. EPA. (1998) “Carcinogenic effects of benzene: An update.” National Centre for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C. (EPA/600/P-97/001F) [as cited in Health Canada 2009].

  • U.S. EPA. (1992) Indoor Air Quality Data Base for Organic Compounds. United States Environmental Protection Agency. EPA-600-R-92-025. Washington, D.C.

  • Wallace, L. A., Pellizzari, E. and Leaderer, B. (1987) “Emission of volatile organic compounds from building materials and consumer products.” Atmospheric Environment, 21(2), 385–393.

  • WHO. (2010) WHO guidelines for indoor air quality: selected pollutants. World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. Available at www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/ pdf_file/0009/128169/e94535.pdf.

  • Won, D., Magee, R. J., Yang, W., Lusztyk, E., Nong, G. and Shaw, C. Y. (2005) “A material emission database for 90 target VOCs.” Indoor Air 2005, The 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate, Beijing, China, Sept. 4–9, 2005, 1–6. Available at www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/obj/irc/doc/pubs/ nrcc48314/nrcc48314.pdf.

  • Yu, C. and Crump, D. (1998) “A review of the emission of VOCs from polymeric materials used in buildings.” Building and Environment, 33(6), 357–374.

[11-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDIAN AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT

NORTHWEST TERRITORIES AND NUNAVUT MINING REGULATIONS

Prospecting permits

1. The following are the areas in the Northwest Territories in respect of which prospecting permits have been issued, effective February 1, 2013, pursuant to section 29 of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut Mining Regulations, C.R.C., c. 1516:

Number

Location (N.T.S.)

Permittee

8397

096L04SW/096L04S.-O.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8398

096L05NE/096L05N.-E.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8399

096L05NW/096L05N.-O.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8400

096L05SE/096L05S.-E.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8401

096L05SW/096L05S.-O.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8402

106I01NE/106I01N.-E.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8403

106I01NW/106I01N.-O.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8404

106I01SE/106I01S.-E.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8405

106I01SW/106I01S.-O.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8406

106I02NE/106I02N.-E.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8407

106I02SE /106I02S.-E.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8408

106I02SW/106I02S.-O.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8409

106I07NE/106I07N.-E.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8410

106I08NE/106I08N.-E.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8411

106I08NW/106I08N.-O.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8412

106I08SE/106I08S.-E.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8413

106I08SW/106I08S.-O.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8414

106I09SW/106I09S.-O.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

8415

106I10SE /106I10S.-E.

Apex Geoscience Ltd.

2. The following prospecting permits have been relinquished in the Northwest Territories:

Number

Location (N.T.S.)

Permittee

8196

106A05SW/106A05S.-O.

Aben Resources Ltd.

8197

106A07NE/106A07N.-E.

Aben Resources Ltd.

8198

106A07SE/106A07S.-E.

Aben Resources Ltd.

8199

106A10NW/106A10N.-O.

Aben Resources Ltd.

8201

106B07NE/106B07N.-E.

Aben Resources Ltd.

8202

106B07NW/106B07N.-O.

Aben Resources Ltd.

8203

106B10SE/106B10S.-E.

Aben Resources Ltd.

8204

106B10SW/106B10S.-O.

Aben Resources Ltd.

8206

088B13NW/088B13N.-O.

Rio Tinto Exploration Canada Inc.

8207

088B13SE/088B13S.-E.

Rio Tinto Exploration Canada Inc.

8208

088B13SW/088B13S.-O.

Rio Tinto Exploration Canada Inc.

8209

088B14SE/088B14S.-E.

Rio Tinto Exploration Canada Inc.

8210

088B14SW/088B14S.-O.

Rio Tinto Exploration Canada Inc.

8233

098A16NE/098A16N.-E.

Rio Tinto Exploration Canada Inc.

3. No prospecting permit has been cancelled in the Northwest Territories.

4. For information on expired prospecting permits, please contact the Northwest Territories Mining Recorder’s Office at 867-669-2691 (telephone) or 867-669-2714 (fax).

KAREN POLAKOFF
Supervising Mining Recorder
Northwest Territories

[11-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDIAN AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT

NORTHWEST TERRITORIES AND NUNAVUT MINING REGULATIONS

Prospecting permits

1. The following are the areas in Nunavut in respect of which prospecting permits have been issued, effective February 1, 2013, pursuant to section 29 of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut Mining Regulations, C.R.C., c. 1516:

Number

Location (N.T.S.)

Permittee

8364

055O12N.-E.

Jennifer Harker

8365

055O12S.-W.

Jennifer Harker

8366

055O12N.-W.

Jennifer Harker

8367

046O09N.-E.

Jennifer Harker

8368

046O09S.-E.

Jennifer Harker

8369

046O09S.-W.

Jennifer Harker

8370

046O09N.-W.

Jennifer Harker

8371

046O08N.-W.

Jennifer Harker

8372

055K03S.-W.

Lane Dewar

8373

065C11N.-W.

Lane Dewar

8374

065C14S.-E.

Lane Dewar

8375

065H12N.-E.

Lane Dewar

8376

065B15N.-E.

Lane Dewar

8377

065B15S.-E.

Lane Dewar

8378

065B16N.-W.

Lane Dewar

8379

065B16S.-W.

Lane Dewar

8380

055K04S.-E.

Lane Dewar

8381

055K04S.-W.

Lane Dewar

8382

076F06N.-W.

Stewart Blusson

8383

076F06S.-W.

Stewart Blusson

8384

076F05N.-W.

Stewart Blusson

8385

076F05N.-E.

Stewart Blusson

8386

076F12N.-W.

Stewart Blusson

8387

076F12S.-W.

Stewart Blusson

8388

076F12S.-E.

Stewart Blusson

8389

076F12N.-E.

Stewart Blusson

8390

076F11N.-W.

Stewart Blusson

8391

076F11S.-W.

Stewart Blusson

8392

076F14S.-W.

Stewart Blusson

8393

076F13N.-W.

Stewart Blusson

8394

076F13S.-W.

Stewart Blusson

8395

076F13S.-E.

Stewart Blusson

8396

076E08N.-E.

Stewart Blusson

8100

055K10S.-E.

Northquest Ltd.

8101

055K10S.-W.

Northquest Ltd.

8129

046M16N.-E.

Vale Inco Limited

8130

046M16N.-W.

Vale Inco Limited

8131

046M16S.-E.

Vale Inco Limited

8132

046M16S.-W.

Vale Inco Limited

8133

046N13S.-E.

Vale Inco Limited

8134

046N13S.-W.

Vale Inco Limited

8135

046N14N.-E.

Vale Inco Limited

8136

046N14S.-E.

Vale Inco Limited

8137

046N14S.-W.

Vale Inco Limited

8138

047B01N.-E.

Vale Inco Limited

8139

047B01N.-W.

Vale Inco Limited

8140

047B01S.-E.

Vale Inco Limited

8141

047B01S.-W.

Vale Inco Limited

8142

047B07N.-W.

Vale Inco Limited

8143

047B08S.-E.

Vale Inco Limited

8144

047B08S.-W.

Vale Inco Limited

8293

065B13N.-E.

Raguz, Mark

8294

065B13N.-W.

Raguz, Mark

8295

065B13S.-E.

Raguz, Mark

8296

065B13S.-W.

Raguz, Mark

8297

065B14N.-E.

Raguz, Mark

8298

065B14N.-W.

Raguz, Mark

8299

065B14S.-E.

Raguz, Mark

8300

065B14S.-W.

Raguz, Mark

8301

065G02S.-E.

Raguz, Mark

8302

065G02S.-W.

Raguz, Mark

8303

065G03N.-W.

Raguz, Mark

8304

065G03S.-E.

Raguz, Mark

8305

065G03S.-W.

Raguz, Mark

8306

065G06N.-W.

Raguz, Mark

8307

065G06S.-W.

Raguz, Mark

8324

046M09S.-W.

Vale Canada Limited

8080

065G16N.-W.

Uranium North Resource Corp.

2. The following prospecting permits have been relinquished in Nunavut:

Number

Location (N.T.S.)

Permittee

7542

057D04S.-E.

Diamonds North Resources Ltd.

7543

057D04S.-W.

Diamonds North Resources Ltd.

7786

057D11S.-E.

Diamonds North Resources Ltd.

7901

065H07S.-W.

Diamonds North Resources Ltd.

7957

016E04N.-E.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

7958

016E04N.-W.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

7965

016E06N.-W.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

7966

016E06S.-W.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

7986

016E15N.-E.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

7987

016E15N.-W.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

7993

016L01S.-E.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

7998

016L02S.-W.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

8013

025O02N.-E.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

8014

025O02S.-E.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

8033

026H09S.-W.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

8034

026H10N.-E.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

8036

026H10S.-E.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

8040

026H11S.-E.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

8056

026H16S.-W.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

8061

026I02N.-E.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

8064

026I02S.-W.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

8081

065J02S.-W.

Uranium North Resources Corp.

8086

065J05S.-E.

Uranium North Resources Corp.

8145

066H14N.-E.

Uranium North Resources Corp.

8146

066H14N.-W.

Uranium North Resources Corp.

8147

066H14S.-E.

Uranium North Resources Corp.

8148

066H14S.-W.

Uranium North Resources Corp.

8159

056H06S.-E.

Diamonds North Resources Ltd.

8321

016E05S.-E.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

8322

026I01N.-W.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

8323

026H08S.-E.

Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

3. The following prospecting permits have been cancelled in Nunavut:

Number

Location (N.T.S.)

Permittee

6783

057C02S.-E.

Indicator Minerals Inc.

7547

058C10N.-W.

Commander Resources Ltd.

7548

058C11N.-E.

Commander Resources Ltd.

7549

058C11N.-W.

Commander Resources Ltd.

7780

046B10N.-W.

Vale Canada Limited

7781

046B10S.-W.

Vale Canada Limited

7782

046B15S.-W.

Vale Canada Limited

7789

036C15N.-E.

Kelsch, Dave

7790

036F02S.-E.

Kelsch, Dave

7791

036F02S.-W.

Kelsch, Dave

7792

036F03S.-E.

Kelsch, Dave

7903

055L07S.-W.

Barry, Lawrence

7904

065H03N.-E.

Barry, Lawrence

7905

065H03N.-W.

Barry, Lawrence

7906

065H03S.-E.

Barry, Lawrence

7907

065H03S.-W.

Barry, Lawrence

7908

065H04S.-E.

Barry, Lawrence

7909

065H11S.-E.

Barry, Lawrence

7911

055E11S.-E.

Barry, Lawrence

7912

055E11S.-W.

Barry, Lawrence

8344

065H04S.-W.

Poplar Uranium

4. For information on expired prospecting permits, please contact the Nunavut Mining Recorder’s Office at 867-975-4275 (telephone) or 867-975-4286 (fax).

JEFF MERCER
Supervising Mining Recorder
Nunavut

[11-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act

 

Official Receivers

2013-180

Bertoia, Peter

 

Bingham, Cathy

 

Caddle, Lisa

 

Garnier, Émilie

 

Guertin, Scott

 

Hughes, Andrew

 

Kozlenko, Mariya

 

Oyelese, Olumide

 

Reay, Kevin

 

Cunningham, The Hon. John Douglas, Q.C.

2013-168

Federal Court Prothonotaries Compensation

 

Special Advisor

 

Government of Manitoba/Gouvernement du Manitoba

2013-178

Administrators

 

Joyal, The Hon.

 

March 1 to March 15, 2013/Du 1er mars au 15 mars 2013

 

Monnin, The Hon.

 

March 16 to March 30, 2013/Du 16 mars au 30 mars 2013

 
Independent Expert Advisory Panel

2013-72

Corriveau, Dr. André

 

Member and special adviser to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

 

Lewis, Dr.

 

Chair and special adviser to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

 

Usborne, Dr. Ronald

 

Member and special adviser to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

 

March 8, 2013

DIANE BÉLANGER
Official Documents Registrar

[11-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Instrument of Advice dated February 22, 2013

Blaney, The Hon. Steven, P.C.

Minister of Veterans Affairs and Minister of State to assist the Minister of Foreign Affairs to be styled Minister of Veterans Affairs and Minister for La Francophonie

Findlay, Kerry-Lynne D., Q.C.

Associate Minister of National Defence

Shea, The Hon. Gail, P.C.

Minister of National Revenue and Minister of State to assist the Minister for the purposes of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency Act to be styled Minister of National Revenue and Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Valcourt, The Hon. Bernard, P.C.

Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development to be styled Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

March 8, 2013

DIANE BÉLANGER
Official Documents Registrar

[11-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. DGSA-001-13 — Licensing Framework for Mobile Broadband Services (MBS) — 700 MHz Band

The intent of this notice is to announce the release of the document entitled Licensing Framework for Mobile Broadband Services (MBS) — 700 MHz Band, which sets out Industry Canada’s decisions with respect to the auction process for spectrum licences in the 700 MHz band. In particular, the document announces the decisions related to the licensing process, the auction format and rules, and the conditions of licence applicable to the 700 MHz band.

This document (hereinafter referred to as the Framework) is the result of the consultation process initiated through notice DGSO-002-12, Consultation on a Licensing Framework for Mobile Broadband Services (MBS) — 700 MHz Band, published in the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, and of the policy decisions announced in the Department’s Policy and Technical Framework: Mobile Broadband Services (MBS) — 700 MHz Band, Broadband Radio Service (BRS) — 2500 MHz Band (SMSE-002-12) in March 2012.

Clarification questions

For a limited period of time, Industry Canada will accept written questions seeking clarification of the rules and policies set out in the Framework. Written questions will be accepted until March 27, 2013. Every effort will be made to post the questions received, along with Industry Canada’s responses, by May 20, 2013, depending on the volume of the questions received. The responses will be considered as clarification of the policies set out in the above-mentioned SMSE-002-12 document, and as amendments or supplements to the rules set out in the Framework.

Questions should be submitted in electronic format (WordPerfect, Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF) to the following email address: spectrum.auctions@ic.gc.ca.

Written questions should be addressed to the Manager, Auction Operations, Spectrum Auction Branch, Industry Canada, 300 Slater Street, 17th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C8.

All questions should cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, the publication date, the title and the notice reference number (DGSA-001-13). Questions and responses will be posted on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html. Printed copies of the Canada Gazette can be ordered by telephoning the sales counter of Publishing and Depository Services at 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

March 7, 2013

FIONA GILFILLAN
Director General
Spectrum Auction Branch

[11-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. DGSO-001-13 — Revised Frameworks for Mandatory Roaming and Antenna Tower and Site Sharing

This notice announces the release of the document entitled Revised Frameworks for Mandatory Roaming and Antenna Tower and Site Sharing, which sets out changes to CPC-2-0-17 —Conditions of Licence for Mandatory Roaming and Antenna Tower and Site Sharing and to Prohibit Exclusive Site Arrangements and to CPC-2-0-18 — Industry Canada’s Arbitration Rules and Procedures.

This document is the result of the consultation process undertaken in Canada Gazette notice No. DGSO-001-12 — Proposed Revisions to the Frameworks for Mandatory Roaming and Antenna Tower and Site Sharing.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html. Printed copies of the Canada Gazette can be ordered by telephoning the sales counter of Publishing and Depository Services at 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

March 4, 2013

PETER HILL
Acting Director General
Spectrum Management Operations Branch

[11-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. DGSO-002-13 — Consultation on considerations relating to transfers, divisions, and subordinate licensing of spectrum licences

The intent of this notice is to initiate a public consultation to elaborate and seek views on the approach to be used by Industry Canada when considering licensee requests to transfer or divide a spectrum licence or enter into a subordinate licensing arrangement.

Industry Canada proposes to revise the departmental publication Licensing Procedures for Spectrum Licences for Terrestrial Services (CPC-2-1-23), which applies to all spectrum licences, in order to indicate the specific criteria considered and process used when spectrum licence transfer applications are reviewed.

Submitting comments

Respondents are requested to provide their comments in electronic format (Microsoft Word, Adobe PDF) to the following email address: spectrum.operations@ic.gc.ca.

Written submissions should be addressed to the Director, Spectrum Management Operations, Industry Canada, 300 Slater Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C8.

All submissions should cite the Canada Gazette, Part Ⅰ, the publication date, the title and the notice reference number (DGSO-002-13). Parties should submit their comments by April 3, 2013, in order to ensure consideration. Soon after the close of the comment period, all comments received will be posted on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Industry Canada will also provide interested parties with the opportunity to reply to comments from other parties. Reply comments will be accepted until May 3, 2013.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on Industry Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Web site at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html. Printed copies of the Canada Gazette can be ordered by telephoning the sales counter of Publishing and Depository Services at 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

March 7, 2013

PETER HILL
Acting Director General
Spectrum Management Operations Branch

[11-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Windsor Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Windsor Port Authority (“Authority”) under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective July 1, 1999;

WHEREAS section 2.2 of the letters patent sets out the place where the registered office of the Authority is located;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to amend section 2.2 of the letters patent to change the street address for the registered office of the Authority;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent of the Authority is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

  • 1. Section 2.2 of the letters patent is replaced by the following:

    2.2 Registered Office of Authority. The registered office of the Authority is located at 3190 Sandwich Street, Windsor, Ontario N9C 1A6.

  • 2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on June 1st, 2013.

ISSUED under my hand this 4th day of March, 2013.

__________________________
Denis Lebel, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

[11-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Windsor Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Windsor Port Authority (“Authority”) under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective July 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule B of the letters patent sets out the federal real property managed by the Authority, and refers to a leasehold interest in real property known as Suite 502, 251 Goyeau Street in the City of Windsor;

WHEREAS the Authority has advised the Minister that the said leasehold interest will extinguish May 31, 2013, and the Authority will no longer occupy the real property;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to remove reference to the said leasehold interest from Schedule B of letters patent of the Authority;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent of the Authority is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, letters patent are amended as follows:

  • 1. Parts Ⅱ and III of Schedule B of the letters patent are replaced by the following:

    PART II

    In addition to the interests described, any other interests in land to the extent they are interests in land in accordance with the Federal Real Property and Federal Immovables Act, whether or not registered, in any way belonging or appertaining to, or benefiting any of the lands described in Part Ⅰ above.

  • 2. These supplementary letters patent take effect on June 1st, 2013.

ISSUED under my hand this 4th day of March, 2013.

___________________________
Denis Lebel, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Windsor Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Windsor Port Authority (“Authority”) under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective July 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the real property, other than federal real property, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority wishes to acquire the real property described below from 1614840 Ontario Inc.;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister authorize the acquisition of the said real property and issue supplementary letters patent to set out the said real property in Schedule C of letters patent of the Authority;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent of the Authority is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsections 9(1) and 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority is authorized to acquire the said real property and the letters patent are amended as follows:

  • 1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by striking out the phrase “(Intentionally deleted)”.

  • 2. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following after the heading “DESCRIPTION OF REAL PROPERTY OTHER THAN FEDERAL REAL PROPERTY”:

    ALL AND SINGULAR that certain parcel or tract of land and premises situate, lying and being in the City of Windsor, in the County of Essex and Province of Ontario, and being composed of that part of Lot Number Four (4) on the west side of Sandwich Street in the said City of Windsor according to Registered Plan Number Forty (40), and being designated as Part 1, on a plan of reference filed in the Land Registry Office in Windsor as 12R-6944.

  • 3. These supplementary letters patent take effect on the date of registration in the Essex County Land Title Office of the documents evidencing the transfer of the said real property from 1614840 Ontario Inc. to the Authority.

ISSUED under my hand this 4th day of March, 2013.

_________________________
Denis Lebel, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

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NOTICE OF VACANCY

LIBRARY OF PARLIAMENT

Parliamentary Budget Officer (full-time position)

Location: National Capital Region

For almost 140 years, the Library of Parliament has been a key resource for parliamentarians, providing independent, non-partisan information, documentation, research and analysis to support Senators, Members of Parliament and parliamentary staff in their daily work. The Library is accountable to Parliament through the Speaker of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Commons

The establishment of the Parliamentary Budget Officer (PBO) position within the Library in 2008 provided parliamentarians with enhanced access to in-depth independent economic and financial analysis. As an officer of the Library of Parliament, the PBO reports directly to the Parliamentary Librarian. The PBO’s mandate, set out in the Parliament of Canada Act, is to provide independent analysis to the Senate and to the House of Commons about the state of the nation’s finances, the estimates of the Government and trends in the national economy; undertake research into the nation’s finances and economy upon request from a committee or parliamentarian; undertake research into the Government’s estimates when requested by a committee mandated to review those estimates; and provide cost estimates of any proposal that relates to matters over which Parliament has jurisdiction.

The successful candidate should possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study such as economics, business, finance, political science or public administration. A graduate degree in a relevant field of study would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate should have experience leading high-level financial analysis, ideally in a public sector environment. Leadership and management experience in a complex stakeholder environment in a public or private sector organization are required, as well as management experience supervising analytical professionals. Experience in providing strategic advice and making decisions on complex and sensitive issues is required. The suitable candidate should possess experience in negotiating and achieving consensus on complex issues among a variety of stakeholders with competing objectives. Experience working in a parliamentary or legislative environment would be considered an asset.

The chosen candidate should have knowledge of the federal budget process and the federal government’s expenditure management process, the Parliament of Canada Act, the Financial Administration Act, and other federal laws applicable to the Government of Canada. He/she will have knowledge of macro-economic policy, as well as knowledge of the operations of the federal government, including those related to sound management principles, accountability and transparency, and an understanding of the Parliament of Canada and Canada’s parliamentary system of governance.

The qualified candidate should possess strong leadership and managerial skills as well as have the ability to provide impartial and authoritative advice and support to Parliamentarians on matters relating to the state of Canada’s finances, the estimates of the Government and trends in the national economy. The ability to respond to complex situations with multiple competing interests arising in a partisan environment is required. The successful candidate will possess effective communication skills, both written and oral, as well as the ability to quickly synthesize and effectively communicate complex information in clear language to non-technical audiences. He/she will also possess the ability to develop and maintain constructive relationships and facilitate information-sharing and meaningful dialogue among senior decision-makers.

A strategic and innovative leader, the suitable candidate should also possess sound judgment in a highly stressful environment and excellent interpersonal skills. He or she should be decisive, impartial, tactful and discreet. Finally, the chosen candidate should possess integrity and high ethical standards.

Proficiency in both official languages is essential.

The successful candidate must reside in or be prepared to relocate to the National Capital Region or to a location within reasonable commuting distance, and will be frequently required to work long hours.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The preferred candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Should you be interested in learning more about this opportunity, please visit www.renaudfoster.com for the full job specification. To apply in confidence, please forward your curriculum vitae and letter of introduction to Nicole Poirier at npoirier@renaudfoster.com. All submissions will be acknowledged.

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format (audio cassette, diskette, Braille, large print, etc.) upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

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NOTICE OF VACANCY

SENATE OF CANADA

Usher of the Black Rod (full-time position)

Salary range: $96,000–$112,900 Location: National Capital Region

The ancient origins of this office date back to the appointment of the first Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod in England by King Edward III in 1348. In terms of the Canadian context, the office dates from the appointment of the first Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod to the Legislative Council of Lower Canada in 1791. The Usher of the Black Rod fills the third longest continuously held state office in Canada (following the Sovereign and the Governor General). In keeping with the Westminster Parliamentary tradition, the Usher of the Black Rod discharges his or her duties as personal attendant of Her Majesty the Queen and, in her absence, her representative (the Governor General or his deputy) when they enter the Parliament Buildings.

The Usher of the Black Rod is the most senior protocol officer in the Parliament of Canada. From a ceremonial point of view, he or she leads the daily Speaker’s Parade to and from the Chamber and directs all logistical, protocol and administrative details relating to official Parliament of Canada ceremonies (e.g. opening of Parliament, Speech from the Throne, Royal Assent). In this regard, the Usher of the Black Rod directs an internal parliamentary committee, inclusive of security, communications, protocol, logistical and other officials, from both chambers. The Usher of the Black Rod is also responsible for Senate ceremonies (e.g. swearing-in ceremonies for newly appointed Senators) as well as the organization and delivery of a number of other ceremonies that are held on an annual basis in the Senate Chamber (e.g. Memorial Service for Former Parliamentarians, Launch of Veterans’ Week). The User of the Black Rod also plays a prominent role in other events held in the Senate Chamber such as the installation of Governors General and lyings-in-state. He or she is, therefore, ultimately responsible for the effective execution of the ceremonial functions of the Senate of Canada.

The Usher of the Black Rod is responsible for security in the Senate Chamber. Under the direction of the Speaker, he or she is called upon to find resolution to issues that may arise and works closely with the Senate Protective Service. The Usher of the Black Rod carries responsibility for all facets of the Senate Page Program, from recruitment to selection to daily operations. The Usher of the Black Rod is a member of the Senate Management Committee.

The successful candidate should possess a degree from a recognized university or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and/or experience. He or she would have experience in managing projects and staff as well as demonstrated success coordinating protocol, logistics and administration for ceremonial events and programs. Experience dealing with parliamentarians would be considered an asset.

The qualified candidate would have a good understanding of the legal, historical and cultural conditions of parliamentary institutions in Canada and abroad. Knowledge of the Canadian parliamentary system, the legislative process and the constitutional mandate of the Senate is essential. The chosen candidate would also be knowledgeable about ceremonies that are part of Canada’s parliamentary heritage. Knowledge of the current political agenda, current legislative initiatives and current domestic issues would be considered an asset. Knowledge of current security issues, both domestic and international, as well as remedial approaches and applications for resolution, would also be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate should be an engaging team builder with high ethical standards and integrity, sound judgement, flexibility and effective communication skills, in writing and orally. Furthermore, he or she should be service-oriented, objective, impartial and fair, and have the capacity to mentor staff and manage projects and special events. The ability to listen to various stakeholders’ needs, to identify and analyze sensitive issues, give sound advice and propose effective recommendations is required. Finally, the suitable candidate must be able to develop and maintain effective relations with parliamentarians, Senate administration staff as well as government executives and foreign representatives and dignitaries.

Proficiency in both official languages is essential.

The successful candidate must reside in or be willing to relocate to the National Capital Region or to a location within reasonable commuting distance.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The preferred candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the Usher of the Black Rod and the roles and responsibilities of the position can be found on the Senate of Canada Web site at http://sen.parl.gc.ca/portal/usher-e.htm.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by April 8, 2013, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@ pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format (audio cassette, diskette, Braille, large print, etc.) upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

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SUPREME COURT OF CANADA

SUPREME COURT ACT

Session advanced

The session of the Supreme Court of Canada which would normally begin on Tuesday, April 23, 2013, will be advanced and shall begin on Monday, April 15, 2013.

March 8, 2013

ROGER BILODEAU, Q.C.
Registrar

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